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Publication numberUS3899105 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1975
Filing dateFeb 20, 1974
Priority dateFeb 20, 1974
Publication numberUS 3899105 A, US 3899105A, US-A-3899105, US3899105 A, US3899105A
InventorsEsseluhn Werner F, Fegley Charles R
Original AssigneeEsseluhn Werner F, Fegley Charles R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chemical irritant spray device
US 3899105 A
Abstract
A chemical irritant spraying anti-burglary device is disclosed in which a chemical irritant such as tear gas is discharged into the area to be protected when an intruder opens a door or forces open a door to enter a private or unauthorized area with which the device is associated. The anti-burglary device employs a spring biased pressurized container for discharging a chemical irritant through a passageway and nozzle. A mechanical trigger for releaseably retaining a pressurized container in a cocked position and for releasing the pressurized container is described. In addition, a lock mechanism to place the mechanical trigger in a non-triggerable condition is also described.
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United States Patent [451 Aug. 12, 1975 Fegley et al.

CHEMICAL IRRITANT SPRAY DEVICE Filed: Feb. 20, 1974 Appl. No.: 443,981

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 555.233 l/l957 Italy 9/316 Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner.lohn P. Shannon [5 7 ABSTRACT A chemical irritant spraying anti-burglary device is disclosed in which a chemical irritant such as tear gas [52] US. Cl. 222/5; 222/835; 222/153; is discharged into the area to be protected when an 2 6 222/180 intruder opens a door or forces open a door to enter a Cl- B private or unauthorized area the device is [58] held of g" 6"" l associated. The anti-burglary device employs a spring 8 1 l l l 1 biased pressurized container for discharging a chemical irritant through a passageway and nozzle. A me- [56] References and chanical trigger for releaseably retaining a pressurized UNITED STATES PATENTS container in a cocked position and for releasing the 2,989,214 6/ 1961 Manheimer 222/180 pressurized container is described. In addition, a lock 3,147,885 9/1964 Sheridan 222/83 X mechanism to place the mechanical trigger in a noni gri 2/2238?) triggerable condition is also described. 3, 95,44 imer et a 3,757,371 9/1973 Martin 222/5 X 8 Claims, 17 ng gu M r k I I fl M W M '1 I 1 l 4 l l {/8 \l l \\|4\\ m 9 2 l \\l I I l l5 7 6 l 1 l l l I ll l l l \n -|s 1p@ 7 -11 l I 3 l l I I I l l l l l l l I 3 4 l l LPS 5 1' 1 1 l .2 {LT 2 l I I l -.z a- .5 -.u%-

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saw 5 PATENTEU Ausi 21975 SHEET CHEMICAL IRRITANT SPRAY DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to an anti-burglary device and more particularly to an anti-burglary device which discharges a chemical irritant such as tear gas from a pressurized container, one type of which is an aerosol container, into a protected area upon activation by an unauthorized person, causing the protected area to be flooded with a chemical irritant and forcing evacuation of the protected area by the intruder; but the invention is not limited to the use of the aerosol type container.

Chemical weapons have been known in the art for many years. One type of chemical weapon is the conventional tear gas grenade in which the firing member is generally triggered manually and said grenade is manually hurled at a target area, causing the target area to be flooded with the chemical irritant.

In another type of chemical weapon, the chemical irritant is stored under pressure in an aerosol type container. The firing member is again generally triggered manually and the chemical irritant in the form of a spray is manually directed at a target.

A third type of chemical anti-burglary device discharges an explosive tear gas shell into the area but this type is both dangerous and very limited as to the amount of tear gas which is discharged into the area to be protected.

Thus what is needed is an anti-burglary device in the form of a chemical irritant dispenser which can be fired by a relatively small amount of mechanical force even though the chemical weapon employs a relatively heavy spring for actuating the pressurized chemical irritant container against the passageway with sufficient force to release the irritant from said container but which anti-burglary device is positively secured against accidental release until triggered by an intruder and which will then release a sufficient volume of chemical irritant into the protected area to force evacuation by the intruder.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The principle object of the present invention is to provide an anti-burglary device of the chemical irritant dispensing type which may be triggered directly by a small amount of mechanical movement, and yet is positively secured against accidental release by a lock mechanism.

