Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3894647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1975
Filing dateSep 28, 1973
Priority dateSep 28, 1973
Publication numberUS 3894647 A, US 3894647A, US-A-3894647, US3894647 A, US3894647A
InventorsVan Montgomery Gary
Original AssigneeSunbeam Plastics Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Child-resistant closure
US 3894647 A
Abstract
A substantially leak-proof and child-resistant combination closure comprising a container and a cap. The container has a threaded neck and the cap has a tubular skirt with mating threads on its inner surface, a disc-like top and resilient annular shoulder portion. There is a sealing liner beneath the top of the cap which engages and seals the open end of the container neck. The cap skirt and the container have cooperating locking means which are engaged when the cap is turned down to normal closed position. The locking means function both to render the closure child-resistant and to stop the relative rotation of the cap onto the container at a predetermined angular position where the locking means is effective. The resilient shoulder of the cap flexes to compensate for tolerance variations in the threads of the cap and container neck in order to insure that the cap liner seals the neck of the container.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Montgomery [45] July 15, 1975 i 1 CHILD-RESISTANT CLOSURE [73] Assignee: Sunbeam Plastics Corporation.

Evansville, Ind.

22 Filed: Sept. 28, 1973 211 App]. No.: 401,838

[52] US. Cl. 215/9; 2l5/22l; ll6/72 [5i] Int. Cl t t 865d 55/02 [58] Field of Search 215/9, 22!; [16/72 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,019,931 2/l962 Thornton 2l5/22l 3,l85,333 5/l965 Sharp 4 2l5/9 3,200,979 8/1965 Powers i 2i5/22l 3,447,709 6/l969 Marasco 215/22l $677,431 7/[972 Westfall 2l5/9 3.7l6,l6l 2/l973 Julian 215/9 3,739,933 6/l973 Degaetano... 215/9 3,770,153 1 H1973 Gach 215/9 Primary Examiner-William i. Price Assistant E.raminerRo E. Hart Attorney, Agent, or FirmHenry K. Leonard {57] ABSTRACT A substantially leak-pro0f and child-resistant combination closure comprising a container and a cap. The container has a threaded neck and the cap has a tubular skirt with mating threads on its inner surface, a disc-like top and resilient annular shoulder portion. There is a sealing liner beneath the top of the cap which engages and seals the open end of the container neck. The cap skirt and the container have cooperating locking means which are engaged when the cap is turned down to normal closed position. The locking means function both to render the closure childresistant and to stop the relative rotation of the cap onto the container at a predetermined angular position where the locking means is effective. The resilient shoulder of the cap flexes to compensate for tolerance variations in the threads of the cap and container neck in order to insure that the cap liner seals the neck of the container.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures CHILD-RESISTANT CLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION With the current emphasis that has been placed upon protection of children of tender ages from harm due to their being able to open containers of medicines. acids. soaps. etc. development of so called child-proof" or. more correctly. child-resistant" containers and closures. has been very rapid.

Many of these child-resistant combinations have em ployed threaded caps and containers with threaded necks. the caps and containers being provided with cooperating means which function to prevent the child of tender years from removing the cap from the container after it has been seated thereon.

Devices of this type which are practical also must be so designed as to provide for capping the containers by the use of conventional capping equipment. Since may products to be so packaged have previously been packaged in vials or glass bottles with threaded necks and simple screw-on caps most packaging organizations already possess capping equipment which is capable of placing such caps onto bottle necks with a fixed torque so that the caps will be securely seated on the bottle necks by the capping machines.

However. the tolerances of manufacturing of both the bottles or vials and the caps or closures are such that even when the caps are put on by automatic. constant torque capping machines. they do not all reach the same angular position relative to the containers on which they are set by the capping machines.

