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Publication numberUS3896513 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1975
Filing dateSep 3, 1974
Priority dateSep 3, 1974
Publication numberUS 3896513 A, US 3896513A, US-A-3896513, US3896513 A, US3896513A
InventorsRaymond W Boucher, Russell D Hand
Original AssigneeHedstrom Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foldable infant{3 s crib
US 3896513 A
Abstract
A foldable infant's crib is fitted with special end gate locks, leg locks, drop gate locks, and a special floor support to insure that the crib will not be folded or collapsed inadvertently and eliminates all possibility of the unit being used as a dressing table with the drop gate lowered.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Boucher et al.

[ 1 July 29, 1975 FOLDABLE INFANTS CRIB [75] Inventors: Raymond W. Boucher; Russell D.

Hand, both of Dothan, Ala.

[73] Assignee: Hedstrom Co., Bedford, Pa.

[22] Filed: Sept. 3, 1974 21 Appl. No.: 502,794

[52] US. Cl. 5/99 R; 5/100 [51] Int. Cl. A47C 29/00; A47D 7/02 [58] Field of Search 5/99 R, 99 B, 99 C, 100

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,788,960 1/1931 Shaw 5/99 R 2,823,390 2/1958 Hagelfeldt 5/99 R 3,094,714 6/1963 Lutes 5/99 R 3,110,913 11/1963 Landry 5/99 R 3,381,319 S/l968 Breault 5/99 R Primary ExaminerRobert L. Wolfe Assistant ExaminerAndrew M. Calvert Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Cesari and McKenna [5 7] ABSTRACT A foldable infants crib is fitted with special end gate locks, leg locks, drop gate locks, and a special floor support to insure that the crib will not be folded or collapsed inadvertently and eliminates all possibility of the unit being used as a dressing table with the drop gate lowered.

17 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures PATENTED JUL 2 9 i975 SHEET 55 52 FIG. 2

FOLDABLE INFANTS CRIB BACKGROUND OF THE INVIENTION This invention relates to a foldable, height-adjustable infant's crib. It relates more particularly to fittings for such a crib which render it safer to use and less prone to being folded or collapsed accidentally by the parent or child when in use.

The usual collapsible crib has a hinged floor panel which can be raised, and inwardly folding end gates which permit the front and rear gates of the crib to be drawn together so that the crib collapses into a relatively flat package which can be stored in a minimum amount of space.

Each crib end gate comprises two hinged together sections and the end gate lock is built into a hinge between these sections. When the two sections of an end gate are in a common plane, a latch pivoted to one gate. section drops into a slot in a keeper attached to the other gate section, thereby locking the two sections in that common plane. Sometimes, however, the latch becomes disengaged from the keeper when the child shakes the crib or the child may intentionally release the latch so that the end gate folds inward, creating a pinch point at the hinged joint between the end gate sections. If the child in the crib should inadvertently place his fingers between these hinged sections, and lean or push outward against the end gate, his fingers may become trapped and squeezed between the two sections causing pain and possible injury.

Also if the end gate becomes unlocked, undue stress is placed on the various crib rails and fittings when the crib is shaken, thereby shortening its useful life.

A similar situation confronts cribs having a drop gate in the front gate. The drop gate is an upper section of the front gate which is hinged to the lower part of the gate, so that it can be swung down to lower the effective height of the front of the crib. This permits easier access by an adult to a child within the crib.

The drop gate is customarily locked in its upper position by spring-loaded pull buttons mounted in the crib corner posts and projecting into openings in the opposite ends of the drop-gate. In some cases, even a young child in the crib can munipulate the pull buttons and unlock the gate and climb out of the crib, without permission. To prevent this the parent may resort to tying the drop gate in its closed position so that the child cannot climb out of the crib. This is a very unsatisfactory solution to the problem, since it makes it difficult for the parent to lower the gate when that becomes desirable.

