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Publication numberUS3899381 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1975
Filing dateFeb 7, 1973
Priority dateFeb 7, 1973
Publication numberUS 3899381 A, US 3899381A, US-A-3899381, US3899381 A, US3899381A
InventorsO'brien William J, Sakal John
Original AssigneeStandard Register Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Direct mail advertising booklet and method of production
US 3899381 A
Abstract
A low cost self-contained, direct-mail advertising booklet, particularly adapted to be a self-mailer type of booklet. A plurality of continuous strips or sheets of paper-like material are superposed and attached together to form a series of booklets in a continuous web. Personalized information such as a name, address, etc., is applied to a portion of the web or to a card or sheet or the like which is attached to the web. The web is folded so that the personalized information is used as a mailing address for the booklet. Separation of the booklet from the web may occur before or after folding occurs. The portion of each booklet which carries the personalized information may be readily removed from other portions of the booklet and placed in the mail by the receiver of the booklet to indicate his acceptance of an offer or the like set forth in the booklet.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 OBrien et a1.

[ Aug. 12, 1975 1 1 DIRECT MAIL ADVERTISING BOOKLET AND METHOD OF PRODUCTION [73] Assignee: The Standard Register Company,

Dayton, Ohio [22] Filed: Feb. 7, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 330,214

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 2,143,247 1/1939 Seaman et a1. 270/5 2,181,117 ll/l939 Brenn 270/21 2,322,647 6/1943 Luce 270/41 3,284,077 ll/1966 Matuschke... 270/5 3,579,947 5/1971 Kalman 93/36 MM 3,665,817 5/1972 Katz et a1 270/37 3,713,673 l/1973 Katz 229/68 R 3,718,277 2/1973 Volkert 283/56 3,743,273 7/1973 Katz et al 270/37 3,820,447 6/1974 Gendron et al 282/115 A Primary Examiner-Charles E. Van Horn Assistant Examiner-J. Gallagher Attorney, Agent, or F irm lacox & Meckstroth 5 7 ABSTRACT A low cost self-contained, direct-mail advertising booklet, particularly adapted to be a self-mailer type of booklet. A plurality of continuous strips or sheets of paper-like material are superposed and attached together to form a series of booklets in a continuous web. Personalized information such as a name, address, etc., is applied to a portion of the web or to a card or sheet or the like which is attached to the web. The web is folded so that the personalized information is used as a mailing address for the booklet. Separation of the booklet from the web may occur before or after folding occurs. The portion of each booklet which carries the personalized information may be readily removed from other portions of the booklet and placed in the mail by the receiver of the booklet to indicate his acceptance of an offer or the like set forth in the booklet.

10 Claims, 23 Drawing Figures m wmm (LET unL PATENTED AUG 1 2 I975 PATENTED Am; i

SHEET PATENTEU AUG 1 2197s SHEET PATENTED i a ShLLi DIRECT MAIL ADVERTISING BOOKLET AND METHOD OF PRODUCTION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the past, direct-mail advertising booklets have been produced in quantities by various methods and each booklet has been mailed in a special envelope to a prospective customer with a personalized cover letter. Of course. such production of the booklets, with cover letters, has been relatively expensive. For example. several pieces have been produced and then brought together for mailing in an envelope or the like.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention comprises the production of booklets, such as direct mail advertising booklets, particularly the self-mailer type of direct mail advertising booklets. Thebooklets are produced by forming a continuous web which includes a plurality of superposed paper-like continuous strips or sheets. The sheets or strips are scored or partially severed at spaced-apart intervals to provide sections. The strips are adhesively attached together. Scoring of the strips to provide sections may occur before or after the strips are collated and attached together. A portion of each section of one of the strips is provided with personalized information, such as a name, address, etc. The web is then burst into booklet portions and then folded. Alternatively, portions of the web are folded, and then the web is burst into booklet portions. The booklet is then ready for mailing. The personalized portion of each booklet can be readily removed by the recipient and mailed back to the sender of the booklet to indicate acceptance of an offer or the like set forth in the booklet.

Thus, an object of this invention is to provide a personalized self-mailer type of direct mail advertising booklet which can be produced at relatively low costs.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method or methods of producing such a booklet.