If the caps or closures have internal sealing liners. which function to render the necks of the containers leak proof. variations in the degree of tightening of the caps onto the necks of the bottles may be important as a result of cumulations in the tolerances. When cork was inexpensive. because it is highly resilient and does not take a set if it is squeezed too tightly. it frequently was utilized as the main body of the sealing liners so that it would compensate easily for these varia tions and would maintain all of the containers in liquid tight condition even if the caps or closures were put on various containers with different torque and thus squeezed the liners to differing degrees.

When the cap of the child-resistant closure is designed. however. it is necessary that the cap be rotated onto the container to a distance sufficient to insure that the cooperating means will engage and thus prevent the cap from being unscrewed by a small child. However. because of the variations in the tolerances such caps may be turned onto the containers by the capping machine or by an adult to positions beyond the positions where the locking means engage. If this occurs, the liner may be squeezed too tightly and take a set. Upon a subsequent replacement of the cap. if it is not turned on as far, the liner will not expand to maintain the seal.

In order to avoid the foregoing common problem. it has been suggested that the cap and container comprise means for stopping the rotation of the cap onto the container at the precise position where the childresistant locking means engage. Again. however. because of the cumulation of tolerances problem. when the rotation of the cap is stopped at a fixed position, the liner may not be in sealing contact with the neck of the container.

It is the object of the instant invention. therefore. to provide a child-resistant closure for a container in which the cap and container have cooperating childresistant locking means engaged at a certain relative angular position of the cap on the container and in which the locking means also prevent the cap from being turned beyond locking position and the cap has a resilient shoulder which compensates for variations in cumulated tolerances to insure that the liner seals the container neck when the cap reaches the fixed or predetermined locking position on the container at which the child-resistant locking means are engaged.

These and other more specific objects and advantages of a closure embodying the invention will be better understood from the specification and from the drawings which follow.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a top plan view of a closure embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view in vertical elevation. with parts broken away of the closure shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary. vertical sectional view with parts broken away taken along the line 3* of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side view in elevation showing how the child-resistant locking means is disengaged to permit removal of the cap from the container;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 1 and illustrating how the closure of the combination ofthc invention may be distorted to insure sealing engagement of its liner against the open neck of the container.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT A substantially leak-proof and child-resistant closure combination according to the invention comprises a container 10 which has a generally cylindrical body portion I I. a threaded neck I2 and an annular shoulder I3 joining the wall of the body 1] to the base of the neck I2.

An inverted cup-shaped cap 14 has a tubular skirt IS. a disc-like top I6 and a resilient annular shoulder portion ]7 connecting the disc-like top 16 and the skirt IS. The cap 14 also has threads I8 formed on the inner surface ofits skirt I5 to mate with the threads on the neck 12 of the container 10.

A disc-like liner 1) is positioned against the inner side of the cap top 16 and is of such size as to close and seal the open center of the container neck 12.

The cap 14 and the container 10 have cooperating child'resistant locking means which consist ofa radially outwardly directed tab 20 at the lower edge of the cap skirt l5 and a pair of stops 2] and 22 formed on the shoulder 13 of the container to be engaged by the tab 20. When the cap 14 is turned onto the container 10. either in its initial capping or after use. the cap 14 must be rotated a sufficient distance for the tab 20 to ride up an incline 23 on the shoulder 13 of the container [0 and then to snap by its own resiliency downwardly behind the stop 21. This is the closed position of the closure 14 relative to the container neck I2. The second stop 22 is angularly spaced beyond the first stop 21 only a distance sufficient that the tab 20 will drop down between the stops 21 and 22 and thus prevent the cap 14 from being turned angularly beyond this normal closed position.

If it were possible to manufacture the cap [4 and the container 10 and its threaded neck 12 without any tolerances in the dimensions. the cap and the neck [2 could be maintained at proper sizes so that when the cap 10 is turned to the normal closed position. the liner 19 is pressed against the open neck I] with just sufficient force so as to seal the container. Of course all manufactures on a production basis must be made with a definite manufacturing tolerance. say plus or minus 0.005 inch or the like. so that when these tolerances cumulate if the cap 10 is turned to its normal closed position. the liner 1) may or may not be in its proper sealing adjacency to the end of the container neck 12. If the tolerances cumulate in one direction. the container may not be sealed at all. If the tolerances cumulate in another direction. it may not be possible to turn the cap 14 far enough down onto the neck 12 for the childresistant locking means comprising the tab and the stop 21 to engage.

