Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3894274 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1975
Filing dateJul 1, 1974
Priority dateJul 1, 1974
Also published asCA1034192A1
Publication numberUS 3894274 A, US 3894274A, US-A-3894274, US3894274 A, US3894274A
InventorsRosenberry Jr George Mowry
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric motor transient voltage suppressing circuit
US 3894274 A
Abstract
An electric power distribution system or an electric device, such as a motor, having a relatively low voltage class of insulation on the conductors or windings thereof is provided with a transient voltage suppressing circuit that is operable to prevent undesirable voltage peaks from being applied to the insulation. Due to the voltage distributing and stabilizing effect of the suppressing circuit, the heat dissipating characteristics of motor windings, combined with the circuit, may be improved and the long-term insulation life of the motor is thereby made more reliable.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Rosenberry, Jr.

[ July 8,1975

[ 1 ELECTRIC MOTOR TRANSIENT VOLTAGE SUPPRESSING CIRCUIT [75] Inventor: George Mowry Rosenberry, Jr.,

Elnora, NY.

[73] Assignee: General Electric Company,

- Schenectady, NY.

[22] Filed: July 1, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 485,056

. [52] US. Cl 317/13 R; 317/16; 317/31;

[51] Int. Cl. H02h 7/09 [58] Field of Search 317/13 R, 16, 31, 40 R, 317/41, 50, 68, 61.5

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,093,477 4/1914 Rudenberg 317/61.5 X

2,246,926 6/1941 Roman 317/61.5 X 3,258,646 6/1966 Fowler 3,688,157 8/1972 Spears 317/13 R Primary Examiner- James D. Trammell Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Vale P. Myles [57] ABSTRACT An electric power distribution system or an electric device, such as a motor, having a relatively low voltage class of insulation on the conductors or windings thereof is provided with a transient voltage suppressing circuit that is operable to prevent undesirable voltage peaks from being applied to the insulation. Due to the voltage distributing and stabilizing effect of the suppressing circuit, the heat dissipating characteristics of motor windings, combined with the circuit, may be improved and the long-term insulation life of the motor is thereby made more reliable.

7 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures PATEHTEDJUL 8 I975 FIG.|

MOTOR ELECTRIC MOTOR TRANSIENT VOLTAGE SUPPRESSING CIRCUIT Cross-Reference to a Related Application The voltage suppressing circuit disclosed herein may be embodied in a unitary varistor device comprising a body of sintered metal oxides such as that disclosed in a simultaneously filed U.S. Pat. application, Ser. No. 484,923 filed on July 1, 1974.

Background of the Invention The'use of voltage responsive non-linear resistance electrical valves, or so-called varistors, to suppress transient voltages is generally well-known in the prior art. Likewise, numerous different types of varistor materials and device configurations are known. Some examples of such devices and the application of them in transient voltage surge suppressing circuits of various types is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,693,053 Anderson, which issued on Sept. 19, 1972 and is assigned to the assignee of the present invention. The type of sintered metal oxide material disclosed in that patent for forming bodies of varistors has been found to produce varistors having desirably sharp cut-off voltage characteristics that make them ideally suited for transient voltage surge suppressing circuits. Accordingly, varistors formed of such sintered metal oxide materials may be used in practicing the teaching of the present invention. Toward that end, the disclosure of U.S. Pat. No. 3,693,053 is incorporated herein by reference. As the disclosure of the present invention proceeds herein, it will be apparent that the invention is not limited to a particular composition of varistor material or to given shapes or configurations of individual varistor devices. Instead, the present invention is directed primarily to the combination of advantageous surge suppressing circuit configurations with electric motor windings.

It is desirable in the design of transient voltage suppressing circuits for electric distribution systems generally and for electric devices such as motors, particularly to provide surge voltage relief means, that will maintain the voltage protection level at its lowest practical value in relation to a pre-determined normal line voltage. At the same time, it is advantageous from a cost standpoint to employ varistors or other surge suppressing devices having relatively low voltage and current ratings so that the unit cost of these system components is no excessive. Of course, cost considerations also require the number of varistors used in a given surge suppression circuit to be kept as low as possible without impairing the desired operating characteristics of the circuit. In known prior art voltage suppressing circuits applicable to electric motors, such as those shown in the above-referenced Anderson U.S. Pat. No. 3,693,053, it is conventional practice to employ circuit configurations that require varistors to have a voltage rating equivalent to the line-to-line voltage of a protected device or system. Moreover, in transient voltage suppression circuits for polyphase systems, as also shown in that patent, it is common practice to provide for lineto-line and line-to-ground protection by providing a number of individual varistors equivalent to twice the number of phases being protected. Typically, in such arrangements, one varistor is connected between respective pairs of each of thelines of the system and additional varistors are connected respectively between the line terminals and ground. Such circuit arrangements have been found to be effective in affording desired levels of voltage stability; however, as will be seen from the following disclosure of the present invention, more economical circuit arrangements are available to accomplish substantially the same degree of surge suppression. 3