Also, some cribs with a drop gate also have a floor panel which can be swung up to an upper horizontal position near the top of the crib so that the parent can change or otherwise tend to an infant without having to bend dow. The floor panel of such cribs is usually maintained in this raised position by a hinge at the rear of the crib and by lugs which project out from the front of the floor panel and engage the front gate of the crib just below the drop gate. With .the floor panel in the raised position, if the drop gate should be unlocked inadvertently and lowered, there would be nothing to prevent the child from rolling out of the crib and falling onto the floor.

The height adjustment of these prior cribs can also be upset by the inadvertent or intentional release of one or more of the fittings controlling the height adjustment of the crib legs, causing the crib to become unstable.

All of these factors constitute potential hazards which should be eliminated to protect children using the cribs.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a foldable, height-adjustable crib which is less prone to being inadvertently folded or collapsed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a safer crib of the type having a drop gate and an elevated floor panel.

Still another object is to provide a crib having a minimum number of pinch points.

A further object of the invention is to provide an infants crib of this type which satisfies all of the current U.S. government safety regulations relating to juvenile furniture.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a crib which cannot be used as a changer with its floor panel in the elevated position while its drop gate is down.

Other objects will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combination of elements and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the following detailed description, and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

Generally, the subject crib has the usual front and rear gates connected by hinged sectional end gates to form a rectangular enclosure. The front gate has a hinged drop gate and the bottom of the enclosure is closed off by the usual hinged floor panel. Posts at the four corners of the crib support extensible legs so that the crib can be positioned at various elevations above the floor.

Each crib end gate is maintained in its fully open position by a special double-acting end gate lock. Each end gate lock comprises a latch hinged to one end gate section and a slotted keeper hinged to the other end gate section, the latch dropping into the slot when the end gate is fully open in much the same manner as a conventional end gate lock. In addition, however, a second latch is hinged to the keeper so that it can pivot in a horizontal plane just below the keeper. The second latch can be swung under the keeper so that it engages a portion of the first latch projecting through the keeper so that the first latch cannot be retracted from the slot to release the end gate. In order to fold the end gate then, the second latch just be swung outward to release the first latch and then the first latch must be swung upwards away from the keeper. Thus, two distinctly different motions are required to unlock each end gate. Consequently, the chances are small of the gate becoming unlocked because of movements of the crib or bacause of the unintentional activities of the child in the crib. So too, the chances of the childs fingers being pinched in the joints between the end gate sections are correspondingly small.

The drop gate of the subject crib is locked in its upward position by a pair of retractable, spring-loaded latches slidably mounted in the top rail of the end gate at the opposite ends thereof. When the gate is in its raised position, the latchesare biased into a pair of keepers formed in the corner posts opposite the latches. In addition, a pair of spring-loaded push button locks-are mounted in the opposite ends of the'same rail adjacent the latches. When each latch is in its fully extended position, it is retained there by the associated push button lock. In order to lower the drop gate, again two distinct actions must be performed to release each end of the gate. First, the push button lock must be depressed, then the sliding latch must be retracted from its keeper. Here also, then, the chances of the drop gate being lowered inadvertently are kept to a minimum.

The hinged floor panel in the present crib is similar to the ones in prior cribs except for the fitting used to maintain the panel in its elevated position when the crib functions as a changer. Instead of the usual lugs to support the front edge of the floor panel, the crib has a special bail hinged to the front'edge of the floor panel which can be swung up and engaged over the top rail of the drop gate to maintain the floor panel in a hori zontal plane near the top of the crib. Unless the drop gate is in its raised or closed position, thecrib cannot be used as a changer with the floor panel in this elevated position. Conversely, as long as the floor panel is in its elevated position, the drop gate cannot be lowered. Consequently, this interlock between the floor panel and the drop gate should eliminate any possibility of an infant rolling out of the crib when the parents attention is distracted momentarily.

A double lock is likewise provided on each of the four extensible crib legs to prevent inadvertent releas of the leg locks.

