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Publication numberUS3893834 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1975
Filing dateMar 4, 1974
Priority dateMar 4, 1974
Publication numberUS 3893834 A, US 3893834A, US-A-3893834, US3893834 A, US3893834A
InventorsArthur E Armstrong
Original AssigneeArthur E Armstrong
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulated cold pack
US 3893834 A
Abstract
Improvements in refrigerating and heating packages (cold packs and hot packs) of the type containing a dry chemical in the outer main package and an additional separate quantity of water mixable to produce an endothermic or exothermic reaction respectively; multi-cell cold and hot packs with insulating means to retain the cold or heat of the activated cell(s) against non-work affecting waste or leakage; single cell hot and cold packs with insulating means to minimize temperature leakage and protect the user; integral wrap-around insulating means for cold and hot packs to hold same against the work being heat exchanged and minimize heat leakage; mitten-type insulation sleeves integral with single or multiple cell hot and cold packs for positioning of the packs with respect to the user's hands, wrists, forearms, feet, ankles and the like; multi-cell hot and cold packs for wrap-around heat exchange of a work object with cooperating heavy stock labels operative to encircle the activated packs, retaining same in connection with the work and performing an insulating function.
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Armstrong 1 1 INSULATED COLD PACK Arthur E. Armstrong, 413 Greenbrier, Moberly, Mo. 65270 [22] Filed: Mar. 4, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 447,927

[76] Inventor:

[52] US. Cl 62/4; 128/403 [51] Int. Cl. F25d 5/00 [58] Field of Search 62/4; 206/219, 233; 128/403, 402

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,549,510 8/1925 Schnitzler 128/403 2,756,874 7/1956 Erickson et al.... 62/4 2,898,744 8/1959 Robbins 62/4 3,074,544 1/1963 Bollmeier et a1. 206/219 3,149,943 9/1964 Amador 62/4 3,175,558 3/1965 Caillouette et al. 128/403 3,429,315 2/1969 McDonald 128/403 3,643,665 2/1972 Caillouette 128/403 3,804,077 4/1974 Williams 62/4 Primary Examiner-Norman Yudkoff Assistant Examiner-Frank Sever Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Thomas M Scofield 1 July 8,1975

[ ABSTRACT Improvements in refrigerating and heating packages (cold packs and hot packs) of the type containing a dry chemical in the outer main package and an additional separate quantity of water mixable to produce an endothermic or exothermic reaction respectively; multi-cell cold and hot packs with insulating means to retain the cold or heat of the activated cell(s) against non-work affecting waste or leakage; single cell hot and cold packs with insulating means to minimize temperature leakage and protect the user; integral wraparound insulating means for cold and hot packs to hold same against the work being heat exchanged and minimize heat leakage; mitten-type insulation sleeves integral with single or multiple cell hot and cold packs for positioning of the packs with respect to the user's hands, wrists, forearms, feet, ankles and the like; multi-cell hot and cold packs for wrap-around heat exchange of a work object with cooperating heavy stock labels operative to encircle the activated packs, retaining same in connection with the work and performing an insulating function.

14 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures INSULATED cou) PACK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Refrigerating and heating packages (cold packs and hot packs) of the type containing. within the outer pack. a dry chemical and a bag of water mixable therewith (on bursting the water bag) to produce an endothermic or exothermic reaction. respectively. are well known to the art. The patent to Robbins et al. US. Pat. No. 2.925.719 issued Feb. 23. I960 for Refrigerating Package" and the patent to Caillouette. U.S. Pat. No. 3.643.665. issued Feb. 22. I972 for Therapeutic Pack for Thermal Applications" typically show the state of the art with respect to same. The water may be isolated from the chemical before activation by other means than bagging.

For certain uses of heating or cooling. it is desirable that the work to be heat exchanged be entirely surrounded by the heating or cooling pack and. as well. insulated externally to avoid heat loss or gain from the environment exterior to the package. Said otherwise. the heating and cooling action of the known endothermic and exothermic reactions are effective. but limited in time and available energy. When it is desirable to quickly and markedly cool or heat a work object. it is most desirable that the entire heat transfer surface of the particular object be in heat exchanging contact with the contents ofthe hot pack or cold pack (indirect heat exchange through the outer package). Likewise, generally speaking. once the object has been heated or cooled. maintenance of such reduced or elevated temperature for as long a period as possible is generally strongly desired.

A graphic example of this is the chilling or refrigerating of a blood sample which has been drawn from a patient by use of an hypodermic syringe. Once the blood sample has been drawn. then the testing of the sample or the constituents thereof are generally carried out at an area of the hospital or clinic considerably distant from the location of the patient. Yet further. the sample to be tested generally is one ofa series of same from other patients which are processed in sequence as received by the laboratory. Thus, considerable time may be involved in the combined transportation and wait for processing to and in the laboratory. If the technician taking the sample has to take several samples or perform other duties prior to transporting the sample to the laboratory. more time is involved. Blood gas de termination is particularly sensitive to delay. It thus be comes highly important to provide means and methods of immediately cooling blood samples shortly after or immediately after they are taken. same to be stored with the cooling means or retained therewithin until immediately before the blood sample is actually processed in the laboratory.

