Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3898718 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1975
Filing dateDec 3, 1973
Priority dateDec 3, 1973
Publication numberUS 3898718 A, US 3898718A, US-A-3898718, US3898718 A, US3898718A
InventorsEubank Marcus P
Original AssigneeEubank Marcus P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus facilitating burial in the vertical position
US 3898718 A
Abstract
A vertical burial system characterized by a plurality of vertically oriented burial bores and a plurality of cylindrical corpse containers disposed vertically in the respective bores. Preferably, each bore contains a casing therewithin that has a plurality of individual supports at different levels for receiving a plurality of the respective vertically disposed corpse containers therewithin. The casings have anchors for preventing being lifted from the bores by bouyancy effects in saturated soils and are sealed against the influx of water. Removable top lids and horizontal tombstones are provided for access and for identification from the top, or surface of the earth. The corpse containers preferably comprise foamed plastic loosely conformably fitting the corpse therewithin for supporting the corpse in the horizontal or vertical position. If desired, the casings, with the respective corpse containers therewithin, may be employed for shipping, as following a common disaster for a family or during war time. In this way, the casing with a plurality of corpse containers therewithin can be emplaced in an automatically drilled bore hole in a cemetary or the like.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Eubank Aug. 12, 1975 [54] APPARATUS FACILITATING BURIAL IN [57] ABSTRACT THE VERTICAL PQSITION A vertical burial system characterized by a plurality of [76] Inventor: Marcus Eubank, BOX 7576, vertically oriented burial bores and a plurality of cylin- Longview, 75601 dncal corpse contamers d1sposed vertically in the respectlve bores. Preferably, each bore contains a casmg [22] Flled: 1973 therewithin that has a plurality of individual supports [21] APPL No 421,043 at different levels for receiving a plurality of the respective vertically dlsposed corpse contamers therewithin. The casings have anchors for preventing being [52] U5. Cl. 27/35; 27/7; 27/29; lifted from the bores by bouyancy ff i saturated 52/137 soils and are sealed against the influx of water. Re-

ovable top and horizontal tombstones are pro- Field of Search 27/2, 3, 4i 8, vided for access and for identification from the top, or 27/9, 35; 52/128 135, 137 surface of the earth. The corpse containers pr eferably comprise foamed plastic loosely conformably fitting [56] References C'ted the corpse therewithin for supporting the corpse in the UNITED STATES PATENTS horizontal or vertical position. If desired, the casings, 376,629 1/1888 Braund 27/7 with the respective Corpse containers therewithin, y 965,000 7/1910 Newman 52/136 be employed for shipping, as following a common di- 3,188,712 6/1965 Bauermeister i 27/35 saster for a family or during war time. In this way, the 3,287,865 11/1966 Lockman 52/136 casing with a plurality of corpse Containers ther 3,348,280 10/1967 Myers 27/2 within can be emplaced in an automatically drilled 3,581,452 6/1971 Jalbert..... 27/35 bore hole in a cemetary or the mm 3,596,419 8/1971 Jalbert 52/137 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Exam iner-Rick Opitz 5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures Attorney, Agent, or FirmJames C. Fails A r vw @Mgfigfii'fi z 15 5 '2 I I 1. 1 i [j 7.- 1 I 2/ PATENT wax 2mm SHEU @GGGC) 0 v i n a ".w @K MX PATENTEB AUG 1 2|975 M mw g APPARATUS FACILITATING BURIAL IN THE VERTICAL POSITION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1 Field of the Invention This invention relates to apparatus for shipping and burying corpses. More particularly, it relates to apparatus facilitating burial, yet conserving space.

