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Publication numberUS3901121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1975
Filing dateJun 14, 1972
Priority dateFeb 2, 1972
Publication numberUS 3901121 A, US 3901121A, US-A-3901121, US3901121 A, US3901121A
InventorsKleiner Carl J
Original AssigneeKleiner Carl J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light emitting device
US 3901121 A
Abstract
The device is worn by a person and comprises a frame having a face of a given design. Located within the frame is a free-running multivibrator which is supplied with power from small batteries also located within the frame. In one embodiment, the device is a jewelry item adapted to be worn for example as a pendant or as a brooch while in another embodiment it is a metronome adapted to be worn on a person's wrist. As a jewelry item it has two light emitting diodes coupled to the two stages of the multivibrator respectively which alternately emit light when the multivibrator is actuated. These diodes are spaced from each other and form two eyes of a face and which appear alternately to blink when the multivibrator is actuated. As a metronome, the device has one light emitting diode coupled to one stage of the multivibrator and which periodically is energized as the multivibrator is actuated. A control means is provided for varying the frequency of operation of the multivibrator and hence the frequency at which the diode is energized.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Kleiner 1 1 Aug. 26, 1975 1 1 LIGHT EMITTING DEVICE Carl J. Kleiner, 2302 Beach, Cisco, Tex. 76437 22 Filed: June 14,1972

[21] App1.No.:262,667

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 222.849, Feb. 2,

1972, abandoned.

[76] Inventor:

[52] US. Cl 84/484; 240/64 W; 240/59;

340/331 [51] Int. Cl. GlOg 7/00; F211 l/OO; G081) 5/36 [58] Field of Search 240/6.4 W, 10 R, 59;

340/331, 341; 58/130 E; 84/484; 307/292, 132 R; 331/113 R [56} References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,854,563 9/1958 Catching 240/6.4 W 2,994,013 7/1961 Skcllctt 340/331 UX 3,271,670 9/1966 Esakov 84/484 X 3,284,083 11/1966 Levin et al 331/113 R 3,508,041 4/1970 Swcany et a1 24()/6.4 W 3,521,049 7/1970 Young 240/64 W 3,540,344 11/1970 Vccch 84/484 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,414,063 9/1965 France 84/484 969,770 9/1964 United Kingdom 240/59 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Morehead, F. F., .112, Light-Emitting Semiconductor, Scientific American, May 1967, p. 109.

Primary E.ranziner-.loseph F. Peters, Jr.

[571 ABSTRACT The device is worn by a person and comprises a frame having a face of a given design. Located within the frame is a free-running multivibrator which is supplied with power from small batteries also located within the frame. In one embodiment, the device is a jewelry item adapted to be worn for example as a pendant or as a brooch while in another embodiment it is :1 metronome adapted to be worn on a person's wrist. As a jewelry item it has two light emitting diodes coupled to the two stages of the multivibrator respectively which alternately emit light when the multivibrator is actuated. These diodes are spaced from each other and form two eyes of a face and which appear alternately to blink when the multivibrator is actuated. As a metronome, the device has one light emitting diode coupled to one stage of the multivibrator and which periodically is energized as the multivibrator is actuated. A control means is provided for varying the frequency of operation of the multivibrator and hence the frequency at which the diode is energized.

7 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PATENTEB AUG 2 6 1975 .EU 2 OF 2 LIGHT EMITTING DEVICE This application is a continuation-in-part application of Ser. No. 222,849, filed Feb. 2, 1972, now abancloned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a small device adapted to be worn or carried by a person and employing modem-day electronic technology. In one aspect it relates to an item of jewelry which has fascinating appeal particularly to the younger generation. In another aspect it relates to an economic and useful metronome which may be worn on a persons wrist.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The device comprises a frame adapted to be worn or carried by a person and includes structure forming a face of a given design. Light emitting means is carried by the frame and is positioned to emit light from a given position on the face. In addition an electronic oscillator is located in the frame for periodically actuating the light emitting means. I In the embodiment disclosed, the light emitting means is a light emitting diode. An electrical energy source is adapted to be located in the frame for supplying electrical energy to the oscillator. In addition a manual on-off switch is provided for turn-on and turnoff of the oscillator and hence of the light emitting means.

