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Publication numberUS3895797 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1975
Filing dateJul 17, 1974
Priority dateJul 17, 1974
Publication numberUS 3895797 A, US 3895797A, US-A-3895797, US3895797 A, US3895797A
InventorsHarrington Moore
Original AssigneeHarrington Moore
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf ball marker
US 3895797 A
Abstract
A device is provided for marking the position of a golf ball on a putting green while the ball has been temporarily removed from play to allow another golfer to putt towards the cup. The marker is in the form of a flat disc formed with a central integral peg extending from one face thereof and a layer of non-woven fibers bonded to the opposite face thereof. The peg is pressed into the ground to temporarily anchor the device in position with the fiber covered face exposed. The fibers form a soft mat similar in texture to the surrounding grass so that the direction of a putted ball will not be materially altered should the ball roll over the device. A pad faced with resilient hooks is provided for temporary locking connection with the fibers of the locking device. The pad is provided with a layer of pressure sensitive material which will allow the pad to be mounted conveniently on an article of clothing such as the visor of a cap or the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Moore GOLF BALL MARKER Harrington Moore, Hidden Harbor. Stuart, Fla. 33494 221 Filed: July 17,1974

[2i] App1.No.:489,270

[76] Inventor:

10/1968 24/DlG. l8

3.401408 Baker Primary ExaminerGeorge J. Marlo Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Morse, Altman, Oates & Bello July 22, 1975 [57] ABSTRACT A device is provided for marking the position of a golf ball on a putting green while the ball has been temporarily removed from play to allow another golfer to putt towards the cup. The marker is in the form of a flat disc formed with a central integral peg extending from one face thereof and a layer of non-woven fibers bonded to the opposite face thereof. The peg is pressed into the ground to temporarily anchor the device in position with the fiber covered face exposed. The fibers form a soft mat similar in texture to the surrounding grass so that the direction of a putted ball will not be materially altered should the ball roll over the device. A pad faced with resilient hooks is pro vided for temporary locking connection with the fibers of the locking device. The pad is provided with a layer of pressure sensitive material which will allow the pad to be mounted conveniently on an article of clothing such as the visor of a cap or the like.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures GOLF BALL MARKER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to golf accessories and more particularly is directed towards a new and improved golf ball position marking device and means for conveniently storing the same when not in use.

2. Description of the Prior Art In golf it is the practice when putting on the green for the player whose ball is furthest from the cup to putt first and, if there is a group playing, the sequence of putting will be in accordance with the distance from the cup. Thus, it will happen rather frequently that one player's ball will lie in the path between the cup and another players ball. In those circumstances the player with the interfering ball will pick up his ball and leave a marker at the spot. Typically, he will leave a small coin, such as a penny or dime at that spot and, when the other player has completed his putt, will replace his ball and retrieve the marker. While coins have been used for many years, they are not entirely satisfactory for several reasons. First of all, the player may not have brought a coin with him and if he does have a coin, if it is shiny may distract the putter. Further, coins are subject to accidental movement if another player, not seeing the coin, kicks it with his foot when walking on the green. More importantly, the smooth hard surface of the coin may alter the direction of a ball putted along the green since the ball would change from rolling over the soft grass surface suddenly onto a hard, smooth surface.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a golf ball marking device that is conveniently stored on a release surface attached to an article of clothing, golf bag or cart, for example. Another object of this invention is to provide a golf ball marking device that is easily anchored in position and one that provides an exposed surface similar to that of the surrounding putting green so as not to interfere with the movement of a putted ball.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention features a golf ball marking device, comprising a thin, flat disc formed with an integral peg extending from one face thereof by which the device may be pressed down and anchored into the ground. A layer of non-woven fabric is bonded to the opposite face of the disc to provide an exposed working surface closely matching that of grass so as not to unduly alter the movement of a ball putted over the device and to reduce reflections. A pad of flexible material faced with a plurality of resilient hooks is provided for engagement to an article of clothing or the like with a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer so that one or more marking devices may be stored by pressing the fabric face against the hooked face of the pad.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a view in perspective showing the invention mounted to the visor of a cap,

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a pair of marking devices and a mounting pad.

FIG. 3 is a view in perspective of a marking device made according to the invention,

FIG. 4 is a view in side elevation showing the marking device and the storage pad in juxtaposed position, and,

FIG. 5 is a sectional view in side elevation showing a marking device in position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, the reference character 10 generally indicates a golf ball marking device detachably connected to a storage pad 12 which, in the FIG. 1 embodiment, is mounted to a visor I4 of a cap 16. The device 10 is in the form of a circular disc, preferably about three-fourths inch in diameter, having an integral peg 18 extending from the bottom face of the disc at the center thereof. Typically, the peg is about one-fourth inch in length and, in practice, the disc and peg may be molded of plastic, machined from metal or the like. The upper face of the disc 20 is covered with a layer 22 of a non-woven, felt-like material cemented or otherwise bonded to the disc. The layer 22 is relatively thick and soft so that when the device I0 is placed on the ground as suggested in FIG. 5 with the peg I8 anchoring the device in place, the exposed surface of the felt material 22 will be more or less flush with the surface of surrounding grass 24. Thus, a golf ball putted on the grass 24 will roll smoothly over the felt layer 22 on the marker without significantly altering course. Since the texture of the fabric closely matches that of the grass the putted ball will roll smoothly and easily. The textured material 22 also eliminates reflections that might otherwise distract a golfer concentrating on his putt.