2. Description of the Prior Art A wide variety of burial systems have been known. These systems have ranged from cremation of the corpses through burial of the corpses in the horizontal position. Many families are reluctant to cremate their loved ones. Consequently, space for cemetaries and the like has reached a premium as land values have climbed and as the large population in the urban areas demand an ever greater proportion of the land. Moreover, the caskets that were employed in the prior art were very ornate caskets that required great care in shipping. Typical of the prior art systems are the coffin containers described in US. Pat. No. 330,432, patented in 1885; the burial vault of US. Pat. No. 2,235,185; the mausoleum of US. Pat. No. 1,631,239 and the burial structure for storing ashes or the like described in US. Pat. No. 617,161.

None of these systems has provided a totaly satisfactory solution that does not require cremation of ones loved one, yet does not take up so much area on the earths surface as to be objectionable for future generations. Moreover, the prior art did not provide corpse containers that could be readily shipped inexpensively.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide apparatus facilitating burial at a predetermined location and alleviating the difficulties of the prior art.

It is also a specific object of this invention to provide corpse containers that can be readily shipped and that can be buried without requiring an inordinate amount of the earths surface area.

These and other objects will become apparent from the invention described hereinafter, particularly when taken in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a typical burial plat in accordance with one embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a partial cross sectional view of a couple of the burial structures as employed in a burial system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a partial exploded view of one of the burial structures of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an isometric view of a corpse container of FIG. 2 in the open position.

FIG. 5 is a partial cross sectional view showing a corpse vertically oriented within the burial structure of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a plurlaity of casings with corpse containers therewithin for shipment of corpses, as from a war zone.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the burial structure 11 comprises a plurality of vertically oriented burial bores, or bore holes, 13 and a plurality of corpse containers, or caskets, 15 disposed vertically in the respective bores 13. FIG. 1 shows a plat layout. FIG. 2 shows the cross sectional details of the respective burial bores. To further conserve space. each of the bores 13 is preferably adapted to receive a plurality of corpse containers 15 vertically disposed therewithin, as illustrated in FIG. 2.

Preferably, also, the respective bores 13 each have casings 17 disposed within the bore 13 to prevent collapse of the side walls or the like. As illustrated, the casings 17 are sealed at their bottom end 19, as well as longitudinally thereof, to prevent the influx of water from the soil.

The bores 13 may take any cross sectional shape desired. Preferably, the bores are drilled from the surface by suitable bits, forming a cylindrically shaped bore hole of the desired depth. For example, the bore may be from 18 to 48 inches in diameter, or as desired. Conventional technology is available to drill bore holes up to six feet in diameter so there is no problem in this regard. The bore may be drilled with conventionally available machinery at its platted location.

The casing 17 may have any cross sectional shape desired. Preferably, the casing 17 is cylindrical for slipping downwardly within the cylindrically shaped bore hole 13.

The casing 17 is emplaced in the burial bore 13 by suitable means to prevent its being lifted therefrom by bouyancy effects when the soil therearound becomes saturated with water. For example, if desired, the casing 17 can be cemented into place by cement sheath poured therearound, as is conventionally done with surface strings of casing in oil field technology. The casing 17 preferably has respective means; such as, brackets 23 and shafts 25, FIG. 3; for attaching anchors 27'. Thus, the casing may be driven downwardly into the bore 13 and the anchors 27 will fold into a stream line position parallel with the longitudinal axis of the casing 17 for insertion. Upon slight withdraw], however, the anchors 27 will expand outwardly into their illustrated holding position to retain the casing 17 within the burial bore 13. If desired, both the anchors and the conventional means, such as cementing in place, may be employed to overcome bouyancy effects where the soil is rather continuously saturated, as in low lying or swampy areas.

The casing 17 may be formed of any suitable material having the desired structural strength for burial or for shipment as described hereinafter. For example, the casing 17 may be formed of suitable structurally strong plastic, such as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene copolymer (ABS), Nylon, Delrin or the like. Preferably, the casing 17 is formed of a metal, such as one of the ferrous metals, for shipment and for use in dry soils. A structurally strong metal, such as aluminum, magnesium or steel, may be employed. With most soils, however, it is preferable to employ some of the less corrodible metals, such as cast iron or one of the copper based alloys, such as brass. Similarly, the respective accoutrements, such as brackets, shafts and anchors are formed of the same material as the casing 17 to prevent setting up corrosive, or electrolytic cell, action therebetween.