A further object of the invention is to provide an antiburglary device of the chemical weapon type which is readily triggered by opening a door, window, or ceiling skylight by an intruder entering an unauthorized area.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved means of spraying or discharging the chemical irritant into the protected area in a minimum amount of time in order to force the intruder from the protected area and to prevent the intruder from reentering the protected area for a reasonable amount of time.

A further object of the invention is to provide an antiburglary device having means for reloading the device and resetting the firing member of the weapon in its cocked position after the device has been triggered.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a directable emission of the irritant means, such as by means of rotatably adjustable spray head, so that the invention might be located on a door, and yet, when the door is opened, direct the chemical irritant into the protected area.

According to the principle aspect of the present invention there is provided an improved means for releasably retaining a spring biased pressurized chemical irritant container slidably mounted in a cavity containing a funnel seat and passageway leading to a rotatably adjustable spray head with nozzle. A self-camming latching-release lever retains the slidably mounted spring biased pressurized chemical irritant container in shouldered engagement, thereby retaining the pressurized chemical irritant container in its cocked position and requiring positive force for release. When the door or window associated with the device is opened by an unauthorized person or when the person enters the restricted area, the self-camming latching-release lever is removed from engagement with a latch plate which keeps the latter engaged; thereby, allowing the selfcamming latching-release lever to cam itself from and release the slidable mounted pressurized chemical irritant container. Thus permitting the container to be thrust toward the funnel seat and passageway by the force of the spring associated with said container and causing said container to discharge the chemical irritant through the passageway and rotatable spray head into the protected area.

Since the self-camming latching-release lever, which serves to retain the pressurized chemical irritant container in its cocked position is rotatable; a relatively small amount of force is required to hold the selfcamming latching-release lever in shouldered engagement with said container even though a relatively strong spring is employed for forcing said container into the funnel seat and passageway. As a consequence, the latch plate holding the self-camming latchingrelease lever will not allow triggering the chemical weapon. The resistance to movement of the, selfcamming latching-release lever on the latch plate is sufficiently low so as not to be detected by an intruder.

In order to retain the container safely in its cocked position against accidental release, a locking mechanism is used in releasable engagement with a selfcamming latching-release lever such that the locking mechanism retains the latching-release lever. The latching-release lever is shaped such as to be selfcamming from the pressure exerted on the latchingrelease lever by the spring biased pressurized chemical irritant container. When unlocked and an unauthorized person enters the protected area, the self-camming latching-release lever is released from the latch plate causing the spring biased container to be thrust toward the funnel seat and passageway, discharging the chemical irritant through the passageway and rotatable spray head into the protected area. When the device is locked, the self-camming latching-release lever is held in a non-releasable condition.

The self-camming latching-release lever is shaped so as to exert only a small amount of force on the locking lever. The locking lever nevertheless can retain the latching-release lever safely against accidental release from mechanical shock.

The anti-burglary device of the chemical weapon type of the present invention may be utilized in homes, factories, farms, office buildings by attaching the device to doors, windows, skylights, etc., and may be used in connection with vehicles such as boats, trucks, airplanes, etc. The device may also be employed for any other application wherein it is desired to prevent unauthorized persons from moving certain objects by placing the mounted device against any other wall or object to prevent the unlocked device from firing until unauthorized movement of the subject objects.

Once actuated, the spray cannot be turned off by the intruder and the entire amount of pressurized chemical irritant will be discharged into the protected area making it impossible for the intruder to remain in the protected area without having protective equipment.

Other objects, aspects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawmgs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a wall of a room having one embodiment of the anti-burglar spraying device of the present invention secured to the door and a latch plate attached to the frame of the door.

FIG. 2 is an elevational similar to FIG. 1, but showing the door open and showing the device discharging its spray.

FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of the anti-burglar spraying device.

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the anti-burglar spraying device.

FIG. 5 is left side elevational view of the anti-burglar spraying device.

FIG/6 is a partial vertical section view similar to FIG. 4 taken along line EE of FIG. 8.

FIG. 7 is right side elevational view of the antiburglar spraying device taken along line FF FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a vertical section taken along line BB of 'FIG. 4.

FIG. 9 is a vertical section similar to FIG. 8 but showing the anti-burglar device in its released position.

FIG. 10 is a fragmented sectional view similar to FIG. 8 but showing the trigger element held from releasing by the latch plate mounted on the door frame.

FIG. 11 is partial section taken along line G-G of FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is a partial section taken along line CC of FIG. 3.

FIG. 13 is a partial sectional taken along line DD of FIG. 3, when the device is mounted on a door hinged different then that in FIGS. 1 through 12.

FIG. 14 is a fragmented partial vertical section of the device but showing a second embodiment of the antiburglar device containing a pressurized container of the aerosol type without a projecting spout.

FIG. 15 is a fragmented partial vertical section of the device but showing a third embodiment of the antiburglar device containing a pressurized container of the type with a sealed end and a means for piercing the seal.

. FIG. 16 is a fragmented partial vertical section of the device but showing a fourth embodiment of the antiburglar device containing a pressurized container of the type with a projecting dispensing cap.

FIG. 17 is a fragmented partial front elevational section of the device but showing a fourth embodiment of the anti-burglar device containing the projection dispensing cap.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like reference characters designate like parts throughout the various views, there is shown in FIGS. 1-13, one form of the chemical irritant spraying device, called device hereafter, of the chemical weapon type according to the present invention, generally designated 1. In FIGS. 1 and 2 the device 1 is shown secured to a door 2 and against a latch plate 13 mounted on door frame 3 so that forceable opening of the door 2 by a burglar or intruder will move the device 1 away from latch plate 13 to be actuated to spray a chemical irritant 14 into the restricted area 7. The device 1 can be placed into a non-actuatable condition by locking the device with key or combination lock mechanism 16 external to the restricted area or by the locking knob 17 mounted on the device.

The device whose front, top and left side are shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 comprises of a pressurized chemical irritant container 55 subsequently shown in FIGS. 8, 9 and 13 slidably mounted between a right housing half 33 and a left housing half 34. The housing halves 33 and 34 when assembled provide two similar sides for mounting the device 1 to the door 2 on either right or left sides of door 2 depending upon the location, left or right, of the door hinges 4.

The pressurized chemical irritant container cavity 68 is formed when the symmetrically opposite housing halves 33 and 34 are joined together as shown in FIGS. 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 13. Similarly formed and coaxial with said container cavity 68 are the spring cavity 64, the passageway 59 and the spray head seat 51.

One type of pressurized chemical irritant container 55 that can be used is of the aerosol type, but the invention is not limited to this type of container.

The pressurized chemical irritant container 55 hereafter referred to as container 55, is slidably retained in cavity 68 such that spring 61 exerts force and thereby moves container 55 in direction 65 and causes spout 58 to seat into passageway 59. The material used for spout 58 is relatively soft and therefore effects an adequate seal at the passageway 59 to retain the fluid at the pressures normally used in the container 55. The container 55 in the position illustrated in FIG. 9 is in its released position where the container spout 58 is seated into the passageway 59.

The container 55 in the position illustrated in FIG. 8 is in its cocked position where the spring 61 is compressed and the spout 58 is coaxial but loosely seated into the passageway 59. The container 55 is releasably restrained in a cocked position by a self-camming latching-release lever 12. The self-camming latchingrelease lever 12 is generally a flat member and includes a shaped latch portion 52, pivot hole 21 and a catch 63 and is best seen in FIGS. 8 and 9. The latching-release lever is rotatably mounted on a pivot pin 20 which supported in holes 22 located in housing halves 33 and 34 and is slidably contained in slot 54 formed by the body halves 33 and 34. The shaped latch portion 52 slidably engages the rim 57 of the container 55 when in the cocked position as shown in FIG. 8. The spring 61 urged container 55 causes self-camming latchingrelease lever 12 to rotate counterclockwise by a camming action of latch portion 52 by rim 57 as shown in FIG. 8 around pivot pin 20 and therefore to be held against the latching plate 13 thus .retainingthe con tainer 55 in its cocked position.

