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Publication numberUS3898641 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1975
Filing dateDec 23, 1971
Priority dateDec 23, 1971
Publication numberUS 3898641 A, US 3898641A, US-A-3898641, US3898641 A, US3898641A
InventorsPhilip M Banner
Original AssigneePhilip M Banner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Security rope alarm means
US 3898641 A
Abstract
Wiring placed within a rope or cable for securing boats or other equipment. The wiring ends are equipped with metal contacts connected in circuit with an alarm control unit and connected to boat and shore chocks having circuit contact means. A/C or D/C power source provides operating current for detection and alarm means that is set-off by disturbing or removal of the rope alarm means.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Banner SECURITY ROPE ALARM MEANS [76] Inventor: Philip M. Banner, 28 Oxford Rd.,

Massapequa, NLY. 11758 22 Filed: Dec. 23, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 211,210

[52] US. Cl. 340/280; 340/421 [51] Int. Cl. G08b 13/06 [58] Field of Search 340/280, 283, 276, 134, 340/421; 200/154, 79; 9/313, 400, l; 339/28,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 597,891 1/1898 Walstrom et a1. 340/280 883,335 3/1908 OConnor.. 340/280 1,014,718 1/1912 Parsons 339/29 Aug. 5, 1975 1,815,206 7/1931 Mathews 340/280 2,913,712 11/1959 Lee 340/280 3,444,547 5/1969 Surek 340/280 3,596,265 7/1971 Garlandm. 340/280 3,618,065 11/1971 Trip 340/280 Primary E.\'aminer-G1en R. Swann, 111

[ 5 7 ABSTRACT Wiring placed within a rope or cable for securing boats or other equipment. The wiring ends are equipped with metal contacts connected in circuit with an alarm control unit and connected to boat and shore chocks having circuit contact means. A/C or D/C power source provides operating current for detection and alarm means that is set-off by disturbing or removal of the rope alarm means.

9 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures SECURITY ROPE ALARM MEANS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION New and improved security devices are needed to protect personal property and combat a tremendous increase in theft particularly on boats that contain valuable accessories, easily disposed of. Where the particular boat already has a security device protecting it there is still no assurance that the equipment and the security device will not be removed altogether, such as in the case of a small boat or trailer or a bike, or a ship by removing the dock securing means and pulling same away. It is easy to disconnect the dock lines and remove equipment without noise wherein the security device aboard would not be triggered until someone attempts entry into a guarded area. An excellent example occured in 1971 where a loaded oil barge was set loose by unknown parties, undetected it drifted out to sea, washed up on the shore of Long Beach Long lsalnd. The subsequent damage to the barge released the oil into the ocean and the barge beached. This invention, upon disturbing or releasing the secured means would provide adequate means of warning necessary to discourage the would be trouble-maker and signal the security forces into action. This invention, unlike other security means uses the metal part of the object being secured as a contact sensor member, wherein the removal or tampering of said contact causes the security alarm to operate. It safeguards financial responsibility, wildlife and beaches from oil spills.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention operates on storage batteries or A/C current. Means can be provided for variable alarm time settings that control the amount of time an alarm will ring should anyone tamper with or remove the rope alarm. In cases of vandalism it would prevent anyone from untying a boat thinking of taking it or leaving same adrift. This invention can be connected to a central control station detection system wherein if any of the protected equipment is moved or removed it will automatically trigger the built-in alarm system provided by the rope alarm means. Reference is directed to prior art circuitry in US. Pat. No. 883,335 Mar. 1908 OConnor that shows a relay electromagnet l2 switch battery 22, a buzzer 21 that perform the function of the circuitry of this application.

Accordingly, a principal object of the invention is to provide new and improved security means for boats, ships, mobile equipment or stationary removable items that require improved security measures afforded by this invention, that uses the metal on a mooring chock or the object being secured as a metal contact automatically breaking the security electrical circuit upon disengagement or tampering. Another'object of the invention is to provide new and improved ropelike alarm security means of a type having simplicity in design and manufacture, economical to produce, safe to use, easy to install that will reduce thefts and provide a new means of discouraging intruders.

