Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3893276 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1975
Filing dateMay 6, 1974
Priority dateNov 17, 1971
Also published asDE2255747A1
Publication numberUS 3893276 A, US 3893276A, US-A-3893276, US3893276 A, US3893276A
InventorsBrown David James
Original AssigneeConder International Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beam and building incorporating the same
US 3893276 A
Abstract
It is known to have triangular section beams with a longitudinal load-bearing member extending along each apex of the triangle and bracing members inter-connecting the longitudinal load-bearing members. Such beams have an ugly appearance, and I improve the appearance of the beam and also provide a new constructional arrangement by rolling lips on the longitudinal load-bearing members and retaining panels in these lips, the lips being arranged such that the panels can be inserted between the lips once the roof or floor has been erected and merely dropped down into their correct positions.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Brown July 8, 1975 [54] BEAM AND BUILDING INCORPORATING 2,808,912 10/1957 Clark 52/655 THE SAME 3,106,146 10/1963 La Vigne 98/40 D 3,111.207 11/1963 Braddon 52/655 {75] In o David Jam Brown, Winchester. 3,665,837 5/1972 Balfanz 98/40 D England 3.673.945 7/1972 Rachlin 52/495 73 Ass' C nder lnt at 1L '1 d, 1 lgnee i g fifiz "m e Primary Examiner-Frank L. Abbott Assistant Examiner-James L. Ridgill, Jr. [22] F1led: May 6, 1974 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Parmelee, Miller. Welsh & 21 Appl. No: 467,148 Kmz Related U.S. Application Data 57 ABSTRACT [63] g i g of 1972 It is known to have triangular section beams with a a an one longitudinal load-bearing member extending along 521 US. Cl. 52/483; 52/655; 52/732; i g 23 1:5352? a zgfg g iz jggg 98/40 D Such be afis have an ugly appearance an cl 1 improve 2 a g 3 the appearance of the beam and also provide a new 6 520/484 '3 98/46 D 6 constructional arrangement by rolling lips on the longitudinal load-bearing members and retaining panels in these lips, the lips being arranged such that the pain [56] References Cited els can be inserted between the lips once the roof or UNITED STATES PATENTS floor has been erected and merely dropped down into L3 [7,470 9/1919 Alschuler 52/18 their correct positions. 1918,7510 7/1933 Whyte 4 52/[8 2,066 388 1/1937 Birkin 52/648 9 Clams, 3 Drawmg Flgures PMENTEDJUL 8 IQYE'? SHEET PATENTEB JUL 8 I975 SHEET PATENTED JUL 8 975 SHEET BEAM AND BUILDING INCORPORATING THE SAME This is a continuation, of application Ser. No. 305,652, filed Nov. 13, 1972 now abandoned.

The present invention relates to a building construction comprising a roof or floor with at least one primary structural member in the form of a beam extending beneath and supporting the roof or floor. A primary structural member which is in the form of a roof or floor beam transfers the weight of the roof or floor to vertical support members such as walls or stanchions. The beam comprising a plurality of longitudinal loadbearing members in a generally triangular configuration as seen in cross-section and delineating three longitudinal sides of the beam. at least two of the sides being inclined to the vertical and to the horizontal, the beam being primarily intended for single-storey, flat roof buildings such as factories and warehouses.

The longitudinal members and bracing members form an open lattice which is not only unattractive in appearance but makes it difficult to paint when there is a requirement for painting all visible surfaces. in addition, dust and dirt tend to lodge on the members and then to fall down into the working space. Furthermore, there is also a tendency for moisture to condense and for the condensation to collect in concealed pockets.

It is desirable to avoid these disadvantages, and it is also desirable to avoid these disadvantages in such a way that the construction provided can be fabricated at low cost and without undue difficulty in assembly.

According to the present invention, the longitudinal load-bearing members comprise longitudinal panelretaining lips extending at least along the tops and bottoms of the inclined sides of the beam, panels being provided on the sides and retained by the lips so that the panels cover the bracing members (as seen from below); the distance apart of the lips on any one inclined side is greater than the height of the respective panel retained by the lips, the top lip extending lower than the top edge of the panel to retain the top of the panel and the bottom lip extending above the bottom edge of the panel to retain the bottom of the panel, so that the panels are inserted by inserting the top edge of the panel behind the top lip. locating the bottom edge of the panel in the correct place and then moving the pane] downwards to retain the bottom edge behind the bottom lip.

