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Publication numberUS3902201 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 2, 1975
Filing dateFeb 11, 1974
Priority dateFeb 11, 1974
Publication numberUS 3902201 A, US 3902201A, US-A-3902201, US3902201 A, US3902201A
InventorsBobo Evan H
Original AssigneeBobo Evan H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plumbing valve
US 3902201 A
Abstract
A control which may be used for the filling of a flush tank of a commode, depending upon the amount of fluid passing through a fluid flow controlling device including a housing containing a turbine wheel. The control includes a valve actuating cam surface which is driven, through a reducer mechanism, by the rotation of the turbine wheel. The rotation of the turbine wheel is caused by the flow of fluid past the turbine wheel. After flowing past the turbine wheel, the fluid flows into a flush tank and commode. The relationship between the turbine wheel and the valve actuating cam surface is such that after a predetermined amount of fluid flows past the turbine wheel, the cam surface is rotated so as to cause the inlet valve to close.
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United States Patent Bobo Sept. 2, 1975 PLUMBING VALVE 3,730,208 /1973 Lewis 137/119 [76] Inventor: Evan I-I. Bobo, P.O. Box 450, FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS McArthur, 45651 11,419 1/1924 Netherlands 251/ [22] Filed: Feb. 11, 1974 Primary Examiner-Henry K. Artis [2]] Appl' N05 441,137 Attorney, Agent, or FirmJerome R. Cox

[52] US. Cl. 4/41; 4/67 A; 4/37; [57] ABSTRACT 4/57 R; 137/119; 222/ A control which may be used for the filling of a flush [51] Int. Cl. E03!) l/36 tank of a commode, depending upon h amount of Field of Search 55, 67 67 A, fluid passing through a fluid flow controlling device 4/34 57, 62, 68; 251/15 5; including a housing containing a turbine Wheel. The 137/404; 222/119 142O control includes a valve actuating cam surface which is driven, through a reducer mechanism, by the rota- [56] References Cited tion of the turbine wheel. The rotation of the turbine UNITED STATES PATENTS wheel is caused by the flow of fluid past the turbine 867,587 10/1907 Moore 222 20 Wheel After flowing P the turbine Wheel, the fluid 1,402,771 1/1910 Johns..... 251/5 flows into a flush tank and commode. The relationship 2,698,111 12/1954 Wiley 222/20 between the turbine wheel and the valve actuating 3.028.997 4/1962 ri 1 9 H 2/20 cam surface is such that after a predetermined amount 3J69-666 2H965 Rinkewlch- 222/20 of fluid flows past the turbine wheel, the cam surface 3,251,507 5/1966 Murray 222/ is rotated so as to cause the inlet valve to close. 3,619,821 11/1971 Bobo 4/41 3,713,558 1/1973 Pech' 222/20 10 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures v, as O L "I"! 36 17 Y /)1r I /fl) PATENTEU $5? 21975 SHEET 2 BF 3 PATENTEDSEP 2191s sum 3 0f 3 PLUMBING VALVE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention is concerned with valve controlling means which may, if desired, be used in conjunction with tank flushing apparatus. Specifically. the invention relates to the use of a metering device to control the supply of fluid to a tank flushing apparatus, More particularly, the invention relates to a turbine wheel which senses fluid flow to the flushing apparatus, said turbine wheel being connected, through an intermediate mechanism, to a cam that controls a valve which in turn regulates the supply of fluid to the tank flushing apparatus.

2. Prior Art Tank flushing apparatus has been the subject of many patents including patents to Gillin U.S. Pat. No. 746,324, Smith U.S. Pat. No. 2,486,336, Barlow U.S. Pat. No. 3,086,217, Emerson et a1 U.S. Pat. No. 3,324,481, and Bobo U.S. Pat. No. 3,619,821. None of the above cited patents except perhaps Bobo, employ a fluid flow sensing device connected to a valve regulating cam. Bobo measures fluid flow by means of a tiltable proportionately filled weight tank.

