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Publication numberUS3903008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 2, 1975
Filing dateDec 19, 1972
Priority dateMay 1, 1972
Publication numberUS 3903008 A, US 3903008A, US-A-3903008, US3903008 A, US3903008A
InventorsCarroll Thomas E, Deweever Edward M
Original AssigneeLanvin Charles Of The Ritz Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleansing bar
US 3903008 A
Abstract
A translucent and/or substantially transparent non-irritating relatively low-hygroscopic conditioning cleansing bar is provided having a relatively low content of sodium stearate and a slightly alkaline pH and comprising up to about 20% sodium stearate, up to about 50% of a quaternized dihydro-imidazolic detergent, up to about 20% water, polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and myristic diethanolamide, and optionally buffers, perfume oils, coloring agents, emollients, foamers and other conventional soap additives. Methods for preparing the above cleansing bar are also provided.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,903,008

Deweever et al. Sept..2, 1975 CLEANSING BAR 3,503,888 3/1970 Miller et a]. 252 117 3,562,167 2/1971 Kamen et a1 252/134 X [75] Inventors Edward Deweeve": Eatomown; 3,598,746 8/1971 Kaniecki et a1... 252 118 x g Lmcrofi, both of 3,793,214 2 1974 ONeill et al. 252/117 [73] Assignee: Lanvin-Charles of the Ritz, Inc., Primary EXami'1erRihard Lovering N York, N Y Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Lawrence S. Levinson; Merle J. Smith; Stephen B. Davis [22] Filed: Dec. 19, 1972 g [21] Appl. No.: 316,631 [57] ABSTRACT Related (1.5, Application Dat A translucent and/0r substantially transparent non- [63] continuationdmpart of sen 249,320 May L irritating relatively low-hygroscopic conditioning 1972, abandoned cleansing bar is provided having a relatively low content of sodium stearate and a slightly alkaline pH and 521 US. Cl. 252/118; 252/117; 252/121; Comprising p to about 20% Sodium Swarm, p to 52 34; 252 5; 252/D[G 3 about 50% of a quatemized dihydro-imidazolic deter- 51 1m. (:1. c111) 9/30; c111) 17/00 sent, p to about 20% water, polyethylene glycol, [58] Field of Search 252/117, 118, 121, 134 Propylene glycol, and myristic diethanolamide, and

optionally buffers, perfume oils, coloring agents, emol- 5 References Cited lients, foamers and other conventional soap additives. UNITED STATES PATENTS Methods for preparing the above cleansing bar are l 'd d. 2,528,378 10/1950 Mannheimer 260/3096 aso prov! e 2,607,740 8/1952 Vitale et al. 252/357 X 6 Claims, N0 Drawings CLEANSING BAR This application is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 249,320, filed May 1, 1972 now abandoned.

The present invention relates to a translucent and/or substantially transparent non-irritating relatively lowhygroscopic moisturizing cleansing bar and to methods of preparing the same.

Translucent or substantially transparent soap bars have been available for consumer use for some time now. These soap bars are generally glycerine-based or alcohol-based to obtain the desired clarity and contain high levels of sodium and/or potassium stearate, namely 65 percent or more and when dissolved in water exhibit alkaline pHs of 8.5 or more and usually at least 9.5. These soaps have been said to be substantially less irritating than conventional non-translucent or non-transparent soap bars which contain from 65 to 95 percent sodium stearate and exhibit alkaline pHs ranging from 9.8 to 10.1. However, even the glycerinebased soap bars of pHs in the area of 9.5 or more have been found to be irritating to the skin and highly undesirable for use by those having particularly sensitive skin.

It has also been found that glycerine-based soap bars exhibit relatively high hygroscopic tendencies, that is they absorb water on the surface thereof, which causes the bars surface to slough and become scaly.

With respect to the alcohol-based soap bars, it has been found that alcohol evaporates therefrom over relatively short periods of time, thereby causing a reduction in size and clarity of the bar. The loss of alcohol also causes the soap bar to become rubbery.