The invention enables the bottom part of the beam to be closed in, and the bracing members can either be completely concealed or just visible behind for instance translucent panels. The panels improve the appearance of the beam, particularly if they are opaque panels, and the panels reduce the area which needs to be painted. In addition, though the panels may not be completely effective in this respect, the panels can reduce the condensation of moisture within the beam. The panels themselves can be provided with a laminated or prepainted surface.

By providing the lips on the longitudinal members themselves, there is no necessity for for instance bolting or screwing the panels in position or for providing separate channels; the lips can be provided very simply and economically, for instance when cold-rolling to form the longitudinal members. The specific arrangement for inserting the panels enables the panels to be inserted by a simple lift-up and drop-down movement, and this can be performed when the beam is in position and when for instance air conditioning conduits and electrical services have been installed in the beam. In addition, the panels can be removed quite simply for maintenance or repair of for instance electrical services, and no tools are required for such removal of the panels.

The longitudinal members of the beam will be in a generally triangular configuration, but the beam itself may be either of generally V-shape or of generally triangular shape in cross-section, in both cases the apex preferably being downwards. Though a generally triangular section (e.g. horizontal ties inter-connecting the top longitudinal load-bearing members) is preferred, it is not essential because say rafters or purlins supported by the beam could inter-connect the top longitudinal load-bearing members of the beam, or a valley gutter could be provided along the length of the beam with the roof dipping down into the interior of the beam.

Inside retaining means for the panels (to prevent the panels falling right into the interior of the beam) can be discontinuous and can be formed for instance by the bracing members themselves.

To provide the retaining lips, the longitudinal loadbearing members may have offset edge portions, giving a Z-shape profile at the edge zones. The preferred cross-sectional shape for the longitudinal load-bearing members has two substantial parts at right angles or approximately at right angles to one another, a first zone of one part making an obtuse angle with an edge zone which forms or mounts the respective retaining lip in this way, said first zone of the top longitudinal loadbearing member can project substantially vertically downwards and the respective edge zone be angled downwards and inwards, and said first zone of the bottom longitudinal load-bearing member can project substantially horizontally outwards and the edge zone be angled upwards and outwards. The obtuse angles need not be the same, but conveniently the obtuse angle of the top longitudinal load-bearing member and the obtuse angle of the bottom longitudinal load-bearing member add up to 270, the preferred arrangement being to have an obtuse angle of about 150 for the top longitudinal load-bearing member and about for the bottom longitudinal load-bearing member.

A rebate may be formed where said parts join, defined by three right angle bends, two bends being in the same direction and on either side of a centre bend in the other direction; the rebate can support ceiling panels, as explained later with reference to the accompanying drawing.

In general, the longitudinal load-bearing members are preferably rolled or otherwise formed from strip metal and are of identical profiles apart from one bend whose angle may differ between the top and bottom longitudinal load-bearing members this means that the same rolling programme can be used for all the longitudinal load-bearing members apart from the say two rolls required to put in the bend in question. An insert is provided behind the bottom lip, to make the bottom lip effectively shallower than the top lip, for correct insertion of the panel.

There are preferably two longitudinal load-bearing members along the bottom of the beam, and there is preferably a gap between them, which gap may be used for blowing or extracting air (air conditioning, ventilation or heating, using the beam interior as a duct) or for connecting items such as suspended electrical fittings to the beam by passing a connecting member up through the gap and securing the member above the gap.

If the beam is of generally V or generally triangular section, it is preferably part pre-fabricated off site as two plane trusses each having a single top longitudinal load-bearing member and a single bottom longitudinal load-bearing member inter-connected by bracing members which can be, say, welded in position. On site, the bottom longitudinal load-bearing members can be secured together, normally by bolting, and the top longitudinal load-bearing members may be interconnected by ties, e.g. in the form of threaded-end rods.

The panels can be put into position either before erecting the beams or, if the beams are suitably designed, after erecting the beams. The panels themselves may be opaque and have suitable sound damping or fire insulation qualities, or alternatively translucent panels may be employed so that lighting can be installed within the beams.