It is the usual practice to control the filling of flush tanks by the use of a float operated valve. As the float rises with the filling of the tank it acts to close gradually the valve and thereby to restrict gradually the inflow of the filling liquid until the tank is full, at which time the float controlled inlet valve completely shuts off the inflow of liquid. This arrangement has been considered to be unsatisfactory because there is a gradual shutting off of the inflowing liquid with the consequent result that a relatively long period of time is required to fill the tank and it is, therefore, necessary to wait a long period of time to reflush the tank. Another disadvantage of this arrangement is that the gradual shutting off of the inflowing water results in an objectionable noise. Further, and possibly most importantly, a leak in the flush tank outflow valve can prevent the level of water in the flush tank from ever attaining a level sufficient to provide enough force to effect a positive inlet valve shut off, thereby allowing a continuous flow of water into the tank and out of the tank outflow valve, thus wasting water.

The use of a metering device to control fluid flow in other contexts has also been the subject of several patents. Patents in this area include Moore US. Pat. No. 867,587, Wolcott U.S. Pat. No. 2,589,650, Wiley U.S. Pat. No. 2,698,111, Rinkewich U.S. Pat. No. 3,169,666, and Nelson et al U.S. Pat. No. 3,507,420. All of the above metering devices are believed to be in nonanalogous art and require a manual resetting each time the device is required to go through a metering cycle. Further, for a given amount of metered fluid, only a portion of the cam cycle is normally utilized in each of the above inventions. None of the devices are designed to be automatically reset for a subsequent metering cycle.

In the devices previously used and disclosed in the references referred to above, the combination ofa fluid flow sensing device connected to a valve regulating cam is believed never to have been employed in flushing devices. Flushing devices heretofore have relied mainly on a float type mechanism to control water flow, and metering devices heretofore have not generally been suitable for completely automatic cycling required in tank flushing apparatus.

The present invention represents an improvement over Bobo U.S. Pat. No. 3,619,821 in that more accurate control of theamount of water used may be obtained with this construction. The construction also provides a simpler means to achieve the desired result. In addition, the metering device does not discharge any water other than through the two outlet pipes, and hence may be used in other applications as well as in connection with a flush tank without any leakage or loss of fluid.

There is, therefore, a need for a valve controlling means designed to be used in conjunction with tank flushing apparatus or separately, which can avoid the problems associated with float type valve controls and can utilize the advantages of a metering type valve control.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a fluid controlling means which may be used as a tank filler device for a commode, designed to provide an improved valve controlling means which will be quiet and efficient in operation and which is controlled automatically without additional effort other than that required to lift the usual tank outlet valve.

One object of the invention is the saving of water which is sometimes wasted in the providing of water to commodes. In this time of waste of our natural resources, the saving of water is most important to the ecology.

A further object of the invention is the prevention of the sometimes continuous running of water in the flushing of commodes.

Another object of this invention is to provide a positive shutoff of the liquid flow into the flush tank after a predetermined quantity of water is delivered normally sufficient to accomplish the desired purpose. After this quantity of fluid has been delivered, the invention shuts off the water supply whether the tank has filled or not.

Another object of the invention is to shorten the time required to fill the tank and thereby increase the possible frequency of flush.

A further object of the invention is the elimination of the float ball and arm used in flushing apparatus.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of an improved meter valve controlling means for whatever use such valve may be required.

Further objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following specification when consid ered in connection with the claims and drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view of a flush tank which employs one embodiment of the present invention, the walls and other parts of the flush tank being broken away to show more clearly the construction.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view partly in elevation and partly in section of the inlet valve and follower guide, portions being broken away.

FIG. 4 is a view in horizontal section taken substantially along the line 44 of FIG. 3 and looking upward.

FIG. 5 is a view in side elevation of the cam.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view partly in elevation and partly in section of the turbine housing, reducer mechanism, and cam. having parts broken away and showing also the relationship between the valve follower and cam.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary view partly in side elevation showing the turbine housing with part of the outer housing removed and with parts shown in section.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to FIGS. I and 2 of the drawings for a more detailed description of the preferred embodiment, a flush tank 11 is indicated by the bottom thereof. The tank has the usual discharge outlet 12 at the bottom thereof providing a valve seat 13 controlled by a bulb or ball valve 14. The outlet 12 may be connected in the usual way to a water closet to be flushed or other article to which water is to be supplied. The flush tank 11 may be of any conventional construction.

