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Publication numberUS3901217 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1975
Filing dateJan 24, 1974
Priority dateFeb 9, 1973
Publication numberUS 3901217 A, US 3901217A, US-A-3901217, US3901217 A, US3901217A
InventorsThomas W Clark
Original AssigneeThomas W Clark
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sphygmomanometer and gauge therefor
US 3901217 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 Aug. 26, 1975 1 SPHYGMOMANOMETER AND GAUGE THEREFOR [76] Inventor: Thomas W. Clark, 611 Westwinds Dr., Palm Harbor, Fla. 33563 [22] Filed: Jan. 24, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 436,096

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 331,289, Feb. 9,

1973, abandoned.

[52] 11.8. C1. l28/2.05 G; 73/396; 116/129 B; 116/129 D; 116/129 N; 128/2.05 C [51] Int. Cl A6lb 5/02 [58] Field of Search..... 128/205 A, 2.05 C, 2.05 G, 128/205 M, 2.05 R, 327; 73/396; 116/129 A, 129 B, 129 D, 129 N, 129 T 3,315,662 4/1967 Buffington 128/205 G 3,633,567 1/1972 Sarnoff 128/205 C 3,757,772 9/1973 Goldblat et a1. 128/205 G Primary Examiner-Wi1liam E. Kamm Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Stein & Orman 5 7 ABSTRACT A sphygmomanometer is self-donning by the user and may be conveniently operated by the user for taking his blood pressure. In lieu of the typical sphygmomanometer arm band, a sleeve is slipped on to the arm of the user. In order to firmly retain the sleeve in operative position, a strap securely tightens the sleeve about the arm, and suitable fastening means such as a Velcro fastener retains the strap in operative position. A typical stethoscope has a microphone secured to the sleeve proximate the sphygmomanometer bladder so that the heart beat sound may be noted without use of the hands for holding the stethoscope. A bulb inflater and pressure gauge are connected with the bladder and are adapted to be held in each hand of the user. The gauge is responsive to manual actuation by the user to record the systolic and diastolic blood pressures.

17 Claims, 18 Drawing Figures SIHYGMOMANOMETER AND GAUGE THEREFOR This is a continuation-in-part application of application Ser. No. 331,289 filed Feb. 9, 1973, now abandoned.

This invention relates to sphygmomanometers and, more particularly, to sphygmomanometers adapted to be self-donned by the user and easily operated by the user.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The use ofa sphygmomanometer in taking ones own blood pressure generally requires the aid of another person, particularly in securing the typical sphygmomanometer band about the arm. Additionally, it is often difficult for an individual taking his own blood pressure accurately to read and note the systolic and diastolic blood pressures as he regulates the typical pressure relief valve.

Various patents disclose attempts at solving these problems, for example a Self-Donning Sphygmomanometer Cuff or band is shown in recent U.S. Pat. No. 3,669,096 in which the band is initially secured about the arm by means of snap fasteners and is then tightened about the arm by means of a Velcro fastener. The snap fasteners are an aid in self-donning of the band, but considerable dexterity is required by the user since only one hand is available to hold the band in place while simultaneously initially fastening it preparatory to tightening the band by means of the Velcro fastener. A Self-Applicable Sphygmomanometer is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 2,869,536. Fasteners are again provided for initially securing the cuff or band in position and a stethoscope is provided as part of the unit.

An electrically operated Sphygmomanometer Apparatus is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,086,513. ltis automatic in operation upon throwing attached a switch or inserting a coin. However, the unit lacks normal portability and is complicated and expensive in construction. A Blood Pressure Testing Machine is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 2,149,690 and is of a stationary coin-operated type with provision for recording the systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The apparatus is not portable in the normal sense and is, of course, expensive in construction.

Another unit for measuring blood pressure is shown in U.S. pat. No. 3,621,831, the primary feature being a particular stethoscope pick-up formed as part of a sphygmomanometer bladder, but no self-donning features are evident. Still another sphygmomanometer is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,621,845 in which the band is provided with a Velcro fastener for securing the band in operative position. This unit also has a built-in stethoscope and a composite pressure bulb valve and pressure gauge.

