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Publication numberUS3895799 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1975
Filing dateNov 2, 1973
Priority dateAug 4, 1971
Publication numberUS 3895799 A, US 3895799A, US-A-3895799, US3895799 A, US3895799A
InventorsErik K Rinne
Original AssigneeErik K Rinne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sports game
US 3895799 A
Abstract
This disclosure is directed to a board type sports' game which comprises a game board having a window opening over which there is supported a sheet of material having suitable indicia formed thereon to simulate a playing field of a particular sport, e.g., a football field, polo field, baseball field, etc. The sheet of material is formed with a readily erasable writing surface. Operatively associated with the window opening and the simulated playing field is a light source which is energized by the players during the play of the game. Disposed between the light source and the simulated playing field is a movable member which is adjustably positioned by the respective players at will beneath the playing field. The movable member has indicia formed thereon to simulate a member of a player's team. The indicia of the movable member is normally obscured beneath the playing field sheet, but is rendered visible when the light source is energized. A writing member or stylus is provided for each player for drawing a line on the writing surface of the simulated playing field to indicate the action of the simulated sport game. The styli may be provided with points of different widths or diameters so that each is capable of making a line of different width.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Rinne July 22, 1975 SPORTS GAME [76] Inventor: Erik K. Rinne, 431 1 Bordeaux Ave., Dallas, Tex. 75205 [22] Filed: Nov. 2, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 412,426

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 168,891, Aug. 4, 1971,

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Photo Electric Football Plays, Cards and Instructions, 7/ 12/71.

Primary ExaminerPaul E. Shapiro Attorney, Agent, or FirmRichards, Harris & Medlock [5 7] ABSTRACT This disclosure is directed to a board type sports game which comprises a game board having a window opening over which there is supported a sheet of material having suitable indicia formed thereon to simulate a playing field of a particular sport, e.g., a football field, polo field, baseball field. etc. The sheet of material is formed with a readily erasable writing surface. Operatively associated with the window opening and the simulated playing field is a light source which is energized by the players during the play of the game. Disposed between the light source and the simulated playing field is a movable member which is adjustably positioned by the respective players at will beneath the playing field. The movable member has indicia formed thereon to simulate a member of a player's team. The indicia of the movable member is normally obscured beneath the playing field sheet, but is rendered visible when the light source is energized. A writing member or stylus is provided for each player for drawing a line on the writing surface of the simu lated playing field to indicate the action of the simulated sport game. The styli may be provided with points of different widths or diameters so that each is capable of making a line of different width.

8 Claims, 19 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUL 2 2 ms SHEET INVENTOR E R/ K K. R NN E BY j W ATTORNEY PATENTEnJuLzz ms 3,895,799

INVENTOR ERIK K. R/A/A E ATTORNEY PATENTEDJUL22 I975 3, 895,799

w INVENTOR ER/K K. R/NNE ATTORNEY PATENTEDJUL 22 ms SHEET INVENTOR ERIK K.R/NNE ATTORNEY SPORTS GAME This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 168,891, filed Aug. 4, 1971, now abandoned.

PROBLEM AND PRIOR ART l-Ieretofore many efforts have been made to simulate varying sports games. However most of the known game devices were developed about a particular game, e.g., football or baseball or golf and the like. Consequently the particular game device was applicable for simulating the play of only a specific game. The known games also had the disadvantage that the play of the game was primarily based on chance whereby the action was determined by the drawing of a particular card, or by some other means of chance. For these reasons the skill or ability of the respective players was for the most part obviated.

Also because the play of the known games was determined mainly by chance, much of the realism and ex citement normally associated with a given live action sport was lost.

Objects It is an object of this invention to provide a game device which can be readily adapted to simulate the play of a number of different sports, e.g., football, polo, soccer, ice hockey, baseball, basketball, etc. wherein much of the real action and excitement of the given live sport is maintained.

Another object is to provide a game device capable of simulating the live action of a given sport by the re spective player participants of the game.

Another object is to provide a game device wherein the ability of hypothetical teams in the simulation of the play of the game can be rated or handicapped in a predetermined manner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a game device in which the color, excitement, and play of a given live sporting event can be captured during the play of the game.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention is directed to a sport game capable of simulating the action and excitement of a live action sport, e.g. football, baseball, ice hockey, soccer, polo, golf, etc. The game comprises a game board having a window. formed thereon cooperatively associated with a light source, which when energized transmits light rays through the window. Supported over the window is a sheet of material having indicia means thereon to simulate the geometry of a particular sports field, e.g., the grid iron of a football game, and other indicia means to indicate the position of hypothetical players and/or obstacles common to the particular game. The sheet of material simulating the playing field is formed with a writing surface, and preferably one which can be readily erased. Associated with the simulated playing field are one or more movable members having indicia means thereon which the respective players of the game may optionally position beneath the simulated playing field. The arrangement is such that the indicia means of the movable members is normally obscured, or not rendered visible until the light source has been energized. A writing stylus is also provided for each player of the game whereby the action of the game is rendered by one of the players drawing a line on the writing surface of the simulated playing field. To provide a means for handicapping or rating the hypothetical teams, the stylus of the respective players may be provided with tips capable of drawing lines of varying widths. The arrangement is such that the wider the width of the line drawn to indicate the action of the play, the more difficult it is for the player to proceed with the 'play of the game.

The game may also comprise auxiliary means for adding additional realism to the game, e.g., a scoreboard, overhead flying aircraft, means for indicating and accounting for windage, as is frequently a factor to be considered in football and the like.

The play of the game is accomplished by the respective players alternately viewing the visible position of the indicia means on the simulated playing field which are intended to represent players and/or obstacles common to a given game, and thereafter with his eyes closed seeking to draw a line with the writing stylus on the writing surface in a manner to avoid the indicia means and/or obstacles on the playing sheet to simulate the hypothetical game action. The indicia of the movable members which are optionally adjusted or set by the respective players during the play of the game constitute hypothetical defensemen or obstacles that are normally obscured to the opposing player until the light source has been energized.

Simply by changing the sheet of material simulating the playing field, and by altering the rules of play to follow the actual rules of play pertaining to the sport identified with the particular field of play, the game device can be readily adapted to any of a number of different sports.

Features A feature of this invention resides in the provision of a game board having a window over which there is disposed any of several different simulated sports playing fields operatively associated with a light source, and optional suitable movable members disposed between the playing field and the light source so as to be rende'red visible only when the light source is energized.

Another feature resides in the provision of a sports game having a simulated playing field having a writing surface upon which the action of play is recorded by drawing a line thereon.

Another feature resides in the provision of a simulated playing field having indicia means formed thereon to represent players of a hypothetical team and/or obstacles common to the play of a particular sport.