The tank bulb or ball valve 14 is attached to a vertically movable rod 15, the upper portion of which is guided within a bracket 16. A life rod 17 has a loop at its lower portion to slidably engage the rod 15. The upper end of the lift rod 17 is connected at 24 to one end of lifting lever 18. Lever I8 is pivoted upon a pin 19 which serves as a fulcrum and which is carried by a side wall of the tank 11. Connected intermediate the pin 19 and the end 26 of lever 18 is a link 36 whose lower end is positioned so as to move valve follower 37 downward when lever 18 is actuated to raise ball valve To operate the lifting lever 18. its end 26 opposite to lift rod 17 is connected by a link 20 to an arm 21 secured to a rotatable shaft 22. Shaft 22 extends through a side wall of the tank 11 and has a handle 23 affixed thereto on the outside of the tank. When the handle 23 is swung in either direction, the arm 21 is rotated and the link 20 is pulled and in turn pulls downwardly upon the end 26 of lever 18 thereby pivoting the lever 18 about pin 19, lifting the end 24 to which the lift rod 17 is attached. and lowering the link 36. This lifts the lift rod 17, the rod 15, and the ball valve 14 from its seat 13 so that the water in the tank is emptied and this also causes the valve follower 37 to be depressed thereby opening valve 32 which allows an inflow of the filling liquid.

The filling liquid is supplied to the interior of tank 11 by inlet pipe 31 (see FIG. 3) which extends into the tank from the outside. At the upper end of the inlet pipe 31 is a valve indicated as 32. When the valve 32 is opened by link 36 and valve follower 37, liquid flows upwardly through pipe 31 past valve 32 to turbine housing 70 wherein a turbine wheel 71 (shown in FIG. 7) is rotated by the fluid flow before part of it is discharged into the tank 11 by discharge pipe 38 (see FIG. 1) and the remainder is discharged into the commode by filler pipe 39.

The turbine wheel 71 is connected by a reducer mechanism 34 (FIG. 5) to a cam 35. Almost as soon as the flow of liquid starts. the surface of the cam 35 maintains the downward position of the valve follower 37 until the cam has been rotated approximately 360 by the inflow of fluid. Thereupon a notch 61 in the cam surface allows the valve follower to return to its upward position and thereupon the valve 32 closes.

Referring now to FIG. 3 for a more detailed illustration of the entire construction and for a description of the valve 32, it may be seen that there is shown valve body 41 of valve 32 connected to inlet pipe 31. Formed on the interior of said valve body are inlet port 42,

valve chamber 43 and outlet port 44 whose lower edge 5 forms a valve seat 45. Contained within the valve chamber 43 are ball 46 and spring 47 positioned so as to maintain a sealing relationship between ball 46 and valve seat except when the ball 46 is depressed as later described.

Positioned above valve body 41 is a casing 50 which directs fluid flow from valve body 41 to turbine housing 70 and also serves as a guide for a vertically movable rod 52 forming a part of valve follower 37. A circular recessed flange 53 also forms a part of follower 37. The 5 flange 53 is attached at the upper portion of the movable rod 52. FIG. 4 illustrates valve follower guide 54 which is attached to the lower end of casing 50 and guides rod 52 of valve follower 37. Fluid enters the casing 50 at 51 and is diverted to outlet 55 to which coupling means 56 is connected and thus is supplied to the turbine housing 70.

The operation of valve 32 is based upon the usual sealing of ball 46 on its seat 45 and the periodical (when desired) downward displacement of ball 46. Normally the lower end of vertically movable rod 52 rests on ball 46. Ball 46 normally maintains a sealing relationship with valve seat 45 by virtue of the force produced by spring 47. When the vertically movable rod 52 of follower 37 is downwardly displaced by link 36, the ball 46 is likewise displaced allowing fluid to pass through valve body 41. Such displacement also removes the upper end of vertically movable rod 52 from its normal position in notch 61 of cam 35 (see FIGS. 1 and 6) thereby allowing cam 35 to be rotated by turbine wheel 71 as later described. In addition. the downward displacement of the rod 52 and its flange 53 allows the swing lever 63 to assume a vertical position in which the lower end of the swing lever 63 makes contact with the bottom flange 53 and thus prevents rod 52 from returning to notch 61 until the cam 35 has rotated sufficiently to displace notch 61 and thereby prevent the immediate return of the rod 52 to the notch 61. Note that spring 47 prevents siphoning even if water pressure fails.

The movable rod 52 is maintained in its downward position by cam surface 64 and thus the valve 32 is kept open until the cam 35 has rotated so as to return notch 61 to its normal position. In the meantime, as the cam 35 rotates, the swing lever 63 is lifted and then again tilted as explained below. This allows the upper end of rod 52 to reseat in the notch and thus close the valve.

