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Publication numberUS3897874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1975
Filing dateJun 10, 1974
Priority dateJun 10, 1974
Publication numberUS 3897874 A, US 3897874A, US-A-3897874, US3897874 A, US3897874A
InventorsCoons Gex B
Original AssigneeCoons Gex B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressurized storage container
US 3897874 A
Abstract
A container for holding contents under air pressure wherein the container comprises a body and a cap with the body connecting by a threaded connection to the cap, the threaded connection including a stop so with the body completely threaded into the cap the inner end of the body is slightly spaced from the closed end of the cap, an O-ring seal mounted upon the body adjacent the inner end thereof, an inwardly extending annular flange formed upon the cap adjacent the closed end thereof, with the body completely threaded into the cap the flange engages the seal to establish an airtight connection between the cap and body, upon initial location of the cap upon the body an airtight connection is established therebetween and as the cap is tightened upon the body, air pressure is caused to increase within the container and maintained due to the interaction between the flange and the seal.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Coons 1 1 PRESSURIZED STORAGE CONTAINER Gex B. Coons. 5641 Colfax Ave. North Hollywood. Calif. 9160] 122] Filed: June 10,1974

[2]] Appl. No.: 477,603

[76] Inventor:

[52] US. Cl. 206/315; 215/352; 220/304; 220/378 [51] Int. Cl... 365d 41/04; 865d 53/02; 865d 85/00 [58] Field of Search..... 206/315; 215/270, 341-346 215/352; 220/8, 254, 304. 357-358. 378;

Primary Exuminerwilliam 1, Price Assistant E.\'uminer-Steven E. Lipman Allurney, Agent or F1'rmRobert E. Geauque Aug. 5, 1975 I57] ABSTRACT A container for holding contents under air pressure wherein the container comprises a body and a cap with the body connecting by a threaded connection to the cap the threaded connection including a stop so with the body completely threaded into the cap the inner end of the body is slightly spaced from the closed end of the cap, an O-ring seal mounted upon the body adjacent the inner end thereof, an inwardly extending annular flange formed upon the cap adja cent the closed end thereof, with the body completely threaded into the cap the flange engages the seal to establish an airtight connection between the cap and body. upon initial location of the cap upon the body an airtight connection is established therebetween and as the cap is tightened upon the body. air pressure is caused to increase within the container and maintained due to the interaction between the flange and the seal 7 Claims. 4 Drawing Figures PRESSURIZED STORAGE CONTAINER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention is an improvement of US. Pat. No. 3,819,040, entitled PRESSURIZED STORAGE CON- TAINER, by the present inventor,

Tennis balls are manufactured to close specifications in order to have a uniform product for use anywhere in the world. One of these specifications is that the ball must have a bounce between 53 inches and 58 inches when dropped on a concrete surface from 100 inches in height. In order to meet this specification and other specifications, tennis balls are made with a relatively thin wall of elastomeric material, covered on the out side with a felt fuzz, and filled with gas (such as air) under pressure. The halls are usually packaged in groups of three in a container having sufficient pressure to substantially equalize the pressure in the balls. This method of packaging maintains the physical characteristic of the balls until the container is opened. At this time the fresh balls begin to age in a primary way, that being the gradual escape of internal gas through the thin wall of the ball at all times and also the acceleration of this escape when the ball is hit with a racket.

The importance of having tennis balls with uniform physical characteristics must not be minimized. Those who are serious tennis players, either the relatively few competitors in tournaments or the many more competitors in recreational play, appreciate the feel of striking a good ball with a racket. It is well known that old defective balls will not go where they are hit and that in trying to compensate for the deficiencies in an old ball, a player will often ruin a good stroke that has been developed with much practice. Some of the best players would rather not play at all rather than play with defective balls.

Once the tennis ball pressurized container which is in common use has been opened, the balls which are not being used and are located in that container begin their deterioration. Also, once a ball has been used, it would be desirable to relocate the used ball in a pressurized atmosphere in order to decrease the balls deterioration.

In the past, there have been several types of containers which have been proposed for such use. However, such previously known containers are complex in construction and therefore costly to manufacture and also require to be connected with a source of pressurized gas once the container is reclosed. As a result, such containers have not achieved any significant commercial success and as of the present day, no repressurizing type of container is known to be employed which repressurizes by interconnecting members.