Another feature resides in the provision of a marking stylus capable of drawing a line of predetermined width whereby a hypothetical team or player can be handicapped or rated in accordance to the ability of a known actual team or player.

Another feature of this invention resides in the provision of a sports game having a simulated playing field having indicia formed thereon to represent hypothetical players and/or obstacles common to the play of the game.

Another feature of this invention resides in the provision of a sports type game having a movable member having indicia formed thereon to represent hypothetical players which can be randomly positioned by one player and which are normally obscured to the other player and which indicia include a plurality of optionally determinable peripheral limits.

Other features and advantages will become more readily apparent when considered in view of the drawings and specification in which:

FIG. 1 isa perspective view illustrating the sports game board embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of the game board of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a detail plan view of a sheet of material simulating a sports field, as for example, a football grid iron.

FIG. 4 illustrates a plurality of writing styli adapted for use with the game board of FIGS. 1 through 3.

FIG. 5 is a card illustrating relative ratings of actual known teams.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a movable member.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a dice which may be used as a chance means to determine certain plays during the play of the game.

FIG. 8 illustrates a series of windage yardsticks adapted for use with the game board.

FIG. 9 illustrates a kicking block arrangement adapted for use during the play of a football game.

' FIG. 10 is a plan view of a game sheet to be used for effecting the play of the game Polo.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a game sheet simulating the playing field for soccer.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of a playing field for simulating the game of basketball.

'FIG. 13 is a plan view of a game sheet simulating a tennis court for effecting the play of tennis.

FIG. 14 is a simulated playing field for effecting the playing of the game baseball.

FIG. 15 is a simulated playing field for simulating the game of hockey.

FIG. 16 is a simulated green for simulating the play of golf.

"FIG. 17 is a simulated ski slope for simulating a skiing game. I

FIG. 18 is a view of a yard stick'for use in the golf game of FIG. 16.

Referring to the drawings there is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 a sports game 30 embodying the present invention. The sports-game '30 comprises essentially a rigid game board 31 having formed therein a window opening 32 having'suitable means for supporting therein a window 33 that is translucent to light. A light source 34 is suitably connected to the undersurfaceof the game board 31 so that when energized the light rays will be transmitted through the translucent. window 33. It will beunderstood that the-window 33 may be formed of any suitable translucent rigid material, as for example, glass, plastic'and the like. The light 34 is suitably wired in circuit with a light switch 35 so that the light can be energized and d'e-energized at the will of the respective players upon actuation of the connected switch means. While the light means 34 may be'electrically connected toa cord adapted to plug into ordinary household current, it is preferred that a battery source 36 of electric energy be wired in circuit with the light source 34 and switch 35 so as to render the game device and entirely self-contained unit. Suitable bracket means 37 are connected to the under surface of the game board for retaining the battery 36.

A sheet of material 38 having indicia formed thereon, simulating a sports playing field is disposed in overlying relationshipto the window 33. It will be understood that the indicia means formed on the sheet material 38 may be formed so as to simulate in miniature the specific geometric configuration of a given sports arena or field, as for example, football, baseball, soccer, etc.

As best seen in FIG. 3, the sheet material 38 includes indicia means defining the geometry of a football field having transversely extending yard stripes 39 to define the gridiron portion of a football field. The sheet material 38 also has formed thereon indicia to define the respective end zones and opposing goal posts G. As best seen in FIG. 3 the sheet material includes other indicia means in the form of short lines 40 which are spaced over the sheet material at predetermined intervals between the respective yard stripes 39 as indicated thereon. The line indicia means 40 are intended to represent defensive players, as for example, would-be tacklers and/or other obstacles encountered during the play of the game.

Other indicia means 41 are formed on the grid iron portion of the field to represent other types of players. As best seen in FIG. 3, indicia means 41 are represented as squares or rectangles having differently colored portions 41A, 41B which are intended to indicate offensive and/or defensive players. As for example, as best seen in FIG. 3 a major portion 41A of the indicia means 41 may be colored one color, as for example, green and the minor portion 41B thereof may be indicated by another color means, as for example, orange. During the play of the game, as will be hereinafter described, the major portion 41A of the indicia means 41, that is the green colored portion thereof, is intended to represent an offensive player and the minor portion, or the orange portion, is intended to represent a defensive player. Also on the playing field illustrated in FIG. 3 are other indicia means in the form of yellow bars 42, some of which are provided with a green dot 428 whereas some of the others are not provided with a green dot. As will be hereinafter described a yellow bar 42, with or without a green dot, represents a fumble, during the play of the game, and the recovery of which will be determined by chance, as for example, the throwing of an odd oreven number on a die. A portion of the broken line symbols 40 are also provided with a green dot for reasons to be hereinafter explained, as indicated at 40A.

Other indicia means are provided on the simulated playing field in the form of pointed bars 45, for example, to indicate a penalty. Accordingly, during the play of the game whenever an action crosses a penalty bar 45, one or the other of the players of the game is penalized according to a chance determination as may be determined by the throw of the dice or die 43. The penalty is determined in accordance with a penalty chart which may be located on a scoreboard 46 which is detachably connected to the game board 31.

The goal post area of the simulated grid iron field of FIG. 3 is also defined by indicia in the form of a square G.

During the play of the game, the game sheet38, e.g., the simulated grid iron of FIG. 3, is arranged so as to be disposed in overlying position to the window 33 of the game board. Along a marginal portion of the simulated playing field 38 there is provided a ten-yard marker or slide 64 which comprises of a reversely bent member so as to be slidably disposed along side the edge of the sheet material. Thus the marker 64 can be readily moved with the movement of play up and down the gird iron during the play of the game, as will be hereinafter described.

rfC ooperatively associated with the game board 31 and fthegamesheet 38 disposed over the window are one or more movable members 47 which may be randomly positioned by there'spective players, during the play of the game. As best'seenin FIGS. 1 and 6 the respective movable members 47 comprise a disk, or the like. It may be suitably connected to the game board about a pivot 48 which can be slidably disposed in a longitudinally extending slot 49 formed on the game board 31. However, it may be preferred simply to rest the movable member on the game board. Formed on the movable member 47 is an indicia 50 to represent a hypothetical player, which can be positioned or pre-set by one of the players of the game anywhere along or on the playing field, by effecting relative rotation and/or longitudinal displacement of the disk 47 along the game board. Preferably the member or disk 47 is made of translucent plastic material with the indicia means 50 suitably marked in a dark color thereon. In the illustrated embodiment the indicia means is defined by a plurality of concentric peripheral limits 50A, 50B, 50C for reasons hereinafter defined. As seen in FIG. 1 the movable member 47 is mounted for longitudinal movement along a slot 49 formed on the game board. The slots 49 are disposed on each side of the game board thereby permitting the respective movable members 47 to be adjustably disposed therealong. It will be noted that the respective movable members 47 are eccentrica lly pivoted in the respective guide slots 49 which permit the indicia means 50 thereon to be superimposed if so desired by a player. Thus by effecting compound longitudinal and rotational movement, the indicia means 50 on members 47 can be located anywhere along the simulated playing field within the radius of movements provided therefor.