A Pneumatically Actuated Pressure Dressing is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,633,567. Here, a band is passed about an anchor and returned upon itself, being secured about the body by Velcro fasteners. However, the width of the free end portion of the band may cause difficulty in aligning the free end portion during fastenmg.

Still another sphygmomanometer has a completely elastic sleeve which simply contracts against the arm and is provided with the usual bulb and pressure gauge connections in addition to a built-in stethoscope microphone.

It is a primary object of this invention to provide a new and useful sphygmomanometer. A related object is provision therein for a convenient self-donning and self use of the sphygmomanometer. Another related object is provision of the sphygmomanometer in the form of a sleeve with provision for securely fastening the sleeve in operative position. Another related object is provision therein of a recording pressure gauge so that the systolic and diastolic blood pressures may be recorded by the user, thus eliminating the necessity of carefully watching the gauge while taking ones blood pressure, a feature of particular desirability in a sphygmomanometer for normal operation solely the the user.

Another object is provision of a new and useful sphygmomanometer including a pressure gauge which records the systolic and diastolic blood pressures. A related object is provision of such a recording pressure gauge in a self-donning sphygmomanometer for operation solely by the user.

Still another object is provision of a new and useful recording pressure gauge and, more particularly, such a gauge adapted to record both systolic and diastolic blood pressures.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention is, in brief, directed to a sphygmomanometer unit which is conveniently self-donning by the user and permits convenient self-operation by the user. A flexible sleeve includes a suitable sphygmomanometer bladder and connected therewith a valved pressure bulb and a pressure gauge, as well as a stethoscope having a microphone pick-up on the sleeve, preferably proximate the bladder. The sleeve may have a resilient section separate from the bladder to permit expansion of the sleeve as it is inserted onto the users arm and for contraction of the sleeve to temporarily hold it about the arm. Additionally, provision is made for firmly securing the sleeve in operative position about the arm by means of a double-purchase cinch strap which may be conveniently gripped by one hand to permit tightening of the sleeve about the arm, and subsequently holding the sleeve in operative position by means of a pressure responsive fastener, such as a Velcro fastener. The pressure gauge has provision for recording the systolic and diastolic blood pressures upon detection through the stethoscope of the first heart beat and stopping of the heart beat, respectively. These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawmgs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompany drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows a person with the sphygmomanometer unit of this invention while the person is taking his own blood pressure.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of the sleeve of the sphygmomanometer unit removed from the users are, with the fastening strap of the unit foreshortened for more convenient illustration.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side view of the unit shown in FIG. 2, looking generally in the direction of line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view taken generally alone line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a side view of the unit similar to that shown in FIG. 3, but with the unit operatively positioned on the arm of the user.

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, but with the unit operatively positioned on a larger arm.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the pressure gauge shown in FIG. 1, the gauge having provision for recording the systolic and diastolic blood pressures and shown in recording position with the transparent cover removed for clearer illustration.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary side view of the gauge, with parts broken away and removed, and illustrates a changed position of certain parts over that shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary side view similar to FIG. 8, but showing still another operational position of the gauge.

FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary side view of the cam portion of the apparatus, looking generally in the direction of line 10-10 in FIG. 8, but with portions of the apparatus in still another position, and with parts removed for clearer illustration.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken generally along line 11-11 of FIG. 7. FIG. 12 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken generally along line 1212 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken generally along line 13--13 in FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary side view (similar to FIGS. 8 and 9) of another embodiment of the pressure gauge with parts broken away and removed for clearer illustration.

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view taken generally along line 1515 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is a plan view of another embodiment of the pressure gauge shown in FIG. 1, with the transparent cover and the dial removed for clearer illustration, showing the stop means of this embodiment.

FIG. 17 is an enlarged fragmentary side view (similar to FIGS. 8 and 9) of another embodiment of the pressure gauge, with parts broken away for clearer illustration.