The pressurization which is required in the containers in which the balls are sold is approximately 13 pounds per square inch. This pressure is not so significantly high as to require a separate pressurizing apparatus to be connected with the container to repressurize the container. It is one object of this invention to employ the use of a pressurizing means incorporated with the container which can be readily applied manually.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The container of this invention provides for a body portion and a cap portion. Once the cap portion is initially inserted upon the body portion, an air-tight connection is established therebetween through an O-ring seal mounted upon the body, closing off the interior of the body portion of the container to the ambient. Means are provided between the cap and the body portion such as a threading arrangement which permits the cap to be tightened upon the body. As a result. the volume of the space within the body portion of the container is decreased. This decreasing of the volume causes a compression of the gas, which is normally air, within the body. The arrangement between the cap and the body is such so that with the cap completely tightened upon the body, the pressurization of the gas within the body will be approximately [3 pounds per square inch. Therefore, the tennis balls which are to be located within the container will again be placed within a pressurized environment. Means are provided between the cap and body to maintain and prevent leakage of the established pressurized environment, such means being described in the Abstract of the Disclo sure and reference is to be had thereto,

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is an isometric view of the container of this invention showing the cap disassociated from the body;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the container of this invention showing the cap completely closed about the body;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the container of this invention taken along line 33 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a portion of FIG, 3 showing the means to maintain the pressurization of the container of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE SHOWN EMBODIMENT Referring particularly to the drawing, there is shown in FIG. 1 the container 10 ofthis invention which is basically composed of a cap 12 and a body I4. The body 14 includes an interior chamber 16 which is adapted to receive a plurality (normally three in number) of tennis balls 18. However, it is to be understood that although this invention is described in reference to the use of tennis balls, it is considered that the apparatus of this invention may be employed for other types of game balls or to pressurize other types of contents. The device of this invention could be readily used for handballs and racquet balls with the container body and cap being scaled to provide the required pressure.

The cap 12 also includes an interior chamber 20. The size of chamber 20 is just slightly larger than the body I4 so that body 14 can be telescopingly received in chamber 20 establishing a close interfit between body 14 and cap I2. An O-ring seal 22 is mounted within an annular groove 23 formed in body 14 adjacent the inner end 25. Seal 22 is formed of a conventional resilierit material such as rubber. The purpose of the seal 22 is to insure that an airtight connection is established between the cap I2 and the body 14 when the cap 12 is inserted upon the body 14.

Located within chamber 20 adjacent the closed end of cap 12 is an inwardly extending annular flange 29. The function of flange 29 will be explained further on in the specification.

Secured to the cap 12 within the chamber 20 is an internal thread 24. Fixedly mounted upon the body 14 is a thread 26. Threads 24 and 26 cooperate together to move body 14 within cap 12. The inner end of thread 24 terminates in a stop 27. With thread 26 in contact with stop 27, the inner end 25 is just slightly spaced from the closed end of cap 12 forming a gap therebetween. In this position the O-ring seal 22 is tightly pressed against flange 29 and actually deforms slightly (approximately nine thousandths of an inch). This pro duces an extremely air-tight connection between cap 12 and body 14 and prevents leakage of the pressurized air from chamber 20. In essence. the cooperation between the flange 29 and the seal 22 is a secondary seal with the primary seal being the O-ring seal 22 in tight contact with the wall of section 30. As illustrated by the dotted line position of the groove 23 and O-ring seal 22 in FIG. 4, the O-ring seal 22 seals against the wall section 30 as it moves to its upper full line position in FIG. 4.

The operation of the container of this invention is as follows: A person grasps both the body 14 and the cap 12 and causes a turning movement to occur there between by the application of manual force. Turning of the body [4 in respect to the cap 12 is facilitated by gripping area 15 on body 14 and gripping area 13 on cap 12. This causes the thread 24 to be moved along the thread 26 until the cap 12 can be disassociated from the body 14. It is to be noted that the depressuration of the chamber 16 is accomplished gradually and no ejecting of the cap 12 is caused. Once the cap 12 has been removed from the open end of body 14, the ball (or balls) 18 which is stored within the chamber 20 can be readily removed.

Let it be assumed that only a single ball 18 has been removed from the chamber 20. The operator then relo cates the cap 12 upon the body portion 14 so that thread 24 becomes coupled with the thread 26. ln this initial position an air-tight seal is established between the O-ring 22 and the smaller diameter section of the cap [2. It is to be noted that the diameter of the thread 24 is equal to or greater than the diameter of the section 20 in order to permit passage of the O ring 22 past the thread 24. With the air-tight connection being initially established between the cap 12 and the body 14 as the cap 12 is rotated about the body 14, a recompression occurs within the chamber 16. The longitudi nal movement of the cap 12 upon the body [4 is preselected so that the compression of the gas within the chamber 16 is to the value of approximately 13 pounds per square inch with three balls located in the chamber 16. Therefore. the balls which are not in use and are being retained within the chamber 16 are not caused to deteriorate but are stored in a satisfactory pressurized environment. New tennis balls are pressurized internally to a value of about 13 psi It is to be understood that with one or two balls removed from chamber 16, a pressurization of less than the initial 13 psi would resultv However, a partial pres surization is better than no pressurization.

