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Publication numberUS3897749 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1975
Filing dateFeb 5, 1973
Priority dateFeb 5, 1973
Also published asCA1001413A1
Publication numberUS 3897749 A, US 3897749A, US-A-3897749, US3897749 A, US3897749A
InventorsChilton Frederick Roy, May Richard L, Robinson Edward Henry
Original AssigneeIdenticator Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dry powder fingerprinting apparatus
US 3897749 A
Abstract
A fingerprinting apparatus is provided for developing latent fingerprints impressed on the surface of a medium, such as a check. The apparatus utilizes a casing having an enclosed cavity formed therein for containing a supply of magnetizable powder. A pair of rotatable magnets are mounted within the cavity to sweep the powder across an aperture in a medium support surface. A cover member extends over the support surface to provide a slot adapted to receive a medium. Mounted on the cover member is a resiliently biased door adapted to maintain the aperture closed when inoperative and to seal the medium during operation. A guide bar that functions as a pivot point for the door is positioned on one side of the aperture while a magnet is positioned across the other side to collect any excess powder.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,897,749

May et al. 1 Aug. 5, 1975 [54] 5:2 :35 FINGERPR'NTWG FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS A P A 17.228 8/1965 Japan 118/637 [75] Inventors: Richard L. May, Manhattan Beach;

Frederick Roy Chino, P3105 Verdcs Primary ExaminerM0rris Kaplan Estates; Edward Henry Robinson Attorney, Agent, or Firm.lackson & Jones Law Torrance, all of Calif, Corporation [73] Assignee: ldenticator Corporation, San

Francisco, Calif. {57] ABSTRACT [22] Fil d; F b, 5, 1973 A fingerprinting apparatus is provided for developing latent fingerprints impressed on the surface of a me- [21] Appl. N0.: 329,753 dium, such as a check. The apparatus utilizes a casing having an enclosed cavity formed therein for contain- [52] US. Cl ll8/3l.5; l l8/637 ing a supply of magnetizable powder. A pair of rotat- [51] Int. Cl. A61B 5/10 able magnets are mounted Within the Qavity to sweep 58 Field of Search ll8/3l.5, 637; 355/3 DD; the powdfir across an aperture in medium pp 117/5 [75 L5 L7 17 surface. A cover member extends over the support surface to provide a slot adapted to receive a medium.

[56] References Cit d Mounted on the cover member is a resiliently biased UNITED STATES PATENTS door adapted to maintain the aperture closed when inoperative and to seal the medium during operation.

:21:52" 113 A guide bar that functions as a pivot point for the 3'233586 2/1966 'g i'ilc 18/637 door is positioned on one side of the aperture while a 3:367:667 2/1968 Auen H 8/49 X magnet is positioned across the other side to collect 3.457.900 7/1969 Drexler l 18/637 y excess P 3,467,399 9/1969 Kelly 61 al [18/50 X 3,543,720 12/1970 Drexler et al 118/637 Clams 5 D'awmg guns SHEET PATENTED Ann 5 I975 DRY POWDER FINGERPRINTING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates generally to fingerprinting systems and more particularly to an improved fingerprinting system utilizing magnetizable powder as the developer.

2. Description of the Prior Art The value of utilizing fingerprints for positive identification has long been known. However, a clean, convenient and quick method of effectuating the recording of a fingerprint has been elusive in the prior art.

Recently, various systems have been proposed utiliz ing magnetizable powder. For example, in US. Pat. No. 3,132,036 a latent fingerprint is developed by brushing the print with a magnetizable powder material. When the powder is brushed onto the surface of the medium, the powder will adhere to the oil defining the fingerprint but not to the portions of the medium devoid of such oils and thereby provide a visible image of the fingerprint.

Various magnetizable powders such as iron, cobalt, or nickel powder or mixtures thereof have been utilized. Generally the finer the powder utilized, the more clearly defined the image of the fingerprint. It has been suggested to utilize powder which has a size of about 325 mesh on to about 650 mesh. The fineness of the powder has remained an exasperating problem for those in the prior art, particularly in a commercial envi ronment. Generally the use of a magnetizable powder for developing a latent fingerprint on, for example, a check has not been acceptable since the finest of the powder frequently escapes and adheres to the customers clothes and hands and also to that of the clerk taking the fingerprint. The messiness involved in the use of the powder tends to alienate both the customers and the employees more so than the conventional recording of other identification upon the check.