The swing lever 63 maintains its vertically downward position until swing lever stop 65 catches lever 63 and causes it to rotate with cam 35 until the lever has been rotated to slightly past a vertically upward position relative to its connecting pin 66. Gravitational forces then cause the lever to swing downward where it comes to rest on the upper edge of flange 53 of valve follower 37. The swing lever stop 65 is positioned on the cam 35 so that this entire sequence of events occurs prior to the reseating of the rod in the notch 61 which completes the filling cycle of the invention.

Referring now to FIG. 7. there is shown a turbine housing containing turbine wheel 71. Located on the periphery of turbine housing 70 are inlet port 72 and outlet ports 73 and 74. Inlet port 72 is connected to tube 75 (see FIGS. 3 and 7) which is attached to the turbine housing 70 in a substantially tangential fashion. Likewise outlet port 74 is connected to pipe 38 which is also attached to the turbine housing in a substantially tangential fashion. Outlet port 73 is connected to pipe 39 in a substantially perpendicular fashion.

The pipes 38 and 39 discharge respectively into tank 11 and overflow pipe 40. The overflow pipe discharges into the toilet bowl. The proportion of fluid flow to the tank 11 to the fluid flow to the toilet bowl is approximately 16 to I in the preferred embodiment. The amount of desired fluid flow to the tank is determined by the amount of fluid necessary to properly flush the commode. The amount of desired fluid flow directly to the toilet bowl is determined by the amount of fluid necessary to refill the toilet bowl after it has been flushed. The proportion of the desired fluid flow may be varied by several means to suit a particular type of installation and for particular desired results. One means of adjusting the proportion is to vary the diameters of the outlet ports 73 and 74 and/or tubes 38 and 39. Similarly. the location and angle of attachment to the turbine housing of the outlet ports 73 and 74 and/or tubes 38 and 39 may be used to vary the proportion.

Fluid passing through valve 32 (see FIG. 3) is diverted by casing 50 and connecting means 56 to tube into turbine housing 70. This causes the fluid to tangentially impinge upon turbine wheel 71 causing it to rotate in a counterclockwise direction. A portion of said fluid is then discharged from housing 70 through port 73 which is connected to tube 39. The tube 39 discharges into the overflow tube 40 leading to the toilet bowl. Fluid is also and mainly discharged from the turbine housing 70 through port 74 which is connected to tube 38 which communicates with tank 11.

The relationship between casing 50 and rod 52 is such to form a substantially sealing relationship. Any fluid that could possibly leak out between the rod 52 and casing 50 would be small in amount and discharge directly into the tank 11, thus causing no harm. Should any amount of leakage be detrimental, however, additional sealing means, such as a gasket, may be provided to form a completely sealing relationship between casing 50 and rod 52.

FIG. 6 illustrates the relationship between the means for sensing fluid flow and the means for controlling fluid flow in the invention. Shown is turbine housing 70 containing turbine wheel 71. Attached to turbine housing 70 by means of fasteners 81 is reducer mechanism 34. Separating the turbine housing 70 and the reducer mechanism 34 is gasket 83. The rotation of the turbine wheel is communicated to the reducer mechanism by shaft 84 (FIG. 7). Valve control cam 35 is mounted on the output shaft 85 of reducer mechanism 34 and in the normal position of the cam, the cam 35 and its notch 61 are directly above vertically movable rod 52.

The reducer mechanism illustrated is a standard commercial gear reduction unit with an input-output ratio of approximately 3000 to 1. The reducer mechanism. however, may take various forms whose inputoutput ratio would depend on the particular application of the invention.

In the operation of the invention, assuming that the tank 11 is full of water and that the valve 32 is closed (as it is in FIG. 1). actuating handle 23 will simultaneously lift ball valve 14 and downwardly displace valve follower 37 so that the contents of the flush tank 11 will be discharged and liquid will be allowed to flow inwardly through valve 32. Because the discharge flow is much greater than the liquid flowing inwardly, the tank will eventually become nearly empty. When the handle 23 is released the ball valve 14 will be allowed to fall toward its seat 13 and as the water recedes move onto its seat and thus allow the liquid flowing inwardly through valve 32 t0 fill tank 11.

