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Publication numberUS3899011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1975
Filing dateAug 9, 1974
Priority dateAug 18, 1972
Publication numberUS 3899011 A, US 3899011A, US-A-3899011, US3899011 A, US3899011A
InventorsAlan C Curtiss
Original AssigneePfizer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disc dispenser
US 3899011 A
Abstract
A number of antimicrobial impregnated discs are simultaneously dispensed into separate chambers of a partitioned cuvette, each containing a suspension of a bacterial broth, to determine which antimicrobial, antibacterial or antibiotic is the most suitable for treating the affected patient. The disc dispenser has a line of dispensing chutes disposed above the open tops of the cuvette chambers and a mechanism for receiving a disc from each of a line of supply tubes and dropping it into the dispensing chute. The upper ends of the dispensing chutes are open to permit visual confirmation that a disc has been discharged through each of the chutes. The dispensing mechanism may comprise an apertured sliding plate which may be unitary or divided in an array of individual dispensers. It is incorporated in a dispensing table on a hollow fixture which receives the cuvette. The fixture may include a pair of end sections and an operating plunger may be mounted in one of them.
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United States Patent Curtiss Aug. 12, 1975 [54] DISC DISPENSER Primary ExaminrHouston S. Bell, Jr [75] Inventor. Alan C. Curtiss, Old Lyme, Conn. I n y g n or connony and Hutz [73] Assignee: Pfizer Inc., New York, NY. g 22 Filed: Aug. 9, 1974 [57] ABSTRACT A number of antimicrobial impregnated discs are si- [21] Appl' 496287 multaneously dispensed into separate chambers of a Related US. Application Data partitioned cuvette, each containing a suspension of a [63] continuatiomimpan of Ser No. 281,946 Aug 18, bacterial broth, -to determine which antimicrobial, 1972, Pat No 33321532 antibacterial or antibiotic is the most suitable for treating the affected patient. The disc dispenser has a s2 U.S. c1. 141/325; 195/127; 221/93; line of dispensing Chutes disposed above the p p 222/362 of the cuvette chambers and a mechanism for receiv- 51 1111.01 B65b 1/04; B65b 3/04 ing a disc from each of a line of Snpply tubes and [58] Field of Search 221/93, 198, 279; 133/4 R, dropping it into the dispensing chine- The pp ends 133 5 R, 5 137 2 5; 23 259; 14 00 of the dispensing chutes are open to permit visual con- 83, 241, 237, 273, 319422 325, 326 firmation that a disc has been discharged through each 3 34, 2 4; 195 03 20 2 of the chutes. The dispensing mechanism may com- 222 132 134 13 139 362, 442 prise an apertured sliding plate which may be unitary or divided in an array of individual dispensers. It is in- 5 References Cited corporated in a dispensing table on a hollow fixture UNITED STATES PATENTS which receives' the cuvette. The fixture may include a 3 300 087 H yp 221/93 pa1r of end sections and an operating plunger may be 3:304:965 2/1967 Tate 141 325 mounted m one of them" 3,372,7l7 3/1968 Fisher 141/325 21 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures 1 r gh-r l mei mq' ll'lia lllii PATENTEDAUGI 2% 3,899,611

DISC DISPENSER CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION, IF ANY This application is a continuation-in-part of copending commonly assigned patent applications for US. Letters Patent: Ser. No. 281,946 filed Aug. 18, 1972, now US. Pat. No. 3,832,532, by this same inventor in conjunction with three other inventors who were coinventors of other portions of the invention disclosed and claimed therein but not the disc dispenser portion being disclosed and claimed herein and Ser. No. 437,700 filed .Ian. 29, 1974, by this same inventor.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Mechanisms for dispensing antibiotic saturated discs from tubular cartridges are described in US. Pat. Nos. 3,031,819, 3,032,179, 3,036,703 and 3,115,992 and Canadian Pat. No. 687,149. Some of these dispensers simultaneously drop a number of discs into a culture dish or into separate compartments of solutions for comparing the effectiveness of the different antibiotics. Such multiple disc dispensers are subject to malfunctions which are significant because the failure to discharge even only one of the array of discs ruins the test. An object of this invention is, therefore, to provide a multiple disc dispenser'for dispensing into anarray of sample solutions, which is dependable in operation and in which malfunctions may be readily detected and corrected.