FIG. 18 is an enlarged fragmentary side view similar to FIG. 17, but showing another operational position of the gauge.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the sphygmomanometer unit 20 is shown in operative position and in use by a person taking his own blood pressure. The sphygmomanometer unit 20 includes a sleeve 22 in lieu of the usual sphygmomanometer band or cuff. This sleeve is firmly held in operative position by a releasable strap 24. A suitable sphygmomanometer bladder 26 (FIGS. 3-6) is part of the sleeve 20 and a suitable air pressure bulb 28 and a valve 30 are attached to the bladder by a flexible conduit 32. A recording .pressure gauge 34 (FIGS. 7-13) is attached to the bladder 26 by another flexible conduit 36. A stethoscope 38 has a pair of opposed earpieces 40 (only one visible in FIG. 1) and a sound pick-up in the form of a microphone 42 secured to the sleeve 22 proximate the bladder 26 (FIGS. 3, 5 and 6).

Referring generally to FIGS. 2-5, the sphygmomanometer unit 20 is shown in detail in these figures. The sphygmomanometer sleeve 22 includes the previously noted sphygmomanometer bladder 26 which is formed by an outer side wall 44 (FIG. 4) of the sleeve and an inner side wall 46, having edge portions joined to each other in any suitable manner as by fused or heat sealed seams 48. The walls 44 and 46 may be of any suitable material such as vinyl, and the outer wall is reinforced in any suitable manner, as by cloth bonded to the vinyl, to retard distension as the bladder is inflated. A section of the sleeve may be resilient and may be formed of any suitable elastic material 50, such as a woven elastic cloth which is attached by fused or heat-sealed seams 52 to opposite ends of the bladder, as may best be seen in FIG. 4.

Suitable connectors 54 for the bulb and valve conduit 32 and the pressure gauge conduit 36 are provided in the outer wall 44 for communication with the interior of the bladder 26. The sound pick-up, here in the form of the stethoscope microphone 42 is connected through the bladder, that is, through the outer side wall 44 and inner side wall 46 in position to be placed over the Brachial artery of the users arm, in typical manner. Thus, in positioning the sleeve 22 on the upper arm, the elastic section 50 stretches for easier insertion and when the sleeve is in substantially operative position on the arm the contracted elastic temporarily holds the sleeve in place.

In order to prevent subsequent expansion of the sleeve 20 as the pressure is applied within the bladder 26, a retaining tie in the form of the double-purchase cinch strap 24 is tightened. The strap 24 is preferably reinforced vinyl similar to the outer wall 46 and is suitably secured to the outer wall of the sleeve, by fused seams 56, as may best be seen in FIG. 3. During use of the sphygmomanometer unit, a free end portion 57 of the strap 26 is first inserted through anchor 58 in the form of a rod 60, suitably secured to the outer wall 44 of the sleeve 20 as by a retaining member 62 (FIG. 2), illustrated in the form of reinforced vinyl doubled upon itself. Opposite ends of the rod 60 are held in tubes 64 of the retaining member 62, the tubes 64 being separated by a cutaway portion 66 of member 62 to receive the strap 24. The retaining member 62 has fused or heat sealed seams 68 securing it to the outer wall 44 of the sleeve 20, and seams 70 along the rod 60 to secure the rod in place. Prior to placing the sleeve 20 on the arm, strap 24 is passed about the anchor rod 60, as may best be seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, so that after the sleeve 20 has been placed on the arm, the free end portion 57 of the strap 24 may be grasped by the right hand (assuming the sleeve 20 is on the left arm) and the strap 24 is pulled across the anchor rod to tighten the sleeve 20 about the arm, whereupon the strap is suitably fastened to retain the sleeve 20 in a firm operative position. To effectively prevent outward expansion of the sleeve as the bladder 26 is filled with pressurized air, the fastening means for the strap 24 is preferably pressure responsive to facilitate one hand fastening of the strap, as shown in FIG. 3. Preferably, a Velcro fastener assembly 72 is provided, one strip 74 of Velcro being elongated to receive (FIGS. 5 and 6) one or more short strips of Velcro, thus providing infinite adjustability of the strap within the adjusting range of the sleeve. FIG. 5 illustrates the sleeve operatively in place on a relatively small arm, and FIG. 6 shows the sleeve on a larger arm. In addition to providing infinite adjustment, the fastener assembly further facilitates easy release of the strap by simply lifting the free end portion 57 of strap 24 to release the Velcro fastener.

When taking ones blood pressure with the previously described sphygmomanometer unit, the right hand may operate the pressure bulb 28 and pressure release valve 30 while the left hand operates the pressure gauge 34. It is generally inconvenient to write blood the systolic and diastolic bolld pressures while operating the equipment. In order to accurately record these pressures, the sphygmomanometer unit is preferably provided with a recording or indicating means in the form of pressure gauge 34, which may be manually operated by the user to indicate and/or record these pressures for subsequent notation.