At the time the operator decides to relocate the ball that is being used within the container 10, the container 10 is opened, the ball inserted in the container 10 and then closed. This causes a pressurization of the gas within chamber 16 and prevents the ball that was used from deteriorating as well as the unused balls.

What is claimed is:

l. A pressurized container comprising:

a body having an interior chamber to be pressurized;

a rigid cap for compressing air in said interior chamher, said cap being longitudinally and bodily movable relative to said body from an initial position to a completely closed position;

first means located between said cap and said body to establish an air-tight connection therebetween. said first means causes establishment of said airtight connection when said cap and body are in said initial position and maintains said air-tight connection during movement of said cap in either direc tion between said completely closed position and said initial position. thereby resulting in gradual change in pressure in said interior chamber as said cap moves in either direction between said positions. said first means including pressure maintaining means. said pressure maintaining means connects with said first means only when said cap is in said completely closed position thereby insuring substantial non-leakage over a period of time of the pressurized air within said interior chamber; and

second means mounted on both said cap and said body. said second means capable of interlocking to effect movement from said initial position to said completely closed position and to result in securement of said cap upon said body in said completely closed position.

2. The container as defined in claim 1 wherein:

both said body and cap being cylindrical in configuration;

said second means comprises a threaded arrangement including a first thread mounted upon said cap and a second thread mounted upon said body.

3. The container as defined within claim 2 wherein:

said first thread is on the interior surface of said cap and said second thread is on the exterior surface of said body, said threads becoming coupled at said initial position and remaining coupled during movement of said cap to said completely closed position.

4. The container as defined in claim 3 wherein:

said first means comprises an O-ring seal which is formed of a resilient material, said seal being located between said second means and said interior chamber for all positions of said cap between said initial position and said completely closed position.

5. The container as defined in claim 1 wherein:

said first means comprises an O-ring seal which is formed of a resilient material, said seal being located between said second means and said interior chamber for all positions of said cap between said initial position and said completely closed position.

6. The container as defined in claim 5 wherein said pressure maintaining means comprises:

said O-ring seal being mounted within said body adjacent the open end of said body, an annular flange attached to said cap, said annular flange protruding into said chamber, said annular flange contacting said O-ring seal when said container is in said completely closed position.

7. The container as defined in claim 5 wherein said pressure maintaining means comprises:

said O-ring seal being mounted within said body adja cent the open end of said body, an annular flange attached to said cap. said annular flange protruding into said chamber, said annular flange contacting said O-ring seal when said container is in said completely closed position.

l k k =0

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2380395 *May 21, 1943Jul 31, 1945Hartford Empire CoSealed package
US3101984 *Apr 7, 1959Aug 27, 1963Gilbert Mfg Company IncPush together, screw apart connector
US3305119 *Feb 12, 1965Feb 21, 1967Reynolds Frank JReclosure caps
US3853222 *Jun 21, 1973Dec 10, 1974Matchpoint Ind IncPressurization apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3951172 *Nov 15, 1974Apr 20, 1976Josam Manufacturing Co.Adjustable cleanout plumbing fitting
US4020948 *Jul 7, 1975May 3, 1977Lee Chun WonTennis ball storage container
US4139311 *Apr 27, 1977Feb 13, 1979Willy LorscheidtDispensing cartridge having an improved automatic filler stick positioning mechanism
US4560566 *Jan 4, 1984Dec 24, 1985Continental Packaging Company, Inc.Controlled pressurization
US5002196 *Oct 20, 1989Mar 26, 1991John BassiliPressure vessel with removable sealing lid
US5251776 *Aug 12, 1991Oct 12, 1993H. William Morgan, Jr.Pressure vessel
US5311988 *Sep 29, 1992May 17, 1994Bronson Henry DPressurizing cap and method for using same
US5518135 *Jun 22, 1994May 21, 1996Freund; William D.Roll-resistant tennis ball can and lid
US5848690 *Oct 24, 1996Dec 15, 1998Wilson Sporting Goods Co.Tennis ball container with pressure seal and screw-on cap
US6006942 *Oct 2, 1997Dec 28, 1999M&M Industries, Inc.Open head container and lid assembly
US6170691Oct 2, 1998Jan 9, 2001M & M Industries, Inc.Open-head container and lid assembly
US7717280 *Dec 10, 2007May 18, 2010Aerojet-General CorporationTwo-piece aft closure for a rocket motor case
CN100593501CAug 25, 2008Mar 10, 2010高明雄Pressure storage for tennis
WO2008005196A2 *Jun 21, 2007Jan 10, 2008Guy H ParrPaint roller storage system and apparatus
WO2008076688A2 *Dec 10, 2007Jun 26, 2008Aerojet General CoTwo-piece aft closure for a rocket motor case
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/315.9, 220/304, 215/352, 220/378
International ClassificationB65D41/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/0442
European ClassificationB65D41/04D1