Most conventional soap bars may include up to about 2-4 percent fragrances usually in the form of perfume oils. Unfortunately, the amount of fragrances employed in such bars is limited to 4 percent or less inasmuch as larger amounts impart an undesirable soft consistency and unpleasant color to the bar. Even with the presence of perfume oils, these soap bars leave only negligible traces of perfume fragrances on the skin after the soap is rinsed therefrom, which usually disappears after relatively short periods. The loss of perfume fragrances or smell from the skin can be attributed to the high concentration of fatty acid soaps present in and the relatively high pH's of prior art soap bars.

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a translucent and/or substantially transparent non-irritating relatively low-hygroscopic conditioning cleansing bar of relatively low sodium stearate concentration and only slightly alkaline pH. The cleansing bar of the invention is thus substantially less irritatingthan prior art soap bars, transparent or otherwise, and retains fragrances in the bar and on the skin after applica tion and rinsing, for substantially longer periods than prior art soap bars. in this respect, the cleansing bar of the invention has been found to produce effects similar to those produced by the use of bath oils in baths. Further, the cleansing bar may be employed as a shampoo bar, particularly suitable for children, inasmuch as it is substantially non-irritating to the eyes. The present bar does not produce the usual stinging effects or tearing normally associated with conventional soap bars used as shampoos. The cleansing bar of the invention is particularly advantageous in that it is highly water-soluble. Thus, it gives good cleansing action, in a gentle manner, without harsh scrubbing. Furthermore, it can be easily rinsed from the skin or hair, without leaving an undesirable residue and leaves the skin feeling soft and refreshed.

The translucent and/or substantially transparent cleansing bar of the invention comprises up to about 20 percent by weight sodium stearate and preferably from about 15 to 20 percent by weight thereof, up to about 10 percent by weight polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight within the range of from about 200 to about 800 and preferably from about 7 to about 10 percent by weight thereof, up to about 6 percent by weight polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight within the range of from about 800 to about 4,000 and preferably from about 3 to about 6 percent by weight thereof, up to about 8 percent by weight propylene glycol and preferably from about 5 to about 8 percent by weight thereof, quaternized dihydroimidazole detergents in an amount within the range from about 10 to about 50 percent by weight and preferably from about 10 to about 35 percent, an alkanolamide in an amount within the range of from about 4 to about 10 percent by weight and preferably from about'6 to about 9 percent and water, preferably deionized water, in an amount within the range of from about 6 to about 20 percent by weight and preferably from about 8 to about 14 percent.

When dissolved in water the cleansing bar of the invention has a slightly alkaline pH ranging from about 8 to about 9.5 and preferably from about 8.5 to about 9.0. The pH of the cleansing bar may be maintained at the above levels by employing conventional mild organic acid buffers such as citric acid, tartaric acid, stearic acid or lactic acid.

In effect, the cleansing bar of the invention is a chemically balanced formula containing no free acids and no free alkali which can produce skin irritation. Even when dissolved in water, the cleansing bar will not irritate or feel harsh to the skin and will not upset the acidalkaline balance of the skin.

In addition, the cleansing bar of the invention may contain up to 20 percent emollient oils without losing hardness or clarity. In fact, in any of the after-disclosed formulations the cleansing bar of the invention exhibits sparkling clarity and retains its hardness, is easily rinsed from the skin or hair, and is substantially less softening, when in non-use and stored in conventional soap dishes than prior art clear or transparent soap bars. Furthermore, the cleansing bar of the invention does not produce drying of the skin as do prior art soap bars which depend upon alcohol (ethyl alcohol) for clarity. Accordingly, the cleansing bar of the invention is particularly suitable for use on sensitive skin such as for use on a babys skin or as a shampoo, particularly for babies.

Where the cleansing bar of the invention is employed as a fragrance or perfume bar, it can include perfume oil(s) in amounts within the range of from about 0.5 to about 10 percent by weight and preferably from about 1 to about 6 percent.

ln addition, the cleansing bar of the invention may optionally include coloring agents, humectants, foamers, sunscreening agents, medications, preservatives, proteins, vitamins, polypeptides, alcohol, glycerine as well as an oily material such as mineral oil or lanolin and other conventional additives for soap bars includ ing oily materials such as isopropyl myristate, castor oil, oleyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol stearates having a molecular weight above 1000.

As in the case of conventional soaps the sodium stearate although present in reduced concentrations acts as a gelling agent and provides a necessary detergent or cleansing function.