SUMMARY A number of antimicrobial impregnated discs are simultaneously dispensed into separate chambers of a partitioned cuvette, each containing a suspension of a bacterial broth, to determine which antimicrobial, antibacterial or antibiotic is the most suitable for treating the affected patient. The disc dispenser has a line of dispensing chutes disposed above the open tops of the cuvette chambers and a mechanism for receiving a disc from each of a line of supply tubes and dropping it into the dispensing chute. The upper ends of the dispensing chutes are open to permit visual confirmation that a disc has been discharged through each of the chutes. The dispensing mechanism may comprise an apertured sliding plate which may be unitary or divided in an array of individual dispensers. It is incorporated in a dispensing table on a hollow fixture which receives the cuvette. The fixture may include a pair of end sections and an operating plunger may be mounted in one of them. The bodies of the individual dispensers may be alternately directed to provide space between them for the actuating mechanism. A pair of sliding plates may be provided in the dispensing table for locking the individual dispensers in their recesses and actuating them by an inclined cam surface. The locking plate lugs may provide a limit of travel for protecting the dispenser pms.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Novel features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to one skilled in the art from a reading of the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein similar reference characters refer to similar parts and in which:

FIG. I is a top plan view of a disc dispenser which is one embodiment of this invention, showing several of its complement of individual disc dispensers installed in it;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the disc dispenser shown in FIG. 1 holding a compartmented cuvette for receiving dispensed discs;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 1 along the line 33;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 1 along the line 4-4;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 3 along the line 5-5 in the unlocked nondispensing condition;

FIG. 6 is a fragmental cross-sectional view of a portion of FIG. 5 in the locked position;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 5 in the dispensing position;

FIG. 8 is a side view in elevation of one of the individual dispensers incorporated in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of the individual dispenser shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 10 is a left-end elevational view of the individual dispenser shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 1 1 is a right-end elevational view of the individual dispenser shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 9 along the line 1212 in the unactuated condition;

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 12 in the actuated condition;

FIG. 14 is a top plan view of a ganged disc dispenser for use in the performance of the method of this invention and which comprises one apparatus aspect of this invention;

FIG. 15 is a front view in elevation of the dispenser shown in FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a right-end view of the dispenser shown in FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 14 along the line 17--17;

FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 15 along the line 1818;

FIG. 19 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 14 along the line 19-19 with the dispenser in the ready position;

FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 19, but in the dispensing position; and

FIG. 21 is a cross-sectional view taken through FIG. 20 along the line 21-21.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In FIGS. 1-7 is shown an antibiotic disc dispenser 11 1 in which a number of individual self-contained dispensers l 15 are mounted on base fixture 116. Dispensers are accordingly mounted in sockets 118 disposed in tablemechanism 119. Sockets 118 are comprised of substantially rectangular slots 120 in top plate 122 and tailed circular holes 125 in bottom plate 123 of dispensing table mechanism 119.

Individual dispenser 115 shown in FIGS. 9-13 includes chuted body within which slide carriage 130 moves against the force of compression spring 162 and upon which cover 164 is mounted on horn 166. Cartridge tube 39 is inserted between internal contact ridges 169 in clamp 170 on the front of cover 164 and contains weight 172 pushing down on feed clip 174 which rests on the stack of antibiotic discs 16 to be discharged by dispenser 115 as later described.