The frustration involved in cashing a check in most commercial establishments is well known. The frequency of bad checks forces merchants to be overly cautious or suffer the consequences. The inconvenience in filling out the various forms of identification and marking the same on the check is well known to most shoppers.

The US. Pat. No. 3,549,397 discloses a method of taking fingerprints where an attempt is made to isolate the magnet from the powder and thereby contain the powder in the apparatus. This apparatus, however, fails to take into consideration the characteristics of the fine powder utilized and it is impossible to use in a commercial environment.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention successfully retains the powder in the apparatus despite frequent use.

Controlling the powder placement is accomplished by the use of features such as foam rubber seals on the shaft carrying the pair of magnets and a pivotable door member that seals the aperture permitting communication with the magnetizable powder. The door member functions to seal the aperture both during the fingerprint development operation with the check and when the apparatus is inoperative. A magnetic bar is positioned adjacent the aperture to remove any excess magnetizable powder from the check.

A powder door can be provided in the bottom of the cavity containing the magnetizable powder to facilitate the introduction of powder. In addition, a support bar can be pivotably arranged beneath the cover member for providing support during ordinary use and to permit the introduction of large documents in specialized applications.

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a sectional view of the fingerprinting apparatus showing a compartment containing magnetic powder having a pair of magnets rotatably mounted therein;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the support surface with both the cover member removed and with a cut-out portion to disclose the function of the seal;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the under surface of the cover member;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the movable door as seen from the aperture; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along lines 5 5 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The present invention is directed to an improved fingerprinting apparatus for developing latent fingerprints on mediums such as checks. Referring to FIG. I, the fingerprinting apparatus 10 comprises a casing 12 preferably molded of plastic. A base member I4 is appropriately connected to the casing I2 by four bolts I6. Other forms of connection could be utilized. A container 18 can be either integrally molded with the base member 14 or be a separate element. The container is adapted to hold the magnetizable powder 20. The side walls 22 of the container 18 are notched (not shown) to journal a shaft 24.

Mounted on the shaft 24 is a magnet holder 26 supporting a pair of magnets 28 and 30 that are diametrically positioned. Also mounted on the shaft 24 is a pair of foam rubber seals 32 and 34 having mylar smooth surfaces 36 adjacent the magnet holder 26. The seals 32 and 34 help maintain the magnetizable powder 20 within the container 18.

The casing 12 has a downwardly extending ledge member 38 that coacts with the side walls 22 to form the container 18. The ledge member 38 locks the shaft 24 in place. Mounted outside the container 18 on the shaft 24 is a pinion gear 40. A similar gear, not shown, is mounted on the other side of the shaft 24. A level member 42 is pivotably mounted on a shaft 44 through a slot 46 in the lever 42. The shaft 44 is mounted on a mounting member 50. The slot 46 is oblong to permit a lost motion movement between the shaft 44 and the lever 42.

The lever 42 carries a rack portion 48 that is adapted to coact with the pinion gear 40. The lever 42 also can contain a slot, not shown, for journaling an extension of the shaft 24 thereby aligning the rack 48 with the pinion gear 40. The lost motion oblong slot 46 permits a large manufacturing tolerance in the length of the lever 42. A spring 52 biases the lever 42 upward as shown in FIG. 1. The lever 42 can actually be duplicated in an operative model with substantially the same lever on the other side of the container 18 having an equivalent rack coacting with a second pinion gear on the shaft 24. The use of two levers improves the strength of the device but it should be recognized that a single lever could perform the same function. A han dle portion 54 can be connected between the two levers to be operated manually by the operator.