The relatively low molecular polyethylene glycols and propylene glycol are present to solubilize the sodium stearate and provide good after-feel of soaped and rinsed skin. The relatively high molecular weight polyethylene glycols are present to enhance the hardness of the cleansing bar and act as a co-solvent and coupling agent to achieve transparency.

The fatty acid alkanolamide is present to enhance the hardness and clarity of the cleansing bar and acts as a foam stabilizer as well. Examples of suitable fatty acid alkanolamides include myristie diethanolamide, laurylmyristyl diethanolamide, luric diethanolamides or eoconut-diethanolamide. The preferred fatty acid alkanolamide is myristie diethanolamide.

The type detergents to be used in this invention which are termed quarternized dihydroimidazoles are intended to be those encompassed by the following formula:

wherein R is a straight or branched chain alkyl or alkylene group of from 3 to 25 carbon atoms, preferably 9 to 13; R and R are hydrogen or a straight or branched chain lower alkyl group of from 1 to 6 carbon atoms; Z is hydrogen or R 80 wherein R is a straight or branched chain alkyl or alkylene group of from 2 to 24 carbon atoms, preferably 10 to 14; X is sodium, (CH COOH, or (CH COONa; Y is hydrogen or sodium and n, n and n are integers from one to four.

The preferred detergents are those of the following formula and are available from the Miranol Chemical Co., lne., lrvington, NJ. under the subtitled trade names.

OH CH COONA Miranol C M Cons. Whole Coconut Dicarboxylatc.

Miranol C M-SF Cone. Whole Coconut Dicarboxy Salt Free.

OH CH COONA Miranol CM Cone. Whole Coconut Monocarboxylate.

N H T /CH2CH2ONA OH CH2COONA Miranol HM Cone. Pure Laurie Monoearboxylate.

CH CH OCH COONA Miranol HM Pure Laurie Diearboxylate.

percent). Thus the term detergent is intended to en compass one or a combination of detergents and the percentage ranges that follow are intended to encompass the total percent of the single detergent used or the total percent of the combination employed.

In preferred compositions of the invention, mineral oil will be present in an amount within the range of from about 1 to about l2 percent by weight so that the bar will have a soothing effect on the skin. Lanolin may also be included in concentrations ranging from about 1 to 8 percent alone or in conjunction with mineral oil, to impart good hair or skin substantivity to the cleansing bar.

Preferred cleansing bar formulations in accordance with the present invention are disclosed in the working examples set out hereinafter.

The cleansing bar of the invention can be prepared employing any of the following methodsv In one method, all of the ingredients to be used in forming the cleansing bar, except perfume oil, are combined in a closed system, for example an Abbe Mill, and the ingredients heated up to 90C and preferably at a temperature within a range from about to about C until a homogeneous and clear mixture in the form of a thick syrup is formed. Thereafter, perfume oil(s) is added with mixing. The mixture is then cooled down to about 70 to 75C, poured into molds, and allowed to cool to below 70C, for example to about 66C until a gel forms which hardens into the cleansing bar of the invention.

In an alternate procedure, the high molecular weight polyethylene glycol and fatty acid alkanolamide are heated to a temperature within the range of from about 70C to about 85C and preferably at from about 75 to about 80C to melt the same. Thereafter, the low molecular weight polyethylene glycol, propylene glycol, deionized water, detergent, and other ingredients which may be present such as lanolin and mineral oil, are added and the mixture heated in a closed system to a temperature up to about 90C and preferably from about 85C to about 90C while mixing. The mixture is maintained at the latter temperature and sodium stearate is then added with mixing until it is dissolved. Mixing is continued until a uniform mixture is obtained. The uniform mixture is cooled down to a temperature ranging from 70 to 75C. Thereafter perfume oil(s) is added with mixing until a homogeneous and clear mixture is obtained. The mixture is then poured into molds and allowed to cool to below 80C to form a gel which hardens into the cleansing bar of the invention.

The following examples further illustrate the present invention but is not intended to be limited thereby.