Another object of the invention is to provide new and improved ropelike alarm security means having a new ropelike alarm means coupled with a power and alarm control unit requiring minimum power or space to produce maximum security advantages.

Another object of this invention is to provide new and improved ropelike alarm means making this invention economically feasible for people requiring protection on bikes, trailers and small things. who can not afford high priced equipment. On boats and other means having some form of its own power source and signalling device such would be utilized in various manufactured models.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following specifications and drawings, of which;

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the ropelike security device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the ropelike security device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a full side view showing a ship secured by the invention.

FIG. 5 shows a front view of the alarm control unit of this invention.

FIG. 6 shows the electrical alarm circuit of the invention.

FIG. 7 shows a front view of one kind of a rope attachment bit.

FIG. 8 shows a front view of another model ofa rope attachment bit.

FIG. 9 shows a front view of a security cover for securing bits, in one illustration.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the figures the invention comprises a 7 wire cable or other ropelike means 1 having two wires 2 and 3 placed inside of it, being connected to securing ends 4 and 5 with built-in contacts 6 and 7 being connected to wires 2 and 3. The wires 2 and 3 are connected to their respective terminals 8' and 9 on the alarm control unit 10. The input power is established by connecting a power source to terminals 11 and 12. Mooring chock 19 has a metal surface 21 allowing circuit contact on the rope alarm l or means to place a contact plug 2-A in the rope alarm end on one side and 3-A on the other side for connection to a mooring bit 19 and 20 or to a boat on the other side, not shown. Another modification mooring bit 20 shows a tamper switch 23 built into the chock and a plug-in means 24 for making electrical contact. Internal connections are made to component parts fuse 13 test switch 14, master on-off switch 15 and to a signal means 16 built into the unit or or connected to terminals 17 and 18 that lead to another horn or alarm means eliminating duplication. One side of the wires 2 and 3 is connected to the alarm control unit 10 and the other side to a mooring chock 19 or 20. A protective security cover 25 would provide additional useful apparatus to lock and protect the ropelike alarm device, having a key lock 26 to secure it. The cover 25 when removed would cause a break in the circuitry setting off the alarm unless another disarming key 27 were used.

FIG. 1 shows the rope or wire holding means I, one form having wires 2 and 3 within it as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 connected to the end loops 4 and 5 having electrical contacts 6 and 7 shown in FIG. 2 are separated fromsaid electrical contact it causes apparatus within the alarm control unit 10 shown in FIG. 5 to sound the alarm.

FIGSQZ and 3 show that contacts 6 and 7 are ei- I thier built into=thc ropelike ends 4'a'nd 5 or are in the 1 form of plug-in types shown as 2-A and 3-A, in FIG. 31 As in FIGS. 2 and 3 the design of the ropelike means 'sh'own dock 32 wherein the removal of any of the lines 1 will result in causing signal means to warn of the condition and the location of the fault.

FIG. 5 shows an alarm control unit having electrical teiminals 8 and 9, II and 12, a fuse l3 switches l4 and 15, a horn signal means 16 and additional terminals l7 and 18 mounted on top and having a relay 28.

The removal of a security rope I from connection to any mooring bit or boat chock 19-21 will cause the relay to open the alarm circuit.

FIG. 6 shows the circuit diagram of the parts in the FIG. 5 alarm control unit 10. It is shown for illustration purposes and commonly used. The invention is not in the circuitry, per se, but the cable, ropes and checks and covers, etc., associated therewith.

FIG. 7 shows a front view of one kind of a securing bit 19. having a'metal contact surface 21, that causes the security ropes' and cables 1 to keep the alarm circuit shown in FIG. 6 closed.

8 showsanother mooring bit 21 having key v 'locking means 26, acontrol switch 23 and a security I rope connection receptacle 24.