In one embodiment, two spaced light emitting diodes are provided to form two eyes of the face. The oscillator comprises a two stage free-running multivibrator. One light emitting diode is coupled to one stage while the other light emitting diode is coupled to the other stage. Actuation of the multivibrator causes the two stages to alternately conduct thereby causing the two diodes to alternately emit light.

In another embodiment a light emitting diode is coupled to only one of the stages for providing the beat time for a metronome. In addition a control means is provided for varying the frequency of operation of the multivibrator to control the beat time.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of the device of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial showing of the electronic components of the device of FIG. 1', and

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a free-running multivibrator of the device of FIGS. 1 and 2 having a light emitting diode coupled to each stage.

FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate a metronome adapted to be worn on a persons wrist;

FIG. 6 is a partial cross-section of the metronome of FIGS. 4 and 5; and

FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram of the circuitry of the metronome.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. 1, there is illustrated at 11 one embodiment of the device of the present invention. The device of FIG. 1 has a front face 13 having a design of an owl forming a jewelry item. Formed in the face are two eyes 15 and 17 through which extend two light emitting diodes 19 and 21 respectively. These diodes 2 alternately are actuated to emit light whereby the eyes appear to .altemately blink. The device or jewelry item 11 of FIG. 1 is adapted to be worn by a person and in this respect has a top hook 23 forholding a chain 25 which is adapted to fit around a persons neck whereby the item 11 may be worn as a pendant.

Referring also to FIG. 2, the jewelry item 11 comprises a frame formed by an inner plate 31 to which are attached a front plate 33 and a rear plate 35. The three plates 31, 33, and 35, are secured together by way of bolts illustrated at 37. The inner plate 31 has open spaces or apertures 31A-31E formed therethrough for supporting electronic circuitry and batteries for actuating the light emitting diodes 19 and 21.

Referring to FIG. 3, the electronic circuitry is an oscillating means comprising a free-running multivibrator 41 having two stages which alternately conduct when the oscillator or multivibrator is actuated. The multivi brator is of the conventional type comprising a collector-coupled transistor multivibrator. In this respect PNP transistor 43 forms one stage while PNP transistor 45 forms the other stage. Also included are capacitors 47 and 49 and resistors 51, 53, 55, and 57. Power is supplied to the multivibrator from four batteries illustrated at 61, 63, 65, and 67. A manually actuated switch 69 may be closed or open to control the passage of electrical energy to the multivibrator to control its operation. The multivibrator may be actuated by moving the switch 69 to contact terminal 71. When this occurs, one transistor will conduct while the other transistor is cut off until a point is reached at which the transistors or stages reverse their conditions. That is, the

'stage which has been conducting, cuts off, and the stage that has been cut off, conducts.

Coupled to the collectors of the transistors 43 and 45, are the light emitting diodes 19 and 21. When transistor 43 conducts, light emitting diode 19 will be actuated to emit light. It will cease to emit light when transistor 43 turns off. Similarly when transistor 45 conducts, light emitting diode 21 will be actuated to emit light. Diode 21 will cease to emit light when transistor 45'turns off. Thus as the two stages of the multivibrator alternately conduct, the two light emitting diodes 19 and 21 alternately emit light. The rate of oscillation of the multivibrator and hence the rate at which the light emitting diodes 19 and 21 alternately emit light, is slow enough to be perceived and seen by a human being. In one embodiment, the multivibrator 41 is adapted to oscillate at a repetition rate of about 3 cycles per second. At this rate, the eyes 15 and 17 of the face of FIG. 1 appear to be alternately blinking when seen by a person.

In one embodiment, the light emitting diodes are identified as type T1 L209, gallium arsenide phosphide visible-light source manufactured by Texas Instrumerits, Inc. of Dallas, Texas, and described in Bulletin No. DLS7111417, February 1971, Revised March, 1971. They have a maximum reverse voltage rating of 3 volts and a maximum continuous forward current rating of 40 m.a. In the circuit disclosed each diode draws less than 5 ma. These light emitting diodes comprise a rounded body which emits light when the diode is properly biased. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2, light emitting bodies 19 and 21 are inserted through apertures 15A and 17A formed through the front plate 33 in the center of the eyes 15 and 17 respectively. Thus a portion of the light emitting diodes extend through the plate 33 forming the front face and are centrally located within the eye portions of the face whereby when the diodes are alternately turned on, they give the appearance of the eyes alternately blinking.