Other objects and advantages of the invention reside in the construction of parts, the combination thereof, the method of manufacture, and the manner of use, as will become more apparent from the following description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic type of perspective view illustrating a method and apparatus for producing direct mail advertising booklets in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 3-3 of FIG. 1 and drawn on a smaller scale than FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a view taken substantially on line 4-4 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 5-5 of FIG. 1 and shown on a smaller scale than FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing a direct mail advertising booklet made in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing initial steps in producing another booklet according to this invention.

FIG. 8 illustrates further steps in-the production of a booklet in the manner illustrated in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a booklet made in accordance with the method illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 and drawn on a larger scale than FIGS. 7 and 8.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the booklet of FIG. 9 in an open condition.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the booklet of FIGS. 9 and 10, with one of the pages positioned angularly to illustrate the side thereof opposite that shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 1212 of FIG. 10.

FIGS. 13 and 14 are perspective views illustrating another modification of the method of producing booklets according to this invention.

FIG. 15 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line l515 of FIG. 13.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of a booklet produced in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14.

FIG. 17 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line I7l7 of FIG. 16. I

FIGS. 18 and 19 are perspective views illustrating a method of'producing another booklet in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 20 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially on line 2020 of FIG. 18.

FIG. 21 is a perspective view showing a booklet made as illustrated in FIGS. 18 and 19, prior to completion of the folding thereof.

FIG. 22 is an enlarged perspective view showing the booklet of FIG. 18 after the folding thereof.

FIG. 23 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 2323 of FIG. 22.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION FIG. 1 illustrates a method of production of booklets according to this invention. A continuous strip or sheet 20 of paper-like material has a plurality of closely spaced longitudinally extending score lines 24 at the central portion thereof. The score lines 24 divide the strip 20 into a longitudinally extending portion 26 and a longitudinally extending portion 28. The continuous strip 20 has transverse perforation lines 30 at spacedapart positions, which divide the continuous strip 20 into sections. As shown in the upper left hand part of FIG.- 1, the portion 26 in each section has printing thereupon which is separated by transverse perforation lines 29 and longitudinal perforation lines 31. The portion-28 of each section has a printed rectangle 34, a return address 36 and a postage permit statement 40 printed thereupon. Within the rectangle 34 is a window or opening 44.

Positioned upon the continuous strip 20 is a continuous strip 50 which has substantially the same width as the continuous strip 20. The strip 50 has score lines 24 which are directly above the score lines 24 of the strip 20. The strip 50 is attached to the strip 20 by adhesive spots or lines 54. The strip 50 is divided into portions 58 and 60 by the score lines 24 and each portion thereof contains printed advertising material or the like on one or both of the surfaces thereof. Transverse perforation lines 30 in the strip 50 are directly above the transverse perforation lines 30 in the strip 20.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, positioned upon the portion 58 of the strip 50 and having a width substantially equal to one-half the width of .the strips 20 and 50 are superposed continuous strips 66 and 68 which are attached together by transverse longitudinal lines or spots 70 of adhesive material to form envelopes 71 which are partially separated from the strips 66 and 68 by transverse and longitudinally extending perforation lines 72. The strip 66 is attached to the portion 58 of the strip 50 by lines or spots 76 of adhesive material. The strips 66 and 68 have longitudinal score lines 75. The upper surface of the envelopes 71 has address information and postage indicia printed thereupon. The address information is usually that of the mailer of the booklets.

Positioned upon the portion 60 of the strip 50 and having a width substantially equal to one-half the width of the strip 50 is a continuous strip 80 which has advertising material printed upon one or both surfaces thereof. The strip 80 and the strips 66 and 68 have spaced-apart transverse perforation lines 30 which are directly above the perforation lines 30 of the strips 20 and 50. The strip 80 is attached to the portion 60 of the strip 50 by lines or spots 86 of adhesive material, as shown in FIG. 2. The perforation lines 30 may be applied to the strips 20, 50, 66, 68 and 80 after they are attached together, if desired, rather then prior to collating and attachment, in the manner discussed above.

Ater such positioning and attaching together of the strips 20, 50, 80, 66 and 68, the strips are moved over high speed printer apparatus 90 or the like, which is ordinarily computer operated, and personalized information, such as the name and address of a recipient, is applied to the lower surface of the portion 26 of the strip 20. Feed holes 110 are shown in the strips 20, 50, 80, 66 and 68 for movement thereof.