The invention will be further described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings. in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-section of a beam in accordance with the invention, along the line II of FIG. 2;

FIG. 2 is an elevation of the beam of FIG. I on a smaller scale; and

FIG. 3 is a cross-section of the top left-hand longitudinal load bearing member of the beam shown in FIG. 1, on a larger scale.

The beam has top and bottom longitudinal loadbearing members 1, 2, which have been cold rolled in steel after pre-galvanising. The top and bottom longitudinal load-bearing members 1, 2 are inter-connected by bracing members 3 to form a triangular section beam; in other words, the longitudinal Ioad-bearing members I, 2 are in a generally triangular configuration as seen in cross-section and delineate three longitudinal sides of the beams, two of the sides being inclined to the vertical and to the horizontal, the bracing members 3 being on the inclined sides. The bracing members 3 are T-shaped, cold rolled in steel after pre-galvanising. The bracing members 3 can be welded in position to form plane trusses which can be stacked and transported without difficulty. Though the left-hand side of FIG. I shows a small modification, in practice the triangular section beam will be symmetrical about its central vertical plane. On site, the bottom longitudinal loadbearing members 2 are secured e.g. bolted together with the incorporation of spacers (not shown) so that a gap 4 is left between them. The top longitudinal loadbearing tie means I are inter-connected by suitable members such as the threaded-end tie rod 5 shown in FIG. 1.

Each longitudinal load-bearing member I, 2 has an offset panel retaining lip 6. The lips 6 extend along the tops and bottoms of the inclined sides of the beam. Each lip 6 provides the outer wall of a channel, and an abutment portion 6', which extends at right angles to the lip 6 as seen in cross-section and provides the base of the channel, the (discontinuous) inner wall of the channel or inside retaining means being provided by the bracing members 3.

Looking at FIG. 3, it will be seen that on each longitudinal load bearing member 1, the respective lip 6 is in the form of an offset edge portion, the lip 6, the abutment portion 6' and an adjacent portion 6" being formed by two reverse bends I7 and 18 to provide a Z- shaped profile at the respective edge zone of the member I. Furthermore, the member 1 has two substantial parts Ia and lb at a angle to one another, the first part la having a bend 19 therein which divides the same into a first zone It" and an edge zone Id at a I50 obtuse angle to one another, the edge zone 1d forming the retaining lip 6. It will be seen from FIG. 1 that on each half of the beam, the longitudinal load bearing members running along the top and bottom of the beam are of identical profiles apart from the bend or angle as stated above, the angle is for the upper member I, while the corresponding angle is I20 for the lower members 2.

Panels 7 may be retained in the channels and cover the bracing members 3, and are inserted by inserting the top edge of the panel in the top channel, behind the top lip, and then dropping the bottom edge of the panel into the bottom channel to retain the bottom edge behind the bottom lip when the panel has been brought into the correct plane, inserts in the form of filler strips 8 (e.g. of plastic such as polyethylene foam) being placed beforehand in the bottom channels to ensure that the top edge of the panel 7 remains engaged in the top channel, is. to make the bottom lip effectively shallower than the respective top lip. Thus, the top lip 6 extends lower than the top edge of the panel 7 to retain the top of the panel, and the bottom lip 6 extends above the bottom edge of the panel 7, to retain the bottom of the panel. The distance between the bottom of the top lip 6 and the top of the bottom lip 6 must thus be greater than the height of the panel 7, the height being its dimension measured up its slope. The panel shown is made of gypsum plasterboard with a transparent plastic face, an industrial finish which requires no painting. However, the panels can be made of any suitable material, such as any plasterboard, corrugated sheeting, translucent plastics or glass.

The beam is shown in FIG. 1 running under a purlin 9, and to the right of the beam shown in FIG. I, a ceiling panel 10 is shown retained by an extruded fitting 11. However, though not preferred, a rebate 12, as shown on the left-hand side of FIG. 1 and in FIG. 3, may be rolled into the longitudinal load-bearing member so that the fitting 11 is no longer required and the edge of the ceiling panel 10 fits into, and is supported by, the rebate 12. The rebate 12 is, as is shown in FIG. 3, defined by three right angle bends 12a, 12b, and 12c, the bends 12a and 12c being in the same direction and on either side of the bend 12b, which is in the other direction. As a further alternative indicated in chaindotted lines to the left of FIG. I, an angle strip 13 may be secured by nuts on the ends of the rods 5 and in turn retain the ceiling panel.

