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Publication numberUS3901219 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1975
Filing dateJul 25, 1974
Priority dateJul 25, 1974
Publication numberUS 3901219 A, US 3901219A, US-A-3901219, US3901219 A, US3901219A
InventorsDonald A Kay
Original AssigneeBecton Dickinson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blood collecting container and method
US 3901219 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States 1 atent 11 1 1111 3,901,219 Kay 1451 Aug. 26, 1975 BLOOD COLLECTING CONTAINER AND METHOD Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. C. McGowan [75] lnvemor' Donald Sharon Mass' Attorney, Agent, or FirmKane, Dalsimer, Kane, [73] Assigneu; Becton, Dickinson and Company, Sullivan and Kurucz East Rutherford, NJ.

22 Filed: July 25, 1974 1 ABSTRACT [211 App]. NO: 491,820 Disclosed herein is an apparatus and method for obtaming accurate, consistent filling of an evacuated blood collecting tube under varying atmospheric pres- [52] US. Cl. 128/2 F; l28/DIG. 5 ure conditions, The apparatus comprises a gaspr00f {51] Int. Cl. A61B 5/14 t b l r container having one open end and one closed Field Of sealchm 128/2 DICI- 214 end; a gas-proof, elastomeric self-sealing closure to seal the open' end; an elastomeric barrier-piston which 425-4 R forms a sliding-seal with the interior side walls of the container; and an indentation for preventing the pis- [56] R f r C t d ton from traversing the entire length of the container. UNITED STATES PATENTS The method of the invention comprises employing the 3 508,653 4/1970 Coleman 128/2 F apparatus of the invention in the colleclio" of 3645253 2/1972 Govcrdc ct alm 128/2 F malian blood. The apparatus and method of the inven- 3,687,296 8/1972 Spinosa 128/2 F i n is p rti larly seful for the collection of blood 3,753,432 8/1973 Guerra 128/2 F with a simultaneous admixture of a chemical additive. 3,779,383 12/1973 Ayrcs 210/1310. 24 3,786,985 1/1974 Blaivas 210 1310. 24 4 Clams 3 Drawmg Flgures l5 i l l? BLOOD COLLECTING CONTAINER AND METHOD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention concerns a method and apparatus for the collection of mammalian blood specimens and more particularly concerns an apparatus and method for the collection of an accurate measure of blood specimen from a mammal.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art The art is replete with descriptions of method and apparatus for the collection of mammalian blood for the purpose of diagnostic determinations. One of the most convenient methods for the collection of mammalian blood is within an air evacuated collection tube such as that described in US. Pat. No. 2,460,641. At the present time, however, identically evacuated blood collection tubes will draw varying amounts of blood in different parts of the world and on different days in the same geographic locality. This is due to atmospheric pressure variations (which can be a result of weather conditions or altitude differences). The accurate filling of evacuated blood collection tubes is most critical in blood collection tubes which contain a chemical additive for admixture with the collected blood specimen. For example, when the evacuated tube contains an anticoagulant such as heparin. Too high or too low a blood to additive ratio may cause the blood sample to give inaccurate results in subsequent blood chemistry testing. This could ultimately lead to an error in analysis.

Prior hereto an apparatus and means for automatically collecting a measured amount of blood into an evacuated blood collection tube has not been available. The apparatus and method of my invention fills this long awaited need.

By the method and apparatus of my invention, it is now possible to collect almost automatically, an accurate measure of blood for clinical analysis. The collected blood may then be separated into its liquid and substantially cellular portions without transfer to a separate container for centrifuging. The apparatus of my invention is a unitary, simply constructed and economical unit which may be disposed of after a single use. The apparatus and method of my invention are readily employed by para-medical personnel having a minimum amount of training in accurate blood collection and analysis techniques.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention comprises an apparatus for the collection of an accurate measure of blood which comprises: a gas-proof tubular container having one open end and one closed end; a gas-proof, elastomeric, self-sealing closure to seal said open end; an elastomeric barrierpiston formed of an elastomeric material and which forms a sliding-seal with the interior side walls of said container; and means for preventing said piston from traversing the entire length of said container; provided that at least one of said closure and said piston has a recess in the surface thereof which is proximal to the other of said closure and said piston. The invention also comprises the method of collecting an accurate measure of blood employing the apparatus of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional side elevation of an embodiment within the scope of the apparatus of the invention shown prior to its operation.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional side elevation of the embodiment seen in FIG. 1 but following its filling with blood.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional side elevation of the em bodiment of the invention as seen in FIG. 2 but following its centrifugation to separate the collected blood into its light liquid component and its heavy, substantially cellular component.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The apparatus of the invention may be fabricated from conventional materials. Illustratively, the gasproof container may be formed of glass. The gas-proof closures employed herein may be fabricated of any suitable elastomeric self-sealing materials. The preferred material for forming gas-proof closures is butyl rubber. The methods and techniques of assembling the apparatus of the invention will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

The apparatus of the invention and the method of the invention will now be further described and exemplified by reference to the various specific embodiments set forth in the drawings.