All of the aforesaid features make the present crib quite safe and the crib should satisfy all present US. government safety regulations relating to cribs. Yet since these additional fittings which bring about these advantages are for the most part constructed of simple stamped metal and plastic parts, they should not appreciably increase the overall cost of making the crib.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view ofa crib made in accordance with the present invention with its legs shown in various positions of adjustment;

FIG. 2 is a view in side elevation thereof with all legs raised;

FIG. 3 is an end view thereof, showing the drop gate in its open position;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of part of a leg lock on the FIG. 1 crib;

FIGS. 5 and 6 are plan views showing the two main components of the FIG. 4 part in greater detail;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of an end gate lock on the FIG. 1 crib, the lock being shown in its fully locked position;

FIG. 8 is a similar view of the lock in its unlocked position;

FIG. 9 is a similar view of the lock in its unlocked po-' FIG. 13 is a similarviewfof the crib showing its floor panel lockedin its el evated position for changing an infant; and I FIG. 14 is a fragmentary lock embodiment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the subject crib shown generally 10 is a generally rectangular enclosure consisting of a front gate 12, a rear gate 14 and a pair of identical end gates 16, all connected together by vertical corner posts 22. 1

Each end gate 16 consists of a pair of sections 16a and 161; whose upper and lower ends are connected by hinges 19 (FIG. 3) to the adjacent corner post 22. These sections are connected together at their lower ends by a conventional hinge 24 and at their upper ends by a special hinge and lock fixture shown generally 26 which will be described in more detail. later.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the upper portion of the front gate 12 constitutes a drop gate. The drop gate is hinged to the lower part of the, front gate by hinges28. The drop gate can be swungdown to a lower position shown in FIG. 3,,or swung to an'upper position illustrated in FIG.-2. The gate is maintained in this upper position by .means of special end gate locks shown generally at 32, mounted inthe ends of gate 22a, which locks secure those ends to the corner posts 22 at the front of the crib. I i I Referring now to, FIGS. 1, 3, 12 and 13, the crib is provided with a generally rectangular floor panel 36. A pair of relatively long straps 38 are pivotally connected by wood screws 42 to the opposite side edges of panel 36 near the rear edge thereof and to the corner posts 22 at the rear of the crib. The connections to the corner posts are made approximately one third of the way up thereon, and the lengths of the straps 38 are such that they support the rear edge of the panel 36 when the panel is in its lower horizontal position illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3, with the front edge of the floor panel being supported by a pair of lugs 48 secured to the lower rail of the front gate and projecting under the floor panel.

Floor panel 36 can also be swung up on straps 38 so that it assumes an upper horizontal position best seen in FIG. 13. In this case, the front edge of the panel is supported by means of a generally U -shape d bail 52 pivotally connected to the opposite ends of that edge by brackets 54. The bail has a web portion 52a which hooks over the top of drop gate 12a to maintain the floor panel 36 in the upper horizontal plane.

The floor panel can only be secured in this position when the drop gate 120 is locked in its raised position. Furthermore, when the panel is suspended in its upper position shown in FIG. 13, the drop gate cannot be opened because the weight of the floor panel and any child thereon tends to bias the gate to its raised or closed position. In other words, the weight of the floor panel acting through the bail SZeXerts a torque on the gate which tends to swing it inwardsfI-Iowever, the extent to which the gate can swing inward is limited by the hinges 28 and the two hinged together rails as well as by the end gate locks 32. When the bail is not being used to support the floor panel, it swings down and nests against the underside of that panel as best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. A hook 55 secured to the underside of view of another drop gate the floor panel near its center as shown in those figures, can be engaged under the bail web 52a to lock the bail in this position.

Referring again to FIGS. 1 and 2, crib has the usual extensible legs 56 adjustably connected lengthwise to the four corner posts 22. More particularly, a threaded bolt 57 projects out from each corner post 22 near the lower end thereof, and also a pin 59 projects out from each post 22 at a point spaced above bolt 57. The bolt 57 is somewhat longer than thethickness of leg 56. However, the pin 59 is somewhat less than the thickness of that leg. A series of positioning holes are spaced along each leg 56 and the spacing between these holes corresponds to the spacing between bolt 57 and pin 59. All but the top hole in each leg 58 extend through the leg. The bolt 57 and pin 59 can be inserted into any adjacent pair of holes in leg 56 to assure a two point connection between the leg and corner post. Following this, a lock nut indicated generally at 66 is turned down onto each bolt 57 on the far side of leg 56 to securely anchor the leg to the corner post. As shown in FIG. 1, each leg 56 can be positioned to place-the floor panel 36 almost on the floor or at selected heights above the floor. The lock nuts 66 are all specially designed so that they cannot inadvertently be loosened by a child in the crib.