The gauge 34 is shown in FIGS. 7-13. It has a suitable body 80 with a transparent cover 82 over a typical sphygmomanometer dial 84, suitably claibrated as from 20 to 300 millimeters of mercury, and indicator means including a pressure indicator in the form of a pivoted hand 86 on a pivot shaft 88 (FIG. 8), and is shown in the zero pressure position in FIG. 7. The indicator means further comprises a pair of recording indicators, also-in the form of hands 90 and 92 on a pivot shaft 94 secured to the cover 82 and pivoted about the same axis as the pressure hand 86 is pivoted. A first of these recording hands is the systolic blood pressure recording hand 90 and is slightly longer than the diastolic blood pressure recording hand 92, for a reason which will be apparent subsequently. In FIG. 7, the hands 86 and 90 and 92 are shown in solid lines in position after the blood pressure has been taken and recorded by the hands 90 and 92, and the relief valve 30 (FIG. 1) opened so that the pressure indicating hand 86 has returned to the zero position with the recording hands 90 and 92 retained in their respective recording positions.

In FIG. 8, the recording hands 90 and 92 have been released from their recording position (as will be described later) and the pressure indicating hand 86 has been actuated by applying pressure from the bulb 28 to the bladder 26 so that the pressure hand 86 swings across the dial 84. An indicator moving means comprising an upstanding tab 96 (FIGS. 7-10) on the pressure hand 86 engages the two recording hands 90 and 92 and swings them clockwise. As the hands swing clockwise to the high pressure portion (300 mm/Hg) of the gauge dial 84, a depending tab 98, also a part of the indicator moving means (FIGS. 810), on the pressure indicating hand 86 engages a stop means in the form of a cam member 100 (FIGS. 7, 8 and and thereupon causes the upstanding tab 96 to be disengaged from the recording hands 90 and 92 so that the pressure indicating hand 86 may pass by the recording hands. Upon passing the cam member 100, the upstanding tab 96 is repositioned for engaging the recording hands 90 and 92 as the pressure indicating hand 86 reverses its direction of movement and proceeds to move counterclockwise responsive to the valve 30 (FIG. 1) being opened to relieve the pressure in the bladder 26 in typical manner.

With particular reference to FIG. 10, which is taken looking generally in the direction of the line 10-10, in either FIGS. 7 or 8, as the hands 86, 90 and 92 are moving together in a clockwise direction in FIG. 7 and to the right in FIG. 10, the depending tab 98 on the pressure indicating hand 86 moves below and across a cam wall 102 ofa cam member 100 which is secured to the dial 84 of the gauge 34. This cam wall 102 descends from left to right so that the upright tab 96 on the pressure hand 86 is caused to move downwardly to the position indicated by the phantom lines in FIG. 10, and thus moves below both of the recording hands 90 and 92 which now remain in the phantom line positions shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. As the pressure hand 86 continues to move clockwise (FIG. 7) or to the right in FIG. 10, the depending tab 98 disengages from the lower face of the cam wall 102 whereupon the inherent resiliency of the pressure indicating hand 86 causes it to move upwardly to the dashed line position in FIG. 7 and at the right of FIG. 10. Now, when the valve 30 (FIG. 1) is operated to gradually reduce the pressure in the bladder 26, the pressure hand 86 proceeds to move counterclockwise (FIG. 7), or to the left as shown in FIG. 10, whereupon the depending tab 98 moves up the cam wall 102 and the upright tab 96-again engages the recording hands 90 and 92 to move them in unison with the pressure hand 86.