As best seen in FIG. 6 the indicia means 50 on each of the movable members 47 have a plurality of predetermined peripheral limits 50A-50C which during the play of the game enables the hypothetical team of the respective players to be rated accordingly. The disk members 47 and the indicia 50 thereon are disposed so as to be located between the light source or window and the undersurface of the simulated playing field 38. The arrangement is such that the playing field sheet 38 will normally obscure the position of the indicia means 50 formed on the movable member. The movable members 47 are generally controlled or positioned'by the player controlling the team in defense. Consequently, as will be hereinafter described, the player controlling the offensive team, e.g.-'in football, will not be aware of the precise positioning of the movable indi cia means 47 until the light source is energized. The arrangement is such that when the light source'34 is energized, the light rays emanating through the window will render the position of the indices 50 of the movable member 47 readily visible through the playing field 38; at which time the presence or position of the respective indicia means 50 is made known to the respective players.

A plurality of writing styli 51, 52, 53 are provided for recording the action of play during the progress of the game. As best seen in FIG. 4 three writing styli 51, 52, 53 are provided. Each writing stylus is provided with a point 51A, 52A, and 53A having a width or diameter capable of making or drawing lines of different widths.

For example, stylus 51 is constructed so as to draw a very fine line 518. Stylus 52 is provided with a writing point for drawing a line of intermediate width 528; and stylus 53 is provided with a writing point 53A for drawing a wide width line 538. The varying line widths of the respective styli 51-53 provide a means whereby a theoretical team of one of the players may be rated rel ative to the hypothetical team of the other player. For example, reference is made to a rating chart of FIG. 5. As shown therein the theoretical teams listed have been offensively and defensively rated. Hypothetically, however, it will be noted that the ratings may be made in accordance to how an actual team is rated by the experts in a given season. For example, as indicated in FIG. 5, the Boston Professional Football Team may have an offensive rating of B and a defensive rating of C. Consequently a player utilizing Boston as his hypothetical team would use the stylus 52 capable of making an intermediate line to simulate the offensive rating of B, while utilizing the smallest periphery 50C of the movable indicia means 50 of the movable member 47 which represents a C rated defense.

Buffalo, for example, according to the rating chart of FIG. 5 has been rated with a C offense and a B defense. Accordingly, a player utilizing Buffalo as a hypothetical team will operate with stylus 53 writing the wide line and utilizing the middle periphery 50B of indicia means of the movable member. Houston, which has been given a C offensive rating and an A defensive rating would be determined by the stylus 53 and the maximum periphery 50A of indicia 50.

To additional realism during the play of the game a scoreboard means connected to the game board to indicate score and/or other information related to the play of a given game, may be manually or electrically operated. For example, the scoreboard 46 is provided with a series of window openings 46A to indicate the score of the respective teams, and also a simulated clock 54 to indicate the time during each quarter of play.

Rotatably journalled adjacent each of the windows is a dial member 55 containing the numerals l to 9 whereby by effecting the setting of the respective ,dial 55 the appropriate score may be noted through'the respective windows as each score is made. While the dials 55' may be manually operated, it will be understood that the respective dials 55 may be electrically actuated so that by energizing an appropriate switch a suitable electrically operated actuator, as for example, a solenoid, may be utilized to advance the dial the appropriateincrements to indicate the score and/or time.

For added amusement a means may be provided for taking into consideration wind conditions during the play of the game. This means may be indicated by a flag symbol 56 which may be connected to the top of the scoreboard 46 where the direction in which the flag unfurls indicates the direction in which the wind is blowing. For example three wind conditions can be provided for. For example the play of the game can go with the wind, go against the wind, or be without wind. As will be hereinafter described the wind condition is determined by a chance means, as for example, by the throw of die 43. For example, if a player throws a one or two on the die 43, the player is playing into a 15 mile an hour wind. If the player throws a three or four on the die 43, he is playing with no wind. If a player throws a five and six on the die he is playing with a 15 mile an hour wind. The flag indicator 56 may be directed accordingly.

To determine the movement of the ball over the field during the play of the game, complementary yard sticks are provided to be used in accordance with the respective wind conditions as determined by the throw of the dice. Thus as indicated in FIG. 8, three different yard sticks 57, 58, 59 are provided, each being calibrated in accordance with the predetermined wind conditions as established by the throw of the dice by one of the players. For example, as indicated on the respective yard sticks of FIG. 8 a maximum distance for a pass or kick with no wind is determined at 50 yards. A maximum kick or pass into the wind is determined at 40 yards and a maximum pass or kick with the wind is determined at 65. yards. However, it will be understood that the respective sticks are calibrated so as to simulate those experiences actually encountered in a live action game.

Also for added amusement, markers in the form of pennants 60 may be provided with the names of the varying teams. During the play of the game a player may select a desired team marker which is then attached to the end zone to indicate a particular players team. 'f

For added amusement an aircraft in the form of an airship 62, as for example, the Goodyear Blimp, which is commonly seen over such sporting events, may be connected to a bracket 61 detachably secured to the game board 31 to simulate this scene common to sports fans.

With the game board thus described and illustrated, the game of football may now be played wherein all of the basic rules of football are made to apply. That is, each team is permitted four downs in an effort to make the requisite tenyards for gaining a first down. The tenyard marker 46, slidably disposed along the edge of the playing field is utilized to measure each such ten-yard advance-for a first down; Also the respective players may change end zones at the end of each quarter so as to have the advantage or disadvantage of the theoretical wind conditions as was determined on the initiation of the play of'the game.

The play of the game is attained by the player in possession of the ball using the prescribed stylus 51, 52 or 53 to indicate the ball movement up and down the field. The play of the'game, after all preliminaries have been ascertained, is initiated by the player in position of the defense setting his movable members 47 to a desired position which is obscured to the player in the position of offense. On each play, the player on offense uses the stylus complementing his offensive rating to record the movements of the ball up and down the field. Play is begun by the player in offense studying and/or attempting to memorize all the indicia on the playing field 38 for a predetermined interval of time.,as.

"magnifying glass may be provided.