Then, as illustrated in the upper right hand part of FIG. 1, the portion 58 of the strip 50 and the strips 66 and 68 are then folded over the strips 80, 50 and 20, so that the strip 68 comes into engagement with the strip 80, and the portion 58 of the strip 50 is then uppermost above the strip 80, as shown in FIG. 3. Then as illustrated in the lower part of FIGS. 1 and 5, the portion 28 of the strip 20 is folded under the portion 26 of the strip 20.

Thus a web as illustrated in FIG. is formed. The web is moved through burster apparatus 112, or the like, and the web is severed at the perforations lines 30 to form booklets 102, as shown in FIG. 1, supported upon a conveyor belt 104, or the like. When the booklets 102 are removed from the conveyor belt 104 and turned over, they appear as shown in FIG. 6, with the personalized name and address printed upon the portion 26 of the strip 20, appearing through the window 44 of the portion 28 of the strip 20. The booklet 102 is then ready for mailing to the name and address which appears in the window 44.

After the person receives the booklet 102, he may sever a personalized part of the portion 26 (a part which carries his name and address) from the strip 20. Such severance occurs along perforation lines 29 and 31. The severed part may then be placed into an envelope portion 71 which can be severed from the strips 66 and 68. Such severance of an envelope portion 71 occurs along perforation lines 72 and 75. The envelope 7] which has the personalized portion 26 of the strip therein is then placed in the mail for transmittal to the addressee named on the envelope 71.

Instead of severing a personalized portion from the strip 20, a card or sheet portion or the like may be removably attached to and carried by a surface of the strip 20 and removed therefrom and mailed without enclosure or placed in an envelope, such as .the envelope 71 for mailing.

FIGS. 7-12 FIGS. 7-12 illustrate production of another booklet in accordance with this invention.

As shown in FIG. 7, a continuous strip or sheet has a longitudinal portion 122 and a longitudinal portion 124, separated by a longitudinal score line 126 at substantially the center thereof. The portion 122 has printed matter 127 applied thereto, and the portion 124 has a window 128. Transverse perforation lines 130 separate the strip 120 into sections.

Positioned upon the portion 122 is a continuous strip 134, which has a width which is substantially equal to one-half the width of the strip 120. The strip 134 is attached to the strip 120 by an adhesive line or spots 135 adjacent the longitudinal score line 126.

Positioned upon the continuous strip 134 is a continuous strip 136, which is substantially equal in width to the strip 134 and is attached thereto by an adhesive line or spots 137 adjacent the longitudinal score line line 126. The strips 134 and 136 have longitudinal score lines 139 adjacent the adhesive lines or spots 135 and 137. The strips 134 and 136 are divided into sections by perforation lines 130 directly above the perforation lines 130 of the strip 120. If desired, the perforation lines 130 may be applied to the strips 120, 134, and 136 after they are collated and attached together, rather than prior to collating. Each section of the strip 136 has a card portion 138, separated from other portions of the section by perforation lines 140.

As illustrated in FIG. 7, after the strips 120, 134 and 136 are so positioned and attached together in the manner discussed above, the web formed thereby is folded into a suitable pack 141 or the like for shipping to a customer thereof.

As illustrated in FIG. 8, upon receipt of the pack 141 the customer moves the web in a continuous manner from the pack 141 to printer apparatus or the like, which applies personalized information 152, such as a name and address, to each card portion 138 of the strip 136.

Then as shown in FIG. 8, the portion 124 of the strip 120 is folded over the strip 136. Such folding is along the score line 126 and the personalized information 152, or a part thereof, on the' card portion 138 of the strip 136 appears through the window 128. The web is then moved through burster apparatus or the like.

Severance occurs along the perforation lines 130 and booklets 164 are formed and moved from the burster apparatus 160 upon a belt 165. One of the booklets 164 is shown in FIG. 9. The booklet is in condition for mailing to the individual whose name and address is carried by the card portion 138 and appears through the window 128.