As the pressure hand 86 continues to move counterclockwise (FIG. 7), the two recording hands 90 and 92 are moved with it by means ofthe upright tab 96. When the heart beat is first detected through the stethoscope 38 (FIG. 1), a recording systolic button (FIGS. 1, 7, l2 and 13) is moved inwardly by the thumb, whereupon a braking means in the form of an annular braking member 112 moves upwardly to engage the tip of the systolic recording hand 90, thus raising this hand upwardly against the force of the inherent resiliency of the hand, and thereby releases the hand 90 from the upright tab 96 on the pressure hand 86. Thus, the systolic blood pressure is recorded as the systolic recording hand 90 is retained in position, and the pressure hand 86 continues to move the diastolic recording hand 92 counterclockwise. When the heart beat ceases to be detected through the stethoscope, a diastolic annular braking member 116, which is also part of the braking means, then moves upwardly and engages the tip of the diastolic recording hand 92 and moves this hand upwardly against the force of its inherent resiliency to dis engage the diastolic recording hand 92 from the upright tab 96 on the pressure hand 86 which continues to move counterclockwise as the diastolic recording hand 92 is retained in position to record the diastolic blood pressure.

As is obvious in FIGS. 7-9 of the drawing, the systolic braking member 112 is of a greater radius than the diastolic braking member 116 and both of these members are concentric with the pivotal axes of the hands. These members are offset circumferentially to conform to reasonable ranges of systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Both of the braking members 112 and 116 are resiliently urged upwardly as by compression springs 118 (FIGS. 8 and 9). The springs 1 18 are each received at their lower ends in sockets 120 (FIGS. 8 and 9) in the dial 84, and are received about depending pins on inwardly extending pads 122 (FIGS. 7, 8 and 9) secured to the bottom edge portion of the associated braking members. Each of the braking members 112 and 116 is provided with four such pads 122 and associated springs 118 as shown in FIG. 7. Additionally, as shown in FIG. 11, the braking members are slideably received in notches 126 in upright supports 128 (FIG. 11) suitably secured to the dial 84.

With reference to FIGS. 12 and 13, the recording buttons 110 and 114 each are of the same construction and function. With reference to the button 114, a shank 130 has a larger portion 132 movable both vertically and horizontally in an elongated vertical slot 134 formed in a side wall of the gauge body 80. A reduced portion 136 of the shank 130 is seated in an aperture 138 in the associated diastolic braking member 116, and extends through a clearance slot 140 in the systolic braking member 112. The inner end of the shank 130 has a groove 142 received in a vertical slot 144 in a resilient latch member 146. When the button 114 is moved inwardly, the latch member 146 is deflected inwardly as indicated by the double heated arrow 148 (FIG. 12) so that an offset tip 150 of the latch member 146 is released from the upper edge of the diastolic braking member 116, whereupon this member 116 moves upwardly responsive to the force of its compression springs 118 (FIGS. 8 and 9). As the braking mem her 116 moves upwardly, the shank 130 of its actuating button 114 is caused to swing upwardly. To reset the braking member 116, the button 114 is moved downwardly to forct the braking member downwardly and is simultaneously moved outwardly so that the top 150 of the latch member 1 46 again engages the upper edge of the braking member 116 to hold the braking member in retracted position, thereby releasing the systolic recording hand 91).

To summarize the donning procedure and operation of the sphygmommanometer unit, with the unit generally as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the sleeve 22 is grasped by the right hand and is slipped on to the left arm. The elastic portion 50 of the sleeve 22 permits expansion of the sleeve so that it may be readily positioned and retained as shown in FIG. 1. With the strap 24 reversed around the anchor rod 60, the free end portion 57 of the strap 24 is now grasped by the right hand as the sleeve is maintained in substantially operative position on the arm by the resilient force of the elastic portion 50, and the free end portion 57 is now pulled until the sleeve 22 is adequately cinched about the arm so that it will remain in operative position as pressure is applied within the bladder 26. With the sleeve 20 tightened by the strap 24, the Velcro fasteners 76 on the free end portion 57 of the strap are pressed into engagement with the elongated Velcro strip 74 secured to the strap, to hold the strap and therefore the sleeve in operative position.

With the stethoscope ear pieces 41) properly positioned in either ear, the valve 30 at the pressure bulb 28 is closed, the pressure bulb is pumped to swing the pressure hand 86 clockwise whereupon the upright tab 96 on this hand engages the diastolic recording hand 92 and then the systolic recording hand 90 (as shown in solid lines in FIG. 7) swings the recording hands clockwise until the depending tab 98 on the pressure indicating hand 86 rides across the lower surface of the cam wall 102 (FIG. 10) to release the two recording hands from the upright tab. The pressure indicating hand 86 then moves free of the cam wall 102 and its resilience causes it to move upwardly to the right hand dashed po sition in FIG. 10.