In the use of cold packs and hot packs with respect to body applications. human or animal. again. the same effect is desired. That is. the body zone to be cooled or heated is preferably reduced or increased in temperature as quickly as possible to the desired level. Thereafter. it is desired that the body zone be maintained at such reduced or elevated temperature for perhaps a considerable period of time either for the terapeutic effect itself or prior to application of further therapeutic or medical treatment thereto. Cold packs and hot packs which are of small enough size to be conveniently packaged. handled and transported by. say. a

first aid technician or athletic trainer have limited capacity. Accordingly. it is extremely important and desirable that means be provided for minimizing wastage or leakage of heat exchange energy from the pack (such as into the hand of the user or helper) when applied to the body zone to be heat exchanged after acti vation of the pack. Additionally. it is desirable that means be provided for securing the hot pack or cold pack relative to the body zone to be heat exchanged for the period of time of its effectiveness so that the patient or helper will not be required to hold same in place.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION A first object of the invention is to provide improvements in both refrigerating (cooling) and heating packages or packs and particularly the packaging of the contents thereof, as well as insulation for parts thereof (cold packs and hot packs).

An object of the invention is to provide improvements over'refrigerating packages and cooling packs (or heating packs) as are seen in the patents to Robbins et al. US. Pat. No. 2.925.719. issued Feb. 23. I964 Refrigerating Package" and Caillouette US. Pat No. 3.643.665 issued Feb. 22. I972 for Therapeutic Pack for Thermal Applications".

Another object of the invention is to improve the in sulation qualities of a refrigerating package or cooling pack (or heating package) in such a manner that the desired cold (hot) temperature of the package is maintainable therein for a maximum time despite the use thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a refrigerating package or cold pack (or heat pack) which has one entire side thereof faced with or formed of heat insulating material whereby only one side thereof is exposed to the work or object being heat transferred.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved refrigerating package or cold pack (or heating package) having a considerable portion thereof faced with effective heat insulating materials so that the portion ofthe refrigerating package or cold pack (or heating package) which is not actually applied to the device. member or work being heat transferred is effectively insulated so that heat is not uselessly transmitted into (or lost from) the contents of the pack. thereby nullifying its desired effect.

Another object of the invention is to provide a refrigerating package or cold pack (or heat pack) having a multiplicity of separately actuatable cells therein same adapted to be wrapped around an object. member or piece of work to be cooled (or heated).

Another object of the invention is to provide a refrigerating package or cold pack {or heating package) having a multiplicity of separately actuatable heat exchange cells incorporated there within. the entire package so fabricated and sized as to be wrapped around the work to be heat transferred. whereby to give effective 360 cooling (or heating) for a long period of time.

Another object of the invention is to provide a multicell refrigerating package (or heat package) having a plurality of separately actuatable cold packs or refrigerating packages (or heat packs) joined together in a single construction. the individual cells so spaced in the construction as to be positioned opposite one another in wrap-around heat transfer use. insulating means being provided on one side of each of the cells and the entire package to minimize extraneous and non-useful heat transfer from and into the improved construction.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved refrigerating or heating package or heat transfer device having one or more individually actuatable cells incorporated there within, insulating means combined structurally with the improved package to minimize extraneous and non-useful heat transfer with respect thereto, the device having extensions of the body thereof by way of a wrap-around flap or leaf which permits total enclosure of and controlled heat exchanging of devices, members or workpieces to be heat exchanged in the most efficient manner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a multiplicity of improved means adapted to prolong and make most efficient the heat exchanging action and life of refrigerating packages and cold packs (or heating packages or packs) typically employing dry refrigerating chemicals and water mixable to produce endothermic or exothermic effects.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved heat cxchanging packages and hot and cold pack constructions which not only improve the quality and quantity of heat exchange. but also minimize any wasteful heat exchange or heat transfer with respect to surroundings irrelevant to the heat exchanging purposev Another object is to provide open-end sleeve cold and hot pack devices of single and multiple cell construction with exterior insulation.

Still another object is to provide sleeve constructions with one closed end (mitten like) for heat exchange devices with single or multiple cell construction.

Other and further objects of the invention will appear in the course of the following description thereof.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings. which form a part of the instant specification and are to be read in conjunction therewith. embodiments of the invention are shown and, in the various views, like numerals are employed to indicate like parts.

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a first form of multicompartment or multi-cell heat transfer device with parts shown in section and cut away to better illustrate the construction. (Specifically, there are multi-level cutaways to show the wall construction and contents of the cells of the construction.)

FIG. 2 is in full lines an end view of the muIti-cell heat transfer package of FIG. I. The dotted line showing comprises an optional wrap around sheet extension detailed in FIGS. 6 and 7.

FIG. 3 is a three-quarter perspective view from above of the multi-cell heat transfer package of FIGS. 1 and 2 showing a syringe placed thereupon prior to closure of the device and before activation of the heat transfer cells thereof.