The container 55 may be locked in its cocked position and the self-camming latching-release lever 12 held in its set position as shownin FIG. 8 by means of a cam-operated locking lever 38 whose catch notch 45 engages catch portion 63 of lever 12. The camoperated locking lever 38 is generally a square crosssectioned member which includes the catch notch 45, spring notch 46 and hole 40 and is best seen in FIGS. 7 through 12. The cam-operated locking lever 38 is rotatably mounted on a pivot pin 39 which is supported in holes 50 in housing halves 33 and 34 and is slidably contained in a slot formed by the housing halves 33 and 34, housing half guides 41 and slot 54 formed by the housing halves 33 and 34. The cam-operated locking lever is held against locking cam 36 by the spring member 48 which is compressed between the spring notch 46 of locking lever 38 and the cavity 47 formed by housing halves 33 and 34 and which slidably contained by cavity 47 and the spring guide portions 49 formed by the housing halves as shown in FIGS. 8, 9, and 11.

In order to place the device 1 into an actuatable or unlocked condition against the latch plate 13, with the door 2 rotably mounted on hinges 4 attached to door frame 3 normally covered by aesthetic moldings 6 in a closed position as shown in FIG. 1, the cam-operated locking lever 38 must be rotated such that the catch notch 45 disengages from the catch 63 of self-camming latching-release lever 12 so that it is only held from rotatably releasing and discharging the spring biased irritant container 55 by latch plate 13. This unlocking is accomplished by rotation of the locking cam 36 shown in FIG. 8 in a clockwise direction for 90 so that cam flat 37 allows locking lever 38 to move from engagement with self-camming latching-release lever 12 as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, FIG. 10 showing the unlocked but unactuated position of latching-release lever 12 and locking lever 38. The locking cam 36 is rotatably mounted in holes 42 and cavities 44 of housing halves 33 and 34 in such a manner that it is fully contained and retained rotatably within the assembled housing. The cavities 44 are shaped so that the locking cam surface is guided and a rotation limiting protrusion 43 engages with similar rotation limiting portions of cavities 42 so as to restrict rotation of the locking cam 36 to 90.

The locking cam 36 is rotated from the position shown in FIGv 8 to the position shown in FIG. 9 by inserting and rotating a key, not shown, 90 in cylinder lock assembly 16 shown in FIG. 12. The lock assemblys blade 23 located in the 90 rotation allowing hole 18 hereafter designated as hole 18 can in its rotation against limit projection 19 rotate the cam 36, of which 18 and 19 are parts, 90 and yet permit a return of 90 by the lock assembly blade. This feature, common to many commercially available lock assemblies is necessary to permit removal of the key. Since most lock assemblies require a rotation in one direction to lock and the opposite to unlock from a key entry position and return to that position for key removal upon completion of the function desired it can readily be seen in FIG. 9 that the blade is now in position to perform the 3 as shown in FIG. 2.

The lock assembly 16 is shown in FIG. 12 mounted on door 2 in hole 35 and is held in place by the lock mounting retainer plate 25 by use of lock assembly mounting screws 24. The device 1 is mounted on the door 2 with the device mounting screws 31 so that the locking cams hole 18 will slide over the lock assemblys blade 23 and permit ease of rotation of the locking cam.

Locking knob 17 which is shaped to press fit into locking cam 36 hole 18 permits locking and unlocking of the device 1 from the restricted area 7. This feature is desirable when more than one door, window, etc., provide access to the restricted area 7 and exit from that area requires only use of one door.