EXAMPLE 1 All of the ingredients set out below with the exception of perfume oil are mixed in an Abbe Mill and heated to about 90C for 2 to 3 hours until a homogeneous and clear mixture in the form of a thick syrup is formed. Thereafter, perfume oil is added with mixing until a homogeneous mixture is obtained. The mixture is then cooled down to 75C, poured into molds, allowed to cool down to 70C to form the cleansing bar Thereafter, polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight of 400 (7.5 g), propylene glycol (6.0 g), deionized water (10.5 g), Miranol C M cone. 70 percent active 14.0 g), amidoether sulfate complex (15.0 g), lanolin (6.0 g) and mineral oil 10.0 g) are added and the mixture heated to 90C in an Abbe Mill for minutes. Sodium stearate (16.0 g) is added to the mixture while maintaining the mixture at 90C with mixing until it is dissolved and a uniform mixture is obtained. The mixture is cooled to 75C and perfume oil (4.0 g) is added with mixing. The mixture is poured into molds and allowed to cool down to 70C until the cleansing bar of the invention is formed. The composition of the cleansing bar so formed is set out in Table 11 below.

The cleansing bar formed herein has essentially the same characteristics and properties of the cleansing bar formed in Example 1.

EXAMPLE 3 Employing the procedure of Example 1, except that perfume oil, lanolin and mineral oil are not present, a cleansing bar having the composition set out in Table 111 below is formed.

t Table 111 having the composition set out below in Table l.

Table l Ingredient by weight Sodium Stearate 19.0 Ingrcdwm 7! y wclght Polyethylene Glycol 400 9.0 Propylene Glycol 7.0 Sodium Stearate 18.0 Deionized Water 15.0 Polyethylene Glycol 400 8.0 Polyethylene Glycol 4000 4.0 Propylene Glycol -0 Myristic Dicthanolamide 8.0 Deionized Water 10.0 Miranol C ,M Cone. (70% active) 18.0 Polyethylene Glycol 4000 4.0 Amido-ethcr Sulfate Complex 20.0 Myristie Diethanol. :nidc 7.0 100 r Miranol C M Cone. (70% active) 18.0 Amido-ether Sulfate Complex 190 Lanolin 2.0 l lf The above cleansing bar has essentially the same or ume 100 0! properties and characteristics of the cleanslng bar EXAMPLE 2 Polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight of 4,000 (4.0 g) and myristic alkanolamide (7.0 g) are mixed together and heated to 75C to melt the same.

formed in Example 1.

What is claimed is:

1. A translucent and/or substantially transparent non-irritating relatively low-hygroscopic conditioning cleansing bar having a pH when dissolved in water within the range of from about 8.0 to about 9.5, consisting essentially of from about 15 to about 20 percent sodium stearatc; from about 7 to about 10 percent polyethylene glycol of molecular weight within the range of from about 200 to about 800; from about 3 percent to about 6 percent polyethylene glycol of molecular weight within the range of from about 800 to about 4,000; from about 5 to about 8 percent propylene glycol; from about 10 to about 20 percent water; from about 6 to about 9% of a fatty acid dialkanolamide capable of enhancing the hardness and clarity of the cleansing bar and acting as a foam stabilizer; and from about to about 50 percent of a quaternized dihydroimidazole detergent.

2. The transparent bar of claim 1 wherein said detergent is of the formula CH CH OX CIIHZH ZO CH COOY wherein X is selected from the group consisting of sowherein the alkanolamide is myristic diethanolamide.

UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE 3E TTFICATE 0F CORRECTION PATENT NO. 3 903 008 DATED Sent. 2, 1975 rrrvmrom Edward M. DeWeever et al.

it is certrrier! ihaierrcr appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected shown below:

Under "Inventors", "Edward M. Deweever" should read Edward M. DeWeever--.

Col. 3, line 16, "luric" should read -lauric.

Col. 4, line 25, the structure should read N CH C H IL CH CH OCH COONA ll 23 f CH COONA line the structure should read CH N CH H I CH OX Signed and Sealed this thirtieth Day of March 1976 [SEAL] Arrest:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arrvsling Officer (ummissiuncr uj'Parents and Trademarks