FIG. 4 is a three-quarter perspective view from above of the pack of FIGS. I-3, inclusive wrapped over on itself with the insulated side outboard and a pair of retaining members such as rubber bands holding the two cells in tight heat exchanging compaction against the work to be beat transferred. A dotted line showing illustrates the use of a wrap-around label therewith.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the lines 55 of FIG. 1 of the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 6 is atop plan view like that of FIG. 1, showing a multiple cell heat exchange package or heat transfer pack, this view additionally showing an extension of the insulation sheet or panel on one side thereby to permit wrap-around of the package therewith and total enclosure of the work to be heat exchanged, as well as insulated sealing of the package when wrapped on work in a position such as in FIG. 4. (Also see dotted line showing of FIG. 2)

FIG. 7 is an end view of the device of FIG. 6 activated and wrapped around a piece of work to be beat transferred (here shown in dotted lines as a syringe as in FIG. 3).

FIG. 8 is an end view of a modification of the device of FIGS. 6 and 7 wherein an extended web is provided between the individual cells of the heat exchange package. as well as the insulating flap, whereby the heat exchanging package may be wrapped around an object of larger size or diameter such as a wrist or forearm (as is seen in this view).

FIG. 9 is a three-quarter perspective view from above of a heat exchange package or heat exchanging pack basically of conventional type as seen in Robbins et al. US Pat. No. 2,925,719. differing in that one side of the device has an insulating panel thereon. Dotted line showings on one side and one end edge of the pack illustrate alternatives where flap. wraparound extentions (see FIGS. 2 and 6) are provided.

FIG. I0 is a view of a multi-cell pack of the type shown in FIG. 1, but absent the insulating sheet on one side thereof. there being provided a cardboard (or other insulating material) sleeve adapted to encircle, receive and enclose the activated package enclosing a work-piece to be beat exchanged.

FIG. I] is a three-quarter perspective view from above of a mitten type hot or cold pack where an integral sleeve is provided with the single hot or cold pack.

FIG. 12 is a side view in full lines of the mitten type cold or hot pack device of FIG. 11. The dotted line showing illustrates an alternative where the sleeve is open and cylindrical so that the hot or cold pack may be applied to the wrist, forearm. ankle or lower leg of the user.

FIG. 13 is an end view of the device of FIGS. II and 12, looking from right to left in the view of FIG. I2.

FIG. 14 is a modification of the devices of FIGS. 11-13, inclusive wherein the insulation is provided interiorly of the sleeve at least in the zone of heating or cooling (full lines) and optionally on the entire interior of the sleeve (dotted lines).

FIG. 15 is an end view of a double cell hot or cold pack device wherein the insulation is provided on the exterior of the device for heating or cooling therewithin. This differs from FIG. 8 in that both webs are closed.

FIG. I6 shows, in full lines. a side. sectional view of the device of FIG. I5, comprising an open ended sleeve with paired hot or cold packs, the showing in dotted lines showing a closed end mitten type device analogous to the showing of FIG. 12 in full lines, but utilizing a plurality of cold or hot packs.

FIG. I7 is an end view of variation or modification of the devices of FIGS. I5 and 16 wherein a plurality of cold or hot packs are provided with respect to a sleeve or mitten, the insulation being provided interiorly of the sleeve or mitten, rather than exteriorly as in FIGS. I5 and I6.

PRIOR ART HOT AND COLD PACKS The prior art teaches chemical therapeutic packs which provide either or reduced temperatures by endothermic or exothermic chemical reaction, respectively. Conventionally. the components for such a reaction are both received within a plastic bag separated from one another by an imperforate membrane. This membrane may be the outer bag itself crimped to divide the contents thereof or. alternatively and typically. the liquid component of the reaction (typically water) may be provided in a second imperforate bag received within the first bag. In the latter case. the bag containing the liquid may be pressurized sufficiently to burst itself by manually squeezing the inner bag through the unpressurized outer bag. This is the teaching of the Robbins et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,925,719 patent, supra.

The packs of the prior art have attained temperatures either sufficiently low or sufficiently high. However. the period during which they are effective is relatively short. Thus. despite their convenience. this limited period of effective application has restricted their use considerably. One attack on the problem of prolonging the effective time of application of such a pack is seen in Caillouette U.S. Pat. No. 3.643.665.

Packs in accordance with the present invention may be employed to apply either heat or cold to a patient. depending upon whether they contain chemical components for an indothermic or an exothermic reaction. respectively. The chemical compositions used to produce each of these types of reaction appropriate for use in cold or heat packs of the type involved in the instant invention are well known in the prior art and will not be repeated here.

It is well known in the art to provide (l plastic films and laminate films. (2) plastic film pouches, packages and containers and (3) heating or refrigerating package constructions of plastic film material. Typical materials. making up such films include polyethylene. cellophane. polypropylene. polyester. etc.. It is also known in the art to provide certain types of rupturable film packages and refrigerating packages. the latter seen in the Robbins et al. patent. supra. Since polyethylene and polypropylene are heat sealable. they are also commonly used as the internal member of a film laminate in a package construction. with a polyester or cellophane layer comprising the external laminate layer. Laminate films seemingly seal better and the seals last longer than simple. non-laminate films.