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional side elevation of an apparatus of the invention referred to generally by the symbol 10. Apparatus 10 comprises a gas-proof tubular container member 12 having one end sealed with a gasproof, penetrable closure 14 and a second end 13 which is sealed. Closure 14 is a member which may be termed a stopper which may be characterized by its cylindrical body portion 16 which is inserted under compression into the open end of container 12 so as to maintain container 12 in a sealed gas type engagement. Stopper 14 also has an enlarged head portion 18 to facilitate its insertion and removal. Body portion 16 of closure 14 has an annular recess 20 therein which together with axial recess 22 in head portion 18 forms a thin penetrable zone 24 in closure member 14. The thin penetrable zone 24 should have a minimum of at least 0.06 inches thickness when the elastomeric material of which stopper 14 is formed is butyl rubber. This minimum thickness assures that the apparatus 10 will maintain a vacuum for a period of at least 2 years. Nested beneath closure 14 is a piston-barrier member 30 which forms an interference-sliding fit with the interior walls 32 of container 12. Piston-barrier 30 as shown in FIG. 1 has a central cylindrical body portion 34 and integral upper sealing ring 36 and lower sealing ring 38 which form a sliding seal with the interior wall 32 of container 12. Within the central body portion 34 of piston-barrier member 30 there is an annular recess 35 which is provided as an alternate embodiment when it is desired to add chemicals 39 to the collected blood. The chemical additive is stored within annular recess 35 prior to the collection of blood. The volumetric area for annular recess 35 is sufficient to hold the chemical additive with a minimal amount of air space. The amount of air space above the piston has a direct bearing on the accuracy of the filling of the tube. The more space above the piston 30 initially, the less accurate is the filling procedure. A small amount of space is required to allow the needle room to penetrate the stopper, but such space should be minimal.

The apparatus of the invention as shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1 may be assembled under conditions of a partial vacuum so that chamber 40 of container 12 will have a partial vacuum contained therein. In practice, the vacuum employed is circa 26 millimeters of mercury.

The method of the invention is carried out by filling an evacuated apparatus of the invention 10 with blood, upon which analysis is desired. Referring now to FIG. 2 there is seen apparatus 10 which has been penetrated by cannula 35 through thin penetrable zone 24 of the closure 14. The open end of cannula 37 terminates within recess 20. Recess 20 should have a minimal volumetric capacity, i.e.; the minimum space required to allow the needle room to penetrate the stopper and receive an initial flow of blood. As blood enters the axial recess 20, the pressure above piston-barrier 30 is increased over the pressure found in evacuated chamber 40. The pressure differential causes piston-barrier 30 to descend within container 12 while maintaining sealing engagement with the inner walls 32 of container 12. Piston-barrier 30 will descend within container 12 until it is stopped by constriction 44 which is integrally molded within the walls of container 12. Constriction 44 is a stop means positioned so that upper chamber 40A has a precise volumetric capacity as required for an accurate volumetric collection of blood. Alternatively, the stop means may be a force fit plastic ring inserted in the container at the desired point. or a tubular sleeve of specified length inserted in the lower end of the container. Upon striking stop means 44, pistonbarrier 30 is halted and when the pressure in upper chamber 40A equals the pressure of incoming blood, the filling of container 12 with blood terminates and cannula 37 may be withdrawn whereupon the thin penetrable self-sealing zone 24 seals the opening previously made by cannula 37. When the annular recess 35 contains a chemical additive such as heparin, sodium oxalate, potassium oxalate or the like then the incoming blood 5 automatically admixes therewith to result in an accurate volumetric collection of blood in admixture with a precise amount of chemical additive previously enclosed within recess '35. That portion of the container represented by chamber 408 will contain residual air not evacuated during assembly of the apparatus l0. Piston-barrier 30 forms a permanent seal between this residual air and the collected blood so that the collected blood is not exposed to atmospheric gases.

Following collection of blood 5, the apparatus may be centrifuged conventionally to effect a separation of the collected blood into its lighter liquid or plasma portion and its heavier substantially cellular portion.

F IG. 3 is a cross-sectional side elevation of a filled apparatus 10 shown following centrifugation wherein the blood has now been separated into its light liquid por tion 5A and its substantially cellular portion 53. To remove the light liquid portion for chemical analysis, one may remove closure 14 and remove by decantation or pipette the light liquid portion for chemical analysis.

What is claimed:

1. Apparatus for the collection of an accurate measure of blood which comprises:

a gas-proof tubular container having one open end and one closed end;

a gas-proof, elastomeric, self-sealing closure sealing said open end;

an elastomeric barrier-piston formed of an elastomeric material and which forms a sliding-seal with the interior side walls of said container;

means for preventing said piston from traversing the entire length of said container; provided that at least one of said closure and said piston has a recess in the surface thereof which is proximal to the other of said closure and said piston, said recess providing only the minimum space required to allow the needle room to penetrate the stopper and receive an initial flow of blood; and

said apparatus having a partial vacuum in all chambers within said container.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said selfsealing closure has a thin zone which is penetrable by a cannula.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said piston has integral sealing rings in the side walls thereof for forming a seal with the interior walls of said container.