Accordingly, the next play is run from the spot of the tackle, fumble, foul or penalty, except that if the tackle for example, ten seconds. The player then in possession V of the ball, closes his eyes, and with the point of the stylus at the point of the ball, attempts to draw a line on the erasable surface of the playing field 38 with his eyes closed in a manner to avoid crossing or coming in contact with indices or obstacles, e.g., 40, 41, 42, 45. In effect the player, in possession of the ball, is simulating the running of the ball by drawing the appropriate line and in doing so attempting to avoid contacting the objects on the field with his eyes closed..,During the play, his opponent, or the other player, will advise him when the drawn line has made contact with a given obis made too close to the marginal edge of the field, the ball is moved inwardly from the sidelines a predetermined distance, as in an actual live game.

If the offensive player runs into a yellow bar 42, with or without a green dot, a fumble is indicated. Accordingly, a fumble chart is referred to, to indicate whether or not the ball is lost or retained. If desired, the fumble chart may be indicated on the scoreboard 46 and is determined by a chance means, as for example, the throw of the dice.

If the ofensive player runs through the green penalty indicia 45, a tackle as well as a penalty is indicated. Accordingly, to determine the penalty, reference is made to a penalty chart, which may be indicated on the scoreboard, which is also determined by chance, as for example, by the throw of a die or dice 43.

Thus it will be apparent that the various indicia means indicated on the playing field may simulate a tackle or termination of a play in the-event the offensive player draws a line therethrough which may or may not be coupled with other possibilities, as for example, a penalty, fumble or the like.

According to the rules of play, once a player hassatisfactorily drawn a line more than 15 yards from scrimmage without running into any of the indicia means on the field 38, all of the objects downfield therefrom which are color-coded green, can be disregardedlas' objects as he continues to draw the line. The logic of this is that once the offensive player advances a predeter mined distance, as for example, 15 yards, he is entitled to an.open field run to simulate a long gain which is made possible by having certain obstacles, namely those having green therein, being disregarded. Thus the offensive player is permitted to continue drawing his line until such time that he comes in contact with an indicia means which does not contain green. Accordingly'fthe'playe'r continues his offensive movement-of the ball until such time that he either makes a touchdown or is forced to give over the ball in accordance with the rules of football.

The game also provides for advancing the ball by passing. To pass, the rules provided that the simulated quarterback, namely the person with the stylus, must first retreat at least fiveyards by running the stylus with his eyes closed before simulating a pass or throw. A pass or throw is accomplished by the player lifting the stylus off the playing sheet with his eyes closed and advancing the stylus in air to a point downfield on the playing field 38, and attemptingto land the point of the stylus within one of the downfield colored squares 41. Failing to hit a colored square with the stylus tip indicates an incomplete pass in which case the ball is brought back to the line of scrimmage. If the players stylus lands anywhere on the green portion of the square 41A a completed pass is indicated. In the event a player completes such a pass he may attempt a run by continuing to draw a line'with his eyes closed until an obstacle is met. If the point of the stylus lands on the orange portion 41B of the square 41, an interception is indicated.

It is noted that on each play the player in possession of the ball studies the playing sheet 38 for a predetermined period of time to ascertain as best he can the location of the various obstacles on the playing field. Thereafter, with his eyes closed he attempts to advance the ball indicated by drawing a line and/or by passing as described.

If the defensive player feels that the offensive player has moved his stylus in contact with the preset indicia means 50 of the movable member 47, the defensive player energizes the light switch to determine whether or not the offensive player actually has made contact with the indicia means 50 of the movable member. When the light is energized, the position of the obscured indicia means 50 can be readily noted. If contact had been made with indicia 50, the play is terminated at that point. If not the play is continued.

Upon every interception of a pass as herein described, the intercepting player is pennitted to attempt a runback. According to a given set of rules, the player making the return may run through any part of the square in which the interception had occurred whereupon the green coded indicia means on the field drops out after yards. However, as in live football the player making the interception can have the option to bat the ball down rather than intercept it, as for example, after a fourth down play.

To set up the defense, the player on defense energizes the light source and is given a predetermined amount of time to set his movable indicia means 50, in an effort to anticipate his opponents next play depending on the situation at hand. Therefore before each play, the player on defense is given a predetermined time interval, as for example, 10 seconds to effect the setting of his moveable defensemen, while the opposing player looks away. After indicia 50 have been set, the defense player then turns off the light. The offensive player then studies the field for a predetermined period of time, and with his eyes closed attempts to run his play. If the defense player thinks that one of his movable defense indicia 50 has successfully stopped the play, he turns the light on so that both players may see the result.

If on a pass play a pass lands touching one of the obscured defensemen then it is considered an interception at the option of the defense player.

A force fumble may be simulated by having the of fensive player run into the two obscured indicia means 50 which have been overlapped by the defensive player. The recovery or loss of a fumble is determined by chance means as hereinbefore indicated.

To simulate a field goal, the player in possession of the ball studies the goal post, then closes his eyes, lifts his marking pen up in the air from the point of play and tries to land in, or to touch the simulated goal post indices G on the playing field. The field goal is considered blocked if the pen touches the portion within the goal post block marked B. Since it would not be practical in live football to attempt a field goal from beyond the 50- yard line, the rules of the game provide that no field goal attempt shall be made beyond the 50-yard line or if college teams are being utilized as the hypothetical teams, 40 yards. All missed field goals will be brought out to the opposing players -yard line, wherein the opposing player takes over the ball.

At the start of the game a determination is made as to which player is to kick off. As in actual football this may be determined by a flip of a coin or by some other chance means. To effect a kick off, the player whose team is to kick places the pen in the middle of his own 40-yard line. He studies the field, then closes his eyes and lifts the pen and brings it down somewhere downfield. According to the rules, a kick off may not go out of bounds or more than -yards downfield, otherwise the kicking team must back up 5 -yards and kick again. Depending on the wind conditions as indicated by chance, the appropriate yardstick illustrated in FIG. 8 is utilized for determining the maximum distance allowed in accordance with theoretical wind conditions.

Every inbound kick-off, as in actual football, is entitled to a return by the offensive player by drawing of an appropriate line on the sheet 38, and on the return all objects with the green in them drop out automatically. Thus to effectively stop a return, the player moving the ball downfield continues until he is stopped by an obstacle otherthan one colored green.

In the event of a punt the player with the ball again studies the field, closes his eyes, lifts the pen and brings it down somewhere downfield as in a kick-off.

A punt is considered blocked if it travels more than 50 -yards downfield. A quick kick, as in actual football, may be made on a third down or less. However, it is considered blocked if it travels more than 65 yards downfield, as measured by the appropriate yardsticks 57, 58, 59.