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an electric distribution system or electrical apparatus with a transient voltage surge suppressing circuit that is more economical to construct and operate than known prior art circuits that afford equivalent protective functions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a transient voltage suppression circuit for apparatus such as electric motors in which the protective level of a motor winding is clamped sufficiently close to the normal line voltage of the motor to enable use of thinner and lower voltage winding insulation than has heretofore been practical.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a transient voltage surge suppressing circuit for a power system of the windings of an electrical apparatus such as a motor having a configuration of varistors, which circuit is effective to reduce the peak voltage applied to any given varistor.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an electric system,having N terminals that are to be protected from voltage surges, with a transient voltage suppressing circuit comprising (N plus I) varistors that are electrically connected to provide line-to-line and lineto-ground transient voltage suppressing protection for the system.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent-to those skilled in the art from the description of it that follows, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

Summary of the Invention In a preferred embodiment of the invention, a polyphase electric motor is provided with a transient voltage suppressing circuit comprising a plurality of varistors that are equal in number to the number of phase winding terminals to be protected in the motor plus 1. The varistors areelectrically connected to terminals of the motor to provide both line-to-line and linetoground surge voltage protection. The suppressing circuit of the invention is effective to maintain the protective level of the motor winding sufficiently close to the rated voltage of the motor so that a lower rating of winding insulation may be used than was practical with prior art transient voltage suppressing circuits. In addition, the long-term voltage stability of the suppressing circuit is improved relative to equivalent prior art circuits because both the normal voltages and peak voltages applied across' the varistors therein are maintained at about half the voltage normally applied to varistors in such functionally equivalent prior art circuits. In other applications of the transient suppressing circuit of the invention, it may be connected to protect a single phase systems and other types of electrical equipment.

Brief Description of the Drawings FIG. 1 is a schematic circuit diagram of a polyphase electric motor provided with a transient voltage suppressing circuit constructed pursuant to the teaching of the present invention.

FIG. 2 isa schematic circuit diagram of a polyphase electric motor having six winding leads thatmay be connected toenable, the motor to be operated for wye start-delta run operation, shown in combination with a transient voltage suppressing circuit constructed pursuant to the present invention.

I Description of the Preferred Embodiments In order to facilitate a description of the invention, some preferred applications of it will be discussed with reference to the drawing. It should be understood at the outset, however, that the circuit of the invention is widely applicable and may be used to protect various types of single and polyphase electric systems and devices. Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, it will be seen that there is shown schematically a polyphase electric motor 1 having three phase windings 2, 3 and 4 that are electrically connected in a conventional wye circuit configuration. The windings are electrically connected, respectively, by the conductors 5, 6 and 7 to line terminals 5, 6 and 7'. In the illustrated embodiment, the common terminal of the wye connected windings is shown as being ungrounded, but as the description of the suppressing circuit of the invention proceeds, it will be recognized that various embodiments of it may be applied to protect either an ungrounded system or a power distribution system, for example, that may have a grounded neutral. A transient voltage suppressing circuit constructed pursuant to the invention is generally designated in FIG. 1 by the number 8 and specifically comprises a plurality of commercially available metal oxides varistors 9, 10 and 11, that are electrically connected in a star configuration, in combination with a common varistor l2 electrically connected in series by a pair of conductors 13 and 14 between a common connection 15 of the star configuration and an electrical ground terminal 16.

As shown in FIG. 1, each of the star-connected varistors 9-1 1 is provided with a pair of electrical leads that may, like the varistors, beformed in any conventional manner of commercially available materials such as those described in the above-referenced Anderson patent. Thus, one terminal of each of the varistors 9-11 is electrically connected, respectively, by the conductors 17, 18 and 19, in common, to the terminal 15. The conductors 20, 21 and. 22, respectively, connect the other ends of varistors 9-11 to the conductors 5-7 and thus to the motor windings 2-4.