FIG. 9 shows the outline of a chock 19 having a protective security cover 25 operated by a key lock 26 also I having a'disarming lock 27 so that the chock is tamper proof and the security rope connection is inaccessible.

, Operational data: Installation in a small craft should have the alarm control placed out of reach or view. operated by small D. C. battery means. Disconnecting the boat at the chockon the boat or the dock or mooring will signal a alarm, sound the alarm, put on lights, take pictures or anyother reasonable means. A larger craft would attach the alarm part to their horn or siren and possibly to a central control agency. The same method would apply to tugs ,and ships wherein the rope alarm .means provides detection of tampering or movement of lines. The small items discussed briefly such as bikes or trailers that are very commonly involved in theft would use a modification of the rope alarm means. Attaehment of a small alarm control unit to a rope alarm connected back to itself would keepthe circuit closed and the alarm in the offposition, operatedby a key. Upon any disconnect ofthe rope alarm or tampering with same will trigger the alarm. The rope whencut or disconnectedinstantly triggers the alarm while the ropelik'e means has the needed strength to amply hold anything that requiressecurity, in different sizes.-

In FIGS. 2 and 3 the drawings shbw rope-like means internally wired, connected -'to built-in end terminal contacts or plugs, ready to connect to an object requiring this security protection. T-he use of wire cables on ships will require insulatedcircuit members that will protect current carrying wiring from the other metal cable strands. Where ropelike means isused on smaller diameter lines or in larger ropelike lines called a hawser which is a heavy line of fibre or wire, any'line over 5 inches in diameter, such will require a new art of embodying the security circuit wiring within the ropelike means, concealing the wire within the lay of the rope. The construction of rope or wire cable does not easily accept. an internal wiring circuit and the ropelike means and cables are subject to stretching under stress varying with the wind, the seas and thepull between the secured boat and a dock. Another important factor is the presence of sea water use and moisture factors in this security device that is quite different than protecting a garment or a appliance against shoplifters where it is merely encircled by a cable holding such articles. For example; The Coast Guard Auxiliary Basic Seamanship course teaches on page 37 that nylon line elongate and I0 percent at normal working loads and over 40 percent at loads up to breaking strength; this also varies with manilla lines or dacron, therefore, the introduction of stretching while wet and under load are important factors. The present invention will be useful in tow lines where in the night an important line should come loose it would endanger the property and lives of people involved in such operations. The present invention provides a new security means for boats and ships providing safety at the dock or at anchor where there is constant pullingby sea and wind motion providing security. The breaking of an anchor line, loosening of a tow rope, the untying ofa boat at a dock or on a deck will sound the alarm. The source of power'to operate the electrical control can be battery or A.C. current. The present invention utilizes the object being secured by having its metal exterior making contact with the ropelike means wiring circuit and upon any separation from either contact will trigger the alarm.

Although the invention has been described in detail with respect to an exemplary embodiment thereof, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that other variations and modifications may be effected within the scope and spirit of the invention.

I claim: 1. A Marine Security Alarm Means comprising, ropelike means for securing a boat mooring bit to a dock mooring bit having a first electrically conductive means incorporated in said ropelike means,

second electrically conductive means on one of said mooring bits, alarm indicator means, said first and second electrically conductive means being connected to said alarm indicator means, whereby when said ropelike means is lifted from said mooring bit, said alarm indicator means is activated by said lifting or separation from said mooringbit. I 2. Apparatus as in claim 1 whereinboth of said mooring bits have electrically conductive means.

3. Apparatus as in claim 1, wherein said ropelike means is a rope line containing a wire said wire comprising the first insulated electrically conductive means.