In addition to the bottom end 19 that is sealingly connected with the casing 17, a top lid 27, FIGS. 2 and 3, is employed. The top lid 27 is removably connected with the casing 17 for allowing access to the interior of the casing 17 in the bore 13.

A tombstone, such as the horizontal tombstone 29,

. maybe employed over the respective bores 13 with the respective names and other information that is usually employed on the tombstones. As illustrated, the tombstone 29 has laterally extending protrusions 31 that can be inserted in mating apertures 33, as illustrated in FIG. 2, for maintaining alignment and alleviating problems with vandalism, such as theft of the tombstones and the like.

For supporting the respective corpse containers at respective levels within the casing, a plurality of individual supports 35 are affixed at the predetermined levels; for example, by welding or being threadedly emplaced in a coupling means. As can be seen more clearly in FIG. 3, each of the supports 35 has diametrically opposed notches 37 for inserting lower lids 39 therethrough. Thus, the lids 39 may be lowered in a vertical position through the upper individual supports until the desired suport 35 is reached. Thereafter, the lids 39 are removably emplaced by being allowed to fall into the horizontal position.

The lids 39, as well as the top lid 27, have respective latches 41 for gripping the support rings 35. The latches 41 have an upper handle means 43 that can be grasped and lifted upwardly to retract the latches 41 for removal of the lids 39 and 27. If desired, appropriate apertures or lifting means, may be employed along one or more sides of the respective lide to facilitate emplacing the lids on the proper support, as well as lowering them through the supports thereabove. The lids 39 are structurally adequate to support the weight of the corpse containers with the corpses 45 therewith, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 5.

The corpse containers, or caskets, 15 preferably comprise an outer skin 47 that, in combination with the remainder of the casket, is structurally adequate to support the weight of a corpse therewithin. Preferably, the corpse container 15 also comprises corpse support means, such as foamed plastic 49. Achieving adequate structural strength is well known and has been described in a pamphlet entitled STRUCTURAL FOAM, The Society of the Plastics Industry. Therein, the achieving of structural foam having integral skins with foamed plastic interiorly thereof and high strength of weight ratios is delineated for several products. These products include high impact polystyrene structural foam, medium impact polystyrene structural foam, polypropylene structural foam and the like. If desired, the skin may be formed of a high density or high structural strength foam and the foamed plastic made from a different foam. In fact, the skin may be made of metal, such as the corrosion resistant copper-based alloys, or the like. On the other hand, molds for casting material, such as urethane casting and the like, may be employed. In fact, the polyurethane structural foams form an excellent material for this application, since there is no danger of poison gases, such as hydrocyanic acid, formed by heating of the polyurethane. The corpse containers 15 may be pre-manufactured in a variety of sizes in accordance with conventional practice. If only the shells 47 are premanufactured, the foamed plactic may be injected therewithin to conform as nearly as desired to the corpse 45. If the corpse is to be viewed, it will, of course, be clothed in accordance with conventional practice. One of the advantages of employing the structural foamed caskets is that the joint between the two halves may be sealed by the use of appropriate sealant, such as a solvent and catalyst, for sealing the top to the bottom when the top is emplaced onto the bottom. This serves to exclude moisture and retard decay. If desired, the corpse container 15 may be encapsulated within additional structural elements, such as peripheral bands oran entire shell, or vault, before being emplaced within the casing 17.

In operation, a bore 13 is drilled in its respective platted area into the subterranean formation. Thereafter, a casing 17 is emplaced within the bore 13 and set into place as described hereinbefore. The respective supports, or support rings, 35 will be emplaced to support the desired number of caskets 15 at their desired locations.