When the relief valve 30 is slightly opened to release the pressure in the bladder 26, the pressure hand 86 proceeds to move counterclockwise and its upright tab 96 engages the two recording hands 90 and 92 so that the three hands now move in unison counterclockwise.

When the heart beat is first detected through the stethoscope 38, the systolic recording button 110 is actuated, whereupon the systolic braking member 112 moves upwardly to release the systolic recording hand from the tab 96 and to hold this hand in fixed position for recording the systolic blood pressure. Continued movement of the pressure hand 86 counterclockwise moves the diastolic recording hand 92 until the heart beat is no longer heard through the stethoscope 38, whereupon the diastolic recording button 114 is actuated to release the diastolic recording hand 92 from the tab 96, whereupon this hand remains in fixed position torecord the diastolic blood pressure. After these pressures have been noted, the actuating buttons 110 and 114 are moved downwardly and outwardly to release the associated braking members 112 and 116 from the recording hands 90 and 92, and the latches 146 (FIG. 12) again retain braking members in their retracted position. The sphygmomanometer unit is now ready for a subsequent blood pressure determination.

In order to remove the sleeve from the arm, the free end portion 57 of the strap 24 is pulled to release the Velcro fastener 72, whereupon the sleeve 22 may be grasped by the right hand and removed from the left arm.

FIGS. 14 and 15 illustrate another embodiment of a resilient, normally generally upright tab 160 in lieu of the previously noted upright tab 96. In FIGS. 14 and 15, the previously noted reference numerals are primed (as 96) to indicate the same or similar parts as shown in FIGS. l-13.

The tab 160 is of such resiliency that it will move the recording hands 90' and/or 92' and will deflect and pass under the recording hands when movement of either or both of the recording hands is stopped as by the braking members 112 or 116, or by a stop pin 162 in lieu of the cam member in the prior embodiment. The stop in 162 is fixed to and depends from the transparent cover 82 generally at the same location, relative to the dial 84, as the cam member in FIG. 7.

The tab may be any suitable type of spring member, for example a coil spring, a plate resiliently con nected with the pressure hand 86', or preferably as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15, a leaf spring 160. The leaf spring 160 has its lower end secured to the pressure hand 86' and its free upper end normally positioned above the recording hands 90 and 92' for engaging and moving these hands. Resiliency of the spring is determined so that it will move the recording hands responsive to movement of the pressure hand, as previously described with reference to the embodiment of FIGS. 7-13. Additionally, the resiliency is such that the spring 161) will be deflected by the stopped recording hand or hands and slide thereunder, as shown in FIG. 15, as when the recording hands engage the stop pin 162 and the pressure hand 86 moves past the recording hands. After passing the recording hands, the leaf spring 160 returns to an upright position ready to engage and move the recording hands in a counterclockwise direction responsive to such movement of the pressure hand 86'.

FIGS. 1618 illustrate yet another embodiment of gauge 34' of the present invention. As in FIGS. 14 and 15, the previously noted reference numerals are primed (as 96') to indicate the same or similar parts as shown in FIGS. 1-13. The embodiment of FIGS. 1618 is constructed so that pressure hand 86' may be stopped to record the diastolic pressure, in lieu of diastolic recroding hand 92. The construction of this embodiment also employs magnets 362 and 364 in lieu of upright tab 96.

As shown in FIG. 16, stop means generally indicated as 166 is mounted on gauge34'in interrupting position relative to indicator drive means, generally indicated as 168. Stop means 166 includes stop button 170, shank 130, stop tip 172, spring 174 and retainer 176. Stop means 166 is mounted on gauge 34' so that shank 130 passes through an aperture (not shown) in gauge body 80' and is attached to stop button 170. Stop tip 172 is attached to the other end of shank 130. Spring 174 surrounds shank 130 and is held in place by retainer 176, which is in turn attached to base plate 178 of indicator drive means 168. By virtue of the construction and placement of retainer 176' around spring 174, stop means 166 is normally held in the position shown in FIG. 16. By pressing stop button 170 spring 174 is compressed, and stop tip 172 abuts drive gear 180 of indicator drive 168, thereby stopping rotation of gear 180. Gear 180 is mechanically connected to pivot shaft 88' on which the pressure indicator (not shown) is mounted. Thus, actuating stop means 166 serves to stop the pressure indicator. Furthermore, stop means 166 is constructed so that tip 172 remains in the same position relative to gear 180 until button 170 is actuated a second time. When button 170 is pressed a second time, tip 172 returns to the position shown in FIG. 16, and the pressure indicator (not shown) is again free to rotate.