After the booklet 164 is received by the person to whom it is mailed, the person may read the advertising material therein. For observing the printed material upon the strips 134 and 136, the pages formed by the strips 134 and 136 may be turned by pivotal type of movement about the score lines 139. The person may also remove the card portion 138 and place it in the mail for return to the sender of the booklet toindicate acceptance of a proposal or the like set forth in the booklet 164. v

FIGS. 13-17 FIGS. 13-17 illustrate production of another booklet of this invention. A continuous strip 170 shown in FIG. 13, is provided with a longitudinal score line 172 adjacent an edge thereof, and transverse spaced-apart perforation lines 174. The perforation lines 174 divide the strip into sections 175, each of which has a window 176. Positioned upon the continuosu strip 170 is a continuous strip 180 which is divided into sections 175 by transverse perforation lines 174 directly above the perforation lines 174 of the strip 170. Each section 175 of the strip 180 has a card portion 182 outlined by perforations 1 83 and each section 175 may also include advertising material or the like.

Positioned upon the continuous strip 180 is a continuous strip 186 which carries advertising material 191 or the like. Positioned upon the strip 186 is a continuous strip 190 which may also carry advertising material 191 or the like. Each of the strips 180, 186, and 190 is substantially equal in width to the strip 170 and is provided with a score line 172 immediately above the score line 172 of the strip 170. Each of the strips 180, 186 and 190 has transverse perforation lines 174, immediately above the transverse perforation lines 174 of the strip 170 and which separate the strip 180, 186 and 190 into sections 175. The strips 170, 180, 186 and 190 are attached together adjacent the score lines 172 by adhesive lines 192 or the like. The strips 170, 180, 186 and 190 may have the perforation lines 174 applied thereto following collating and attachment together thereof,'if desired. rather than prior to the collating and attaching thereof. Marginal holes 194 are used to move the strips 170, 180, 186 and 190 and the web formed thereby.

After the strips 170, 180, 186 and 190 are so formed into a web, the web is folded in the manner shown at the left hand part of FIG. 13 for formation of a pack, for transportation to a customer.

As illustrated in FIG. 14, the customer then moves the web from the pack thereof to printer apparatus 200 or the like, which applies personalized information 204, such as a name and an address, or the like to each section 175 of the strip 190.

The strip 170 is then foldedly moved from the under side of the web to the upper side thereof, as illustrated in FIG. 14. The web is then burst by any suitable means to form booklets, such as a booklet 206 shown in FIG. 16.

FIGS. 18-23 FIGS. 18-23 illustrate production of another booklet in accordance with this invention.

A continuous strip 230 is provided with alternate transverse perforation lines 234 and transverse score lines 238 which divide the strip 230 into alternate sections 240 and 242. Positioned upon the continuous strip 230 is a continuous strip 250 which has alternate perforation lines 234 and score lines 238 which are directly above the perforation lines 234 and score lines 238, respectively, of the strip 230. Thus, the strip 250 is divided into alternate sections 252 and 254. The strip 250 is attached to the strip 230 by transverse adhesion lines 260 which are adjacent the score lines 238.

If desired, the perforation lines 234 and the score lines 238 may be applied to the strips 230 and 250 after they are collated and attached together, rather than prior thereto.

Each of the sections 252 .of the, strip 250 is provided with a window 264 and'has return address information 266 and postage ,268applied 'to1the lower surface thereof-Each of the sections 254' of the strip 250 is provided with a card portion 270, which is outlined byperforations 271 and a portion of a perforation line 234.

-The strips 230 and 250 thus form a web which is folded into a pack 275, as illustrated in the right hand part of FIG. 18.

The pack 275 may be shipped to a customer who follows the procedure illustrated in FIG. 19. The web is moved from the pack 275 thereof to printer apparatus 280 which applies personalized information 284, such as a name and address, to each card portion 270. The web is then moved through burster apparatus 287 and severed at each perforation line 234 to form individual booklets 290 which may be carried from the burster apparatus 287 by a conveyor belt 293. Then, as illustrated in FIG. 21, the section 252 of each booklet 290 is-' folded along the score line 238 so that the section 252 covers the section 254. The section 240 is also folded along the score line 238 backwa-rdly into engagement with the section 242, as shown in FIGS. 21 and 23.

Thus, each booklet 290 appears as shown in FIG. 22 as the personalized information 284 appears through the window 264. The booklet 290 is then ready to be' mailed to the individual whose name and address appear through the window 264. When the individual receives the booklet 290, he may read the material printed therein and may remove the card portion 270 from the section 254 and place the card portion 270 in the mail for return to the sender of the booklet 290, as

an indication that the individual'whose name and address appears on the card accepts an offer or thelike presented in the booklet.