The corpse will be embalmed and prepared for burial in accordance with conventional technology. It will be emplaced within the foamed plastic 49 within the shell 47. At an appropriate time, the top half will be emplaced contiguous the bottom half and about the corpse 45. As indicated hereinbefore, the joint between the top and bottom halves may be sealed if desired.

The one or more caskets 15 are then lowered into position in the casing 17 within the bore 13. If the tolerance is sufficiently close fitting, the air cushion employed in the casing 17 will serve to lower the corpse container 15 slowly to the bottoom end 19, or onto suitable support lid 39 that will have been emplaced. On the other hand, it may be desired to provide a lowering means; such as, a sling or a hook and eye arrangement in the corpse container 15 and the lowering apparatus. Ordinarily, a lid 39 will then be emplaced above the respective corpse container. Finally, the top lid 27 will be emplaced over the top end of the casing 17 and a tombstone 29 emplaced over the lid 27.

Another embodiment of this invention is illustrated in FIG. 6. Therein, one or more casings 17 have a plurality of respective corpse containers 15 disposed therewithin and are sealed at each end by ends 53 for shipment from a given location; such as, a site of a common disaster or a war zone; to one or more burial destinations, such as a central government cementary. If the number of corpses warrant it, a plurality of casings 17 maybe banded together by suitable bands 55 for shipment aboard a ship or the like. When the burial site is reached, the respective casing 17 may be lowered into bores 13 that have been drilled into the subterranean formation. For this reason, it is imperative that all of the corpse containers 15 be properly oriented with the heads toward the top and the top position of the casing 17 be plainly marked to facilitate proper insertion into the bores 13.

GENERAL The casings 17 may be maintained dry by keeping a superatmospheric pressure of nitrogen or the like therewithin.

The respective supports 35 and the lids 39 may be sealed together by emplacement of suitable resilient gaskets therebetween to isolate a lower casket in its chamber from an upper chamber in the event of a later burial.

The respective casings 17 may be cleared of any water that may seep thereinto by sealing emplacement of a top lid and blowing the water from the casing by air or the like. Thereafter, the point of leaking of the water thereinto may be sealed, as by injected plastic, cement or the like.

While the use of foamed plastic for a supporing means has been described hereinbefore, any other suitable support means desired can be employed as long as adequate support is given to the corpse in the respective horizontal and vertical positions. For example, inflatable, compartmentalized air mattresses or the like can be employed if desired.

The term vertically oriented is employed herein to mean that the bores and casings are oriented at an angle of more than 45; and, preferably, about 90; with respect to the horizontal such that only an area of the earths surface equal to the area of the lateral dimensions are required, rather than the area of the lateral and longitudinal dimensions as required by conventional horizontal burial.

Although this invention has been described with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure has been made only by way of example and that numerous changes in the details of construction and the combination and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A burial structure comprising:

a. a plurality of vertically oriented burial bores;

b. a plurality of respective casings disposed in respective bores, said casing being adapted to receive a plurality of vertically oriented corpse containers and being sealingly connected with a bottom end and sealed against influx of water;

c. removable top lids connected with the top of respective said casings for allowing access to the interior of said casing within said bore;

d. individual supports disposed at a plurality of respective levels within respective said casings for supporting said corpse containers individually within each said casing; and

e. a plurality of corpse containers having corpses therewithin and disposed in vertical orientations within respective said casings within respective said bores on respective said individual supports; said corpse containers including foamed plastic loosely conformably fitting both front and back of said corpse therewithin for supporting said corpse in a vertical position; said corpse containers comprising a high density plastic skin that is unitary with a foamed plastic interior; said high density skin and said foamed plastic interior being sealable about a corpse before being disposed vertically in said casing within said bore; said foamed plastic traversing both in front of and in back of said corpse and extending to meet and mate with the foamed plastic in the opposite half when said corpse container is closed about said corpse such that sealant can be disposed on the mating surfaces of said foamed plastic, as well as said high density skin, to seal said corpse container.

2. The burial structure of claim 1 wherein said individual supports have respective lid poritons that are removably connected with said casing for removal subsequent to installation.