While not shown in the drawings, one of the levers such as lever 42 can have both an inwardly extending lug and a trigger portion. The lug is adapted to engage an arm portion of a hammer during downward move ment of the lever 42. The arm portion of the hammer can also be pivotably supported on shaft 44. A coil spring can be mounted on the base member 14 to biasingly engage upward the bottom of the arm portion of the hammer. The hammer itself can be adapted to contact the top of the casing 12. Basically, the purpose of a hammer and trigger assembly would be to simply cock the hammer when the lever 42 is pressed downward and the magnets 28 and 30 are swept through the magnetizable powder and across the aperture 56 which is exposed to the medium. When the lever 42 is moved upward, the hammer would be triggered to strike the bottom of the casing 12 and thereby assist in removing any excess magnetizable powder 20 on the medium. This hammer and trigger function is optional in the present invention and accordingly is not disclosed in the drawings.

A support member 58 can be a continuation of the support surface 60 of the casing 12. The support member 58 carries the aperture 56 and could be integrally molded into the casing 12 in an alternative embodiment.

A powder door 62 is pivotably mounted on a pair of hinges 64 and fastened by a screw 66 to the base member 14. The powder door 62 is designed to facilitate the introduction of the magnetizable powder 20 into the container 18 without disassembling the entire fingerprint apparatus 10.

Referring to FIG. 2, the aperture 56 and support surface 60 can be clearly seen since the cover member has been removed for illustrative purposes. As one edge of the support surface 60, a support bar 68 is pivotably connected between the support surface 60 and the cover member (not shown). During normal use of the fingerprint apparatus 10, the support bar 68 will be po sitioned, as shown in FIG. 1, between the cover member 70 and the support surface 60. This prevents damage to the cover member 70 from any unexpected forces on the cover member 70. A latent fingerprint on a large document can be introduced in the slot 72 exist ing between the cover member 70 and support surface 60 for development.

Adjacent the aperture 56 is a magnetic bar 74 and optionally a groove 76. The magnetic bar 74 serves to remove any excess powder from the medium as it is withdrawn from the slot 72. The groove 76 can be provided to assist in accumulating any excess magnetizable powder 20.

A guide bar 78 is positioned adjacent the aperture 56 and includes shoulders 80 and 82 as seen in FIG. 2. The guide 78 serves to both position the medium optimumly over the aperture 56 and provide a pivot point for a door member 84.

The door member 84 supports a resilient foam rubber pad 86 that is designed to seal the aperture 56. The door member 84 includes a peripheral lip 88 that terminates in a pair of extensions 90 and 92. A handle member 94 is pivotably connected to the door member 84.

Referring to FIG. 3, the underside of the cover member 70 is disclosed with a mounting frame 96. Extending inward from the mounting frame are a series of lug members 98, and 102. The lug members 98, 100 and 102 are adapted to extend over the peripheral lip 88 of the door member 84. Four springs 104 are positioned between the door member 84 and the cover member 70. These springs 104 bias the door member 84 to sealingly close the aperture 56. Notches 106 and 108 are provided in the cover member 70 to accommodate the handle member 94. The particular location of the lug members 98, 100 and 102 permits both the peripheral lip 88 to be slid under the lugs 98 and 102 and for the extension 90 to be resiliently moved past the lug 100. This arrangement permits as easy assembling of the door member 84 in the cover member 70.

The springs 104 are mounted respectively on pins 112 and holders 114.

The U-shaped mounting bar of the handle member 94 is adapted to pivot on the shoulders 80 and 82 of the guide bars 78 when the cover member 70 is positioned across the support surface 60. The mounting bar 110 is pivotally connected to the door member 84 at the notches 116 between the springs 104 so that the pivotal motion will be translated into a vertical motion for the door member 84 as seen in FIG. 5. Thus, the depression of the handle member 94 will pivot the rudder pad 86 away from the aperture 56 and permit the introduction of a medium into an operative position. When the handle 94 is released, the springs 104 will bias the rubber pad 86 sealingly across the aperture 56 to prevent any magnetizable powder 20 from being lost. As the medium, such as a check. is removed from the aperture 56, the developed fingerprint will pass across the magnetic bar 74 which assists in removing any excess powder 20.