The Robbins et al. patent. supra. discloses a refrigerating package including an outer envelope formed of a suitable. flexible. fluid tight sheet plastic material (for example polyethylene. vinyl or acetate). and inner envelope formed of the same material. a quantity of dry refrigerating chemicals such as ammonium nitrate within the outer envelope and a quantity of water or other hydrous chemical disposed within the inner envelope. When the package is to be activated. an inward squeezing force is manually applied thereto so as to affect the rupture of the inner bag. Upon such rupturing of the inner bag. the water originally contained therein mixes with the dry chemical so as to result in a solution having a much lower temperature than the original temperature of the package.

The patent to Perino U.S. Pat. No. 3.250.384 "MUL- TlPLE LAYER RUPTURABLE PACKAGING FILM AND CONTAINERS THEREFROM". issued S-l- 0-66. discloses (FIGS. 7-9. inclusive) cooling packages of the type described and. as well, materials useful in the films for the respective containers thereof. It should also be understood that double wall polyethylene bags or multiple layer polyethylene bags or containers may be employed. particularly for the outer bag. in said cold and heat packs as seen in the patents to Scholle U.S. Pat. No. 2.898.027. Sachs U.S. Pat. No. 3.l22.l97. as well as the method patents to Anderson et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3.l30.647 and Makrauer U.S. Pat. No. 2.721.69l.

The point here is that the instant improvements apply to the heating and cooling packages of the type described whether (I) the chemicals in the bag are kept from one another by separate packaging or merely subdivision of the original package; (2) the outer container is single ply, multi-ply, a laminate of different mate rials. a plurality of plies of the same material or the like or (3) the inner container (if there is one) is a single layer. multi-layer. multiple ply. laminate. weakened or the like.

FIGS. 1-5, INCL. FORM FIGS. I-S, inclusive. in full lines. disclose a multi-cell heat exchanging pack. in this instance a cold pack. par ticularly adapted to chilling or refrigerating of a small container such as the body of a hypodermic syringe. A particular example ofa use of this type would be the refrigeration ofa syringe containing blood withdrawn for a patient. the refrigeration permitting the transport of the blood in the syringe to the medical or hospital laboratory for blood-gas determination. The construction comprises a two compartment. integral cooling pack which folds over and encloses the item or syringe to be cooled after activation of each compartment. or at least one compartment of the multiple cell pack. Each cell or compartment contains a rupturable inner pouch and ammonium nitrate. Additionally. one entire side of the multi-cell refrigerating package is faced with an insulating sheet to better retain the cold or. said otherwise. prevent transfer of heat from the environment into the cold pack.

Referring specifically to FIG. 1. the overall pack is generally designated 10 with end edges lOu and 10b and side edges 10c and 10d. In the instance illustrated. the cold pack cells (generally designated ll and 12) are of the outer bag receiving an inner bag type. the inner bag holding water with the remainder of the volume of the outer bag receiving granular ammonium nitrate or an equivalent suitable chemical. Thus. cell 11 has inner bag 13. while cell 12 has inner bag 14. As above noted. the inner bags 13 and 14 may be of single ply material. multiple ply material. laminate material or the like as taught by the prior art. The granular ammonium nitrate is seen at IS in FIGS. 1 and 5.

The multi-cell outer bag construction specifically here shown comprises four sheets of polyethylene l6-l9 which are heat sealed to one another along each of the edges 1011-11. respectively and down the center thereof as seen as 20 thereby to define and produce the two cells II and I2 therewithin. As previously noted. the walls of the outer bag may be of single ply. multiply ply. laminate or double thickness or double wall mate rials as desired and as seen in the prior art. Heat sealed. glued or otherwise fixedly attached to wall 16 is an integral sheet ll of heat insulating material such as minutely expanded polystyrene. Any resiliently flexible expanded or cellular insulator of conventional type which is available in sheet form of plastic. metal or other material adhesively. heat-sealingly or sonicly weldable to the outer package film may be employed.

A typical manner of formation of the cooling pack construction of FIGS. 1-5, inclusive would first involve the connection to one another of sheets 16-19. inclusive by heat sealing. ultrasonic welding or other conventional means along the edges ll 10('. inclusive. Sheet 21. of insulating material. would either be previously attached in the manner desired to sheet 16 or in corporated as an element in the original assembly. i.e.. all five sheets heat sealed. ultra-sonically welded or otherwise attached to one another. This results in a two cell outer bag with the upper end (in the view of FIG. I) unclosed.

Into each cell or pouch. then. the water containing bags 13 and 14 are dropped. together with the granular ammonium nitrate. Thereafter. the top edge a (in the view of FIG. I) is sealed after suitable evacuation (as taught in Robbins et al. US. Pat. No. 2,925,7l6) whereby to facilitate bursting of the bags 13 and 14. If insulating sheet 21 is not already integral with sheet 16, it may be incorporated in the seal of the sheets 16-19, inclusive to one another by conventional means.

The center panel or divider of the package must be of sufficient width that. when the two cells are activated and one cell is laid on top of the other as in FIG. 4. the free edges 10c and 1011 will be approximately as close to one another as the side edges of the center panel 20. However. when the article to be cooled. such as the syringe. is placed thereon it is anticipated that retainer means for the package may be provided. FIGS. 2 (dotted lines) and 6 and 7 show one form of such a wrap around connection and will be described sepa rately. However. FIG. 4 shows the use of a pair of rub her hands 22a and h with the activated package wrapped around a syringe. Alternatively. a cylindrical or rectangular section cardboard sleeve may be provided into which the activated container wrapped around the object to be refrigerated may be slid. The use of such a sleeve may remove the necessity of insu lating sheet 21 as the sleeve provides the insulation on the exterior of the package (see FIG. 10).