3. The burial structure of claim 1 wherein said casing have anchors for preventing being lifted from said bores by bouyancy effects in saturated soils.

4. Apparatus for shipping and burying corpses comprising:

a. a plurality of elongate cylindrical containers having a top end plainly marked for proper orientation when inserted within a vertically oriented burial bore;

a plurality of corpse containers disposed in end-toend and head-to-foot relationship with heads toward the top within each said elongate cylindrical container and supported individually therewithin; said corpse container comprising a high density plastic skin that is unitary with a foamed plastic interior; said high density skin and said foamed plastic interior being sealable about a corpse before being disposed vertically in said casing within said bore; said foamed plastic traversing both in front of and in back of said corpse and extending to meet and mate with the foamed plastic in the opposite half when said corpse container is closed about said corpse such that sealant can be disposed on the mating surfaces of said foamed plastic, as well as said high density skin, to seal said corpse container; said foamed plastic loosely conformably fitting both front and back of a corpse therewithin for supporting said corpse in either of the horizontal or vertical positions; and

0. ends connected to each end of said elongate cylindrical container and holding said corpse containers longitudinally disposed therewithin.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said elongate cylindrical containers have means for attaching a plurality of anchors for preventing being lifted from burial bores in saturated soil by bouyancy effects.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US376629 *Feb 4, 1887Jan 17, 1888F Onebraund
US965000 *Feb 15, 1910Jul 19, 1910Edwin A NewmanTombstone.
US3188712 *Jul 27, 1962Jun 15, 1965Bauermeister Ernest EVertical casket
US3287865 *Nov 5, 1962Nov 29, 1966Lockman Frederick VSectional tiered vault structure
US3348280 *Oct 1, 1964Oct 24, 1967Myers Morgon JUpright burial casket, vault and carrier
US3581452 *Apr 1, 1968Jun 1, 1971Jalbert Donald ABurial system with sealed casket made of plastic
US3596419 *May 27, 1969Aug 3, 1971Jalbert Donald AWaterproof concrete burial vault and method of construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4328606 *May 16, 1980May 11, 1982Nunes Abner HVertical plural tubular vault burial system
US4727632 *Aug 7, 1986Mar 1, 1988Yearsley David AArticle and method for enclosing and protecting entombment caskets
US4893385 *Jan 23, 1989Jan 16, 1990Schrag Truman FMemorial vault apparatus
US4977652 *Nov 13, 1989Dec 18, 1990Gray GrahamTree forest cemetery
US5115607 *May 6, 1991May 26, 1992Norwalk Vault Company Of Bridgeport, Inc.Casket enclosure and method of storing same in a burial crypt
US5261199 *Dec 17, 1991Nov 16, 1993Build-A-Mold LimitedHigh density foam burial vault
US5659932 *Apr 29, 1996Aug 26, 1997Wright; George W.Burial capsule with anti-decay system
US6055793 *Dec 7, 1998May 2, 2000Irwin; Eddie N.Compaction/containment burial process
US6161268 *Jun 7, 1999Dec 19, 2000Joseph; CharlesModular niche construction
US6279212 *Sep 10, 1999Aug 28, 2001Joseph C. BalchCremation and record burial system
US6389664 *Aug 5, 1999May 21, 2002Beverley Ann WoodPortable burial system for cremation remains
US6421890May 9, 2000Jul 23, 2002Curtis L. BiggarModular storage system for storing cremated remains