Details of self-contained dispensers 115 are shown in FIGS. 9-1'3. Dispenser 115 is shown in an unactuated condition in FIGS. 9-12 with the return movement of slide carriage 130 arrested by tail plate 192 of cover 164. The apertured end 194 of slide plate 195 remote from pin 128 is thinner than the rear end 196 to dispose disc feeding aperture 198 in a thinner shouldered portion 194 of slide plate 195. This facilitates smooth operation of slide carriage 130 and dependable feeding of discs 16. The thicker rear portion 196 of slide plate 195 smoothly confines discs 16 within tubular cartridge 39 which is inserted within shouldered socketed funnel 200 in body 160.

Weight 172 in tube 39 has a bottom stern 202 disposed against the bottom of angular U-shaped clip 174 to urge it downwardly. Weight 172 weighs, for example, 4 grams and clip 174 which is for example made of spring material such as beryllium copper, causes about 2 grams of frictional resistance in rubbing against the inner walls of tubes 39, to leave a resultant 2 grams of force pushing down on the stack of discs 16. Points 204 of clip 174 ratchet the downward movement of clip 174 and maintain the stack of discs 16 firmly packet together. The disposition of stem 202 of weight 172 on the bottom arm 206 of clip 174 clear of side arms 208, prevents weight 172 from bending clip 174 and interfering with the efficient operation of clip 174. Dimple 210 at the center of bottom end 206 of clip 174 is higher than slot 212 in body 160 through which slide 130 passes to prevent clip 174 from dropping into aperture 198 and binding operation of slide 130.

FIGS. 12 and 13 show the engagement of socket 214 within cover 164 over horn 166 on body 160. Clearing hole 216 in the rear actuating end 217 of slide carriage 130 passes over tapered guide shaft 218 on body 160 about which compression spring 162 is mounted. The rearward movement of slide carriage 130 is arrested by tail plate 192 extending downwardly from cover 164. Forward movement of slide 130 from the position shown in FIG. 12 to that shown in FIG. 13 carries a disc 16 from the stack in cartridge 39 over the open upper end 127 of chute 126 through which it is dropped. Dispenser 1 15 is shown being manually actuated by fingers 222 in FIG. 13, which is the manner in which dispensers 115 are individually used. Dispensers 115 are also capable of simultaneous multiple operation when mounted on a supporting and actuating fixture as otherwise described herein. Semicircular portion 129 of the upper rim of open end 127 of chute 126 is chamfered to help direct discharged discs 16 into chute 126.

The installation of individual disc dispensers 115 is illustrated in FIGS. l-4, showing chutes 126 disposed above cuvette 12 and its corresponding upper ports 26 through which discs 16 are discharged into tubular disc holder 29 of cuvette compartments S -S Cuvette 12 is a compartmented container for inoculated broth used for measuring the effect of antimicrobial agents on the growth of microorganisms in the broth. The detection of growth in broth by forward light scattering requires such a chamber to be both optically transparent to the irradiating light used and geometrically consistent with the light scattering photometer. Convenient and rapid examination of the efi'ect of many antimicrobial agents on the growth of a given microorganism is accomplished by a linear array of such optical chambers as a single unit, described in aforementioned copending application Ser. No. 281,946, filed Aug. I8, 1971. Cuvette l2 permits the convenient introduction of an equal volume of broth inoculum into each chamber S. Cuvette 12 also has the capability of conveniently accepting an antimicrobial impregnated paper disc into all test chambers and is not capable of accepting such an antimicrobial disc in its-single control chamber. Furthermore, cuvette 12 is water-tight, optically polished, optically reproducible, inexpensive, relatively small, stackable, and may be disposable. Cuvette 12 is a linear array of one control chamber, S and 12 antimicrobial test chambers, 8 -12.

A row of lobes 15 extends the entire length of the long axis of the cuvette (excluding the reservoir). They are connected to the reservoir by a major distribution port 31, and accept broth inoculum from the reservoir by manually rotating the cuvette to lower them and cause equal amounts of solution to fill them through distributing ports 33 assisted by return flow of air through vents 35. The area of ports 33 increases away from reservoir R.