Turning now to FIGS. 7 to 9, each end gate lock 26 comprises two hinge sections 72 and 74. Section 72 is connected to the upper rail 17a of each end gate section 16a by wood screws 76 (FIG. 8) and section 74 is secured to the upper rail 17b of end gate section 1612 by wood screws 78. The two lock sections are, in turn, connected by a pivot 82. These hinge sections are generally similar to those found on conventional crib end gate locks, so a detailed description of them is not needed here. Suffice it to say that section 74 includes a tab 84 which extends out horizontally and has a slot 86 extending parallel to the rail 17b.

A latch 88 is connected by a pivot 92 to lock section 72 and it is arranged to swing vertically about that pivot. Latch 88 includes a relatively long nose 88a projecting downward which is arranged to engage in slot 86 when the rails 17a and l7bof the two end gate sections are aligned as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. In this sense the latch is similar to those found on conventional end gate locks. However, the nose 88a is usually long so that it projects an appreciable distance below tab 84. Moreover, a notch 94 is formed near its end on the edge thereof facing pivot 82 so that when latch 88 is engaged in slot 86 as shown in FIG. 7, the lower edge 94a of the notch is vertically oriented.

A secondlatch 98 is connected by pivot 82 to tab 84. Latch 98 is more or less rectangular and lies generally in a horizontal plane. However, it has an accessible upstanding ear 98:: which facilitates manipulating the latch.

A notch 102 is formed in the corner oflatch 98 opposite raised ear 98a. The innermost edge 102a of the notch is oriented so that when the latches 88 and 98 are both in their locked positions shownin FIG. 7, the notch edge 102a bears against and is perpendicular to the notch edges 94a on latch 88.

In order to lift up latch 88 to release the end gate, its nose 88a must swing along on an are which moves it closer to pivot 82. Thus as long as latch 98 is its locked position shown in FIG. 7, its edge 102a prevents movement of nose 88a in that direction. Consequently,

the latch 88 cannot be; raised to release the end gate. Rather, the parent must first pull out latch 98 and then .li ft=up latch 88 in two distinct motions in order to unlock the end gate. This beingthe case, there is little liklihood of the end gate lock being opened accidentally if the crib is jostled by a child in the crib.

Refer now to FIGS. l0.and 11 which show the drop gate lock 32 in greater detail. Each lock comprises a generally rectangular plate I10 which is arranged to slide horizontally in a vertical slot 112 formed in the end of drop gate upper rail 13. The plate includes a depending ear a which projects through the bottom of the slot and extends below the rail to function as a trigger which can be engaged by a parents finger to actuate the lock.

Plate 110 also includes an integral nose 11012 which projects from the main body of the plate toward the ad jacent corner post 22. This nose 110 is arranged to engagein a slot 114 of a striker plate 116 secured to the corner. post directly opposite the nose. The plate 110 is retained within slot 112 by a pin Il8 which extends transversely through the rail 13 and also through a horizontal slot 122 in plate 110. When the plate is positioned in its slot so that the pin 118 is at one end of slot 112, the nose I101; is retracted under ,rail 13. On the other hand, when the pin occupies a position at the other end of slot 122, the nose 110!) projects an appreciable distance beyond the end of rail 130. The plate is biased toward the latter position by a spring 124, situated in a bore 126 in the portion of slot 112 behind plate 110, the spring being compressed between the plate 110 and the inner end of the bore.