US6904721 *Jan 7, 2003Jun 14, 2005Hampton E. ForbesCremated remains holder and marker combination
US7036195Aug 22, 2003May 2, 2006Haven Of RestApparatus and methods of burial using a columbarium pod
US7458138 *Nov 2, 2006Dec 2, 2008David SpiersGrave lining system
US7478461Feb 14, 2006Jan 20, 2009Haven Of RestApparatus and methods of burial using a columbarium pod
US7631404 *Jun 28, 2006Dec 15, 2009Donald ScruggsEasy inter burial container
US7636991 *Oct 14, 2008Dec 29, 2009Scalisi Iii CharlesGreen burial system
US7703186Jun 30, 2007Apr 27, 2010Williamson Gerald FCasket and burial system
US7900326 *Feb 20, 2009Mar 8, 2011Antoine ElhajBroken heart shaped coffin
US7987564 *Dec 3, 2009Aug 2, 2011Stefan LeederUrn column
US8046883 *Oct 8, 2009Nov 1, 2011Scruggs Donald EEdged non-horizontal burial containers
US8104153 *Oct 14, 2009Jan 31, 2012Scruggs Donald ENon-horizontal burial methods
US8214978Jun 23, 2010Jul 10, 2012Moran Robin ABurial capsule
US8214979 *Aug 16, 2011Jul 10, 2012Scruggs Donald ESelf boring vertical burial containers
US8695184Dec 5, 2012Apr 15, 2014Kurt MikatMethod and apparatus for preserving human and animal remains
US8745932Jun 13, 2011Jun 10, 2014Brian Kenneth FisherInterment system
US8943762 *Jan 7, 2014Feb 3, 2015Charles CarlsonCremated remains remembrance and burial system
US8966725 *Jan 10, 2013Mar 3, 2015Marc LangelierFuneral urn system and method of using same
US9290960 *Jun 2, 2014Mar 22, 2016Richard McHaleBurial concepts stacking system
US20030221300 *Mar 25, 2003Dec 4, 2003Caven Lawrence AnthonyL Anthony burial urn method
US20040098846 *Aug 22, 2003May 27, 2004Glass Robert L.Apparatus and methods of burial using a columbarium pod
US20070050958 *Jun 28, 2006Mar 8, 2007Donald ScruggsEasy inter burial container
US20070113389 *Nov 2, 2006May 24, 2007David SpiersGrave lining system
US20100031482 *Oct 8, 2009Feb 11, 2010Scruggs Donald EEdged non-horizontal burial containers
US20100031483 *Oct 14, 2009Feb 11, 2010Scruggs Donald ENon-horizontal burial methods
US20100139060 *Dec 3, 2009Jun 10, 2010Stefan LeederUrn column
US20100212123 *Feb 20, 2009Aug 26, 2010Antoine ElhajBroken Heart Shaped Coffin
US20120000044 *Aug 16, 2011Jan 5, 2012Scruggs Donald ESelf boring vertical burial containers
US20130185907 *Jan 10, 2013Jul 25, 2013Marc LangelierFuneral urn system and method of using same
US20140215933 *Jan 7, 2014Aug 7, 2014Charles CarlsonCremated remains remembrance and burial system
USRE33636 *Feb 20, 1990Jul 16, 1991 Article and method for enclosing and protecting entombment caskets
WO1994009741A1 *Oct 14, 1993May 11, 1994Elder Davis, Inc.Burial or cremation casket
WO2004018294A2 *Aug 22, 2003Mar 4, 2004Haven Of RestApparatus and methods of burial using a columbarium pod
WO2004018294A3 *Aug 22, 2003Jul 1, 2004Haven Of RestApparatus and methods of burial using a columbarium pod
WO2004100849A2 *May 14, 2004Nov 25, 2004Kuehn Petrus GerhardusA burial casket
WO2004100849A3 *May 14, 2004Mar 24, 2005Petrus Gerhardus KuehnA burial casket
WO2007030339A2 *Aug 25, 2006Mar 15, 2007Scruggs Donald EVertically installed burial container and burial method
WO2007030339A3 *Aug 25, 2006Jul 19, 2007Scruggs Donald EVertically installed burial container and burial method
Classifications
U.S. Classification27/35, 52/137, 27/7, 27/29
International ClassificationE04H13/00, A61G17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G17/00, E04H13/00
European ClassificationA61G17/00, E04H13/00