In one embodiment, the batteries 61, 63, 65, and 67 are commercially available mercury cells rated at 1.4 volts each. In the series-parallel connections illustrated in FIG. 3 the total voltage applied to the multivibrator is 2.8 volts. Capacito'rs' 47 and 49 each are rated at microfar'ads, volts. Resistors 51 and 53 each are rated at100 ohms while resistors 55 and 57 each are ratedat22 kilohms. Transistors 43 and 45 are identifled as type 2N5139, National. With these component values, the multivibrator will oscillate at a rate of about 3 cycles per second, as indiciated above and will continue to run at this rate for about 45 hours before the batteries are exhausted and need to be replaced. When the jewelry item is not in use switch 69 may be opened to conserve the batteries.

In the embodiment disclosed, the owl forming the jewelry item has a height of about 2 inches and a width of about 1.5 inch. lts thickness is about 6/16ths of an inch. lts weight is about 2.5 ounces. Thus the jewelry item is relatively small and lightweight and may be 'readily worn by a person either as a pendant or for example a red transparent plastic sheet of material.

Although the jewelry item shown has a face and the design of an owl, it is to be understood that other faces mayd'be employed instead, such as a smiling face of a person, the face of a fish, bird, etc. In addition it is to be' understood that instead of two light emitting diodes,

only one may be employed to represent a single blinking eye. In addition other faces instead of animal faces may be employed for the jewelry item. For example the jewelry item may have a configuration and hence a front face in the form of a heart. A single light emitting I diode may be employed to periodically turn on or a plurality of light emitting diodes may be employed for example to periodically turn on to light up the word Love.

Referring now to FIGS. 4-6, the metronome is identified'at 101 and comprises a frame formed by a main frame plate 103 to which are attached a front plate 105 and a fear or back container 107 which contains the electronics and batteries. The main frame plate 103, front plate 105, and the back container 107 are secured together by bolts illustrated at 109. Coupled to the plate 103 is a flexible band 111 which enables a person to wear the metronome on his or her wrist. The front plate 105 has an aperture 113 extending therethrough in which is located a light emitting diode 115. The diode has its top portion extending above the front face 105A of the plate 105 whereby the diode is visible to the viewer. The electronics located in the container 107 are employed to cause the light emitting diode 1 l5 periodically to blink or to emit a visible timing beat for use by a musician or for example a director to aid the musician'or director in maintaining the desired rate of beat in the rendering of a musical composition. A manually adjustable dial or control means 117 is provided for adjusting the rate or frequency at which the diode 1 15 is energized to provide a means for adjusting the rate of the timing beat. Indicia numbers 76, 96, 120, and 144 formed on the front face represent different rates or frequencies to which the timing beat may be adjusted. An on-off switch 119 also is employed for turning the metronome off or on. In addition a light shield 121 may be employed to fit around the front face A for shielding against light to allow a person to use the metronome in daylight. The shield 121 for example may be formed of translucent flexible plastic material having a dark tint. It is coupled in place by placing its three sides around the edges of plate 105 and the clip members 121A around the edges of plate 103 as illustrated in FIG. 5.

Referring to FIG. 7, there will be described the electronic circuitry for operating and controlling the light emitting diode forming the beat mechanism of the metronome. The electronic circuitry is an oscillating means comprising a free-running multivibrator 122 having two stages which alternately conduct when the multivibrator is actuated. The multivibrator is similar to that of FIG. 3 with certain modifications thereof. In this respect PNP transistor 123 forms one stage while PNP transistor 125 forms the other stage. Also included are capacitors 127 and 129; resistors 151, 153, 155, and