When the drop gate 12a is raised to its upper position shown in FIG. 12,.the nose ll0b engages the side edge of the plate 116. The edge of the nose facing the plate is beveled so that the engagement between that edge andthe striker plate causes the plate 110 to retract into its slot 112 in opposition to the spring bias. When the nose ll0b is brought directly opposite slot 114 in the plate, it snaps into the slot, securely locking the end of the drop gate.

Still referring to FIGS. 10 and 11, means are provided for insuring that the end gate lock 32 cannot be opened inadvertently by a child in the crib. More particularly, the portion of the slot 122 on the side of pm 118 facing end post 22 is reduced in width as shown at 112a in FIG. 10. Also as best seen in FIG. 11, the pin 118 is longer than the rail 13 is wide and it has a reduced diameter shaft portion 1180 located on the near side of plate 110 as viewed in FIG. 10. Furthermore, that end of the pin terminates in a button 118!) located well outbound of rail 13. A coil spring 128 is compressed between the inside face of button 118]) and the side of the drop gate rail 13.

As long as pin 118 is held in its fully retracted positionby spring 128, as shown in solid lines in FIG. 11, the relatively large diameter poition of pin 118 is positioned opposite the narrow slot portion 112a, so that the ,plate 1 l0 cannot be retracted to release the end gate. However, when the parent depresses button 118b, the narrow shank portion 118a of pin 118 is brought opposite, slot portion 122a as seen in dotted lines in FIG. I1. Now the plate 110 can be slid horizontally to retract the nose 110!) from striker plate I16 and release the d'ropgate.

Here again then, two distinctly different motions are required in order to unlock each end of the drop gate.

Consequently, there is little liklihood of the gate being opened accidentally or by an infant in the crib.

Turning now to FIGS. 4 to 6, even the extensible legs 56 of subject crib are locked in place by special safety knobs 66 so that they cannot be loosened accidentally. More particularly, each knob 66 must be depressed and at the same time turned in order to remove the knob from its threaded bolt 57 (FIG. 1). Again, then two distinctly different physical motions are required in order to loosen the knob.

Each knob 66 includes a generally cylindrical metal nut 130 having a threaded bore 132 which can be turned down onto bolt 57 (FIG. 1). A flange 130a at the upper end of the nut is secured within a cup-shaped member 134 made of plastic or other inexpensive rigid material. As best seen in FIG. 5, the top face of the member 134 is formed with a relatively small circular groove 136 near its center and the inside wall 138 of the groove is beveled. Further, an array of raised radial ribs 142 extend from groove 136 almost to the periphery of the member.

Member 134 has an overlying cap 146. Cap 146 is slightly larger in diameter than member 134 and it has a lip 148 extending all around its rim which engages under member 134 to hold the cap on the member, while allowing relative rotation between the two. The inside bottom wall of the cap is formed with a raised circular sectioned fin 152. Each fin section is flexible and resilient and deformable radially outward. The diameter of the fin is such that when the cap 156 is placed on member 134, the edge of fin 152 is situated at the top of the beveled groove wall 138. The inside wall of cap 146 is also provided with an aray of raised radial ribs 156 extending between fin 152 and the perimeter of the cap. When the cap is installed on member 134 as shown in FIG. 4, the fin 152 spaces the ribs 156 on cap 146 above ribs 142 on the underlying member so that when the cap is rotated relative to member 134 no torque is transmitted to the member and its nut 130. On the other hand, when the top of the cap is depressed as it is turned, the sections of fin 152 will be pressed against the beveled groove edge 138 and splay outward. This permits the cap to approach member 134 so that the ribs 142 can interfit with ribs 156.

Now when cap 146 is turned, torque is transmitted via member 134 to nut 130. Thus, both a pressing and turning motion are required in order to effectively turn each nut 130.