A desirable feature of the device 1 is shown in FIGS. 3, 9, l0 and especially l2 and consists of holes 28 in housing halves 33 and 34 concentric and in-line with hole 26 in door 2. Hole 26 is located from the holes 28 in the housing halves 33 and 34 during mounting of the device 1 on door 2 and the mounting of latch plate 13 on door frame 3 with mounting screws 32. The in-line hole can now be used to check the condition, actuated or not, of the device 1 by visual or mechanical means. If insufficient light is available a pin of specific length whose diameter is small enough to fit holes 26 and 28 may be used to probe the devices condition. As an additional desired embodiment a self-contained light source such as a light emitting diode, battery and camoperated locking lever 38 actuated switch could be contained within the unused cavities formed by the housing halves 33 and 34 of device 1 with the light emitting diode located in the housing half furtherest from the door 2.

The lock assembly 16 is shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 12 is commercially available from manufacturers such as Chicago Lock Co., 4311 Belmont Ave., Chicago, 111. 60641 (Model 4031 Eaton Corp., Yale Lock and Hardware Division, Rye, NY. 10580.

The device 1 is not limited to use of the lock assembly type shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 12 and may be used with other types of lock assemblies such as the combination lock assembly 66 and dial knob 67 are shown in FIG. 13 which also shows an alternate mounting and assembly of device 1 on door 2. A push-button lock assembly such as manufactured by the Simplex Security Systems Company, 10 Front St., Collinsville, Conn. 06022 could also be effectively utilized to actuate and deactuate device 1.

In the unlocked, actuatable condition shown by FIGS. 1 and 10, the device protects the restricted area 7 from entry from accessable area 8 even though the door 2, generally secured to frame 3 by hinges 4 and the doors normal knob and latch mechanism 10 and latch plate recessed in frame 3. Upon unauthorized entry to restricted area 7 by forcing open door 2, rotatably mounted on hinges 4, breaking out the doors regular latch plate as shown by the 'broken frame section 11 as shown in FIG. 2 the device 1 is actuated. As the door 2 rotatably moves into the restricted area 7 such as a home. apartment or office, etc., the device 1 slidably moves away from latch plate 13 as shown in FIGS. 2, 9 and 11. As soon as the self-camming latching-release lever 12 slides from its engagement with latch plate 13 it is free to be cammed out of its container 55 retaining position by the force of spring 61 slidably moving container 55 in container cavity 58 in direction 65, the rim 57 of the container 55 slidably forcing the shaped latch I plate 13.

12 in such manner as to move lever 12 out of slot 54.

The container -55 continues to move in direction 65 to seat container spout 58 firmly in passageway 59 and de- I press spout 58 into container 55 causing the pressurized irritant 14 to be discharged through the device 1 spray head 15, passageways 59 and nozzle 60 into restricted area 7 as shown in FIGS. 2 and 9.

After the device has been fired in the manner described herein above, the housing halves can be separated to replace the container 55, after restoring latching release lever 12 to its cocked position as depicted in FIG. 8 if screws and nuts are used to assemble the housing halves 33 and 34 instead of the rivets 30 shown in FIGS. 3, 8, 9 and 11.

Yet another important feature is that the spray head is rotatable in socket hole 51 through a large angle up to 360 so that the chemical irritant spray 14 may be directed into any area relative to the triggering object such as when it is desired to spray into the area after an unauthorized person moves a triggering object or entryway at a comer of the area to be protected.

Another important feature is that the spring 61 be of substantial force so that the container spout 58 will seat in the passageway 59 withsufficient force to release the pressurized chemical irritant through the passageway 59 and out the nozzle 60.

