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Publication numberUS3897602 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1975
Filing dateAug 26, 1974
Priority dateAug 26, 1974
Publication numberUS 3897602 A, US 3897602A, US-A-3897602, US3897602 A, US3897602A
InventorsWaterbury Richard N
Original AssigneeWaterbury Richard N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pipe cleanout accessory
US 3897602 A
Abstract
A pipe clean out accessory that may be removably secured to a chuck of a motor driven electric drill with the chuck when rotated in a first direction rotating and advancing a stiff externally threaded cable from a coiled position in a container. The accessory includes a control assembly that is reciprocally movable relative to the container. Reciprocal movement of the control accessory may be used to advance or retract the cable from the container when it is desired to accomplish this result in a shorter length of time than is possible by rotation of the cable. The cable may also be retracted into the container by rotating the chuck in a second direction.
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United States Patent [191 Waterbury PIPE CLEANOUT ACCESSORY Richard N. Waterbury, Lot 1214, 10001 West Flagler St., Miami. Fla. 33144 22 Filed: Aug. 26, 1974 1211 Appl.No.:500,409

[76] Inventor:

[ 51 Aug. 5, 1975 Primary lituminer-Edward L. Roberts Attorney, Agent or Firm-William C. Babcock [57] ABSTRACT A pipe clean out accessory that may be removably secured to a chuck of a motor driven electric drill with the chuck when rotated in a first direction rotating and advancing a stiff externally threaded cable from a coiled position in a container. The accessory includes a control assembly that is reciprocally movable relative to the container. Reciprocal movement of the control accessory may be used to advance or retract the cable from the container when it is desired to accomplish this result in a shorter length of time than is possible by rotation of the cable. The cable may also be retracted into the container by rotating the chuck in a second direction.

6 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PIPE CLEANOUT ACCESSORY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention Pipe cleanout accessory for use with an electric motor driven drill.

27 Description of the Prior Art In the past, various types of sewer cleaning machines have been designed and used that are intended solely for this purpose, and in the main are employed by commercial establishments such as plumbers, sewer cleaning companies and the like. These prior art machines are of heavy duty construction and are so expensive that they are out of reach of the average homeowner who may have need for such a piece of equipment but once or twice a year.

Furthermore, the prior art devices are of bulky construction and require a substantial space when stored.

The primary purpose in devising the present invention is to supply a small, lightweight, inexpensive sewer or drain line clean out accessory that may be removably mounted on the chuck of an electric motor driven drill, and the device when so mounted capable of being used for sewer or drain line cleanout purposes. After the clean out operation is completed, the accessory is removed from the drill, with the drill then capable of being used for its intended purpose.

The present invention, after being removed from the electric drill may be stored in a relatively small space until it is again needed for cleanout purposes, whereupon it is again rcmovably mounted on the drill.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The pipe clean out accessory includes a hollow container in which an external thread defining cable that is stiff but somewhat resilient is maintained in a coiled configuration. The device is used with an electric drill of the type that includes a pistol grip, and a power driven rotatable chuck. The chuck engages a driving member that is rigidly secured to the container.

The container has a first elongate rigid tube projecting forwardly therefrom, which tube terminates in a circumferentially extending stop of the free end thereof. A second tube is mounted on the first tube between the stop and container, with the second tube having a longitudinal guide formed therein. A third tube is slidably mounted on the second tube, and with the third tube having a rigid member projecting inwardly therefrom that is at all times in slidable engagement with the longitudinal guide.

A control assembly is rigidly secured to the forward end of the third tube and has the cable extending therethrough. When the device is being used, one hand engages the pistol grip of the electric drill, with the other hand being in engagement with the control assembly.

First and second members are pivotally supported from the control assembly, with these members being spring loaded, and at all times tending to move to a position where they are in engagement with the external threads on the cable. The first and second members have handles associated therewith. and the handles capable of being used to selectively move the first or second members to first positions where they are not in engagement with the cable, and the members being held in the first positions by stop means that are operatively associated with the control assembly.

When it is desired to advance the cable forwardly from the control assembly, the electric drill is caused to rotate the chuck in a first direction to concurrently rotate the container and first tube as a unit relative to the second and third tubes and the control assembly. The first member as such rotation takes place is allowed to pivot to a second position where it is in contact with the threads on the cable. Upon it being desired to retract the "able into the container, the chuck is caused to rotate the container and first tube as a unit relative to the second and third tubes and control assembly in a second direction, and as such rotation takes place in a second direction, the second member is allowed to pivot to a second position where it is in engagement with the external threads on the cable.