In some cases, for convenience, it may be desirable to arrange the knobs 66 so that the cap 146 has to be depressed only when the knob is being loosened, not when it is being tightened down on the bolt 57 (FIG. 1). This is accomplished by providing teeth 160 on the outside of the side wall of member 134 and teeth 162 on the inside of the side wall of the cap 146. When the knob is fully assembled, these teeth are shaped and arranged to engage one another when the cap 146 is turned in a clockwise direction as would be the case if one were tightening the knob, but to ride over one another when the cap is turned in the opposite direction. Thus, even though the top wall of cap 146 is not depressed when it is being turned clockwise, the engagement of the teeth 160 and 162 suffices to transmit torque to nut 130. On the other hand, when the cap 146 is turned counterclockwise to loosen the knob, there is no torque transmitted by these teeth and, consequently, no movement of nut 130. Rather, in order to loosen the nut, one has to depress the top face of cap 146 while turning the cap as described above.

FIG. 14 shows a modified drop gate lock. It is the same in all respects as the one in FIGS. 10 and 11, except for the mode of locking plate 110. Movable pin 118 is replaced by an L-shaped latch 202 pivoted on a stationary pin 204. The latchs short leg 202a extends downward under rail 13 and a coil spring 206 biases that leg against the underside of that rail as shown in solid lines. Thus, it prevents plate from being retracted. However, when the latch 202 is moved to its dotted line position out of the way of the plate, the place can be retracted.

It will be seen from the foregoing, then, that the provision of the above fittings on an otherwise conventional crib should minimize the incidence of accidents due to pinch points as well as inadvertent release of locks controlling the position of the drop gate, end gates and legs. Furthermore, the inclusion of these fittings enables the crib to satisfy all of the current governmental safety regulations pertaining to cribs.

We claim:

1. A folding infants crib of the type having front and rear gates and foldable end gates pivotally connected to form a generally rectangular enclosure and a floor panel hinged to the bottom of the enclosure, the improvement comprising a double acting end gate lock for locking each of the end gates in its unfolded position, said lock including a pair of hinged-together lock sections, one lock section having a laterally extending tab and means defining a slot in said tab, said slot extending in a direction generally parallel to the end gate section to which it is attached, a latch pivoted to the other lock section adjacent to the pivot between the two sections, said latch being swingable vertically, a relativelylong'nose projecting from the latch, said nose being arranged to engage in the slot when the latch is swung down toward the tab with the end gate in its unfolded position, said nose having a portion which projects'below the tab, and means for removably engaging the portion of the nose extending below the tab so that the first latch cannot be retracted from the slot.

2. The crib defined in claim 1 wherein the engaging means comprise a second latch swingably connected to one of the first and second lock sections for movement in a generally horizontal plane, said second latch being swingable toward the first latch so that a portion thereof engages the nose portion of the first latch extending below the tab.

3. The crib defined in claim 2 wherein the nose portion extending below the tab and the portion of the second latch which engages said nose portion have nutually perpendicular surfaces which engage one another.

4. The crib defined in claim 1 wherein the engaging means are hinged at the common hinge between the first and second lock sections.

5. The crib defined in claim 1 and further including a drop gate hinged to the crib front gate at the top thereof, said drop gate being arranged to swing between an upper position wherein it is generally coplanar with the front gate and a lower position wherein it hangs down outside the front gate, means for locking the drop gate in its upper position and wherein the hinge means connecting the floor panel to the bottom of the enclosure comprise a pair of relatively long straps connected between the bottom of the enclosure and one edge of the floor panel, said panel being swingable about said straps so that the panel can be raised up to a generally horizontal plane near the top of the enclosure, and means swingably connected to the floor panel at the edge thereof opposite the straps for engaging the drop gate when that is in its upper position so that the floor panel can only be maintained in its elevated position when the drop gate is in its upper position.

6. The crib defined in claim wherein the engaging means comprise a bail swingably connected to the underside of the floor panel and whose web portion is arranged to hook over the top of the drop gate.

7. The crib defined in claim 5 wherein the means for locking the drop gate comprise a fixture retractably mounted in at least one end of the drop gate near the top thereof, a keeper mounted on the crib corner post opposite the fixture, said fixture having a portion which projects out beyond the drop gate and engages the keeper when the drop gate is in its upper position, means for biasing the fixture toward the keeper, and means for locking the fixture in engagement with the keeper.