157; and a potentiometer 159 controlled by dial 117. Power is supplied to the multivibrator from four batteries connected together in series and illustrated at 161. The on-off switch is illustrated at 119. Coupled to the collector of transistor 123 is the light emitting diode 1 15 for emitting the timing beat in the form of a pulsating light. The multivibrator may be actuated or turned on by moving the switch 119 to contact terminal 163. When this occurs, one transistor will conduct while the other transistor is cut off until a point is reached at which the transistors or stages reverse their conditions. That is, the stage that has been conducting, cuts off and the stage that has been cut off, conducts. When transistor 123, conducts, light emitting diode 1 15 will be energized to emit light. It will cease to emit light when transistor 123 turns off. Thus as the stage formed by transistor 123 periodically conducts, light emitting diode periodically will emit light to form the timing beat. The frequency of the timing beat may be varied by adjustment of dial 117 which is coupled to the rotatable element 159A of the potentiometer 159. The multivibrator is calibrated and the control dial and the indicia numbers are placed in such a manner that rotation of the dial 117 to align its arrow 117A with the various indicia numbers will produce the beat frequency indicated by the indicia numbers. The beat frequency is beats of light flashes per minute.

The light emitting diode is of the type T1L209 as indicated above and the PNP transistors are also of the type 2N5139, National as indicated above. Resistor 157 is rated at 39 kilohms while the potentiometer 159 is rated from 0 to 100 kilohms. Resistor 155 is rated at 22 kilohms and capacitors 127 and 129 each are rated at 10 microfarads, 20 volts. Resistor 153 is rated at 100 ohms while resistor 151 is rated at 680 ohms. The R-C time constant of the two stages are different whereby transistor 123 will be off for a longer period of time than transistor in each operating cycle. This is desirable in order to minimize drain on the battery and hence to conserve its lifetime. In this respect, since light emitting diode 115 is energized when transistor 123 conducts, the stage formed by transistor 123 will draw more current when it conducts than will the stage formed by transistor 125. Thus it is desirable to reduce the conduction time of the stage formed by transistor 123.

In one embodiment, the batteries 161 are commercially available mercury cells rated at 1.4 volts each. The diode 115 draws m.a. for the series battery connections shown. For the value of the components given and with the series battery connections, the metronome may operate for about 12 hours before the batteries are exhausted and need to be replaced. Although not shown, an opening, having a removable cover, is formed through the back plate 107A of container 107 to allow the batteries to be replaced.

It is to be understood that the different frequency ranges for the operation of the metronome may be obtained by employing a potentiometer 159 having different rated resistance ranges. One suitable range of beat frequencies extends from 40-210 cycles or beats per minute. In one embodiment the potentiometer 159 was of type T-lOOK sold by Centralab, Electronics Division of Globe-Union, Inc.

If desired, the four batteries 161 may be coupled to gether in a series parallel arrangement as illustrated by the battery connections of FIG. 3. This arrangement has advantages in that it will increase the operational time of the device to about 50 hours although the intensity of the light emitted by the light emitting diode will be relatively lower. In this embodiment the diode 115 will draw about 6 ma.

In one embodiment, the frame of the metronome has a width of about 1% inches, a length of 2% inches and a thickness of 9/16 of an inch. Its weight is about 3 ounces. Thus it is relatively small and lightweight and may be readily worn on a persons wrist,

Although the metronome was described above as being used by musicians or directors, it is to be understood that it has other uses. For example it may be used by doctors to monitor the pulse rate of a patient.

Although the light emitting diodes in the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 4 are illustrated as extending through the front plates forming the front faces, the diodes do not need to extend through the front plates and may in fact be positioned below the front plates and still emit light through the front plates forming the front faces, visible to the viewer, if the plates forming the faces are of a transparent or translucent material.

If desired, a single dial could be employed to control both the on-off switch 119 and the potentiometer element 159A of the device of FIGS. 47 although preferably the on-off switch and the potentiometer are controlled independently of each other in order to minimize the possibility of accidental turn-on.

I claim:

1. A light emitting device adapted to be worn or carried by a person, comprising:

a thin frame comprising an intermediate plate means sandwiched between a front plate and a rear plate, said intermediate plate means having a carrying zone formed therein,

electrical components including a free-running multivibrator and a source of DC voltage for actuating said multivibrator located in said carrying zone,

a light emitting diode to be periodically actuated by said multivibrator,

said light emitting diode being connected in the circuit of said multivibrator and to one stage thereof, said light emitting diode being positioned to be visible from the front of said device,

an on-off switch connected to the circuit of said multivibrator and extending through said frame to the exterior thereof for controlling the flow of electrical energy from said source to said multivibrator and hence to said light emitting diode,

at least one of said front or rear plates being adapted to be removed for replacing components within said frame.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein:

said front plate has an aperture extending therethrough,

said light emitting diode being positioned to extend into said aperture to a position whereby it is visible from the front of said device.