Thirteen disconnected light scattering lobes 17 of chambers S (S S S accept an equal volume of broth inoculum from interconnected distributing lobes 15 by manually rotating the cuvette about its long axis to lower them. Once filled with broth inoculum the thirteen chambers S are isolated from each other by the partitioning walls 36. Distributing ports 33 and air distribution vents 35, located at the top of each partition 36 and well above the broth level are the only interconnections between the chambers. These vents are necessary for proper fluid distribution into lowered distributing lobes 15 as described above.

Twelve apertured tubular fingers 29 extend down into the 12 test scattering chambers (S S S Each hollow finger, known as a disc holder, accepts an antimicrobial paper disc 16 (6.5 mm diameter) via 12 disc ports 26 on the top surface of cuvette 12. The disc drops into the disc holder 29 and comes to rest on the floor 73 of this holder. Two elution ports, E, in the walls of the disc holder adjacent to the disc permit elution of antimicrobial agent into the surrounding broth innoculum of the scattering chamber. As shown in FIG. 16 (for reference only) a strip 34 of flexible sealing material with twelve nipples 40 (called the closure inserts) are inserted into the disc ports 26 to provide a watertight seal for each disc holder. Strip 34 is received between parallel rails 34a straddling ports 26 on the upper surface of cuvette 12 and it is usually removed while cuvette 12 is inserted in cavity 50 of dispenser 14. An L-shaped bracket B located on the back of cuvette 12 and extending the length of the cuvette long axis enables the attachment of the cuvette to holding brackets in processing analyzing equipment (not shown).

As shown in FIG. 3, cuvette 12 is aligned in its required position .under chutes 126 by insertion of legs 238 and 240 respectively within left-hand locating shoe 242 and right-hand locating shoe 244 into which cuvette 12 is inserted by pushing it from front to back into chamber 246 disposed between dispensing table assembly 119 and lower base platform 248.

As shown inGFIGS. 3 and 4, dispensing table mechanism or assembly 1 19 is comprised of an elongated aluminum extrusion 250 incorporating top plate 122 and bottom plate 123. Extrusion 250 also includes pairs of opposed longitudinal grooves 252 and 254 disposed below bottom plate 123 which receive sliding cam actuating plate 256 and locking plate 258, which are further described in FIGS. 5-7. Base platform 248 is primarily comprised of an elongated channel 260 made of stainless steel, internally reinforced by aluminum tubes 262 which secure the lower ends 264 and 266 of C- shaped end supports 268 together by threaded engagement by cap screws 270. The upper ends 272 and 274 of end supports 268 are secured to extrusion 250 by cap screws 276. End supports 268 are identical to each other, but the left-hand and right-hand installations are inverted l80 with respect to each other. This disposes channel 278 receiving operating plunger 280 at the top of right-hand end support 268, and channel 278 is inoperatively disposed at the bottom 264 of left-hand end support 268. The outer open ends of end supports 268 are covered by end sheets 281 which are removably held in place by lugs 282 which are wedged against U- shaped clips 284 secured by the cap screws 270 and 276 to the central securing wall 286 of end supports 268. Lugs 282 are also wedged between a slight space not shown between the sides of U-shaped clips 284 and the adjacent wall of end support 268.

FIG. 5 shows a locking plate 258 in the unlocked position for receiving chutes 126 of individual disc dispensers 115. Locking plate 258, is for example, a thin framed rectangular plate formed of a relatively strong sheet material, such as polycarbonate resin. The use of a polycarbonate resin in the grooves of an aluminum extrusion provides a degree of self-lubrication. L- shaped locking lugs 288 project within locking plate 258 and have tips 290, which engage over locking lugs 124 on chutes 126. Wedges 292 shown in FIG. 3 are incorporated under locking tips 290 for securely engaging over lugs 124 on chutes 126 to hold individual disc dispensers 115 securely in place.