An out of bounds punt or quick kick does not get a return, as in actual football. Thus the player receiving the ball commences his play with a first down at the point where the ball crossed out of bounds in the air. In every inbounds punt or quick kick, a return is permitted, at which time all the greens will drop out after 15 -yards.

When a player is tackled or chooses to down the ball in his own end zone rather than return it out of the end zone, such as after a kick-off, punt or end zone interception, a touchback is indicated. When this occurs, the ball is brought out to the twenty yard. line directly in line with the spot in the endzone where the ball landed. y

A safety occurs when a player is tackled in his own end zone. Then, as in actual football, after each safety the team which gave up the safety kicks off to the opposing team from its own twenty yard line.

Extra points can be effected in the manner herein described, either by passing,.running or kicking, as in actual football.

Thus with the game device described it will be noted that all the rules applicable to live football can be applied to the game device herein described.

It will be understood that the marks drawn on the playing field by the stylus by the respective players to indicate the movement of the ball maybe erased after each series of downs or as required by the players. Thus, for each series of play, a graphic record of each series is made on the playing sheet 38. The game construction thus provides a game in which the excitement and realism of a live football game is retained; and wherein the game can be played in accordance with the actual rules of the game.

While the described game is particularly constructed so as to effect the simulation and realism of a live football game, it will be understood that the rules may be varied so as to accommodate any actual rule changes which may be made in the actual game and/or as may be desired to be changed by the players respectfully. If desired, audible signals may be provided to determine the time interval in which a player may view the playing field before effecting the start of a play. As shown in FIG. 1 such audible timer 61 is connected to the board. The timer 61 is set to sound an alarm a lapse of a predetermined time interval.

To adapt the gameboard of FIGS. 1 and 2 as herein described, to the play of another sports game, as for example, polo, all that is required is to substitute a simulated polo playing field 65 of FIG. for the football field 38 of FIG. 3. As seen in FIG. 10 the simulated polo field comprises a sheet of material having a suitable erasable writing surface 66 thereon. The simulated polo field 65 is provided with a series of indicia means 67, 68, 69 in the form of circles, and bars to indicate obstructions and/or penalties.

In the case of polo the movable members 47A are located adjacent the opposed ends of the field 65 wherein the indicia means 70 formed thereon are utilized as opposing goalies, which are rendered visible only when the light source 34 is energized.

The rules of play of the simulated polo game will conform to the rules of play of the actual game. That is,

eight 7 and 1/2 minute periods are provided with no clock stoppings. During the play of the game of polo by the gaming device herein described, the light source remains off throughout most of the game. Each player is provided with a marking stylus, e.g., 51, 52 or 53 in accordance with the rating of the particular theoretical team which each of the players is controlling. Opening face-off is effected by chance, that is, by shaking the die and determining who gets possession of the ball in the middle of the field. The player in possession of the ball studies the field for a predetermined number of seconds, then closes his eyes and either dribbles or passes the ball from the spot forward toward his opponents goal. Dribbling the ball is attained by a player drawing a squigly line with his stylus until he hits an object whereupon he loses the ball to his opposing player. The player then receiving the ball places his writing stylus at the point where the first player had lost the ball whereupon he studies the field for a predetermined number of seconds, thereafter closing his eyes as he either dribbles or passes the ball from that spot onward. At any time as a player in possession of the ball is dribbling, he may effect a pass. To effect such a pass, the player in possession of the ball stops his stylus, opens his eyes and studies the field for a predetermined number of seconds whereupon he then closes his eyes and guides the stylus point toward one of the circle indicia 67. If the player positions the point of his pen in the circle indicia, a completed pass is indicated, from whence he may continue to dribble or pass with his eyes closed. If he misses the circle indicia 67 in attempting the pass, the pass is deemed incomplete and his opponent takes over the ball from that point onward.

If a player, in dribbling a ball coincides with a penalty marker, then the player is required to determine the penalty by chance, as for example by the throw of the die 43.

When a player is in his opponents half of the field, he may attempt to make a goal shot. This is attained by sliding his stylus with his eyes closed across the field and between the goal posts located at his opponents end of the field. In the event that he is successful in directing his shot between the goal posts, his opponent attempts to block the shot by adjusting the position of his goalie indicia with the light 34 off. Once the defending player has adjusted his goalie indicia by positioning the same, the light is turned on to see if any part of the shot touches any part of the goalie indicia. If this occurs then the shot is blocked and the defending team take the ball over at this point. If the line drawn by the stylus does not contact the goalie indicia 70, a goal is scored. If desired the field may be erased after all out of bounds plays and/or goal shots. As seen in FIGS. 1 opposed slots 47A, 49A may be provided in the end zone of the board for accommodating the movable member 47A for those games having a goalie indicia as in polo, hockey, etc.

FIGS. 11 and 15 illustrate a simulated playing field 73, 74 for effecting the games of soccer or ice hockey. Essentially each of these fields is substantially similar to that of the polo field 65 described. That is, both the soccer field and hockey field 73 and 74 have opposite indicia thereon to simulate opposing obstacles, penalties and the like common to the game. The play of the game of soccer or hockey is simulated in the same manner described with respect to the game of polo, except that the actual rules as applied to live hockey and soccer are rendered applicable to the play of ice hockey and soccer games. As in polo the movable members 47B, 47C for soccer and ice hockey are also located adjacent the opposed end portions of the playing field, and the indicia thereon functioning as a goalie. In operation, the games of soccer and hockey are played similar to that of polo, as described.

Accordingly, the respective teams can be rated in the same manner in which the football teams were rated. That is, by provided styli 51, 52, 53 capable of making lines with different sized thickness and/or by providing goalie indices on the movable members of different size of proportions and/or having several optional predetermined limits, a prospective teams offense and/or defense can be rated accordingly.

It will be noted that as in the game of football or polo the player utilizing the stylus capable of drawing the finest line, e.g. line 51B, the greater becomes the probability of avoiding an obstacle, thereby enabling the player to attain larger gains. Thus a better offense is likely. A player utilizing a stylus 53 capable of making a wide line will be handicappted accordingly as his probability of intersecting an obstacle is increased accordingly.

FIG. 12 illustrates a playing field arrangement adapted for use with the game board of FIG. 1 to effect the play of a basketball game. In this arrangement the playing field 80 is provided with indicia means simulating the outline of a basketball court, and having other indicia means 81, 82, 83 thereon to define simulated players and penalties. Operatively associated with the basketball field 80 are a pair of movable members 84, 85, each having formed thereon an indicia means 84A, 85A to represent additional defensive players which may be randomly positioned. As described, indicia 84A, 85A are disposed beneath the field 80 and are normally obscured except when the light 34 is energized. I

As shown in FIG. 12 the circular indicia 81 represents offensive players whereas the dash lines 82 represent defensive players. The movable indicia means 84A, 85A of the movable members 84, 85 represent moving defensive men. The wide bars 83 indicate a penalty or foul.