The amount of liquid flowing inwardly through valve 32 is metered by turbine wheel 71 which translates said inward flow of liquid to a rotary motion. Said rotary motion is communicated by the reducer mechanism 34 to valve controlling cam 35. In this manner a predetermined amount of liquid is used to refill the tank 11 each time it is discharged.

The flushing apparatus illustrated is only one embodiment in which this invention may be utilized. It is to be understood-that the above described embodiments of my invention are for the purpose of illustration only and various changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention.

For example, although not specifically shown, a filter means may be inserted at any point in the flow passages prior to the introduction of the fluid into the turbine housing. This filter would serve to protect the close fitting parts of the flow sensing unit from becoming jammed by foreign objects in the fluid.

Further, the profile of the notch 61 in cam 35 may be used to regulate the valve action. Sloping the upper portion of the sides of the notch would allow the valve to shut gradually, thus avoiding any hammering" effeet in the supply pipes due to a sudden shutting of the valve.

The materials used to construct the invention may be of many and various kinds. In the preferred embodiment, however, the invention would be made principally of plastic materials.

Still another possible variable structure of the invention is the turbine wheel construction. Although backward curved blades are illustrated and are the preferred embodiment, the blades would be either Straight or forward curved or even of an entirely different construction.

The following claims are intended to cover all modifications which do not depart from the spirit and scope of my invention. The invention is not to be necessarily limited to the specific construction illustrated and described, since such construction is only intended to be illustrative of the principle of operation and the means presently devised to carry out said principle. It is to be considered that the invention comprehends any minor change in construction that may be permitted within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination a flush tank for supplying liquid to a toilet bowl to flush said bowl and a filling device for the delivery of a predetermined amount of liquid to said flush tank, said filling device comprising:

A. a liquid supply line;

B. a valve to which said liquid supply line is connected in order to supply liquid to said valve and which has a moving part to open or close said valve to allow or prevent passage of liquid through said valve;

C. means for metering the amount of liquid flowing through said valve; and

D. means for actuating said moving part to close said valve dependent on the passage of a predetermined amount of liquid through said metering means in which the means for actuating said moving part comprises:

i. a cam with a substantially circular outer surface excepting for a notch in said cam surface; and

ii. a swing lever and swing lever stop mounted on said cam so as to co-act with said valve to prevent the valve from immediately reseating after being actuated.

2. The combination of claim 1, in which the means for metering the amount of liquid flowing through said valve comprises:

i. a housing having a liquid flow passage therethrough, and

ii. a turbine wheel contained with said housing.

3. The device of claim 1, in which said valve comprises:

A. a housing having a liquid flow passage formed therethrough and having a circular valve seat;

B. a spherical ball designed to form a sealing relationship with said valve seat;

C. a valve follower having a portion which rides on the cam surface and another portion which contacts the spherical ball;

D. a flange on said valve follower located so as to coact with the swing lever located on the cam; and

E. a spring positioned so as normally to maintain a sealing relationship between said circular valve seat and said spherical ball.

4. The device of claim 1, wherein a filter means is lo cated in the liquid flow passages at a position prior to the introduction of the flow into the turbine housing.

5. The device of claim 1, wherein the device is made principally of a plastic material.

6. The device of claim 1, in which said metering means comprises:

A. a turbine wheel;

B. a circular housing containing said turbine wheel;

C. an inlet pipe tangentially located on the circumference of said housing;

D. an outlet pipe tangentially located on the circumference of said housing; and

E. a second outlet located on the circumference of said housing.

7. The combination of claim 4, wherein a filter means is located in an inlet conduit and is connected to the turbine housing at a position prior to the inlet conduits introduction into the turbine housing.

8. The combination of claim 4, wherein a filter means is located in an inlet conduit.

9. In combination a flush tank for supplying liquid to a toilet bowl to flush said bowl and a filling device for the delivery of a predetermined amount of liquid of said flush tank, said filling device comprising:

A. a liquid supply line;

B. a valve to which said liquid supply line is connected in order to supply liquid to said valve and which has a moving part to open or close said valve to allow or prevent passage of liquid through said valve;

C. means for metering the amount of liquid flowing through said valve; and

D. means for actuating said moving part to close said valve dependent on the passage ofa predetermined amount of liquid through said metering means;

in which the means for metering the amount of liquid flowing through said valve comprises:

i. a housing having a liquid flow passage therethrough. and

ii. a turbine wheel contained within said housing; and

the means for actuating said moving part comprises:

i. a substantially circular cam formed with a notch in the outer circumference thereof, and driven by said turbine wheel.