Yet further. an adhesive label as seen in FIG. 4 (23) may be employed, one side of the label carrying an adhesive thereon which will attach over the insulating sheet 21 to its own self. Information as to the patients name. identity number. ward. date. time of activation. and the like may be supplied on the other side of the label in spaces provided therefor.

FIGS. 6 AND 7 Referring to FIG. 2 (dotted lines). as well as FIGS. 6 and 7, therein is shown a multi-cell heat exchanging pack of the character seen in FIGSv 1-6, inclusive (full lines in FIG. 2) with the single change that either the insulating sheet 21 of FIG. I or one or both of sheets 16 and 17 (as well as insulating sheet 2! are extended laterally (in the view of FIG. 6 to the right) in order to provide a free flap of insulating material of such width that it will completely wrap around the open edges of the folded over pack (as in FIG. 7) to provide a full. 360 insulated closure of same around the work piece to be beat exchanged. In the event that one or both of sheets 16 and I7 are not required for strength in reenforcement of the insulating sheet 21, same may be omitted with the flap made up of just the latter.

There being no difference between the insulating packages of FIGS. I and 6 save in the additional extension laterally ofthe insulating sheet 21 of FIG. I. all of the parts identical in the showings of FIGS. 6 and 7 to those already described in FIGS. l4. inclusive are numbered the same. but primed. The wrap around flap extension of the full line showings of FIGS. 6 and 7 is numbered 24, while the dotted line showing thereof in FIG. 2 is also numbered 24.

FIG. 9 SINGLE CELL PACK FIGv 9 is a showing of a single cell heat exchanging package or cold or heat pack of the type seen in Robbins et al. US. Pat. No. 2.925.7l9, differing therefrom in that one side thereof is additionally faced with a sheet or panel of heat insulating material. In this Figure. the outer bag 35 receives therewithin an inner bag 36 carrying water. Additionally received within the outer bag and surrounding inner bag 36 is a quantity of heat exchanging chemicals such as ammonium nitrate 37 adapted to mix with the water of the bag when the latter has been ruptured or burst. As is conventional, the outer bag 35 is partially evacuated of air to permit such bursting or rupturing of inner bag 36. The provision of the heat exchanging panel or sheet 38 on one side of the outer bag 35 permits the user to hold the bag in his hand and apply it to the forehead. wrist. ankle or whatever point of the body it is desired to heat exchange. By virtue of the insulating sheet being present a minimum quantity of heat exchange through that side of the bag is experienced whereby to prolong the life of the cold pack in action and further insure that the users hand is not chilled or heated to the point of discomfort.

FIG. 9 also illustrates the provision therewith (full lines to the right) of a wrap-around insulating sleeve 38. The width of the latter (on a side edge of the pack) should at least be equal to or preferably markedly greater than the pack width. In dotted lines at 39 is seen an optional insulating flap provided on an end edge of the pack. This flap must be of length equal to or markedly greater than the pack length. The length of the side or end flap should be able to wrap over the noninsulated face of the pack and part of the insulated side. In this manner. resilient bands. adhesive labels. adhesive tabs or the like may secure the flap in position around the work object to be beat exchanged. The outer bag of the insulated pack of FIG. 9 may be fabricated of three to five sheets (one insulated) as previously described. The wrap around flaps 38 and 39 of FIG. 9 may be just the insulation sheet if strong enough. Generally one or more film sheets are also included.

FIG. 8 FORM FIG. 8 illustrates a multicell heat exchanging pack of a form adapted to cool or heat a workpiece (such as a persons forearm) of larger cross-section than. say. a syringe as in FIG. 3. In this case the double cell pack is provided with a web 40 between the cells of greater width. and greater length insulating flap 41. The work piece 42 is engaged on each side thereof by cells 43 and 44 and the outer side 45 is an insulating sheet (like 21 in FIGS. 1-4, inclusive) which extends into or comprises flap 41. Otherwise. the construction is the same as the pack of FIGS. 6 and 7. Of course. the ratio of length to width of the cells of the pack may be varied from the showing of FIG. I.

FIG. 10 CONSTRUCTION FIG. 10 illustrates a multi-cell heat exchanging pack where the desired insulation (provided by sheets 21 and 21 in FIGS. 1 and 7, respectively) is obtained by use of a separate sleeve 46 of insulating material such as cardboard. In this case, the pack having cells 47 and 48 separated by web 49 are first activated, then wrapped over the workpiece (not seen) and thereafter inserted inside the (oval section) sleeve 46 which provides a friction fit therewith as well as insulation. The outer surface of the sleeve may be inscribed or marked for data insertion. Sleeve 46 is analogous to label 23 in FIG. 4 but insulates and preferably extends substantially the entire length of the heat exchanging pack. With use of sleeve 46 both the insulating sheet (like 21 or 21') and the wraparound tab (24) may be omitted. Sleeve 46 may be circular in transverse section or oval and further may be frusto-conical rather than cylindrical to facilitate insertion and removal of the heat exchanging package and work therein.