If it were economically feasible to utilize natural cork for the liner 19. it would have sufficient resiliency and compressability so that it could be made thick enough to engage the end of the container neck 12 in sealing relationship at both extremes of the tolerance variations. However. as mentioned above. the cost of cork has become prohibitive for its use as a liner in large volume containers such as aspirin bottles. and the like.

In order to compensate for the tolerance variations. the cap 14 of the invention has the annular shoulder portion 17 so that the liner I9 is brought into sealing engagement with the end of the threaded neck 12 of the container 10 whether the tolerances result in the locking tab 21 reaching the normal position as illustrated in FIG. 2 or as illustrated in FIG. 5. It will be observed by comparing the indicated distances d, and d that the extremes of the tolerance variations are illustrated and that in both conditions. the tab 20 is positioned between the stops 21 and 22 and the liner I9 is pressed against the end of the neck 12. The annular shoulder 17 is illustrated as being stretched downwardly in FIG. 5 to compensate for the tolerance variations presumed to exist between the cap 14 and neck 12 of FIGS. 2 and 5. respectively.

Having described my invention. 1 claim:

I. A substantially leak-proof and child-resistant closure combination. said combination comprising a. a container having a tubular neck, a hollow body and a generally inwardly extending shoulder between the upper portion of said body and the base of said neck.

b. a one-piece cap for said container. said cap having a tubular skirt. a disc-like top and a resilient annular shoulder portion means connecting said skirt and said top.

c. a disc-like liner beneath said cap top and engageable with the end of said container neck for sealing said neck.

d. means comprising mating threads on said neck and said cap skirt for retaining said cap on said neck.

e. and cooperating locking means on said cap skirt and said container shoulder engageable when said cap is rotated to normal closed position relative to said neck and for preventing rotation beyond normal closed position f. said shoulder portion means being stretchable for downward movement of said tubular skirt for compensating for tolerance variations in said threads. and between said threads and said locking means.