The gap 4 can, as explained above, be used for blowing or extracting air; blowing means 16, e.g. an exhaust fan or a blower, is shown schematically in FIG. I for exhausting air through the gap 4 and from the interior of the beam or for blowing air into the interior of the beam and hence through the gap 4, for air conditioning, ventilation or heating. Alternatively hangers 14 can pass up through the gap 4 for securing items such as lighting equipment to the beam. The hangers can either be bolted to the bottom longitudinal load-bearing members 2 (the hangers may act as the spacers), or the hangers can have wider top ends which rest on return flanges of the bottom longitudinal load-bearing members formed by bends 20, or on the top edges of the members if the return flanges 15 are not present.

The use of the lips greatly improves the appearance of the beam, and by using techniques such as plug welding the bracing members to the longitudinal loadbearing members, no bolts and no welding need be visible, giving the beam a very clean look. However, in a cheaper construction, the panels need not be present.

According to an independent aspect, this invention also provides a building member comprising two profiled members, each having a number of longitudinal bends therein, which members have been formed from strip metal and are of identical profiles apart from one bend whose angle differs between the two members. The members are preferably longitudinal load-bearing members in a composite beam.

I claim:

1. In a building construction comprising a roof or floor, at least one primary structural member in the form of a beam extending beneath and supporting said roof or floor, said beam comprising four longitudinal load-bearing members arranged in an inverted generally triangular configuration as seen in cross-section with one of said longitudinal load-bearing members running the length of the beam along each of the two top edges of the triangular configuration and with the two remaining longitudinal load-bearing members running the length of the beam along the downwardly depending bottom edge thereof to delineate three longitudinal sides of said beam, two of which are inclined to both the vertical and the horizontal, said longitudinal load-bearing members each being formed from strip material provided with longitudinal bends therein, including a first such bend which divides said longitudinal load-bearing member longitudinally into two substantial parts angularly disposed toward one another, and two longitudinal reverse bends adjacent the longitudinal edge of one part of said longitudinal load-bearing member to form an integral off-set lip extending substantially the length thereof, said lip on the one part of each of the top longitudinal load-bearing members cooperating with the lip on said one part of one of the bottom longitudinal load-bearing members to provide outwardly off-set integral longitudinal panel-retaining lips extending substantially along the tops and bottoms of said inclined sides of said beam, the other parts of said two top longitudinal load-bearing members being adapted to support said floor or roof and the other parts of the two bottom longitudinal load-bearing members being secured to one another, said beam further comprising bracing members inter-connecting said cooperating top and bottom longitudinal load-bearing members and panels on said inclined sides, said panels being retained by said lips and covering said bracing members, the distance apart of said reverse bends forming the lips on any one said inclined side being greater than the height of the respective panel retained by said lips, the top said lip extending lower than the top edge of said panel to retain the top of said panel, and the bottom said lip extending above the bottom edge of said panel to retain the bottom of said panel, whereby said panels are inserted by inserting said top edge of said panel behind said top lip, locating said bottom edge of said panel in the correct plane and then moving said panel downwards to retain said bottom edge of said panel behind said bottom lip.

2. A beam as claimed in claim 1, wherein the portions of the longitudinal load-bearing members between the reverse bends comprise abutment portions extending generally at right angles to said lips as seen in crosssection, said bracing members forming inside retaining means for said panels.

3. A beam as claimed in claim 1, and comprising two plane trusses, each said truss comprising a single top said longitudinal load-bearing member and a single bottom said longitudinal load-bearing member, interconnected by said bracing members, said bottom longitudinal load-bearing members being secured together and said top longitudinal load-bearing members being inter-connected by tie means.

4. The beam as claimed in claim 1 wherein the two longitudinal load-bearing members extending along the bottom edge of the beam are secured to one another with a gap therebetween.