When the restricted area 7 is not violated by unauthorized entry the device may be returned to a locked, unactuatable condition by operating the lock assembly 16 or the locking knob 17 so that the locking cam 36 is returned to the position shown in FIG. 8 causing locking lever 38 to rotate to engage catch 63 of the selfcamming latching-release lever 12 with catch notch 45 which locks lever 12 in place so that device 1 no longer can be actuated when slidably moved away from latch A second embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 14. In this embodiment the basic structure is previously described and like numbers are increased 200 to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In this embodiment, the pressurized chemical irritant container 55, shown in FIG. 8 having a projecting spout 58, is replaced with a pressurized chemical irritant container 255, shown in FIG. 14, having a recessed valve. Pressurized containers of the aerosol type with recessed dispensing valves are well known in the trade. In addition, the spray head 15 and recessed passageway 59 of the first embodiment 'shown in FIG. 8 is replaced with a spray head 215 having a projection 258 and a fluid passageway 259 all which are shown in FIG. 14.

In this embodiment all elements function as described in the first embodiment with the following difference. The pressurized container when released is discharged by the action of the spray head 215 projection 258 engaging with and depressing the recessed valve of the pressurized container 255. The chemical irritant is then discharged through the valve of the pressurized container, through the passageway 259 and out the orifice 260, then into the area to be protected.

A third embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 15. In this embodiment the basic structure is as previously described in the first embodiment and like numbers are increased by 300 to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In this embodiment, the pressurized chemical irritant container 55, shownin FIG. 8 of the first embodiment and having a projecting spout 58, is replaced with a I pressurized chemical irritant container 355, shown in FIG. 15, having a pierceable seal '373. Pressurized containers having pierceable seals are Well known in the trade. In addition, the spray head 15 and recessed passageway 59 of the first embodiment shown in FIG. 8 is replaced with a spray head 315 having a projection 358 shaped to pierce seal 373 and a means for making a fluid seal capable of withstanding the pressure required for effectively discharging the chemical irritant into the restricted area.

Now referring to FIG. 15; FIG. 15 is an inverted embodiment of FIG. 8 of the first embodiment in which all elements function as described in the first embodiment with the following exceptions. The pressurized container 355 when released by the latching-release lever 312 is forced into pierceable engagement with the sprayhead projection 358 by the action of a spring acting in a manner similar to the action of spring 64 of FIG. 8 of the first embodiment. As the pierceable seal 373 is pierced by the action of the sprayhead projection 358; the pressurized container 355 continues to move by the urging of the spring acting in a manner similar to spring 64 of FIG. 8 of the first embodiment forming a seal by the action of the O-ring 374 and its retaining seat 351 and the pierceable seal 373 of the pressurized container 355. The chemical irritant is then discharged through the pierced seal 373 of the pressurized container 355, through the passageway 359 and out the orifice 360, and then into the area to be protected.

A fourth embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17. In the embodiment the basic structure is previously described in the first embodiment and like numbers are increased 100 to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In this embodiment, the pressurized container 55, shown in FIG. 8 having a projecting spout 58 is replaced with a pressurized container 155 shown'in FIG. 16, having a projecting dispensing cap115. Pressurized containers of the aerosol type having-projecting dispensing caps are well known in the trade. In addition,

the spray head 15 and recessed passageway 59 of the first embodiment shown in FIG. 8 are replaced with apertures 171 and 172 of housing halves 133 and 134 through either of which the spray is discharged depending upon which housing valve is against the mounting surface.

In this embodiment all elements function as described in the first embodiment with the following difference. The projecting dispensing cap of the pressurized container is forced upward into engagement with the internal top of housing halves 133 and 134 by the action of a spring acting in a manner similar to the action spring 64 of FIG. 8- of the first embodiment The action of the spring urged slidably mounted pressurized container 155 causes the projecting dispensing cap 115 to be depressed when released by the latching-release lever 112, causing the entire contents of the pressurized container 155 to be discharged through the orifice of then out aperture 171 or aperture 172 into the area to be protected. 7

As shown in FIGS. 16 and 17, the housing halves 133 and 134 containa hole 169 in the top of the housing halves l33'and 134 through which a slot in the projecting dispensing cap 115 may be engaged so that the projecting dispensing cap 115 may be rotated to align the orifice 160 with either aperture 171 or 172 depending upon the mounting of the device.