2. A combination according to claim 1 in which the cooperating child-resistant locking means comprise a tab on the lower edge of the cap skirt and a pair of angularly spaced stops on the shoulder of the container cngageable by said tab.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3019931 *Dec 3, 1959Feb 6, 1962Thornton Elbert H EReceptacles with positive locking closures
US3185333 *Dec 19, 1963May 25, 1965Harold Sharp DavidSafety cap and closure
US3200979 *Jun 17, 1964Aug 17, 1965Powers Joseph BLatching cap
US3447709 *Jun 14, 1967Jun 3, 1969Marasco VincentLocking cap for bottles and the like
US3677431 *Apr 6, 1970Jul 18, 1972Continental Can CoContainer closure
US3716161 *Oct 26, 1971Feb 13, 1973Sunbeam Plastics CorpSafety closure for a medicine bottle or the like
US3739933 *Mar 22, 1971Jun 19, 1973Degaetano BLiquid-proof safety closure
US3770153 *Aug 4, 1972Nov 6, 1973Sunbeam Plastics CorpSafety closure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3971487 *Jul 18, 1975Jul 27, 1976Sunbeam Plastics CorporationThreaded cap and neck for a liquid container
US3974929 *Jun 11, 1975Aug 17, 1976Sunbeam Plastics CorporationChild resistant closure
US4002259 *Oct 6, 1975Jan 11, 1977Kerr Glass Manufacturing CorporationSafety closure
US4376497 *Sep 15, 1980Mar 15, 1983Owens-Illinois, Inc.Child resistant dispensing closure
US4787526 *Feb 26, 1988Nov 29, 1988Pehr Harold TContainer closure having child protective fastening means
US4809874 *Feb 26, 1988Mar 7, 1989Pehr Harold THinged closure for containers
US4865209 *Jul 25, 1988Sep 12, 1989Sunbeam Plastics CorporationChild resistant closure
US4925041 *Nov 29, 1988May 15, 1990Pehr Harold TClosure for container
US5013073 *May 14, 1990May 7, 1991Pehr Harold TAutomatic reset window latch
US5038454 *Mar 26, 1990Aug 13, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanyInjection blow molding process for forming a package exhibiting improved child resistance
US5137260 *Jun 13, 1989Aug 11, 1992Pehr Harold TChild resistant container with flush latched closure
US5147060 *Nov 1, 1991Sep 15, 1992Russell-Stanley CorporationSafety container
US5186344 *Oct 2, 1990Feb 16, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyContainer and closure having means for producing an audible signal when a seal has been established
US5213225 *May 29, 1991May 25, 1993Beeson And Sons LimitedContainer and closure
US5230433 *Jan 28, 1992Jul 27, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyAdult friendly child-resistant attachment for containers used to store potentially dangerous materials
US5265751 *Apr 24, 1992Nov 30, 1993Russel-Stanley CorporationSafety container
US5310074 *Jun 25, 1993May 10, 1994Berry Plastics CorporationCanister with lid-release control mechanism
US5383564 *Jan 21, 1993Jan 24, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyAdult friendly child-resistant attachment for containers used to store potentially dangerous materials
US5394999 *May 6, 1993Mar 7, 1995Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Child resistant package
US5411157 *Oct 2, 1992May 2, 1995Beeson And Sons LimitedContainer and the manufacture thereof
US5454476 *May 24, 1993Oct 3, 1995Beeson And Sons LimitedContainer and closure
US5462182 *Jan 27, 1994Oct 31, 1995Weatherchem CorporationScrews-on child resistant consumer-friendly closure
US5562218 *Sep 7, 1995Oct 8, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyAdult friendly child-resistant attachment for containers used to store potentially dangerous materials
US5564580 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 15, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyAdult friendly child-resistant attachment for containers used to store potentially dangerous materials
US5586671 *Feb 23, 1996Dec 24, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyChild resistant package
US5664693 *May 28, 1996Sep 9, 1997Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Child resistant package
US5769254 *Jun 7, 1995Jun 23, 1998Beeson And Sons LimitedContainer and closure with alignable handle
US5794803 *Nov 1, 1996Aug 18, 1998Rexam Closures, Inc.Child-resistant measuring cup closure and dispensing container
US6102223 *Jan 10, 1997Aug 15, 2000Rexam Plastics, Inc.Safety closure and container
US7111746Jan 8, 2004Sep 26, 2006Tri State Distribution, Inc.Shellable child resistant closure container with positive lock mechanism
US8302792 *Jun 4, 2008Nov 6, 2012Airsec S.A.S.Child-safe closure device with a deformation engagement skirt
US8424705 *Sep 1, 2009Apr 23, 2013Dwyer Instruments, Inc.Gage cover retention mechanism
US20040195197 *Jan 8, 2004Oct 7, 2004Miceli David A.Shellable child resistant closure container with positive lock mechanism
US20070187351 *Feb 15, 2006Aug 16, 2007Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Tab-interconnected dispensing closure and container neck finish
US20090320590 *Sep 1, 2009Dec 31, 2009Dwyer Instruments, Inc.Gage Cover Retention Mechanism
US20100206877 *Jun 4, 2008Aug 19, 2010Airsec S.A.S.Child-safe closure device with screw and collar for revealing first opening
USRE38399 *Jul 15, 2002Jan 27, 2004Rexam Medical Packaging Inc.Safety closure and container
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/216, 116/72, 215/221
International ClassificationB65D50/00, B65D50/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D50/046, B65D2101/0053
European ClassificationB65D50/04F2