4. A method of collecting an accurate measure of blood which comprises:

A. providing an air-evacuated tubular container having one open end and one closed end;

a gas-proof elastomeric self-sealing closure sealing said open end;

an elastomeric barrier-piston formed of an elastomeric material and which forms a sliding-seal with the interior side walls of said container;

means for preventing said piston from traversing the entire length of said container;

provided that at least one of said closure and said piston has a recess in the surface thereof which is proximal to the other of said closure and said piston, said recess providing only the minimum space required to allow the needle room to penetrate the stopper and receive an initial flow of blood; said apparatus having a partial vacuum in all chambers within said container; and

B. filling said container by inserting a cannula into said recess, said cannula being attached to a source of blood.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3508653 *Nov 17, 1967Apr 28, 1970Charles M ColemanMethod and apparatus for fluid handling and separation
US3645253 *Nov 4, 1969Feb 29, 1972OrganonInstrument for the withdrawal of body fluids
US3687296 *Mar 26, 1971Aug 29, 1972Ewi Research & Dev CorpFluid separator
US3753432 *Mar 10, 1971Aug 21, 1973Guerra LHypodermic syringe for blood tests
US3779383 *Apr 25, 1972Dec 18, 1973Becton Dickinson CoSealed assembly for separation of blood components and method
US3786985 *Jan 5, 1973Jan 22, 1974Hoffmann La RocheBlood collection container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3986962 *Jul 10, 1975Oct 19, 1976Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNovel assembly for separating blood
US4020831 *Dec 4, 1975May 3, 1977Technicon Instruments CorporationBlood collecting syringe
US4091802 *Feb 17, 1976May 30, 1978Eastman Kodak CompanyVented liquid collection device
US4147628 *Jan 23, 1978Apr 3, 1979Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBlood partitioning method
US4212307 *Jan 12, 1978Jul 15, 1980Concord Laboratories, Inc.Blood sampling syringe
US4215702 *Jan 12, 1978Aug 5, 1980Patrick AyerArterial blood extraction device
US4216782 *Feb 14, 1978Aug 12, 1980Sarstedt WDevice for the extraction of blood
US4245654 *Mar 22, 1977Jan 20, 1981Concord Laboratories, Inc.Blood sampling syringe
US4279863 *Sep 12, 1979Jul 21, 1981Sherwood Medical Industries, Inc.Reagent separator for a blood collection tube
US4361155 *Oct 29, 1980Nov 30, 1982Anastasio Frank WBlood sampling unit
US4588556 *Nov 29, 1984May 13, 1986Walter Sarstedt Kunststoff-SpritzgusswerkArrangement for placing a separating gel between two phases located in a sample tube
US4675159 *Sep 29, 1985Jun 23, 1987Al Sioufi HabibMethod and device for disinfecting biological fluids and container for same
US4818386 *Oct 8, 1987Apr 4, 1989Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDevice for separating the components of a liquid sample having higher and lower specific gravities
US4936314 *Dec 9, 1988Jun 26, 1990Terumo Kabushiki KaishaMethod of evacuating and preserving a blood collecting device
US5342753 *Dec 26, 1991Aug 30, 1994Smith Jr William IBlood collecting tube with blood factor antibodies as anticoagulant
US5511558 *Jun 6, 1994Apr 30, 1996Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBlood collection assembly having additive dispensing means and method for sample collection using same
US5593639 *May 26, 1995Jan 14, 1997Japan Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd.Blood-sampling vessel
US5738670 *Sep 19, 1996Apr 14, 1998Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBlood collection assembly having additive dispensing means
US6001087 *Sep 30, 1996Dec 14, 1999Becton Dickinson And CompanyCollection assembly with a reservoir
US6238578Dec 9, 1996May 29, 2001Sherwood Services AgMethod for dispensing separator gel in a blood collection tube
US8394342Jul 21, 2009Mar 12, 2013Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDensity phase separation device
US8747781Jul 21, 2009Jun 10, 2014Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDensity phase separation device
US8794452Aug 1, 2013Aug 5, 2014Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDensity phase separation device
US8998000May 14, 2010Apr 7, 2015Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDensity phase separation device
US20010007315 *Mar 9, 2001Jul 12, 2001Fiehler William R.Method and apparatus for dispensing separator gel in a blood collection tube
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EP0017127A2 *Mar 24, 1980Oct 15, 1980Terumo CorporationA method for separating blood and a barrier device therefor
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WO1987001924A1 *Sep 29, 1986Apr 9, 1987Al Sioufi HabibMethod and device for disinfecting biological fluids and container for same
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/577, 422/918
International ClassificationB01L3/14
Cooperative ClassificationB01L3/5021
European ClassificationB01L3/5021