Thus, it is understood that several types of booklets may be produced in accordance with this invention.

It is to be understood that in accordance with this invention personalized information may be applied to sheets or cards which are attached to a strip in spacedapart relationship along the length of the sheet. For example, one of the continuous strips in a continuous web may have spaced-apart card members or sheets attached thereto by adhesive means or by staples or the like along the length of the strip and personalized information is applied thereto in a manner such as that discussed above.

Although the preferred embodiment of the apparatus has been described, it will be understood that within the purview of this invention various changes may be made in the form, details, proportion and arrangement of parts, the combination thereof, and manner of use which generally stated consist in booklet structure and method of production thereof capable of carrying out the objects set forth, as disclosed and defined in the appended claims.

The invention having thus been described, the following is claimed:

1. A high speed method of producing booklets having personalized addresses thereon, comprising the steps of printing a continuous cover paper strip with repetitive information along the length thereof, the cover paper strip having a first half portion and a second half portion, forming a series of longitudinally spaced apertures within the first half portion of said cover paper strip, printing at least one continuous insert paper strip with repetitive information along the length thereof, the insert paper strip having a width substantially one-half that of said cover paper strip, collating the insert paper strip into superposed relation with the second half portion of the cover paper strip, attaching one longitudinal edge portion of the insert paper strip to the longitudinal center portion of the cover paper strip, personalized addressing the insert paper strip at longitudinally spaced intervals with different addresses, folding the first half portion of the cover paper strip over onto the insert paper strip for exposing a personalized address through each aperture and to form a continuous series of booklets, and severing the collated strips at longitudinally spaced intervals to separate the booklets.

2. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein the insert paper strip carries a detachable portion for each booklet, and said detachable portion is personalized addressed.

3. A-method as defined in claim 2, wherein the detachable portion is printed with a return address and forms a return mailer.

- 4. A method as defined in claim 1 including the steps of forming longitudinally spaced feed holes within at least one longitudinal edge portion of each of said cover paperstrip and said insert paper strip.

5, A method as defined in claim 1 including the step of forming longitudinally spaced and laterally extending score lines within the cover paperstrip and the insert paper strip to facilitate severing the collated strips for separating the booklets.

' 6. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein a second continuous insert paper strip is printed and collated in superposed relation with said one insert paper strip, and including the step of attaching a longitudinal edge portion of the second insert paper strip to the corresponding edge portion of said one insert paper strip.

7. A method as defined in claim 1 wherein said one longitudinal edge portion of the insert paper strip is attached by a longitudinally extending line of adhesive.

8. A method as defined in claim 7 wherein the cover paper strip is folded along a longitudinally extending line adjacent said line of adhesive.

9. A method asdefined in claim 1 wherein each of said apertures within said first half portion of said cover paper strip has a substantially rectangular configuration.

10. A high speed method of producing booklets having personalized addresses thereon, comprising the steps of printing a continuous cover paper strip with repetitive information along the length thereof, the cover paper strip having a first half portion and a second half portion, forming a series of longitudinally spaced apertures within the first half portion of said cover paper strip, printing at least one continuous insert paper strip with repetitive information along the length thereof, the insert paper strip having a width substantially one half that of said cover paper strip, collating the insert paper strip into superposed relation with 'the second half portion of the cover paper strip, attaching one longitudinal edge portion of the insert paper strip to the longitudinal center portion of the cover paper strip by a longitudinally extending line of adhesive, personalized addressing the insert paper strip at longitudinally spaced intervals with different addresses, folding the first half portion of the cover paper strip over onto the insert paper strip for exposing a personalized address through each aperture and to form a continuous series of booklets, and forming longitudinally spaced and laterally extending lines of perforations within the collated strips to facilitate separating the booklets.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification156/204, 156/459, 156/269, 156/181, 270/37, 156/227, 229/69, 156/384, 156/277, 281/3.1, 283/56, 270/7, 281/5, 462/2, 156/252, 462/6, 229/300, 229/303
International ClassificationB42C3/00, B42D15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB42C3/00, B42D15/08
European ClassificationB42D15/08, B42C3/00