10. In combination, a flush tank for supplying liquid to a toilet bowl to flush said bowl and a filling device for the delivery of a predetermined amount of liquid to said flush tank. said filling device comprising:

A. a liquid supply line;

B. a valve to which said liquid supply line is connected in order to supply liquid to said valve and which has a moving part to open or close said valve to allow or prevent passage of liquid through said valve;

C. means for metering the amount of liquid flowing through said valve; and

D. means for actuating said moving part to close said valve dependent on the passage ofa predetermined amount of liquid through said metering means in which the means for metering the amount of liquid flowing through said valve comprises:

i. a housing having a liquid flow passage therethrough, and

ii. a turbine wheel contained within said housing;

iii. an inlet pipe located tangentially to the turbine wheel on the circumference of said housing;

iv. an outlet pipe located tangentially to the turbine wheel on the circumference of said housing; and

v. a second outlet located on the circumference of said housing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1402771 *Feb 16, 1917Jan 10, 1922 johns
US2698111 *Apr 25, 1952Dec 28, 1954Verne Wiley WilliamFluid flow control mechanism for predetermined volume
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US3251507 *Aug 21, 1964May 17, 1966Robert W MurrayDispensing nozzle with pre-set shut-off
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3940805 *Aug 18, 1975Mar 2, 1976Sievers William OSelective volume flush valve
US3999223 *Mar 1, 1976Dec 28, 1976Sievers William OFlush valve with selected volume control
US4014050 *Apr 15, 1976Mar 29, 1977Goldsworthy Forrest CApparatus employing a timer for controlling the quantity of water flushed by a toilet
US4145775 *Jan 16, 1978Mar 27, 1979American Water Engineering CorporationWater saving device for water closet
US4764996 *Jun 3, 1987Aug 23, 1988Pino Charles WWater saving device for water closet
US4841581 *May 12, 1987Jun 27, 1989Russell William KDrain plug assembly for dishwasher, and the like
US4916762 *Jan 18, 1989Apr 17, 1990Shaw William SPositive shut-off, metered water control system for flush tanks
US4980932 *Mar 19, 1990Jan 1, 1991Stemples Robert LWater saving device
US5125120 *Nov 5, 1991Jun 30, 1992Marvin BaronToilet water regulator
US5134729 *Sep 8, 1989Aug 4, 1992Shaw William SUniversal positive shut off, metered water control system for use with flush toilet tanks
US5155870 *Aug 31, 1990Oct 20, 1992Toto Ltd.Water closet flushing apparatus
US5259073 *Jul 31, 1992Nov 9, 1993Toto Ltd.Water closet flushing apparatus
US5315719 *Jul 31, 1992May 31, 1994Toto Ltd.Water closet flushing apparatus
US5806556 *Oct 30, 1995Sep 15, 1998American Standard Inc.Turbine controlled metering valve
US7509973Apr 5, 2006Mar 31, 2009Manuel DeiveSystem to prevent excess fluid flow with a secondary resetting shut-off valve assembly
US7617949Dec 16, 2005Nov 17, 2009Kevin BrownFlow volume limiting device
US8783289Jan 30, 2012Jul 22, 2014Thomas Evan DaniellWater reservoir shutoff
US9038207 *Jan 11, 2012May 26, 2015Brass Craft Manufacturing CompanyToilet overfill regulator
US9155384Jan 6, 2012Oct 13, 2015Masco Builder Cabinet GroupResistant sink base cabinet
US20070138201 *Dec 16, 2005Jun 21, 2007Kevin BrownFlow volume limiting device
US20100146692 *Dec 11, 2008Jun 17, 2010Arnold RamirezLeak prevention fill valve control system for toilet tank
US20120174308 *Jul 12, 2012Mahesh CheerlaToilet overfill regulator
WO2013116213A2Jan 29, 2013Aug 8, 2013Daniell Thomas EvanWater reservoir shutoff
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/59, 4/366, 137/119.7, 222/20
International ClassificationE03D1/32, E03D1/36, E03D1/30
Cooperative ClassificationE03D1/32, E03D1/36
European ClassificationE03D1/36, E03D1/32