The third tube and control assembly may be recipro cated as a unit relative to the first and second tubes, container and drill. When such reciprocation takes place with the first member in a spring loaded second position, the second member advances the cable from the container on the forward motion of each reciprocal stroke. The cable may be retracted into a container by allowing the second member to pivot to a second position where it is in spring loaded contact with the external threads on the cable, and reciprocating the third tube and control assembly as a unit relative to the first and second tubes, container, and the electric motor driven drill. When such reciprocation takes place with the second member in the second position and in contact with the threads on the cable, the cable is retracted into the container on each rearward stroke of the control assembly and third tube rearwardly towards the electric drill.

The reciprocal movement of the control assembly and third tube relative to the first and second tubes and container is carried out when it is desired to advance or retract the cable from the invention at a more rapid rate than is achievable by causing the drill to rotate the container in either a first or second direction.

The cable may be advanced or retracted by reciprocating the control assembly and third tube, either when the container is rotating in a first or second direction or when the container is stationary. The cable as it is forced from the invention either by rotation of the container, or reciprocal movement of the control assembly and third tube, is directed into the pipe from which foreign material is to be cleared by contact with the stiff cable.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view of the pipe cleaning assembly operatively associated with the chuck of an electric drill having a pistol type grip;

FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the device taken rearwardly of the pistol grip of the electric drill;

FIG. 3 is a second end elevational view of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the portion of the control assembly illustrating one of the spring loaded handles thereon,

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of the invention mounted on the chuck of an electric drill having a pistol grip;

FIG. 6 is a second longitudinal cross sectional view of the invention as illustrated in FIG. 5, but with the control assembly and third tube in an advanced position relative to the container and first and second tubes;

FIG. 7 is a transverse cross sectional view of the invention taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6-.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged side elevational view of the control assembly with the first member occupying a second position whereby the cable will be advanced relative to the container either by forward movement of the control assembly relative to the container. or the cable being driven by the drill in a first direction;

FIG. 9 is a second side elevational view of the control assembly, with the first member held in a first position by a stop, and the second member occupying a second position in which it is in spring loaded contact with the threads on the cable, and the second member when so 15 disposed causing the cable to retract into the container either by rotation of the container or by reciprocating the control assembly and third tube. relative to the container and first and second tubes;

FIG. I is a transverse cross sectional view of the in vention taken on the line I0I0 of FIG. 6.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The clean out accessory A as shown in FIGS. 1, and 6 includes a container B that serves to house a length of cable C in a coiled configuration. which cable has threads formed on the external surface thereof. An electric drill D is provided that includes a pistol grip E and chuck F that is in engagement with a driving mem ber G that is secured to the container B.

The container B has a first elongate rigid tube H secured to a forwardly disposed neck portion thereof, and the tube on the forward end developing into a stop 10. The first tube H is in rotatable engagement with the interior of the second tube J. which second tube occupies a fixed longitudinal position relative to the first tube, and is situated between the stop 10 and container B. The second tube .I has a longitudinal guide I2 defined on the external surface thereof. A third tube K is slidably mounted on the second tube J. The third tube K includes a rigid member 14 that extends inwardly therefrom to at all times slidably engage the guide I2. A control assembly L is mounted on the forward end of the third tube K as may be seen in FIGS. 1, 5 and 6.

The container 8 as may be best seen in FIGS. 5 and 6 is defined by an external shell I6 that preferably has a cylindrical rearwardly disposed portion 16a that develops on the forward end into an inwardly tapering portion 16b. The portion 16b develops into a forwardly extending restricted neck 16c, which neck has the rearward portion ofa first tube H rigidly secured thereto by conventional means. The container B also includes a second shell I8 of substantially smaller diameter than the first shell 16, which second shell includes a cylindrical portion 180 and forwardly disposed portion 18b of conical shape. as best seen in FIG. 5.