The novel transient voltage surge suppressing circuit 8 shown in FIG. 1 operates to provide line-to-line and line-to-ground surge voltage protection for each of the windings 2-4 of motor 1. As indicated above in the discussion of the background of the present invention, this circuit arrangement makes it possible to utilize varistors that are substantially identical in their electrical characteristics, and which need have voltage ratings that are only about 2 percent greater than one-half the normal line voltage of motor 1. Due to the steeply nonlinear characteristic ofthe metal oxide varistors and the floating common terminal 15 that allows the varistors to drop substantiallyequal voltages across the series-connected arrangements of the common varistor l2 and any one of the other varistors 9-1 1 for either a lineto-line or line-to-ground surge suppressing operation, only half of the normal line voltage, or any peak voltage, will appear across any of the varistors. Thus, none of the varistors 9-12 need have voltage or current ratings equivalent to the line voltage of the motor, as was common in prior art surge suppression circuits, but rather need only have voltage ratings equal to about half of the rated motor operating voltage. By reducing by approximately 50 percent the peak voltages to which any of the varistors in thelcircuit is subjected, the life of the system should be, enhanced. I

An equally important advantage of the novel combination of the present invention is that the accurately clamped protective level provided by the suppressing circuit for the motor windings 2-4 enables them to be adequately insulated with a relatively low voltage class of insulating material. Such a feature is particularly desirable,not only becauseof the saving in .cost on insulating material, but because of the reduction in the space heretofore required to accommodate higher voltage classes of insulating material in such motors.

Although the preferred embodiment of the invention described above with reference to ,1 is shown in relation to a polyphase motorhaving three line leads or terminals, it should be readily understood that the star configuration of the transient voltage suppressing circuit of the present invention is generally adaptable to any number of circuit leads, including the two leads of a single-phase circuit. In fact, for a motor having N leads, the star configuration of varistors, in combination with a common series varistor, pursuant to the circuit configuration of the present invention, would result in the use of N plus I varistors in total, with one of the varistors being connected between the common terminal of the star configuration and a ground terminal. From the description of the inventionset forth thus far, it will be apparent that the desirable advantages and optimum operating characteristicsof surge suppressing circuit 8 will not be lost or impaired if additional electric system components are connected to the terminals 5', 6 and .7, nor will the removal of motor ,1- from the conductors 5,6 and 7 protective functions afforded by circuit 8. Furthermore, it can be seen that in the event one only desires to protect a single phase of an electrical system with the present invention, it is equally suited to that purpose. For example, if only lines Sand 6 are to be protected, the varistor 11 could be removed or disconnected from the terminal 15, so that line-to-line and line-to-ground protection would be afforded by varistors 9 and 10 connected, respectively, in series with varistor 12. Since there are six line terminals 27'-3 2', a total of 6 plus I, or seven varistors, is used in the transient voltage surge suppression circuit of the invention used to protect this particular motor. Thus, the varistors 33 through 38 are connected, respectively, by conductors 39-44 to the line terminals, and by conductors (unnumbered) at their opposite ends to common terminals 45. The common varistor 46 is electrically connected byconductors 47 and 48 between the common terminal 45 and a ground terminal 49. 7

It will be understood by those familiar with the motor art that thesix-terminal independent motor winding arrangement shown in FIG. 2 is fairly commonly used for wye start-delta run'or multi-speed motors; therefore, it will be recognized that the circuit combination depicted has considerable practical value because the number of varistors required with the present invention to provide line-to-line and line-to-ground. surge voltage protection is approximately half the number of varistors required when using alternative surge protective circuits to provide similar protection. The operation of this embodiment of the invention is similar to that illustrated in FIG. 1 in that the common varistor 46 is always in series with one of the other varistors 33-38, whether a line-to-line or line-to-ground voltage surge is to be suppressed by the system. Accordingly, the advantages of possibly prolonged varistor life and reduced motor winding insulation ratings and winding insulation thickness are also afforded by this embodiment of the invention.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that various modifications and alternative forms of the invention may be developed from the description of it that is contained herein; accordingly, it is my intention to encompass within the following claims the true scope of my invention.

What I claim as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States of America is:

1. An electric distribution system having a plurality of electrical conductors equal in number to N that are to be protected from transient voltages, in combination with a transient voltage suppressing circuit comprising a plurality of metal oxide varistors equal in number to N plus 1, all but one of said varistors being connected in a star configuration with one of the respective terminals of each star-connected varistor being electrically connected in common, electric conductor means connecting each conductor, respectively, of the N conductors of the distribution system to an associated outer varistor terminal of the star configuration of varistors, the remaining varistor being electrically connected in series between the common connection of the star configuration of varistors and an electrical ground terminal, each of said varistors having substantially identical electrical characteristics.