4. Apparatus as in claim 1, wherein said ropelike means is a wire cable, containing a wire said wire comprising the first insulated electrically conductive means. i

5. Apparatus as in claim I, wherein said first and second electrically conductive means comprises a plug and a socket.

6. Apparatus as in claim 1, wherein a cover is mounted on one of said mooring bits.

7. Apparatus as in claim 6, wherein a lock is mounted on said cove r.

8. Apparatus as in claim I, having a tamperproof

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US597891 *Nov 9, 1896Jan 25, 1898 Electrically-actuated lock for bicycle-racks
US883335 *Sep 26, 1907Mar 31, 1908John J O'connorElectric theft-alarm system.
US1014718 *Mar 8, 1910Jan 16, 1912Isaac Hardy ParsonsElectrical coupling.
US1815206 *Aug 30, 1923Jul 21, 1931Sadie L MathewsAutomatic burglar alarm for automobiles
US2913712 *Jul 3, 1957Nov 17, 1959Lee Katherine LAnti-shoplifting alarm device
US3444547 *Oct 8, 1965May 13, 1969Gefco Mfg CorpAnti-shoplifting device
US3596265 *Jun 17, 1968Jul 27, 1971Garland Percy ATamper-proof shoplifting alarm
US3618065 *Nov 4, 1969Nov 2, 1971Trius CorpAntitheft alarm for appliances
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4482333 *Apr 30, 1982Nov 13, 1984Geri Engineering, Inc.Automatic inflation system
US4536754 *May 13, 1983Aug 20, 1985Sentrol, Inc.Magnetically retained connecting cable incorporating magnetically operated switch
US4992789 *Oct 31, 1989Feb 12, 1991Daniel CzerwinskiMarine lock and alarm apparatus
US5134248 *Nov 13, 1990Jul 28, 1992Advanced Temperature Devices, Inc.Thin film flexible electrical connector
US5936538 *Sep 28, 1998Aug 10, 1999Meschkow; Sasha H.Shoelace warning system
US6100793 *Feb 1, 1999Aug 8, 2000Dimou; George A.Integrated vehicle and building alarm system
US6188324Mar 22, 2000Feb 13, 2001Sasha H. MeschkowShoelace warning system
US7079032Mar 25, 2004Jul 18, 2006Acco Brands Usa LlcPortable electronic device physical security apparatus with alarmed cable
US7191623Jan 18, 2006Mar 20, 2007Acco Brands Usa LlcComputer physical security device with retractable cable
US7204106May 18, 2004Apr 17, 2007Acco Brands Usa LlcPortable electronic device physical security
US7614266Nov 10, 2009Acco Brands Usa LlcSecurity apparatus with reset mechanism
US7647796Feb 6, 2007Jan 19, 2010Acco Brands Usa LlcComputer physical security device with retractable cable
US7730751Jan 28, 2009Jun 8, 2010Acco Brands Usa LlcLocking device with passage
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US7997106Dec 15, 2010Aug 16, 2011Acco Brands Usa LlcSecurity apparatus including locking head and attachment device
US8001812Dec 23, 2010Aug 23, 2011Acco Brands Usa LlcSecurity apparatus including locking head
US8042366Oct 25, 2011Acco Brands Usa LlcSecurity apparatus including attachment device
US8230707May 21, 2008Jul 31, 2012ACCO Brands CorporationSecurity system with lock interface member with multiple apertures
USD651889Jan 10, 2012Acco Brands Usa LlcSecurity apparatus
USD660682May 29, 2012Acco Brands Usa LlcSecurity apparatus
USD661975Jun 19, 2012ACCO Brands CorporationAttachment device for security apparatus
USD670553Nov 13, 2012ACCO Brands CorporationAttachment device for security apparatus
DE10231012A1 *Jul 9, 2002Jan 29, 2004Henry OpitzAlarm system for theft protection of object, especially boat, has alarm sender as electrical conductor system for connection to controller configured to detect electrical conductor system interruption
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Classifications
U.S. Classification340/568.2, 340/652, 340/568.4
International ClassificationG08B13/06
Cooperative ClassificationB63B2017/0009, G08B13/06
European ClassificationG08B13/06