The use of a pair of magnets 28 and 30 permits the medium to be brushed with the magnetizable powder 20 twice as much as if a single magnet was utilized.

With the use of the present invention, it is possible to provide a commerical fingerprint apparatus 10 for developing latent fingerprints with magnetizable powder 20. The powder 20 is successfully maintained within the apparatus 10 without any effort by the operator. While the above description discloses the preferred embodiment of the present invention, it should be realized that modifications can be made by those skilled in the art and accordingly, the scope of the present invention should be measured solely from the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A fingerprinting apparatus for developing a fingerprint impressed on the surface of a medium comprising:

a housing;

a container mounted in the housing and adapted to hold a supply of magnetizable powder;

a powder door on the bottom of the container to permit access for inserting magnetizable powder;

a support member adapted to supportingly receive the medium and having an aperture communicating with the container whereby at least a portion of the medium with the fingerprinted surface facing the aperture can be operatively exposed to the magnetizable powder in the container;

a spring biased closure member adapted to be biased to close the aperture and prevent the escape of the magnetizable powder;

resilient means on the surface of the closure member adapted to seal the aperture;

at least one magnet movably mounted within the container to operatively contact the magnetizable powder and carry at least a portion of the powder across the aperture in the support member to enable the magnetizable powder to contact and adhere to the fingerprint impressed on the medium;

means for moving the magnet in the container; and

means for removing excess powder including a second magnet member fixedly extending adjacent one edge of the aperture.

2. A fingerprinting apparatus for developing a fingerprint impressed on the surface of a medium comprising:

a housing;

a container mounted in the housing and adapted to hold a supply of magnetizable powder;

a support member adapted to supportingly receive the medium and having an aperture communicating with the container whereby at least a portion of the medium with the fingerprinted surface facing the aperture can be operatively exposed to the magnetizable powder in the container;

a cover member mounted over the support member and forming therewith a slot for receiving the medium;

a pivotable support bar connected to the housing and capable of supporting the cover member in one position and permitting the entrance of a medium larger than the cover member in another position;

at least one magnet movably mounted relative to the container to operatively contact the magnetizable powder and carry at least a portion of the powder across the aperture in the support member to enable the magnetizable powder to contact and adhere to the fingerprint impressed on the medium; and

means for moving the magnet relative to the aperture.

3. The invention of claim 2 further including a spring biased closure member adapted to be biased to close the aperture and prevent the escape of the magnetizable powder, and resilient means on the surface of the closure member adapted to seal the aperture, the means for removing excess powder includes the second magnet member fixedly extending adjacent one edge of the aperture.

4. A fingerprinting apparatus for developing the imprint of a fingerprint impressed on the surface of a noncharged medium such as a check, the medium capable of retaining the oils of the fingerprint comprising:

a lower housing;

a container mounted in the lower housing and adapted to hold a supply of magnetizable powder capable of coacting with a fingerprint impression;

a support member connected to the lower housing and adapted to supportingly receive the medium having an aperture communicating with the container whereby at least a portion of the medium with the fingerprinted surface facing the aperture can be operatively exposed to the magnetizable powder in the container;

a cover member positioned above the aperture and spaced therefrom;

a closure assembly including a closure member located between the aperture and the cover member and a lever member pivotably mounted and extending under the cover member to operatively contact the closure member and adapted to be manually operated for controlling the access to the aperture through the movement of the closure member;

resilient means on the closure member for sealing the aperture;

spring means for continually biasing the closure member to a position which would seal the aperture and retain the magnetizable powder within the container during non-use;

at least one magnet member movably mounted relative to the container to operatively move at least a portion of the powder across the aperture in the support member to enable the magentizable powder to contact and adhere to the fingerprint impressed on the medium; and

means for moving the magnet member in the housing.

5. The invention of claim 4 wherein two magnets are movably mounted in the container.

6. The invention of claim 4 wherein a powder door is provided on the bottom of the container to permit access for inserting magnetizable powder.

7. The invention of claim 4 wherein the means for moving the magnet includes a shaft supporting the magnet, a gear operatively connected to the shaft, and a pivoted lever having a rack portion for engaging the gear.