2. An invention as defined in claim 1 wherein N equals 2.

3. An electric motor having a polyphase winding provided with a transient voltage suppressing circuit that enables the use of a relatively low voltage class of insulation on the windings, said voltage suppressing circuit comprising a plurality of metal oxide varistors electrically connected in a star configuration with one terminal of each varistor electrically connected in common, electric conductor means connecting each phase winding of the motor, respectively, to an associated outer terminal of the star configuration of varistors, and a common varistor electrically connected in series between the common connection of the star configuration and an electrical ground terminal, each of said varistors having substantially identical electrical operating characteristics.

4. An invention as defined in claim 3 wherein each of the varistors electrically connected in said star configuration comprises a single phase, dual terminal varistor.

5. An invention as defined in claim 3 wherein said polyphase winding is a wye-connected three-phase winding and the star configuration of varistors is also a wye connection having each of its outer terminals connected, respectively, to an outer terminal of the wye connected motor winding.

6. An invention as defined in claim 3 wherein said polyphase winding is a three-phase winding having two terminals on each winding that are selectively connectable to enable the motor winding to be connected with either a wye or delta winding, said electric conductor means being effective to connect each of said winding terminals to an associated outer terminal of the star configuration of varistors.

7. An invention as defined in claim 2 including a single-phase motor connected in operating relationship to the two conductors of said distribution system.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1093477 *Mar 14, 1913Apr 14, 1914Siemens Schuckertwerke GmbhMeans for protecting electric circuits from excessively-high differences of potential and similar disturbances.
US2246926 *Nov 1, 1938Jun 24, 1941Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoSurge protection for electrical apparatus
US3258646 *Aug 15, 1962Jun 28, 1966 Fig. i prior art
US3688157 *Dec 28, 1970Aug 29, 1972Spears Joseph FMotor protection control apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4023071 *Jun 9, 1975May 10, 1977Fussell Gerald WTransient and surge protection apparatus
US4161008 *Apr 26, 1978Jul 10, 1979Northern Telecom LimitedProtection circuitry for cable transmission system
US4345290 *Sep 22, 1980Aug 17, 1982Johnson Richard HElectrical transient suppressor
US4347539 *Jun 3, 1981Aug 31, 1982Westinghouse Electric Corp.Electrical equipment protective apparatus with energy balancing among parallel varistors
US4455586 *Apr 15, 1982Jun 19, 1984Oneac CorporationHigh voltage filtering and protection circuit
US4710841 *Oct 23, 1985Dec 1, 1987Bottrell Gerald WSystem for production of induction machines against damage from residual voltage effects
US4740859 *May 20, 1986Apr 26, 1988Leon A. HoskamerTransient voltage surge suppressor and line short monitor
US4768125 *Nov 18, 1987Aug 30, 1988Byrne Timothy KProtective device for an electric motor
US4814941 *Oct 19, 1987Mar 21, 1989Steelcase Inc.Power receptacle and nested line conditioner arrangement
US4896083 *May 4, 1988Jan 23, 1990Transworld Products, Inc.Successible switch activated control circuit
US4901187 *Jan 12, 1988Feb 13, 1990Allina Edward FElectrical transient surge protection
US4931895 *Oct 28, 1986Jun 5, 1990Allina Edward FElectrical transient surge protection
US5724221 *Feb 2, 1996Mar 3, 1998Efi Electronics CorporationDirect contact varistor assembly
US6304013Sep 21, 1999Oct 16, 2001General Electric CompanyLine termination network assembly for an electric motor
US7518256 *Jul 1, 2004Apr 14, 2009Gamesa Innovation & Technology, S.L.Control and protection of a doubly-fed induction generator system
US7848122 *Apr 23, 2008Dec 7, 2010Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc.Terminator for reducing differential-mode and common-mode voltage reflections in AC motor drives
US7933108 *Dec 18, 2007Apr 26, 2011Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc.Motor drive with low leakage surge protection
USRE35077 *Nov 29, 1991Oct 31, 1995Allina; EdwardElectrical transient surge protection
CN100466447CJul 4, 2005Mar 4, 2009株式会社日立产机系统power-converting device, motor and motor drive system
EP0130851A1 *Apr 11, 1984Jan 9, 1985Merlin GerinProtection apparatus against overvoltages in electrical low-voltage installations or networks
EP0429718A1 *Dec 1, 1989Jun 5, 1991Van der Geenst, BernardElectro-motor
EP1385255A1 *Jul 4, 2003Jan 28, 2004Zf Friedrichshafen AgElectric drive system
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/23, 361/91.1, 361/56
International ClassificationH02H7/09, H02H7/08, H02H9/04
Cooperative ClassificationH02H9/04, H02H7/09
European ClassificationH02H9/04, H02H7/09