The cylindrical portion I8a on the rearward periphcry thereof develops into a circumferential outwardly extending extension 18c that merges on the rearward portion thereof into a flat circular flange 18d that abuts against the interior surface of the cylindrical portion 16a. The second shell 18 is held in a fixed position within first shell 16 by a number of fasteners 20 of conventional design. The rearward edges of the shell por tion 16a and 18a are preferably doubled over to define beads 16:! and 186 for reinforcing shells l6 and I8. The

ports the driving member G in a central axially aligned position therefrom due to a bracket 24 that engages a forward end of the driving member G. The bracket 24 is secured to the center interior end portion of the second shell 18 as shown in FIG. 5 by conventional means such as welding or the like (not shown).

The rearward end ofthe cable C is secured to the interior of the first shell 16 by a rivet or pin 26 that extends through the shell and is shown in FIG. 5. The pin 26 prevents the entire length of the cable C being displaced from the confined space 22, as it is moved forwardly therefrom by means that will be explained later in detail. The member 14 shown in FIG. 6 is preferably supported from the third tube K by a band 28 that extends around the rearward portion of the third tube and is secured thereto. i

The control assembly L as best seen in FIGS. 3, 8 and 9 includes a transverse rigid member 30. preferably of circular shape. that has a bore 32 therein into which the forward end portions of the third tube K project. and

the third tube being secured to the member by conventional means (not shown). The member 30 supports two parallel. laterally spaced, forwardly extending first and second plates 34 and 36, which plates are best seen 3 in FIG. 3. The first and second plates 34 and 36 as 40 and 36 by screws 39. A sheet of resilient material 40 is mounted on the forward surface of the member 30 and has an opening 42 therein through which the cable C may move. The sheet 40 serves as a wiper to remove foreign material from the cable C prior to it being re 45 tracted into the confined space 22 of the container B.

First and second cable engaging members 42 and 44 are rigidly secured to first and second transverse shafts 46 and 48 that extend between the first and second plates 34 and 36 and are pivotally supported therefrom.

50 The first shaft 46 on one end develops into a handle 46a that is normally disposed to the shaft and adjacently disposed to the first plate 34 as shown in FIG. 3. The second shaft 48 also has an outwardly extending end portion that defines a second handle 480 that is adjacently disposed to the second plate 36 as shown in FIG. 3.

Each of the shafts 46 and 48 has a tensioned coiled spring 50 operatively associated therewith. with one end of the spring being affixed to the shaft and the other end 500 occupying a fixed position relative to the plate 34 or 36 most adjacent thereto as shown in FIGv 4. The spring 50 associated with the first shaft 46 at all times tends to pivot the member 42 into a second position shown in FIG. 8. where a lower sharp edge 42a of the member is in pressure Contact with the threads 52 formed on the external surface of the cable C. The cable C is preferably formed from resilient stiff wire that is helically wound in a tight configuration to define the threads 52 on the external surface of the cable.

The spring 50 operatively associated with the shaft 46 at all times tends to pivot the first member 42 from the first position shown in FIG. 9 to the second position shown in FIG. 8, where the edge 42a of the member is in pressure contact with the thread 52.

When the first member 42 is in the second position, it will be noted that the forward edge 42b of the memher is angularly disposed relative to the longitudinal axis 520 of the cable C. The first member 42 is not able to pivot counter-clockwise beyond the second position shown in FIG. 8 due to pressure contacting the cable which rests on the support 38. The first and second plates 34 and 36 have transversely aligned. longitudinally spaced first and second openings 54 and 56 formed therein, which openings may be alternately occupied by a rod 58. When the rod 58 is removed from the aligned openings 54, the spring 50 automatically pivots the first member 42 to the second position shown in FIG. 8. However, when it is desired to have the first member 42 occupy the first position shown in FlG. 9. the first handle 46a is pivoted in an appropriate direction to dispose the first member as shown in FIG. 9. The first member 42 has a pin 60 extending outwardly therefrom on which a head 52 is supported. When the rod 58 is extended through the first openings 54 as shown in FIG. 9, the rod is contacted by the head 62 and the member 42 is held in the first position.