8. The invention of claim 4 further including a pivotable support bar connected at one end to the housing and capable of supporting the cover member in one position and permitting the entrance of a medium larger than the cover member in another position.

9. The invention of claim 7 wherein the lever is pivotably mounted to the housing through a lost motion connection.

10. The invention of claim 7 wherein the shaft is mounted in the container and a pair of foam rubber seals with smooth faces adjacent the magnet seal either side of the shaft to the container.

11. The invention of claim 4 wherein the support member further includes a guide bar which functions as both a pivot point for the lever member and an alignment stop for the medium.

12. The invention of claim 3 wherein resilient means includes a foam rubber pad with a relatively smooth face.

13. The invention of claim 4 further including the cover member fixedly mounted over the support member and forming therewith a slot for receiving the medium, the cover member having a plurality of lugs, the closure member having a peripheral lip adapted to coact with the lugs to align the closure member over the aperture.

14. A fingerprinting apparatus for developing the imprint of a fingerprint impressed on the surface of a noncharged medium such as a check, the medium capable of retaining the oils oof the fingerprint comprising:

a lower housing;

a container mounted in the lower housing and adapted to hold a supply of magnetizable powder capable of coacting with the fingerprint impression;

a support member connected to the lower housing and adapted to supportingly receive the medium having an aperture communicating with the container whereby at least one portion of the medium with the fingerprinted surface facing the aperture can be operatively exposed to the magnetizable powder in the container;

a cover member fixedly positioned above the aperture and spaced therefrom;

a closure assembly including a closure member located between the aperture and the cover member and a lever member pivotably mounted and extending under the cover member to operatively contact the closure member and adapted to be manually operated for controlling the access to the aperture through the movement of the closure member;

resilient means on the sealing face of the closure member for sealing the aperture;

spring means for continually biasing the closure member to a position which would seal the aperture and retain the magnetizable powder within the container during non-use including a plurality of springs operatively positioned between the cover member and the closure member;

at least one magnet member movably mounted relative to the container to operatively move at least a portion of the powder across the aperture in the support member to enable the magnetizable powder to contact and adhere to the fingerprint impressed on the medium; and

means for moving the magnet member in the housing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2600580 *Jun 3, 1949Jun 17, 1952Haloid CoElectrophotographic apparatus
US3158507 *Jan 11, 1960Nov 24, 1964Continental Can CoFloating roller seal
US3233586 *Jul 20, 1962Feb 8, 1966Lumoprint Zindler KgDevices for the application of developer powder
US3367667 *Jul 16, 1965Feb 6, 1968United States Steel CorpRoll seal for vacuum strip-treating chamber
US3457900 *Feb 29, 1968Jul 29, 1969Eastman Kodak CoSingle magnetic brush apparatus for development of electrostatic images
US3467399 *Jul 17, 1967Sep 16, 1969United States Steel CorpRoll seal for vacuum strip-treating chamber
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4190056 *Oct 31, 1977Feb 26, 1980General Medical CompanyMethod and means for recording sweat gland activity
US4381159 *Nov 12, 1980Apr 26, 1983Sirchie Fingerprint Laboratories, Inc.Magnetic fingerprint dusting brush
US4391503 *Mar 25, 1981Jul 5, 1983Gestetner Manufacturing LimitedMagnetic brush developer unit for photocopier
US5281293 *Jun 8, 1992Jan 25, 1994Frame Curtis CDevice for lifting and processing latent fingerprints or other evidence
US5613712 *Apr 21, 1995Mar 25, 1997Eastman Kodak CompanyPersonal identification document
US5879453 *Aug 8, 1997Mar 9, 1999Wallace Computer Services, Inc.System for verifying the identity of an applicant through the use of fingerprints
US5912981 *May 28, 1997Jun 15, 1999Hansmire; KennyBaggage security system and use thereof
US6162485 *May 7, 1998Dec 19, 2000Wallace Computers Services, Inc.Fingerprinting system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/31.5, 399/267
International ClassificationA61B5/117
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/1172
European ClassificationA61B5/117B