3. The device of claim 2 comprising means coupled to said frame for allowing a person to wear said device as an item of jewelry,

said source of voltage producing an output voltage not greater than about 6 volts DC,

said multivibrator being characterized to periodically actuate said light emitting diode at a frequency slow enough to be perceived and seen by a human being.

4. The device of claim 2 comprising:

control means connected to the circuit of said multivibrator and extending through the frame to the outside for varying the frequency of operation of said multivibrator to form a variable frequency metronome having alight emitting diode as its beat producing means,

said control means being adapted to vary the frequency of operation of said multivibrator within a range including the range from about 40 cycles to about 210 cycles per minute, and

a bend connected to opposite ends of said frame for allowing a person to wear said metronome on the wrist,

said source of voltage producing an output voltage not greater than about 6 volts DC.

5. The device of claim 4 comprising a band supporting plate sandwiched between said front plate and said rear plate,

said band being connected to opposite ends of said band supporting plate.

6. The device of claim 5 wherein frame in its thin plane has a cross-sectional area not greater than about 3.4 square inches:

7. The device of claim 4 comprising:

means for shielding said light emitting diode against extraneous light to facilitate use of said device in daylight.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2854563 *Jun 3, 1955Sep 30, 1958James W CatchingIlluminated jewelry
US2994013 *Feb 21, 1958Jul 25, 1961Tung Sol Electric IncTransistor circuit for intermittently energizing a load
US3271670 *Apr 2, 1962Sep 6, 1966Connecticut Technical CorpElectronic beat producing device
US3284083 *Mar 26, 1964Nov 8, 1966Martin Schnur And Mel AppelSwitch actuated multivibrator chance device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3986144 *Jun 16, 1975Oct 12, 1976Joseph RussoOscillator with blinking light emitting diode for ornamental ring
US4018131 *May 27, 1975Apr 19, 1977Cannon Robert LElectronic metronome
US4035630 *Jun 26, 1975Jul 12, 1977Burke John GArticle of jewelry
US4090355 *Sep 17, 1976May 23, 1978Kabushiki Kaisha Daini SeikoshaElectronic metronome
US4170036 *Aug 7, 1978Oct 2, 1979Howard SusselArticle of jewelry with flashing diode
US4206829 *Dec 27, 1976Jun 10, 1980Towmotor CorporationControl system for lift trucks or the like
US4218611 *May 17, 1978Aug 19, 1980Trendmark CorporationMethod and apparatus for controlling eating behavior
US4231079 *Mar 28, 1979Oct 28, 1980Heminover Stephen RArticle of wearing apparel
US4623206 *Dec 28, 1984Nov 18, 1986Fuller James TSpring battery retainer
US4673928 *Feb 18, 1986Jun 16, 1987Guim RFuse cap warning light
US4777408 *Jun 23, 1986Oct 11, 1988Deluca Frederick PElectronic adornment for simulating natural flickering light
US4971059 *Sep 18, 1987Nov 20, 1990Niewald Jack LMedical timing device
US6558165Sep 11, 2001May 6, 2003Capticom, Inc.Attention-focusing device and method of use
US7064498Mar 13, 2001Jun 20, 2006Color Kinetics IncorporatedLight-emitting diode based products
US7186003Mar 13, 2001Mar 6, 2007Color Kinetics IncorporatedLight-emitting diode based products
US7385128Aug 18, 2005Jun 10, 2008Tailgaitor, Inc.Metronome with projected beat image
US7659674May 1, 2007Feb 9, 2010Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc.Wireless lighting control methods and apparatus
US20100090621 *Mar 20, 2008Apr 15, 2010Jeffrey BakerMethod of and light system for dance instruction
WO1987002542A1 *Oct 9, 1986Apr 23, 1987Ncdi IncLow powered strobe light
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/484, 331/113.00R, 340/331, 362/104, 362/124, 968/820
International ClassificationG04F5/02, A44C15/00, G04F5/00, A44C25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C15/0015, G04F5/025
European ClassificationG04F5/02C, A44C15/00C