8. The crib defined in claim 1 and further including legs positioned at the four corners of the enclosure each said leg having a series of positioning holes therein for receiving a bolt, a bolt projecting out from each of the four corners of the enclosure through one of the openings in the associated leg, a nut screwed down on each of the bolts to clamp the associated leg to the enclosure, each said nut including a cap engaged over the nut so that it can both be rotated relative to the nut and be moved axially through a small distance relative to the nut, means for biasing the cap axially in one direction relative to the nut, and co-acting means on the nut and cap which interfit with one another when the cap is moved in the opposite direction axially relative to the nut so that torque is transmitted from the cap to the nut only when the cap is moved axially in said opposite direction.

9. The crib defined in claim 8 and further including second co-acting means on the nut and cap which interfit with one another only when the cap is rotated in the clock-wise direction.

10. A folding infants crib of the type having front and rear gates and foldable end gates pivotally connected to form a generally rectangular enclosure and a floor panel hinged to the bottom of the enclosure, the improvement comprising a drop gate hinged to the crib front gate at the top thereof, said drop gate being arranged to swing between an upper position where it is generally coplanar with the front gate and a lower position where it hangs down outside the front gate, means for locking the drop gate in its upper position, and wherein the hinge means connecting the floor panel to the bottom of the enclosure comprise a pair of relatively long straps connected between the bottom of the enclosure and one edge of the floor panel, said panel being swingable about said straps so that the panel can be raised up to a generally horizontal plane near the top of the enclosure, and means swingably connected to the floor panel at the edge thereof opposite the straps for engaging over the drop gate when that is in its upper position so that the floor panel can only be maintained in its elevated position when the drop gate is in its upper position.

11. The crib defined in claim 10 wherein the engaging means comprise a bail swingably connected to the underside of the floor panel and whose web portion is arranged to engage the drop gate.

12. The crib defined in claim 10 wherein the means for locking the drop gate comprise a fixture retractably mounted in at least one end of the drop gate near the top thereof, a keeper mounted on the crip corner post opposite the fixture, said fixture having a portion which projects out beyond the drop gate and engages the keeper when the drop gate is in its upper position, means for biasing the fixture toward the keeper, and means for locking the fixture in engagement with the keeper.

13. The crib defined in claim 12 wherein the fixture locking means comprise a pin mounted in the end of the drop gate, said pin extending through a generally horizontal slot in the fixture, said pin having a neckeddown portion and being movable axially in the end gate, the width of the slot varying along its length so that the fixture cannot be retracted unless the pin is shifted axially so as to bring its necked-down portion opposite the slot in the fixture.

14. The crib defined in claim 13 and further including a double-acting end gate lock locking each of said end gates in its unfolded position, each said lock including a pair of lock sections connected to the end gate sections, a first latch pivotally to one lock section so that it can be swung against and engage the other lock section, a second latch pivotally connected to the other lock section so that it can be swung against and engage the first latch to prevent the first latch from being disengaged from the second lock section.

15. A folding infants crib of the type having front and rear gates and foldable end gates pivotally connected to form a generally rectangular enclosure and a floor panel hinged to the bottom of the enclosure, the improvement comprising an adjustable leg secured to each corner of the enclosure, the securement including a threaded bolt projecting out from each enclosure corner through the associated leg, a nut for turning down on the bolt to clamp the leg to the enclosure, a cap engaged over the nut, means for connecting the cap to the nut so that it is rotatable relative thereto, the connection between the cap and the nut also permitting an appreciable amount of axial movement between the cap and the nut, means for biasing the cap in one direction axially relative to the nut, co-acting means on the cap and nut which interfit with one another when the cap is moved axially in the opposite direction relative to the nut so that torque is transmitted from the cap to the nut only when the cap is moved in said opposite direction.

16. The crib defined in claim 15 and further including second co-acting means on the cap and nut which interfit only when the cap is rotated clockwise relative to the nut so that the nut can be tightened down on the associated bolt without having to be shifted axially in said other direction.