When the rod 58 is removed from the second openings 56, the spring 50 operatively associated with the second shaft 48 automatically pivots the second mem ber 44 clockwise from the first position shown in FIG. 8 to the second position shown in FIG. 9. The second member 44 when in the second position has a a sharp edge thereof in pressure Contact with the threads 52 on the cable C. It will be noted in FIG. 9 that the position of the shaft 48 and the length of the second member 44 are so related that the longitudinal edge 44b of the sec ond member 44 is angularly positioned relative to the longitudinal axis 52a of cable C. The second member 44 has a second pin 64 extending outwardly therefrom that has a second head 66 on the outer extremity theieof. and the head being urged into pressure contact with the rod 58 by spring 50 when the member 44 is in the first position shown in FIG. 8 and the rod is disposed in the opening 56. The springs 50 are of sufficient strength as to maintain the first and second mem ber 42 and 44 in substantial pressure contact with the threads 52 when the members are in the second position.

The use and operation of the invention is extremely simple. When it is desired to advance the cable C from the container B, the rod 58 is removed from the openings 54 and placed in the openings 56 to hold the second member 44 in the first position shown in FIG. 4. The drill D is now energized to rotate the container B and first tube H relative to the second aand third tubes J and K and the control assembly L. The edge 42a of the first member 42 is engagement with the threads 52 of cable C and the cable is advanced forwardly from the control assembly 1. into the pipe (not shown) to be cleaned.

If it is desired to advance the cable C more rapidly from the container B than is possible by rotation of the cable. the control assembly L and third tube K are reciprocated as a unit relative to the first and second tubes H and J and container B, with the edge 42a ofthe first member sliding over the threads 52 on the rearward portion of the reciprocatory stroke. but engaging the threads on the forward portion of the stroke to advance the cable forwardly from the control member L.

When it is desired to retract the cable C into the container B, the rod 58 is removed from the second openings 56. with the first member 42 then being pivoted to the first position shown in FIG. 8 and held in this first position by the rod 58 being inserted in the opening 54.

As this manipulating of the rod 58 takes place. the second member 44 immediately pivots to the second position shown in FIG. 9 due to the action ofthe springs 50 associated with shaft 48.

When the cable C is caused to rotate in a second direction by use of the drill D. the edge 44a ofthe second member is in pressure contact with the threads 52 of the cable C, and the cable is moved rearwardly through the control assembly L into the container B to assume a coiled configuration in the latter. Should it be desired to retract the cable into the container B at a more rapid rate than is possible by rotation of the cable C. the com trol assembly L and third tube K are reciprocated as a unit relative to the first and second tubes H and .l and container B. On each rearward stroke of rcciprocatory motion, the edge 44a engages the threads 52 to retract the cable into the coiled configuration in container B as shown in FIG. 5, and on the forward portion of the reciprocatory stroke the edge 44a of second member 44 merely slides over the thread 52 without engaging the same.

After the invention has been used to clean the pipe or tubular member (not shown) the invention A is dis engaged from the chuck B, and the drill D and the in vention may then be stored in a relatively compact space until again needed. The forward end of the cable C is preferably formed into a head C] of spiral configuration to dig into foreign material (not shown) in a pipe (not shown} that is to be cleaned.

The use and operation of the invention has been explained previously in detail and need not be repeated.

I claim:

1. In combination with an electric motor driven drill having a chuck and pistol type grip, a pipe clean out accessory that includes:

a. a hollow container having an interior surface;

b. a first means secured to said container that may be removably gripped by said chuck to rotate said container by said motor;

. a first elongate tube projecting forwardly from said container that is axially aligned with said first means, said first tube including an outwardly ex tending stop on a free forward end thereof;

d. a length of stiff wire that is spirally wound to define a cable having threads on the exterior surface thereof, said cable due to the resiliency thereof frictionally engaging said interior surface of said container with sufficient force that said container and cable tend to rotate as a unit. and a first por tion of said cable projecting from said container into said first tube;

1:. a second tube that is rotatably engaged by said first tube and occupies a substantially fixed longitudinal position thereon between said stop and container. said second tube including longitudinal guide means as a part thereof, said guide means having first and second ends;

f. a third tube supported for longitudinal movement on said second tube. said third tube having first and second ends;

g. second means extending inwardly from said first end of said third tube that slidably engage said guide means for preventing said third tube rotating relative to said second tube; and