Locking plate 258 is moved back and forth from the unlocked to locked positions by upwardly extending peg 294, which is for example cast as an integral part of locking plate 258. Peg 294 extends upwardly through arcuate slot 296 in top plate 122 which it maintains peg 294 and locking plate 258 in its extremities in conjunction with the resiliency of peg 294.

Cam actuating plate 256 is a thin framed rectangular sheet made of polycarbonate plastic, similarly to sheet 258, and it includes sloped or inclined cam surface 298 of rounded saw tooth or triangular form extending inwardly within its central opening 300. Camactuating plate is urged to the left extremity of travel in the nondispensing position shown in FIG. 5 by coil springs 302 secured to end supports 268 over lugs 304. Dispensing actuation of cam plate 256 to the right is accomplished by pushing plunger 280 downwardly, as shown by arrow 306 in FIG. 3, which pulls cam plate 256 to the right through flexible strap 308 connecting the righthand side of cam plate 256 to the bottom 310 of plunger 280. Flexible cable 308 is of a strip of a strong flexible material, such as nylon-coated stainless steel cable or other suitable flexible material.

The operation of dispenser 111 is easily accomplished after individual dispensers 115 are installed, as shown in FIGS. 5-7. Main dispenser 111 is unlocked for receiving individual dispensers 115. FIG. 6 shows the position of locking plate 258 in the left-hand or locking position in which peg 294 is in the left hand side of arcuate slot 296 and locking lugs 288 are moved in line with chutes 126 of dispenser and in engagement over locking lugs 124 on chutes 126.

The dispensing position of dispenser 111 is shown in FIG. 7 in which cam plate 256 is moved to the right by downward pressure of plunger 280 to pull connecting cable 308 to the right in the direction of arrow 312. Movement of cam plate 256 to the right forces saw toothed cam elements 298 against dispenser-operating pins 128 to force them inwardly within framed opening 300 to operate individual dispensers 115 in the manner previously described. Visual observation and verification that discs have been discharged from each of dispensers 115 and into ports 26 of cuvette 12 is afforded by the open tops 127 of chutes 126 which are exposed at the top of dispenser table assembly 119 on the upper portion of dispenser 111. Any jams which might occur, can also be easily cleared through exposed tops 127 of dispensing chutes 126. FIG. 1 also has a LOCK direction indicia 314 and individual dispenser numbers 316 to facilitate locking and unlocking and coordination of the type of discs in each individual dispenser.

Dispensers 115 may be easily reloaded by removing cartridge tubes 39 and replacing them in the manner previously described. Only two individual dispensers are shown in solid outline installed in main dispenser 111 in FIGS. 1-4. One additional individual dispenser 115 is shown in FIGS. 1-3 to indicate the manner in which the full complement of individual dispensers 1 15 is installed.

Disc dispenser 14 shown in FIGS. 14-21 conveniently and .rapidly introduces a single antimicrobial impregnated paper disc 16 into each of the l2 (or less if desired) disc holders 29 of cuvette 12 with the entire panel of discs added simultaneously by a simple manual manipulationfThe upper plate section 38 of the freestanding dispenser 14 accepts a maximum of 12 cartridges 39 containing antimicrobial discs 16. Glass cartridges 39 are identical to those currently being used for Kirby-Bauer discs. The lower plate section 41 of dispenser 14 contains a track guide 48 which accepts a cuvette 12 in .upright position. Upper plate 38 and lower plate 41 are joined in a channel form by rear vertical wall 43. Cuvette 12 is inserted on track 48 into cavity 50 until stop 45 is reached. The top of cuvette 12 is guided by insertion of the parallel rails 34a in slot 27a in the bottom of plate 27 later described. Another slot 27b is provided in the bottom of plate 27 for passage of inoculum tube 78. The middle section 47 of the dispenser 14 has mechanism 49 somewhat similar to that shown in US. Pat. Nos. 3,031,819, 3,036,703 and 3,115,992, whichupon actuation of a lever 51, slides a single disc 16 out of each cartridge 39 and drops the disc 16 into the tubular disc holder 29 of the cuvette. In this manner, 12 discs can be simultaneously added to a cuvette.