To effect play of the game of basket ball with the field exhibited by FIG. 12, it will be understood that the field representing the basketball court is disposed over the window of the game board. The movable members 84, 85 are pivotally connected within the side slots 49. The game of basketball is commenced by indicating by chance, which player gains possession of the ball on the opening jump. Assuming that a player has gained possession of the ball, the light source 34 of the game board is turned on permitting the other play to set his two movable defensemen at any simulated position on the court while the player having control of the ball looks away. Thereafter with the light turned off, the player in control of the ball commences the play by positioning his stylus at the center of the court and studying the court for a predetermined period of time, for example two seconds. After the player with the ball has studied the game board, he closes his eyes and either shoots, passes or dribbles the imaginary ball down the court. To effect a dribble the player draws a line with his stylus in a manner to avoid any of the indicia means on the field 80. If he hits an object the rules provide that he loses control of the ball to his opponent. After the simulated ball is turned over or lost to the opponent, the player gaining control of the ball looks away for 6 seconds, while the player who lost the ball sets up his defense by turning on the light 34 and adjusting his two defensive indicia means 84A, 85A. The light is then turned off and the procedure is resumed by the player now in possession of the ball. If at any time a defensive player feels his movable defensive men, indicia 84A, 85A, have intercepted, the light is energized.

Passing may be effected by either player in control of the ball by lifting the stylus and attempting to land in, or touch one of the circles indicia 81. If a player succeeds in lifting the stylus from the point of play on the board and lands the point in one of the indicia circles 81, a completed pass is indicated. If he fails to drop the point of the stylus in one of the circles indicia 81, the pass is deemed intercepted. If the pass is completed, the player in possession of the ball may either dribble, pass or shoot from that point to another point with his eyes closed. Accordingly, the play of the game continues until the player has lost control of the ball.

If a player dribbles or passes into a penalty indicia 83, the penalty is determined by a throw of a dice or other chance means in accordance with a predetermined penalty chart. In the event the penalty turns up to be a free throw, the free throw is effected by the player positioning his stylus anywhere along the free throw line 85, whereupon he then studies the basket 86 for as long as he wants. The player then closes his eyes, lifts the point of the stylus off the board and tries to land or touch the basket 86. If the player succeeds in scoring the free throw, he is given one point.

A field goal may be effected at any time by the player in possession of the ball. This is attained by studying the appropriate basket for a predetermined period of time, as for example, two seconds, then closing his eyes and lifting the stylus from the position on the playing field in an effort to land the point in the basket 86.

After a missed free throw or field goal, the defense may try a rebound. This is attained by turning on the light 34 to see where the movable indicia 84A, 85A are,

turning the light off, and then rotating or setting the defense indicia 84A, 85A to a position the player feels is beneath the point of the stylus. To determine whether or not a rebound has been made the light 34 is turned on to determine whether or not the indicia 84A, 85A covers the point made by the tip of the stylus. If the indicia means 84A, 85A are touching the simulated ball position, the defense takes over possession of the ball and may either dribble, pass or shoot as herein described. If the defensemen miss, then the offense has rebounded and may either dribble, pass or shoot as the case may be. If a player dribbles into the present indicia 84A, 85A, or if a pass lands touching the indicia, control of the ball is given up to the other player.

After each basket, out of bounds, or penalty, the surface of the playing field may be erased. Accordingly the game continues for the predetermined period set for the play of the game.

FIG. 14 indicates a field of play simulating a baseball diamond so that the principle of the game disclosed may be utilized for effecting the play of baseball. As shown in FIG. 14 the sheet material 90 is provided with an outline of a baseball diamond thereon including the outfield. Operatively associated with the baseball diamond is a movable member 91 having indicia means 92 located thereon to simulate a defensive player. In the illustrated embodiment the defensive player is illustrated as a glove 92A having a series of concentric rings 93 circumscribing the glove 92A. The arrangement is such that the glove 92A and the concentric rings 93 circumscribing the glove are utilized to determine a teams defensive rating. For example, a better rated defensive team, as for example a pennant winning team, would use the maximum or largest defensive area, whereas a poor defensive team would be limited to the smallest defensive area of the defensive indicia means. Likewise, as described, a better rated offensive team would use a writing stylus with the most narrow tip.

In effecting the play of baseball, the game is intiated by the player taking the field, setting the position of the movable defenseman 92, as the player at'bat looks away. It will be understood that the movable defense player 92 is set with the light on, and that the movable member 91 is suitably mounted for movement relative to the game board 31. The light is then turned off so that the player at bat is not aware of the location of the defense indicia 92. The offensive player by a chance means, eg. a spinner 94, as indicated in FIG. 14A, determines whether or not the batter has struck out, walked, fouled out, hit a grounder, hit a fly etc. If the chance means 94 indicates that the player has hit a grounder the offesnive player then places the pen at the home plate, closes his eyes and draws a line through any part of the infield. The defensive player then moves the movable member 91 to position the indicia 92 thereon in line with the line drawn by the other player. The movable member 91 is moved with the light off until the player feels the indicia 92 is touching the line drawn by the offensive player. To determine whether or not the defensive indicia 92 intercepts the line drawn by the offensive player, the light is turned on. If the glove or any part of the appropriate concentric circle 93 is touching any part of the line inside the infield, as for example, at C, the determination is that the defensive player has scooped up the ball, and may now attempt to throw the runner out by placing his stylus at the spot where the glove touched the line and closing his eyes, lifting the stylus and trying to land the ball in the black circle around first base. If he succeeds in landing in or touching the circle, the batter is indicated out. If the fielding player fails to hit the circle around first base, the indication is that the batter has succeeded in reaching first.

In the event that the offensive player has men on base then of course the fielding player would have the option to throw to the appropriate base to attempt the forced out.

In the event that the spinner 94 indicates that the of fensive player has hit a fly ball, the offensive player then places the pen at the home plate, closes his eyes and lifts the pen to bring it down somewhere in the outfield. if it lands in the home run band 95 then the offensive player is given a homerun. If it lands beyond this band, it is deemed a fly out. If it lands before the band, the defensive player may attempt to catch it by moving the defensive sheet 91 with the light off until he thinks the glove indicia 92A is touching the point at which the stylus landed. To determine contact the light 34 is energized. If the indicia 92A is beneath the point it is an indication of a caught fly. If not, but the dot winds up touching one or more of the concentric circles around the glove, the number of bases is determined by whether or not the dot is within the first, second or third concentric circle. If the dot falls beyond the outer concentric circle, the hit is deemed to be an in side the park home run. It will be readily apparent that with the structure thus described, the players can effect the play of the game which closely follows the action of live baseball.