The use of the multi-cell pack of FIGS. 1-4, inclusive (or 6 and 7) with a blood syringe operates to take 986 F blood (typically lOcc) and refrigerate the syringe and blood more quickly than ice to 34 F. In order to achieve the desired effect, it is necessary to activate both cells of the pack at once. By means of insulating the multi-cell pack on one side thereof and also providing the wrap around flap or at least means for retaining the noninsulated sides together against the work with the insulating sheet 2I outwardly oriented. the longev ity of the pack is maximized as there if a minimum of heat drain into the system. This is true in the case of all packs illustrated incorporating insulation or having insulating means used in conjunction therewith.

HEAVY STOCK INSULATING LABEL, PER SE FIG. 4 shows in dotted lines a wraparound label encircling the folded over, activated pouch of FIGS. 1-5, inclusive as an alternative to the resilient bands 22a and h for retaining the insulated double pouch of these figures in position around the work object to be heat exchanged. FIG. 10 shows the multi-cell heat exchanging package of FIGS. l5, inclusive received within a cardboard (or other insulating material) sleeve for retention of the multi-cell pack in contact with the work and aiding the insulation ofthe work with respect to the exterior enviroment. It should be understood that, with respect to FIG. 10, the one side of the multi-cell pack need not (necessarily) be insulated (as at 21 in FIG. I), as the sleeve 46 of FIG. l0 itself will provide the insula tion. However. the combination of the insulating sleeve 46 and the insulated sheet on one side of the multi-cell pack is most advantageous. It should be understood that a sleeve (as 46) may be employed to receive a single cell package (FIG. 9), with or without insulation on one side thereof and with or without a wrap-around flap 38 or 39 surrounding the work.

Without additional illustration then, as seen in FIG. 4 with respect to the encircling. wrap-around label 23, it should be understood that same may be faced with an insulating sheet in the entire area thereof or formed of such heavy paper stock that the label itself comprises an insulator when same is wrapped around (encircling) the multi-cell or single cell pack (preferably multi-cell as in FIG. 4) and secured with respect thereto. This may be accomplished by using rubber bands or resilient bands as 221: and 22b outside of the pack and the label. Yet further, there may be an adhesive edge on the heavy stock or insulated label sheet itself so that it can be secured to itself in wrapover relationship (one end overlapping the other end). Yet further, portions of the label may have adhesive on the inner face thereof whereby same may be secured to the outer face of the pack itself. It is contemplated that the insulating label may be used with a non-insulated pack or an exteriorly insulated pack as in FIG. 4. When the label itself is part of or the entire insulation for the pack itself, then its length would be extended to cover a greater portion of the exterior area of the pack it will encircle, whereby to most effectively insulate. Thus, preferably, it would be the entire length of the pack of FIG. 4 as a specific example.

It should be understood that, in the case of a hot pack, both sides of a single cell or double cell pack may be insulated to a greater or lesser degree. That is, in some hot pack embodiments, the temperature reached by the hot packs is unpleasant or burning to the skin of a user. In such case, instead of having one face essentially uninsulated and the other face insulated (FIG. 9), rather, one face would have relatively light insulation thereon and the other face would be more heavily insulated. In that manner. for example, the hand of a user would be fully protected and a minimum quantity of heat leakage would be encountered on that particular side. On the other hand, there would be a greater heat transfer across the lesser insulated side whereby to slow down the heat transfer therethrough or cut down the quantity of same. Such usage can be employed with cold packs, but it is less applicable in such situations than in the case of hot packs.

In the case of a label securement, as in FIG. 4, whether or not same is of insulating material or heavy stock, the use of the label is as follows:

I. The patient identification information is filled in on the label provided.

2. The cooling pack is activated by squeezing the sides thereof together causing the water bags to rupture. After breaking the water bags. the pack may be agitated by shaking until the liquid is mixed with the crystals to obtain maximum cooling effect 3. The work (or the filled syringe of FIGS. 3 and 7) is placed in the center of one-half of the uninsulated side of the cooling pack. The other side is then folded over to insure complete coverage of the syringe with the cooling solution in the pack. The work should not be placed in the center web area as this would leave a portion ofthe work or syringe not covered or in contact with the coolant.

4. Where the backside or a portion thereof of the label is adhesive, the label is wrapped snugly around the pack and glued down so as to firmly hold the syringe or work in place with the cells of the cooling pack in contact therewith.

5. In the case of a blood sample. the syringe should be analyzed within 30 minutes after the sample is withdrawn from the patient.

FIGS. 11-13, INCLUSIVE Referring to the full line showings of FIGS. ll-l3, inclusive. therein is shown a single heat exchanging package (hot pack or cold pack) having a closed loop and closed end sleeve (mitten-like) associated therewith. This particular heat exchanging device is designed to heat exchange inwardly of the pouch. that is. heat or cool an object received within the pouch and in contact with the noninsulated heat exchanging surface of the heat exchanging package. Specific examples of heat exchangable work include a hand of the user. the front portion of the foot of the user. or any object of a size such as may be received within the pouch.