17. The crib defined in claim 12 wherein the fixture locking means comprise a pin mounted in the end of the drop gate, said pin extending through a generally horizontal slot in the fixture, a latch pivotally mounted on the pin, said latch having a leg and being swingable from a first position placing its leg under the gate end in the path of the fixture to a second position spacing its leg away from the gate end out of the way of the fixture and a spring biasing the latch to said first position.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4402097 *Sep 24, 1980Sep 6, 1983Scott Frances MExpandable support frame for flexible sleeping mattresses
US4715075 *Feb 3, 1987Dec 29, 1987Louis ShamieAdjustable legs for folding crib
US4752977 *Apr 25, 1986Jun 28, 1988Midmark CorporationHandle for releasing side rail of a crib
US4765004 *Jun 10, 1986Aug 23, 1988West End Hub Spring CompanyFolding portable crib
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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/99.1, 5/100
International ClassificationA47D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47D7/002, A47D7/02
European ClassificationA47D7/02, A47D7/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 23, 1996ASAssignment
Owner name: HEDSTROM CORPORATION, PENNSYLVANIA
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Effective date: 19951027
Jan 23, 1996AS35Release
Free format text: HEDSTROM CORPORATION BOX 432, SUNNYSIDE ROAD BEDFORD, PENNSYLVANIA 15522 * BANKAMERICA BUSINESS CREDIT, INC. : 19951027
Jul 15, 1991AS01Change of name
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Owner name: NEW HEDSTROM CORP., A CORPORATION OF DE
Effective date: 19910110
Jul 15, 1991ASAssignment
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Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:NEW HEDSTROM CORP., A CORPORATION OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005810/0012
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Jan 18, 1991ASAssignment
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Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NEW HEDSTROM CORP., A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005570/0695
Effective date: 19910109
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Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HEDSTROM CORPORATION, A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:005591/0029
Jan 17, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: JEPSON CORPORATION, THE
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION);REEL/FRAME:005804/0501
Effective date: 19910109
Nov 20, 1987AS06Security interest
Owner name: SECURITY PACIFIC BUSINESS CREDIT INC., 140 EAST 45
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT
Effective date: 19870703
Nov 20, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SECURITY PACIFIC BUSINESS CREDIT INC., 140 EAST 45
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT;REEL/FRAME:004818/0817
Effective date: 19870703
Owner name: SECURITY PACIFIC BUSINESS CREDIT INC., A DE. CORP.
Aug 5, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT, XERO BUILDING, STE. 1
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HEDSTROM CORPORATION;GERRY MANUFACTURING CORPORATION;JEPSON RECREATIONAL PRODUTS CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004446/0949
Effective date: 19850506
Aug 5, 1985AS06Security interest
Owner name: GERRY MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
Owner name: HEDSTROM CORPORATION
Owner name: JEPSON RECREATIONAL PRO
Effective date: 19850506
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT, XERO BUILDING, STE. 1
Jun 19, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: HEDSTROM CORPORATION AN IL CORP
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BROWN GROUP RECREATIONAL PRODUCTS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004418/0854
Effective date: 19850506
Sep 16, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: BROW GROUP RECREATIONAL PRODUCTS,INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:BROWN GROUP RECREATIONAL INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004064/0013
Effective date: 19820422
Owner name: BROW GROUP RECREATIONAL PRODUCTS,INC., STATELESS
Sep 16, 1982AS01Change of name
Owner name: BROW GROUP RECREATIONAL PRODUCTS,INC.
Owner name: BROWN GROUP RECREATIONAL INDUSTRIES, INC.
Effective date: 19820422
Sep 14, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: BROWN GROUP RECREATIONAL INDUSTRIES, INC.
Free format text: MERGER WITH CHANGE OF NAME EFFECTIVE 8-04-81;ASSIGNOR:HEDSTROM CO.;REEL/FRAME:003928/0226
Effective date: 19810804
Owner name: BROWN GROUP RECREATIONAL INDUSTRIES, INC., MASSACH