h. a control assembly secured in a fixed position on said second end of said third tube. said assembly including a pair of laterally spaced plates that are secured to said second end of said third tube with said cable extending forwardly between said plates. a support extending between said first and second plates on which said cable slidably rests. first and second rigid members pivotally supported between said plates, first and second tensioned helical springs means that at all times tend to pivot said first and second members from first positions where they are out of contact with said cable to second positions where they are in pressure contact with said threads on said cable. manually operable stop means for selectively holding either said first or second member in said first position, with said first member when in said second position capable of advancing said cable forwardly out of said control assembly either by said container. first tube. and cable rotating in a first direction relative to said second and third tubes and control assembly or by manually reciprocating said control assembly, and third tube as a unit relative to said first and second, said cable being advanced by the forward moving portion of each reciprocatory stroke. with said second member when in said second position and in engagement with said threads causing said cable to move towards and into said container when said container and first tube are rotated in a second direction relative to said control assembly, second and third tubes, and said cable being moved rearwardly into said container when said control assembly and third tube are reciprocated relative to said first tube, with said rearward movement of said cable occurring on the portion of the reciprocating motion in which said control assembly and third tube move towards said container.

2. A pipe clean out accessory as defined in claim I in which said hollow container is defined by a first outer shell and a second inner shell radially spaced from said first shell. said first and second shells having rearward edges. that are in abutting contact, and rigidly secured to one another. said first shell developing into a restricted neck on the forward portion thereof to which said first elongate tube is secured. and said second shell having a closed forward end. with said first and second shells cooperating to define a confined space in which a portion of said cable is at all times disposed in a coiled configuration and said cable due to the resilience thereof being in frictional pressure contact with the interior of said first shell and rotating concurrently as said container is rotated.

3. A pipe clean out accessory as defined in claim 2 in which said first means includes a bracket secured in a centered position to an exterior surface of said second shell. and an elongate member rigidly supported by said bracket in alignment with the axis of rotation of said second shell and said member capable of being removably gripped by said chuck to rotate said container when said motor driven drill is electrically energized.

4. A pipe clean out accessory as defined in claim I in which said longitudinal guide means is a longitudinal slot formed in said second tube and said second means is a rigid member that extends inwardly from said first end of said first tube to slidably engage said slot.

5. A pipe clean out accessory as defined in claim I which in addition includes a transverse rigid member secured to said second end of said third tube and to which said pair of laterally spaced plates are secured with said transverse member capable of being gripped by one hand of a user when one hand of the user is in engagement with said pistol grip of said motor driven drill and said member when so engaged permitting said control assembly and third tube to be reciprocated longitudinally relative to said first and second tubes and said container to advance and retract cable from or into said container.

6. A pipe clean out accessory as defined in claim 1 which in addition includes:

i. means for removing foreign material from said cable prior to the latter being retracted through said third tube into said first tube and said container.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4837887 *Feb 2, 1988Jun 13, 1989Mclaughlin Thomas LPower cleaning apparatus
US4956889 *Jul 3, 1989Sep 18, 1990Emerson Electric Co.Portable drain cleaning apparatus
US5749117 *Sep 20, 1996May 12, 1998Forsline; Ladd B.Paint applicator having an improved working tip
US5850664 *May 6, 1997Dec 22, 1998Forsline; Ladd B.Method and apparatus for constructing a paint applicator
US6158076 *Feb 22, 1999Dec 12, 2000Emerson Electric Co.Feed control devices for hand operated drain cleaning tools
US6412136Jul 16, 2001Jul 2, 2002Emerson Electric Co.Drain cleaning apparatus
US6470525 *Nov 30, 1999Oct 29, 2002Arthur A. SilvermanDrain cleaning apparatus having remote power feed
US7367077 *Mar 4, 2004May 6, 2008Emerson Electric Co.Drain cleaning apparatus
US8826483Nov 19, 2012Sep 9, 2014Emerson Electric Co.Feed control lock for hand operated drain cleaner
US20120011906 *Jul 16, 2010Jan 19, 2012Wildauer John BAuger cam lock
EP1818114A2Jan 22, 2007Aug 15, 2007Rothenberger AGPipe cleaning machine with a drum for a snake
EP1818114A3 *Jan 22, 2007Dec 1, 2010Rothenberger AGPipe cleaning machine with a drum for a snake
WO2008124230A1 *Mar 6, 2008Oct 16, 2008Emerson Electric CoCloset auger
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.33
International ClassificationB08B9/04, B08B9/02
Cooperative ClassificationB08B9/045
European ClassificationB08B9/045