FIG. 16 indicates a game sheet 96 which may be utilized with the game board 31 to simulate the play of golf. It will be understood that a plurality of game sheets 96 may be provided, each representing a different hole to be played. Thus each sheet will designate or represent a different hole or tee.

The movable member 97 associated with the golf sheet 96 has formed thereon indicia means 98 to represent the cup. The movable member 97 is thus located adjacent the green portion 99 located at the end of a fairway 100. The movable member 97 thus enables the cup 98 to be variously located on the green. The sheet 96 is also provided with other indicia means to simulate various obstacles associated with golf, e.g., sand traps, brooks, trees, roughs, etc. The procedure is to have a player position the cup 98, with the light on, at a particular spot on the green. In the play of the game a determination is made as to which player shoots first. This can be determined by chance. The player then shooting places his writing stylus, accoring to his handicap, on the tee indicated at 1. The player then studies the fairway for a period of time, closes his eyes and lifts the point of the stylus off the sheet and lands it somewhere down the fairway. All shots from the rough or fairway are called drives. If a drive goes more than 250 yards, as measured by an associated yardstick 101 (FIG. 18), which is calibrated to game scale, the drive is counted as two strokes. If a shot lands in a water hazard, as for example, a brook, as indicated at 102, it counts as a double stroke. Thus the next shot must be taken from the near side of the water hazard. If a shot lands in or touching a tree or other obstacle as indicated at 103 it is considered to be a bad lie, and the next shot must be made with the opposite hand. If a shot lands inside or touching the black circle 103A around the simulated trees, the player on his next shot may not shoot over this tree. Accordingly, the next shot must be made with a straight line between the point where the stylus left the ground to the point where the pen landed. If a shot goes to the sandtrap as indicated at 104, a chance means, as for example a die 43, is utilized to determine the number of strokes required to advance from the trap 104. The number showing on the roll of the die thus indicates the number of strokes a player is required to take to get out of the trap. With the number of strokes determined, the player then shoots out of the trap in the same way he effected the drive, except that in the case of a trap shot, the ball can not travel more than thirty yards as measured by the yardstick 101. If it exceeds thirty yards as measured by the yardstick, the shot counts as a double stroke.

A player is not entitled to putt until he is able to locate his ball actually on the green. To putt, a player studies the cup as long as he wants with the light on, then closes his eyes and draws a line with his stylus to the vicinity of the cup. If any part of the line touches the cup the ball is considered as dropping in. if not, he must putt again from where he ended the line of the previous putt and continue putting until the ball is sunk. The total number of strokes taken are then added, and the total determines the score for a particular hole. The action is repeated for each of the different hole sheets 96.

' If desired, the concept described may also be applied to effecting the play of tennis. This is attained by having a game sheet having indicia means thereon to define the boundaries of a tennis court 111. The movable members 112 and 113 contain an indicia means in the form of a silhouette player 114 having outstretched racket as indicated at 115, 116. lf four players are intended to play the game, an extra movable member is located at each end of the court, and each such member 112 and 113 is rendered separably movable.

In the play of this game, the light 34 is left on throughout the game so that the position of the movable indicia means 115, 116 can at all times be noted.

The play of the game generally follows the following rules. The party or player serving is determined by chance. To begin the play of the game, the party serving locates his appropriate stylus behind the base line as indicated at A. He then studies the court for a predetermined period of time and with his eyes closed, lifts the marking stylus off the sheet and tries to land in the opposite forecourt of the opposing player. The opponent then studies the court for a given interval of time; closes his eyes and moves the defense or movable sheet 112 until he feels that one of his rackets 115, 116 is touching the point where the stylus of the opposing player landed. The player then holds the movable member 112 steady, and opens his eyes. If either one of the rackets 115 or 116 is touching the dot, it is an indication that he is able to return the serve. If neither of the rackets indicia 115, 116 is touching the dot, the player failed to return the serve and the point is scored against him.

If he did successfully return the serve, the returning player places his stylus on the dot and studies his opponents or servers court for a period of time. The player then closes his eyes and lifts the stylus off the sheet 1 10 and tries to land on his opponents side of the net. If the shot fails to land on his opponents side of the net, or goes out of bounds or touches the net, a point is scored for the opponent. If the return shot lands on the opponents side of the net, the opponent then goes through the same procedure by attempting to place his defensive indicia 115, 116 in a position, with his eyes closed, to locate the rackets of his defensive indicia on the point his oppoents stylus landed to effect the return volley. Accordingly the volley continues until someone fails to either reach the ball or hits it out of bounds etc. The standard rules of scoring tennis are applied.

FIG. 17 illustrates a game sheet 120 for simulating a ski-type game. As shown, the sheet 120 is provided with a series of simulated ski trails 123 of varying shapes wherein the respective trails widen and narrow as they descend from a summit 121. At the bottom of the sheet 120, is a finish line 122 which the respective trails cross.

The sheet also includes a plurality of indicia means simulating various obstacles 124 which one may encounter in skiing, e.g., trees, stumps, mounds, divets, ice patches etc. Also the sides of some of the trails may define cliff areas as indicated at 125.

Operatively associated with the ski sheet 120 is a movable member 127 having an indicia thereon simulating a hazard such as a bear trap 128 or other type of hazard. It will be understood that the movable member is pivotally mounted to the game board 31 in any of the respective slots 47, 49 or 47A, 49A, so that a player may randomly position the indicia hazard 128 on any of the ski trails.

In the play of the game, a player presets the indicia means of the rotary member 127 on any of the ski trails. The player making the ski run the places his stylus, of appropriate rating, at the summit 121. With the light off, the player studies the ski slope with his eyes open for a period of time. Then with his eyes closed the player draws a line with his stylus down any of the ski trails in an effort to cross the finish line 122 at the bottom of the sheet. It will be noted that the player can follow any of the trails, some trails being more narrow than others, function being to slow the player down as more care will be needed to draw the line within the boundary of such narrow trails. Also the narrow portions of the trail are arranged to define the shortest distance downhill. The wider trails twist more, and are thus longer.

The game is played by timing with a stop watch the time it takes a player to negotiate a trail. For every obstacle hit by a player on his way down a trail, a predetermined time interval, e.g., five seconds, is added to his given time. For example if a player travels from the summit to the finish line in 60 seconds, and hits two trees on his way down, his time would total 70 seconds. If the player bounds over one of the cliffs, he is out of the game.

To determine if a player hits the indicia traps 128, the light is energized, and if the line drawn by the stylus makes contact with the trap, the player is out of the running. Thus the player with the best time is declared the winner.