The heat exchanging package is generally designated 50 and may be either a cold pack or a hot pack. The basic outer bag construction may be single sheet per wall or double sheet per wall, as is conventional. and the outer bag contains the usual supply of heat exchanging chemical and a bag or enclosure of water normally separate therefrom before activation, whereby to provide an exothermic or endothermic reaction upon mixing of the water with the chemical. In short, the heat exchanging package is a conventional cold pack or hot pack. The exterior surface 50a of the heat exchanging package is faced with an insulating sheet such as sheet 21 in FIG. 1. This sheet is attached to the outer film face of the package in conventional manner as previously described. The inner face 50b of the heat exchanging package is either not insulated (cold pack) or less insulated (hot pack) than the outer face 501:.

The sleeve 51 (generally designated) comprises (interiorly) a continuation of one to four layers of the film making up the heat exchanging pack (depending on the number of layers in the pack per se and the number of film layers desired in the loop of the sleeve) and, optionally. an external layer of insulating material. This may he a continuation of the insulating sheet on side 5011 of the heat exchanging package. The layers of film interior of the pouch are numbered 51a, 11, etc. and the optional insulation layer exterior thereof 52. The easiest method of closing the loop of the sleeve is to have one side edge flap extension heat or otherwise sealed to the other edge of the package. but two edge extensions may be connected to one another Referring to FIG. 12 and the full line showing. it is seen that one end of the pouch, namely. 53 is closed. while the other end thereof, 54 extends past the boundry or limit of the heat exchanging package 50 and is open for insertion of the work to be heat exchanged.

FIG. 12 also shows, at 55 the sleeve open at both ends. or the other end from 54, which permits the sliding through the sleeve of a hand so that the wrist or form of the user (for example) can be beat exchanged or the users ankle or lower leg. In use. the object to be heat exchanged is slipped into the pouch or sleeve into contact with the less insulated or noninsulated portion 50b of the heat exchanging package 50. The package is then activated and maintained in contact with the work. The external insulation of the package and (optional) sleeve maximizes the life of the package. The package may be activated prior to work insertion.

FIG. 14

FIG. 14 shows a variation of the device of FIGS. 11-13, inclusive. this with the insulation reversed. That is, at least a portion ofthe interior of the pouch is insulated (or more insulated in the case of a hot pack), while the external exposed portion of the heat exchange package is noninsulated or relatively less insulated (hot pack). This permits the insertion, for example, of the hand of the user inside the pouch during application of the outer surface of the heat exchanging package to the work to be heat transferred without internal pouch heat exchange or excessive heating or cooling of the hand of the user.

In FIG. 14. the heat exchanging package is generally designated 56 with an external surface portion 56:: and an internal surface portion 56!). At least the latter is more heavily insulated than the former or insulated while the former is not insulated (cold pack).

The loop portion of the sleeve externally is one or more thicknesses of film 57a, b, etc. while an optional surfacing of insulation material 58 may be provided if desired.

FIGS. 15 and 16 FIGS. 15 and 16 are precisely like FIGS. 11-13, inclusive, with the exception that the closed sleeve construction includes at least two heat exchanging packages with closed elongate webs communicating between the side edges thereof. More than two heat exchanging packages may be employed, if desired. This modification compares to FIG. 8 in that FIG. 8 shows only one closed web with a flap. The illustrations of FIGS. 11-17, inclusive are like that of FIG. 8 in that more square heat exchange packages than the elongate rectangular cells of FIG. 1 are shown. That is. a more conventional shape like that of FIG. 9 is illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 11-17, inclusive. However, the elongate rectangular cells may be employed in each case.

At any rate, referring to FIGS. 15 and 16, there are two heat exchanging packages generally designated 59 and 60, respectively. Each has a noninsulated or less insulated inner or inboard face or portion 590 and 600, respectively. The outer faces or portions have an insulated or more heavily insulated face or portion 59b and 60b, respectively. The webs 61 and 62 are formed of one, two. three or four film thicknesses most conveniently comprising elongations and fusions of the edges of the heat exchanging packages themselves and may optionally be externally faced with insulation sheets 63 and 64.

The described construction may be open or closed at one end to provide an open ended semi-cylindrical sleeve or a closed end mitten-like configuration having a multiplicity of activatable heat exchanging packages to heat or cool the work which will be placed inside the sleeve or pouch. The entire external surface of the sleeve or mitten may be insulated to retain the heat or cool or minimize heat exchange with the external environment.

In the case of a closed end pouch or mitten, before activation of one or more of the heat exchanging packages, the users hand, foot or a liquid. as examples, may be placed therewithin. Activation of one or both of the packs will heat or cool the work contained within the pouch or mitten. The same is true with respect to a double end open sleeve except that liquids would not be retained therewithin.

The dotted line showing of FIG. 16 shows the closed end pouch or mitten which is roughly frusto-conical. The dotted line parts are numbered the same as the full line, but primed.

FIG. 17

FIG. 17 comprises a variation on the multi-cell closed sleeve or loop construction of FIGS. 15 and 16 wherein the insulation is interior of the sleeve. pouch or mitten, rather than exterior thereof. In the case of hot packs. there would be greater insulation interiorly than there would be exteriorly. In such case, in use, the pouch or sleeve could be inserted over or on a users hand and a first activation of one of the heat exchanging packages accomplished. After the heat exchanging effect of the first cell was exhausted. then the second activation could take place with further application of the second cell to the work to be heat exchanged. All the time, the user's hand would be protected from excessive heating or cooling as if wearing a glove or protective sleeve.