5. A beam as claimed in claim 4, and further comprising means for blowing or extracting air through said gap, for air conditioning, ventilation or heating.

6. The beam as claimed in claim 1 wherein the angle between the two substantial parts of each of the longitudinal load-bearing members formed by said first longitudinal bend therein is substantially a right angle, and wherein another longitudinal bend is provided in said one part to divide the same into a first zone adjacent the other part and an edge zone including said integral lips, said edge zone forming an obtuse angle with said first zone and extending from the same side of said first zone as the respective second part.

7. A beam as claimed in claim 6, wherein a rebate is formed in at least the upper longitudinal load-bearing members where said parts join, said rebate being defined by three right angled bends, two said bends being in the same direction and on either side of a centre said bend in the other direction.

8. A beam as claimed in claim 6, wherein said longitudinal load-bearing members are of identical profiles apart from said another bend whose angle differs between the top and bottom longitudinal load-bearing members, an insert being provided behind each said bottom lip to make said bottom lip effectively shallower than the respective said top lip.

9. The beam as claimed in claim 6 wherein yet another longitudinal bend is provided in the other part of each longitudinal load-bearing member such that the edge portion thereof forms substantially a right angle with the remainder thereof and extends from the same side of said other part as the respective one part.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 1 3,893,276

DATED 1 July 8, 1975 lNvENTORi 1 David James Brown It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

0n the first page, insert data element [30] as follows:

"[30] Foreign Application Priority Data November 17, 1971 Great Britain.... ...53344/71" Signed and Scaled this twenty-first D a y of October 1 9 7.5 [SEAL] A ttes t:

RUTH C. MASON (ummz'ssruner uj'Parems and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1317470 *Nov 29, 1918Sep 30, 1919 alschuler
US1918790 *Jun 9, 1931Jul 18, 1933Whyte Frederic MVentilating and reflecting transom for passenger cars
US2066388 *Aug 23, 1933Jan 5, 1937Firm Edward G Budd Mfg CompanyConstruction of metal girders
US2808912 *Feb 1, 1954Oct 8, 1957Youngstown Sheet And Tube CoRadio tower and leg for the same
US3106146 *Jun 20, 1961Oct 8, 1963Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpAir distribution duct assembly
US3111207 *Jun 6, 1960Nov 19, 1963Ralph E BraddonBar joists
US3665837 *May 13, 1970May 30, 1972Chicago Metallic CorpLineal air diffuser bar
US3673945 *Feb 11, 1970Jul 4, 1972Joel R RachlinVentilating air distributing channel
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4080881 *Oct 26, 1976Mar 28, 1978Campbell Research CorporationBuilding construction
US4349996 *Apr 24, 1980Sep 21, 1982Armco Inc.Integrated roof system
US4888934 *Feb 5, 1988Dec 26, 1989Raymond CoutureBeam structure
US6212846Feb 9, 2000Apr 10, 2001Franklin E. JohnstonIsosceles joist
US6662651 *Aug 15, 2002Dec 16, 2003Javelin Sports, Inc.Portable exercise device
US8297017 *Nov 13, 2009Oct 30, 2012Plattforms, Inc.Precast composite structural floor system
US8381485May 4, 2010Feb 26, 2013Plattforms, Inc.Precast composite structural floor system
US8453406May 4, 2010Jun 4, 2013Plattforms, Inc.Precast composite structural girder and floor system
US8499511Apr 20, 2012Aug 6, 2013Plattforms Inc.Precast composite structural floor system
US8745930Oct 29, 2012Jun 10, 2014Plattforms, IncPrecast composite structural floor system
US20100132283 *Nov 13, 2009Jun 3, 2010Plattforms, Inc.Precast composite structural floor system
WO2014009909A1 *Jul 10, 2013Jan 16, 2014Medabil Sistemas Construtivos S/AMetal lattice structure for roofing systems, and chord assembly for use in a lattice structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/475.1, 454/338, 52/650.2, 257/E29.65, 454/301
International ClassificationE04C3/04, E04B9/00, H01L29/10, H01L29/02, E04C3/09
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2003/0495, H01L29/1091, E04C3/09, E04B9/00, E04C2003/0486
European ClassificationE04C3/09, H01L29/10F3, E04B9/00