While a number of different sports games have been described it will be apparent that each relies on utilizing a sheet material having indicia means thereon representing the playing field of a given sport, and having,

means formed thereon defining obstacles which are to be either avoided or used to effect the play of the game. In each form the action, for the most part, is indicated by the drawing of a line over the writing surface of the respective sheet material with a stylus with the players eyes closed; after the sheet had been studied for a period of time. Also the concept includes the utilization of movable members having indicia means thereon which function as defense men or team members which can be randomly positioned by an opposing player during the play of the game.

FIG. 9 illustrates an accessory which may be used during the play of the football game of FIGS. 1 to 3. The accessory includes kicking squares A and B which are each formed of clear translucent material, e.g. glass or plastic. The respective squares A and B have indicia thereon to simulate a kicker. The indicia represents a punter and indicia 111 of square B represents a place kicker and holder. The lower dot on each square represents the ball at the line of scrimmage. The upper dot represents the ball location after it is passed from center.

During the play of the game of football as hereinbefore described, the appropriate square A or B is placed directly on top of the field in the appropriate kicking situation. Consequently if the defense desires to try for a block kick, he turns off the light under the field 38, and pushes the movable member 47 from the line of scrimmage until he feels that the indicia 50 thereof is touching the upper dot. If the defense play is successful in covering the upper dot with movable indicia 50, the kick is considered blocked.

It will be understood that the field illustration of FIGS. 10, 11, 12 and 15 illustrates merely a representative showing of the various obstacles or indicia located thereon. In actual embodiment the various indicia and- /or obstacles are spotted over the entire playing field in a manner similar to that shown in FIG. 3.

If desired a siren (not shown) may be incorporated or associated with the scoreboard 46 which may be sounded whenever a score is made. It will be understood that the siren may be electrically connected to the battery source of power 36 and sounded by activating a switch connected in circuit therewith.

While the instant invention has been described with respect to a particular embodiment thereof, it will be readily appreciated and understood that variations and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the rules.

What is claimed is:

1. A game comprising: a game board having a window formed thereon, said window being at least translucent to light; light source located relative to said game board for transmitting light from said source through said window when energized; means simulating a playing field supported over said window, said playing field having a readily erasable playing surface; means forming a non-erasable stationary playing obstacle on said playing field; movable means having non-erasable indicia thereon to represent a movable playing obstacle; said movable means being mounted on said game board beneath said playing field for relative movement with respect thereto such that said movable obstacle is obscured until said light source is energized; and a marking stylus for drawing an erasable line to represent an action play of said erasable surface during the play of the game.

2. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein the indicia means of said movable means includes a plurality of optional determinable limits.

3. A sports game comprising: a game board having a window formed thereon, said window being translucent to light; a light source located relative to said game board for transmitting the light from said source through said window when energized; means simulating a sports playing field adapted to be supported over said window, said playing field having a readily erasable playing surface and indicia means formed on said play ing field to represent a series of stationary obstacles during the play of the game; a pair of means movably mounted on said board to define game obstacles that can be adjustably set on the playing field by one of the players, said movable means having indicia thereon to represent a playing obstacle; means for rotatably journalling said movable means on said game board; and a marking stylus for drawing an erasable line to represent an action play on said erasable surface during the play of the game.

4. A sports game comprising: a game board having a window formed thereon, said window being translucent to light; a light source located relative to said game board for transmitting the light from said source through said window when energized; means simulating a sports playing field adapted to be supported over said window, said playing field having a readily erasable playing surface and indicia means formed on said playing field to represent a series of stationary obstacles during the play of the game; means movably mounted on said board to define a game obstacle that can be adjustably set beneath the playing field by one of the players, said movable means having indicia thereon to represent a playing obstacle; means for mounting said movable means for relative longitudinal and rotary movement on said game board; and a marking stylus for drawing an erasable line to represent an action play on said erasable surface during the play of the game.

5. A game comprising: a game board having a slot formed in the surface thereof, means simulating a playing field adapted to be supported on said game board, said playing field having a readily erasable playing surface and non-erasable indicia means formed on said playing field to represent a series of stationary obstacles; movable means mounted on said board beneath the playing field, said movable means having nonerasable indicia thereon to represent a movable obstacle; connector means secured to said movable means, said connector means being slidably disposed in said slot; and a marking stylus for drawing an erasable line to represent an action play on said erasable surface during the play of the game.

6. A game comprising:

a game board including a support surface having window means formed therein which is at least translucent to light;

means for selectively directing light through the window means of the support surface of the game board;

means forming a simulated sports playing field having a readily erasable playing surface and indicia means formed on the surface to represent at least one stationary playing obstacle;

means for positioning the playing field on the support surface of the game board over the window means thereof;

movable means having indicia thereon to represent a playing obstacle;

means mounting said movable means on the support surface of the game board beneath the playing field for relative movement with respect to the playing field so that the playing obstacle on the movable means can be adjustably set beneath the playing field; and

at least one marking stylus for making an erasable line to represent an action play on the erasable surface of the playing field during play of the game.

7. A game comprising: a game board having means defining a window opening; a surface traversing said.

opening which is at least translucent to light; a light source connected beneath said game board for transmitting light through said window surface; sheet means positioned over said surface, said sheet means having a readily erasable writing surface; fixed indicia means formed on said sheet means to define a plurality of playing obstacles; means for indicating simulated wind conditions; a series of distance-indicating members calibrated in accordance to varying simulated wind conditions to indicate various distances of play during the play of the game; adjustably positionable indicia means disposed beneath said sheet, said adjustably positioned indicia means being normally obscured until said light source is energized; and a marking stylus for drawing an erasable line on the writing surface of said sheet.

8. A game comprising: a game board having a cut-out portion defining a window opening; a surface traversing said opening which is at least translucent to light rays; a light source connected beneath said game board for transmitting light rays through said window surface; sheet means positioned over said surface, said sheet means having a readily erasable writing surface, a fixed indicia means formed on said sheet means to define a non-erasable playing obstacle, adjustably positionable indicia means disposed beneath said sheet, said adjustably positionable indicia means being normally obscured until said light source is energized; means to mount said adjustably positionable indicia means for longitudinal and rotational movement relative to said playing field; and a marking stylus for drawing an eras-,

able line on the writing surface of said sheet.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4162792 *Jan 12, 1977Jul 31, 1979Mattel, Inc.Obstacle game
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US8540247 *Jan 28, 2013Sep 24, 2013Jeff PoulosMethods and devices for on-the-roll sports games
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/240, 273/277
International ClassificationA63F3/06, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00283, A63F3/0615, A63F2003/00287, A63F2003/00324, A63F3/00041, A63F2003/00271
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4D