When the marking devices 10 are not in use they are temporarily stored by pressing the felt-covered face of the disc against the surface of the pad 12. The pad I2, as shown in FIG. 2, is covered with a large number of small, resilient hooks 26 which releasably lock with the felt material 22 on the marker. The felt material 22 and storage pad 12 may be of the material sold under the trademark Velcro. The pad I2 typically may be 1% inches square and may be covered on its rear face with a layer 28 of pressure-sensitive adhesive material temporarily covered by a release sheet 30 so that a golfer may purchase as a combination a pad 12 with perhaps two markers 10 attached thereto. The golfer may apply the storage pad to whatever surface is most convenient for him. In the FIG. 1 embodiment, the pad 12 is applied to the visor of the cap although the pad could be applied to a variety of other surfaces such as the side of a golf bag, belt, shirt or the like.

Having thus described the invention what I claim and desire to obtain by Letters Patent of the United States I. A golf ball marker and holder, comprising in combination a. a substantially flat disc,

b. a peg extending perpendicularly from one face of said disc,

0. a stratum of fibrous felt material bonded to the other face of said disc, and,

d. a pad having a surface area greater than that of said disc mountable to a selected support surface and formed on one face thereof with a plurality of flexible, resilient hooks for detachable engagement with said fibrous material and a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive material on the other face of said pad.

2. A golf ball marker according to claim 1 wherein said disc is circular and said peg is integral therewith in the center thereof.

t l l l

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3266804 *Dec 30, 1963Aug 16, 1966Dale A CarterBowling ball including thumb hole lined with velvet pile
US3405408 *Dec 20, 1965Oct 15, 1968James H. BakerTie holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3938805 *Jul 23, 1974Feb 17, 1976Kei SakumaGolf accessory
US4017082 *Apr 29, 1975Apr 12, 1977Charles E. ChanningMeans and method for placing a golf ball position marker on a putting green and for removal thereof
US4037296 *Dec 15, 1975Jul 26, 1977The Alan White CompanyMethod and article for tufting upholstery and the like, and the resulting article of manufacture
US4159115 *Feb 2, 1978Jun 26, 1979Ticktin & Mardinger Ltd.Handle grip
US4164910 *Apr 7, 1977Aug 21, 1979Robert FeilerScore registering device
US4257607 *Jul 23, 1979Mar 24, 1981Zygmund NedwickGolf swing guides
US4381622 *Dec 29, 1980May 3, 1983Alan L. KaufmanLawn edge construction and method
US4406296 *Jan 15, 1982Sep 27, 1983Howard WexlerJewelry system
US4611355 *Nov 16, 1984Sep 16, 1986Charles GalantoConvertible patches for apparel
US4625862 *Apr 22, 1985Dec 2, 1986Gene ClaytonSupport assembly for golfing accessories
US4776043 *Nov 27, 1987Oct 11, 1988Coleman Richard EHat and logo
US4838198 *Apr 20, 1988Jun 13, 1989Knox Darryl TBook mark
US4956928 *Jan 11, 1989Sep 18, 1990David LehrmanApparatus for securing an iron to an ironing board cover
US4964508 *Oct 25, 1989Oct 23, 1990Balsley Joseph WKey cache
US5011150 *Jun 25, 1990Apr 30, 1991Averill David BGolf tee retrieving system
US5031812 *May 17, 1990Jul 16, 1991Gustine Floyd LGolf ball marker, carrying pouch and support
US5046446 *Aug 21, 1990Sep 10, 1991Sumrall Curtis EReminder device
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US5143371 *Feb 6, 1992Sep 1, 1992Strahan Ronald LGolfer's aid
US5253368 *Jul 22, 1992Oct 19, 1993Blake David ACap with erasable billboard
US5282616 *Jan 13, 1993Feb 1, 1994Stacavich Notaro Marylou IGolf ball marker
US5326612 *May 20, 1991Jul 5, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyNonwoven female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US5359733 *Aug 30, 1993Nov 1, 1994Brannon Garry APatch attachments for hats
US5407439 *Jun 1, 1994Apr 18, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layer female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US5470417 *Oct 11, 1994Nov 28, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making multi-layer female component for refastenable fastening device
US5476258 *Feb 21, 1995Dec 19, 1995Frisone; DanielGolf ball position marker with slope indicator
US5517737 *Jun 6, 1994May 21, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for continuously stretching or continuously releasing stretching forces from a web using two pairs of opposing non-planar belts
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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/406, 273/DIG.300, 128/DIG.150, 224/918, 24/450, 2/209.13, 224/181, 2/195.1, 224/901.8
International ClassificationA42B1/24, A63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2209/10, A63B57/0075, Y10S224/918, A42B1/24, Y10S273/30, Y10S128/15
European ClassificationA63B57/00M, A42B1/24