There are two heat exchanging cells or packages 65 and 66, generally designated, each having an insulated or more heavily insulated interior portion 65a and 66a, respectively. The exterior work applying portions are designated 65b and 66!), respectively. The closed web has from one to four thicknesses of film designated 67a, h, etc. and 68a, 1), etc.. The optional interior web insulation sheets are designated 69 and 70. respectively.

As in the dotted line showing of FIG. 16, one end of the device of H6. 17 may be closed to achieve a pouch or mitten effect. On the other hand, the sleeve may be open ended at each end as in the full line showing of FIG. 16.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to attain all of the ends and objects hereinabove set forth together with other advantages which are obvious and which are inherent to the apparatus.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

I. In a heat exchanging package which comprises a sealed outer bag of flexible, fluid tight sheet material,

a dry heat exchanging chemical (when mixed with water) disposed within said outer bag,

a sealed water containing inner bag disposed within the outer bag.

the inner bag of smaller dimensions than the outer bag,

and the interior of the outer bag not entirely filled with air whereby an inwardly directed force applied through the outer bag of sufficient magnitude will rupture the inner bag without breaking the outer bag to effect mixing of the water and the heat exchanging chemical,

the improvement which comprises one entire side of the heat exchanging package having a sheet of aqueous liquid impervious heat insulating material integrally fixed thereto, and

a flexible aqueous liquid impervious web provided,

communicating between and connecting to opposite edges of said package. whereby to form a closed loop sleeve.

2. A device as in claim 1 wherein one entire surface of the sleeve is integrally insulated with liquid impervious insulating material on the same side thereof as the package, whereby to provide a closed loop of said liquid impervious'material on said sheet and package.

3. A device as in claim 2 wherein the sleeve and the package are insulated on the exterior surface thereof,

thus to provide an exteriorly insulated and interiorly heat exchanging package with means for attaching same with respect to the work to be heat exchanged.

4. A device as in claim 2 wherein the sleeve and the package are insulated on the interior surfaces thereof, thus to provide an interiorly insulated and exteriorly heat exchanging package with means for attaching same with respect to the work to be heat exchanged.

5. A device as in claim 1 wherein the sleeve is closed at one end thereof by attaching one end of the sleeve to one end edge of the package.

6. A heat exchanging package of multi-cell construction comprising, in combination,

a pair of congruently configured, sealed outer bags of flexible, fluid tight sheet material,

means connecting one edge of each of said outer bags together in spaced relationship to one another to form an integral two-cell construction,

a quantity of dry, heat exchanging chemical disposed within each of said outer bags,

a sealed, water containing inner bag disposed within each of said outer bags,

each of inner bags of smaller dimension than the outer bag containing same,

the interior of each of said outer bags not entirely filled with air whereby an inwardly directed. force applied through the outer bag of sufficient magni tude will rupture the inner bag without breaking the outer bag to effect mixing of the water and heat exchanging chemical,

web means connecting the outer bags to one another of sufficient dimension that said bags may be positioned in substantial parallel face to face juxtaposition when at least one of said cells is activated for heat exchange by bursting the inner bag thereof and the object to be heat-exchanged is positioned between and covered by the two cells,

one entire side of the heat exchanging package. in-

cluding one like side of each of said two outer bags and the web means interconnecting them, having a sheet of liquid impervious heat insulating material integrally fixed to said sides and web thereto.

7. A package as in claim 6 wherein said cells are of elongate rectangular form.

8. A package as in claim 6 wherein said outer bags are defined and fabricated by heat sealing at least two face to face sheets of fluid tight material to one another.

9. A device as in claim 6 wherein each of the package and the cells are rectangular in configuration and a rectangular flap extension of said insulating material is provided extending from at least one side edge thereof, the said flap of a length at least substantially equal to the width of one of said cells.

10. A multi-cell heat exchanging package comprising, in combination,

a pair of sealed outer bags of flexible, aqueous liquid impervious sheet material,

a quantity of dry, heat-exchanging chemical (when mixed with water) disposed within each said outer bag;

a sealed, water containing inner bag disposed within each outer bag;

each said inner bag of smaller dimensions than the outer bag containing same;

the interior of each outer bag not entirely filled with air whereby an inwardly directed force applied through the outer bag of sufficient magnitude will'j rupture the inner bag without breaking the outer bag to effect mixing of water and the heat exchang ing chemical;

integral. flexible. aqueous liquid impervious sheet webs connecting adjacent edges of the outer bags to one another so that the bags and webs form a closed loop sleeve,

and a sheet of aqueous liquid impervious heat insulation material integrally fixed to and facing one like side of each outer hag.

sleeve is closed.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/4, 607/114
International ClassificationA61J1/16, F25D5/02, A61F7/02, A61F7/10, A61M5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/002, A61F2007/0001, A61F7/106, F25D2331/8014, F25D2303/0822, F25D5/02, A61J1/165, A61F2007/0276, A61F2007/0249
European ClassificationF25D5/02, A61M5/00P, A61F7/10C