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3975313 *Jun 19, 1974Aug 17, 1976Shelmire Jr Jesse BedfordSolid amphoteric skin cleanser
US4012341 *Jun 24, 1975Mar 15, 1977American Cyanamid CompanyUnique all synthetic detergent shampoo bar
US4165293 *Jul 31, 1978Aug 21, 1979Amway CorporationSolid transparent cleanser
US4240760 *Jul 21, 1978Dec 23, 1980Brewster Laboratories, Inc.Foam scrubbing device incorporating a cleanser
US4256600 *Mar 13, 1978Mar 17, 1981The Greyhound Corp.Translucent soap bar containing citronellyl esters as lime soap dispersants
US4290904 *Dec 1, 1980Sep 22, 1981Neutrogena CorporationTransparent soap
US4326986 *Jul 6, 1976Apr 27, 1982Exxon Research & Engineering Co.Composition and method for suppressing vapor loss of volatile hydrocarbons
US4386052 *Oct 30, 1981May 31, 1983Exxon Research And Engineering Co.Composition and method for suppressing vapor loss of volatile hydrocarbons
US4396521 *Mar 16, 1981Aug 2, 1983Giuseppe BorrelloSolid detergent spotter
US4701321 *Apr 18, 1984Oct 20, 1987Soft Sheen Products, Inc.Liquid detergent with sunscreen agent
US4851147 *Feb 26, 1987Jul 25, 1989Finetex, Inc.Transparent combination soap-synthetic detergent bar
US4933174 *Oct 19, 1987Jun 12, 1990Amethyst Investment Group, Inc.Method of using a liquid detergent with sunscreen agent
US4988453 *Feb 27, 1990Jan 29, 1991Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Transparent soap bar containing a monohydric and dihydric alcohol
US5002685 *Jun 29, 1989Mar 26, 1991Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Translucent detergent bar having a reduced soap content
US5523017 *Oct 7, 1992Jun 4, 1996NephinSolid cleansing bar
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US5627149 *Nov 17, 1994May 6, 1997Colgate Palmolive CompanyComposition
US5916590 *Sep 25, 1996Jun 29, 1999Mcneil-Ppc, Inc.Soft gelatin pharmaceutical dosage form
US6054425 *May 20, 1996Apr 25, 2000Imaginative Research Associates, Inc.Cleansing bar with high levels of emollients and particulate silica
US6352964Apr 13, 1999Mar 5, 2002Imaginative Research Associates, Inc.Cleansing bar with high levels of liquid and particulate silica
US6395692Oct 4, 1996May 28, 2002The Dial CorporationMild cleansing bar compositions
US6514918Aug 18, 2000Feb 4, 2003Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc.Viscous, mild, and effective cleansing compositions
US6706675Feb 20, 2003Mar 16, 2004The Dial CorporationTranslucent soap bar composition and method of making the same
EP0053222A1 *Jul 14, 1981Jun 9, 1982Neutrogena CorporationTransparent soap
EP0239165A2 *Mar 17, 1987Sep 30, 1987Buuren Cornelis VanSynthetic soap and method for the preparation thereof
EP0283091A1 *Mar 10, 1988Sep 21, 1988Buuren Cornelis VanSynthetic toilet soap
EP0708175A1 *Oct 17, 1995Apr 24, 1996Colgate-Palmolive CompanyComposition
EP0719549A1 *Dec 28, 1995Jul 3, 1996McNEIL-PPC, INC.Soft gelatine pharmaceutical dosage form containing a translucent gel
EP0808895A2 *May 20, 1997Nov 26, 1997Imaginative Research Associates, Inc.Cleansing bar with high levels of emollients and particulate silica
WO1988006617A1Feb 19, 1988Sep 7, 1988Finetex IncTransparent combination soap-synthetic detergent bar
WO1993007245A2 *Oct 7, 1992Apr 15, 1993NephinA solid cleansing bar
WO1998016619A1 *Oct 1, 1997Apr 23, 1998Unilever NvPourable cast melt bar compositions comprising low levels of water and minimum ratios of polyol to water
WO1998016620A1 *Oct 1, 1997Apr 23, 1998Unilever NvCast melt bar compositions comprising high levels of low molecular weight polyalkylene glycols
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/147, 510/483, 510/490, 510/505, 510/506, 510/154, 510/152, 510/502, 510/480
International ClassificationC11D1/52, C11D17/00, C11D10/00, C11D10/04, C11D1/38
Cooperative ClassificationC11D10/047, C11D17/006, C11D1/523, C11D17/0095, C11D17/0052
European ClassificationC11D10/04F, C11D17/00K, C11D17/00H6, C11D17/00H2
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