FIGS. 1 through 14 and FIGS. 16 and 17 show the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device in its preferred embodiment using a pressurized container of the aerosol type containing an internal tube from the valve to the bottom of the aerosol container. The anti-burglar device will work equally well inverted with aerosol containers of the type not having an internal flow tube. Both types of aerosol containers are well known in the industry but the invention is not limited to this type of pressurized container.

Although we have herein shown and described the invention in what we have conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is recognized that departure may be made therefrom within the scope of our invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein, but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent structures and devices.

We claim:

1. A chemical dispensing anti-burglar device comprising: a body member, a pressurized container, means for slidably supporting said container in said body member, a fluid passageway in said body member having an open entry section, means for discharging fluid from said container into said open entry section, a spring biasing said container toward said open entry section, means for releasably retaining said container in a cocked position away from said open entry section, said retaining means including a trigger element mounted for movement within said body member between an actuation position and a release position, said trigger element in the actuation position being in engagement with a surface of the container to retain the container in a cocked position, said trigger element in the release position allowing the container to be forced against the open entry section by the spring, whereby the means for discharging fluid causes discharge; means for locking said trigger element in engagement with said container, said locking means being mounted for movement within said body member between a locked position and a release position, said locking means in said locked position securing said trigger element in engagement with said surface of the container, and said locking means in its release position permitting the trigger element to move to its release position; and means external to the body member for releasably retaining the trigger element in its actuation position, said external retaining means including a latching plate mounted separate from the body member, the body member being movable between a first position in which the external retaining means retains the trigger element in its actuation position, and a second position in which the external retaining means allows the trigger element to move to its release position.

2. The device of claim 1 in which the pressurized container comprises a pierceable section, means to provide a seal between the pierceable section and said open entry section, and means for puncturing said pierceable section, whereby fluid may be discharged.

3. The device of claim 2 in which said means for puncturing comprises a projecting spout.

4. The device of claim 2 in which the locking means comprises a combination lock assembly.

5. The device of claim 1 in which the locking means comprises a cylinder lock assembly.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein said pressurized container includes a valve, said valve discharging fluid upon depression.

7. The device of claim 6, wherein said valved pressurized container contains a projecting dispensing spout, said dispensing spout discharging fluid upon depression; said open entry section being funnel shaped for receiving said projecting dispensing spout on said container.

8. The device of claim 6 wherein said valved pressurized container includes a recessed valve, said body member includes a projection in said open entry section extending beyond said open entry section toward said container to engage said recessed valve, said recessed valve activated upon depression to emit fluid.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3147885 *Aug 21, 1961Sep 8, 1964Raymond Sheridan FrancisInflating device for life preservers
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4024986 *Feb 3, 1976May 24, 1977Fegley Charles RFluid dispensing anti-burglar device
US4121735 *Sep 17, 1975Oct 24, 1978Goldwell Gmbh, Chemische Fabrik H.E.DotterSystem for quantity-controlled spraying of a liquid active ingredient
US4125084 *Sep 6, 1977Nov 14, 1978Muckle Manufacturing Division Builders Iron Products, Inc.Fire extinguisher alarm
US4202471 *Mar 8, 1978May 13, 1980Fegley Charles RFluid dispensing anti-burglar booby trap device
US5489045 *Feb 17, 1993Feb 6, 1996Jennings; Roy H.Door alarm/sprayer with options
US5598142 *Dec 4, 1995Jan 28, 1997Winner International Royalty CorporationVehicle accessory protection systems
US7360674May 15, 2007Apr 22, 2008Simon SassoonControllable door handle sanitizer system and method
US7878371May 12, 2009Feb 1, 2011Hyso Technology LlcControllable door handle sanitizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/5, 222/153.14, 116/100, 116/86, 222/83.5, 222/180
International ClassificationB65D83/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/267
European ClassificationB65D83/26D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 7, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: GE FAUNC AUTOMATION NORTH AMERICA, A CORP. OF DE
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, A CORP. OF NY
Free format text: AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY;GE FANUC AUTOMATION NORTH AMERICA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005004/0718
Effective date: 19880101