Cartridge tubes 39 are inserted through holes 19 in upper plate 38 and adjacent support plate 21 and spacer plate 23. Midsection 47 includes spaced horizontal guide plates 25 and 27 between which slide plate 37 reciprocates. Upper plate 25 includes counterbored holes 52 which receive the bottom ends of cartridge 39. Slide plate 37 includes holes 53 which receive discs 16 from tubes 39 and drop them through holes 55 in plate 27 into ports 26 in cuvette 12. Viewing slot 21a allows the user to monitor operation and to easily clear jamming through holes 530 in plate 25 caused by any malfunctions, such as jamming of a disc 16 in a hole 55 in plate 27. Plate 37 is reciprocated by lever 51 through splined shaft 57. Racks 59 energizing splined shaft 57 are connected to the ends of slide plate 37 to move it back and forth by lever 51. Compression springs 61 react between vertical wall 43 and the rear edge of slide plate 37 to return it to the receiving position.

I claim:

1. A disc dispenser for dispensing discs from cartridges to a compartmented container having an array of compartments having top openings for insertion of said discs, said dispenser comprising a base fixture, a dispensing table mechanism mounted upon said base fixture, said dispensing table mechanism having an array of upper and lower holes offset a predetermined distance from each other, cartridge-supporting means disposed on said dispensing table mechanism for holding said cartridges above said upper holes for successively dispensing discs into them, an apertured dispensing plate means mounted in said dispensing table mechanism for sliding movement from alignment with said upper holes to alignment with said lower holes, drive means connected to said dispensing table mechanism for moving said dispensing plate means from one said alignment to the other whereby discs received from said upper holes are carried and dropped into said lower holes, a compartmented container-receiving chamber disposed under said dispensing table mechanism and within said base fixture for holding said compartmented container with its apertures aligned with said lower holes to cause said discs dispensed through said lower holes to drop into said compartments in said container, and auxiliary apertures in said dispensing table mechanism subatantially aligned with said lower holes to permit visual verification of dispensed discs and to facilitate clearing discs which may jam in said lower holes.

2. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 1 wherein said dispensing table mechanism comprises a pair of upper and lower spaced parallel apertured plates, said array of upper holes being disposed in said upper apertured plate and said lower holes being disposed in said lower apertured plate, said dispensing table mechanism also comprising an apertured dispensing plate mounted inbetween said spaced parallel apertured plates for sliding movement from alignment with said upper holes to alignment with said lower holes.

3. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 2 wherein said cartridge-supporting means comprises a top apertured plate disposed a short distance above said spaced parallel plates.

4. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 3 wherein said auxiliary apertures are provided in said top apertured plate.

5. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 1 wherein said dispensing table mechanism has a plurality of sockets for receiving individual disc dispensers, an individual disc dispenser being disposable in each of said sockets, each of said individual disc dispensers incorporating said upper and lower holes, a locking means on the dispensing table mechanism for engaging said individual disc dispensers in said sockets and securing them to said dispensing table mechanism said drive means being connected with said individual disc dispensers whereby said disc dispensers are simultaneously operated to dispense discs from each of the individual disc dispensers and discharge them into said compartmented container.

6. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 5 wherein each of said disc dispensers incorporates a body extending laterally therefrom, and said sockets being constructed and arranged for disposing the bodies of disc dispensers installed in said sockets in alternate directions whereby space is provided therebetween for actuating said dispensers.

7. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 5 wherein said dispensing table mechanism incorporates a top apertured receiving plate and a lower base plate for holding the bodies of said dispensers and supporting them.

8. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 7 wherein a sliding locking plate having a plurality of locking surfaces is incorporated in said dispensing table mechanism for engaging said individual dispensers and holding them securely in position for dispensing discs.

9. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 8 wherein each of said individual dispensers has a locking projection extending laterally from it, and said sliding locking plate comprises a locking frame plate member having a plurality of locking lugs disposed within it for engaging said locking projections on said individual dispensers.

10. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 9 wherein said locking frame plate member has a plurality of L- shaped lugs extending inwardly within it.

11. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 5 wherein each of said individual disc dispensers has an actuating pin, and said drive means comprises a sliding cam plate having a plurality of cam elements with one of said cam elements operatively engaging each of said actuating pins.

12. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 10 wherein said sliding cam plate comprises a substantially rectangular cam frame plate, said cam elements comprise sloped surfaces extending inwardly within said cam frame plate.

13. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 12 wherein a framed locking plate having a plurality of locking lugs extending inwardly thereforrn is disposed adjacent said cam frame plate, said framed locking plate having a plurality of L-shaped lugs extending inwardly within it.

14. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 5 wherein said drive means comprises a plunger, end supports on said base fixture, a channel in one of said supports for receiving said plunger, and a connecting drive linkage connected between said dispensing table mechanism and said plunger for actuating said dispensing table mechanism.

15. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 14 wherein said connecting drive linkage comprises a flexible cable.

16. A disc dispenser as set forth in claim 5 wherein said compartmented container-receiving chamber comprises a lower base plate spaced below said dispensing table mechanism a sufiicient distance to receive said compartmented container therebetween, and aligning lugs on said base plate for holding said compartmented container in alignment with the holes in the dispensing table mechanism.

17. A ganged antibiotic disc dispenser for supplying antibiotic discs from cartridges to a compartmented container having an array of compartments each having an aperture for insertion of said antibiotic discs, said dispenser comprising a base, a pair of upper and lower parallel spaced apertured plates mounted upon said base, said pair or parallel spaced apertured plates each having an array of holes offset a predetermined distance from each other, an apertured dispensing plate mounted inbetween said spaced plates for sliding movement from alignment with one of said array of holes to alignment with the other, drive means on said base for moving said dispensing plate from one said alignment to the other whereby discs received from said upper spaced plate are carried and dropped into said lower spaced plate, a compartmented container receiving chamber disposed between said base and said lower spaced plate for holding said compartmented container with its apertures aligned with the apertures in said lower spaced plate to cause said disc dispensed through said lower spaced plate to drop into said compartment in said container, cartridge supporting'means disposed on said base above said spaced plates for holding said cartridges above the apertures in said upper spaced plate to successively dispense discs into it, and auxiliary apertures in the said upper spaced plate substantially aligned with said apertures in said lower spaced plate to facilitate clearing discs which may jam in said apertures of said lower spaced plate.

18. A ganged antibiotic disc dispenser as set forth in claim 17 wherein said cartridge supporting means comprises an upper apertured plate disposed a short distance above said spaced plates.

19. A ganged antibiotic disc dispenser as set forth in claim 18 wherein said base and said upper apertured plate are comprised of a pair of horizontal plates joined by a substantially vertical wall to comprise a channel, said pair of spaced plates and said drive means being connected to said substantially vertical wall, and an access opening being provided in said channel to provide access to said auxiliary apertures for inspection and clearing.

20. A ganged antibiotic disc dispenser as set forth in claim 19 wherein upper and lower slotted bars are provided in said receiving space for aligning said apertures in said compartmented container under said spaced parallel spaced plates.

21. A ganged antibiotic disc dispenser as set forth in claim 17 wherein said drive means comprises a splined shaft engaged with a pair of racks connected to the sides of said apertured dispensing plate.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/325, 435/287.1, 221/93, 435/32, 222/362
International ClassificationC12M1/20, G01N35/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01N35/00, C12M99/02
European ClassificationG01N35/00, C12M1/20B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 14, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: WARNER-LAMBERT COMPANY, 201 TABOR RD., MORRIS PLAI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PFIZER INC.;REEL/FRAME:003853/0905
Effective date: 19810409