Thus, by virtue of this embodiment diastolic recording hand 92 and its associated braking member 116 may be eliminated. It is, of course, obvious that systolic recording hand 90 and its associated braking member 112 would be utilized as in the embodiment of FIGS. l-l3, or of FIGS. 14 and 15.

Referring now to FIGS. 17 and 18, magnet 362 is mounted on pressure hand 86' substantially opposite a similarly placed magnet 364 on systolic recording hand 90'. Of course, if systolic recording hand 90 is formed from magnetic-attractivematerial, magnet 364 may be omitted. When systolic braking member 112' is retracted, as shown in FIG. 17, magnets 362 and 364 will be attracted to each other, thereby causing systolic recording hand 90' to travel along the same are as pressure hand 86. This common, arcuate movement of systolic recording hand 90 and pressure hand 86 will occur regardless of whether pressure hand 86' is moving clockwise or counterclockwise. Thus, cam member 100 may be omitted from this embodiment.

In operation, the embodiment of FIGS. 16-18 works as follows. With the stethoscope ear pieces 40 properly positioned in either ear, valve 30 is closed, and pressure bulb 28 is pumped. Pressure hand 86 responds by swinging clockwise. Magnets 362 and 364 cause systolic recording hand 90' to move along with pressure hand 86'. When valve 30 is slightly opened to release the pressure in bladder 26, pressure hand 86' begins to swing counterclockwise, and systolic recording hand 90' follows as above. Whenthe heart beat is first detected through stethoscope 38, systolic recording button 110 is actuated, whereupon systolic braking member I12 moves upwardly to release magnet 364 from magnet 362 and to hold systolic recording hand 90 in fixed position. Pressure hand 86' continues to move counterclockwise until the heart beat is no longer heard through stethoscope 38. At that time, stop means 166 is actuated by pressing stop button 170, whereupon stop tip 172 engages gear 180 to hold pressure hand 86' in fixed position, recording the diastolic blood pressure. After these pressures have been noted, actuating button is moved downwardly and outwardly to release braking members 112' from systolic recording hand 90, and stop button is pressed to release stop tip 172 from gear 180. The sphygmomanometer is now ready for subsequent use.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained, and since certain changes may be made in the above description without departing from the scope of the invention it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention, which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Now that the invention has been described, what is claimed is:

l. A sphygmomanometer assembly of the type primarily designed to be self-operating by the user, said assembly comprising: pressure gauge means comprising an indicia-bearing dial, indicator means rotatably connected to said dial and disposed to sweep over a predetermined portion of said dial, said indicator means including at least one pressure indicator and at least one recorder indicator, braking means movably connected to said dialand disposed to extend outwardly from the face of said dial into path interrupting engagement with said one recorder indicator, indicator drive means interconnecting said one pressure indicator with a source of fluid pressure, said gauge further comprising indicator moving means comprising a positioning means fixedly connected to said one pressure indicator for movement therewith, said positioning means disposed in interruptive engagement with said one recorder indicator, said one recorder indicator being rotatably connected to said gauge in movable relation to said dial, whereby movement of said pressure indicator and engagement of said positioning means with said one recorder indicator causes movement of said one recorder indicator along with said pressure indicator.

2. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said braking means comprises at least one substantially arcuately shaped braking member mounted on said dial substantially adjacent a predetermined portion of the path of travel of said one recorder indicator, said one braking member selectively extendable outwardly from the face of said dial into engagement with said one recorder indicator, whereby movement of said one recorder indicator along said path of travel ceases.

3. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said pressure gauge is used in combination with sleeve means, said sleeve means including a non-resilient portion, said non-resilient portion including a fluid-actuated bladder connected thereto; retaining means including an anchor fixedly attached to said sleeve, a tie connected to said sleeve and disposed to engage said anchor and securing means formed on said tie for securing said sleeve on the body of the user; operating means for regulating the flow of fluid to and from said bladder; sound transducer means including a sound pickup member attached to said sleeve adjacent the arm of the user and disposed for sensing the heartbeat of the user, said bladder being connected to said one pressure indicator and serving as the fluid source.

4. An assembly as in claim 3 wherein said securing means is a Velcro fastener including an elongated strip, said securing means further comprising at least one other strip selectively engageable along said elongated strip for selectively positioning the free end portion of said tie in substantially infinitely variable adjusted positions throughout an adjusting range of said securing means.

5. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said indicator means comprises a plurality of recorder indicators rotatably mounted on said gauge relative to said dial about a common axis, said braking means comprising a plurality of braking members each disposed in interrupting position relative to one of said plurality of recorder indicators, actuating means connected to each of said braking members such that each of said plurality of indicator recorders may be stopped independently of the other.

6. An assembly as in claim 5 wherein said braking means further includes latch means including biasing means connected to each of said braking and movably disposed relative to each braking member to extend each of said braking members into engagement with one of said recorder indicators independently of one another, activating means interconnected to each of said plurality of recorder indicators by said latch means for selectively stopping the movement thereof.

7. An assembly as in claim 5 wherein said plurality of recorder indicators have different longitudinal dimensions, said corresponding brake means disposed substantially adjacent the outer periphery of said dial and at varying distances from the axis of rotation of said indicator means.

8. An assembly as in claim 7 wherein each of said braking members includes a substantially arcuate configuration corresponding to at least a portion of the path of travel of said recorder indicators, said braking members disposed substantially concentric to the axis of rotation of said indicator means.

9. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said positioning means further comprises a substantially upstanding portion disposed in interrupting position relative to said one recorder indicator, and cam means mounted on said gauge in engaging position with said positioning member, said cam means disposed and configured to displace said positioning member out of engagement with said one recorder indicator, whereby travel of said recorder indicator with said pressure indicator in a given direction ceases.

10. An assembly as in claim 9 wherein said cam means is further configured to re-orient said pressure indicator relative to said one recorder indicator, said positioning means disposed to engage said one recorder indicator in said re-oriented position for travedl of said one recorder indicator along with said pressure indicator in a direction opposite to said given direction.

11. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said positioning means comprises a substantially resilient member outwardly extending from said pressure indicator to engage said one recorder indicator causing it to move along with said pressure indicator.

12. An assembly as in claim 11 further comprising blocking means mounted on said gauge in interrupting position relative to the path of travel of said one recorder indicator, said blocking means disposed to stop the forward travel of said one indicator recorder independent of the continuous movement of said pressure indicator.

13. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said positioning means comprises a first magnet connected to said pressure indicator and disposed in engaging relation to said recorder indicator, said recorder indicator comprising at least in part magnetically attractable material.

14. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said positioning means comprises a first magnet mounted on said pressure recorder and a second magnet mounted on said one recorder indicator in substantially opposed engaging relation to said first magnet.

15. An assembly as in claim 1 wherein said braking means further includes latch means connected to said braking means and actuating means releasably interconnected to said latch means for releasing said latch means and causing engagement of said braking means with said one recorder indicator.

16. An assembly as in claim 1 further comprising stop means mounted on said gauge in interrupting position relative to said indicator drive means, whereby said one pressure indicator may be stopped.

17. An assembly as in claim 16 wherein said stop means comprises a stop tip connected to an actuating means, said actuating means including biasing means interconnected between said actuating means and said stop tip and disposed to position said stop tip into engagement with said indicator drive means.

UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION 6 PATENT NO. 1 3 9 1 217 DATED August 26, 1975 iNVENT0R(5) 1 Thomas W. Clark It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2, line 13, delete the first occurrence of "the" and insert therefor -by-,

Column 5, line 9, delete the first occurrence of "blood" and insert therefor --down.

Signed and Scaled this i i seventeenth Day Of February 1976 [SEAL] Attest:

i RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner oj'Parents and Trademarks

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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/490, 73/709, 128/900, 116/301, 116/271
International ClassificationA61B5/022
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/02233, A61B5/022, Y10S128/90
European ClassificationA61B5/022D, A61B5/022