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Publication numberUS3903745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1975
Filing dateApr 22, 1974
Priority dateApr 22, 1974
Publication numberUS 3903745 A, US 3903745A, US-A-3903745, US3903745 A, US3903745A
InventorsBolser Clark M
Original AssigneeBolser Clark M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas sampler for collecting and measuring gaseous emissions from flues
US 3903745 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Bolser [451 Sept. 9, 1975 GAS SAMPLER FOR COLLECTING AND MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM FLUES [76] Inventor: Clark M. Bolser, PO. Box 61 l, Le

Mars. Iowa 5103] [22] Filed: Apr. 22, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 463,100

Primary ExuminerS. Clement Swisher {57] ABSTRACT A gas sampler for collecting and measuring gaseous emissions from flues, comprising a container, including an open top thereof. A pivotal cover element. equipped with handle and lock latches, is attached to the open top of the container as is a pivotal control panel element. A vacuum pump and a cooling fan are secured within the container and enclosed by means of a vacuum pump cover means, which is likewise secured to the container. A particulate matter filter means and a moisture and acid trap means are also secured within the container. The control panel element is equipped with an electrical power cord with plug, a fuse. an electrical outlet means and switch means with lights, for operating the vacuum pump, fan and electrical outlet means; a control means, for regulating collection of flue gas sample; a vacuum measuring means and a temperature measuring means, for determining the volume of flue gas collected; a control means and means for connecting a calibration manometer to the vacuum measuring means; and means for connecting flexible tubing to a sampling probe as well as to a sample flask. The control panel element is further comprised of a pressure measuring means, comprised of high-range and low-range draft gauges with shut-off valve means, and pitotube connectors for measuring pitotube velocity pressure differential. The cover element is further equipped with a folding support, attached to the cover element, which fastens to the container to hold the cover element in a rigid inclined position, and a clip means for securing data sheets thereon. The control panel element is likewise equipped with folding supports, attached to the con trol panel element, which fasten to the container to hold the control panel element in a vertical position.

17 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTED SE? 9 5 szicnunrg Fig.

GAS SAMPLER FOR COLLECTING AND MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM FLUES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Conventional procedures for evaluating gaseous emissions from flues require gathering and transporting large quantities of equipment to a sampling site. which is usually located in an elevated area, limiting human accessibility and movement. These logistical restrictions usually require at least two people to conduct tests of flue emissions. which involves considerable time in assembling the sampling apparatus, conducting the tests. and dismantling the sampling apparatus. It is likewise not uncommon to experience unfavorable climatic conditions at the sampling site as well as high atmospheric concentrations of toxic substances and excessive noise levels.

Furthermore. these conventional procedures require additional physical measurements, besides the appropriate chemical analysis, to be performed on the gas samples collected upon return to the laboratory. These additional physical measurements expend considerable time and due to the chemical nature of the substances analyzed and the common prescribed sampling proce dure, the data obtained by this procedure is subject to possible errors.

Therefore it is the principal object of this invention to provide a gas sampler for collecting and measuring gaseous emissions from flues.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler for collecting and measuring gaseous emissions from flues, primarily oxides of nitrogen.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler which is lightweight and compact. that can be easily transported and operated by one individual.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a conveniently integrated arrangement of components enabling rapid set up and dismantling of essential sampling apparatus, collection of gas samples and other data necessary to determine flue gas discharge.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler wherein auxiliary sampling equipment, tools, and supplies may be enclosed and transported to the sampling site.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system which enables all necessary physical measurements of a gas sample to be made at the sampling site.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system for accurately measuring both high and low velocity pressure differentials in a flue by which the velocity and the volumetric flow rate of flue gas discharge can be determined. V

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a pivotal control panel element which can be operated in either a horizontal or vertical position and which allows easy access to and service of all components of this invention.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system for measuring the temperature of the gas contained in the sample flask.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system for easy calibration of the vacuum measuring means and for substituting a standard manometer for said vacuum measuring means.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system for removing contaminating particulate matter from the gas sample.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system for removing moisture and acid from the gas withdrawn from the flue before it enters the vacuum pump.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a system for removing heat generated by operating the vacuum pump.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a privotal cover element which opens to a rigid inclined position and which is equipped with means to facilitate the recording of data.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler with means for connecting and operating additional electrical accessories thereon.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler comprising a means for protecting the components thereof. thus reducing breakage.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gas sampler which is economical and durable in use, sophisticated in design and engineering, and refined in appearance.

These and other objectives will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

This invention consists in the construction, arrangements, and combination of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, specifically pointed out in the claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an exploded pictorial of the components of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of the device of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a front perspective view thereof with the control panel element positioned in a vertical sampling arrangement;

FIG. 4 is a top view thereof with the cover element open in a rigid inclined position and with the control panel element in a closed horizontal position;

FIG. 5 is a top view similar to that of FIG. 4, but with the control panel element in an open horizontal position;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the particulate matter filter means taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the moisture and acid trap means taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of the sample flask temperature measuring means taken on line 8-8 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a single-line diagram of the components comprising the system for controlling the collection of a gas sample;

FIG. 10 is a singleline diagram of the components comprising the system for measuring velocity pressure differential; and

FIG. 11 is a line diagram comprising the electrical components thereof.

The gas sampler is generally referred to by the reference number [0, whose components are illustrated in FIG. I, and is ideally suited for quick set up as indicated by FIGS. 2 and 3. The gas sampler [0 of this invention is generally comprised of a container I2 with a pivotal cover element 14, which is attached to the container 12 by means of hinge I6 and secured by any convenient means such as welding as illustrated in FIG.

1. When open, the cover element 14 is held in a rigid inclined position, see FIG. I, by folding support 18 and lug 20, shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, which is secured to the container 12 by any convenient means such as welding. Cover element 14 is secured to the container I2 in a closed position by means of lock latches 22 as indicated in FIG. 2, thus creating an attractive looking device. Cover element 14 is also equipped with a clip means 24 for securing data sheets thereon as described in FIGS. 1 and 3. The gas sampler I is carried by means of folding handle 26, secured to the cover element I4 by any convenient means such as rivets, and is also equipped with rubber feet 28 as illustrated in FIG. 2.

With the cover element 14 in an open condition, as indicated in FIG. 4, the pivotal control panel element 30 is accessible. Control panel element 30 is attached to the container I2 by means of hinge 32, which is secured by any convenient means such as rivets 34 and screws 36, as illustrated in FIG. 1, and is held in a horizontal position by means of panel supports 38 as shown in FIG. 5.

Control panel element 30 can be opened to a vertical position as illustrated in FIG. 3 by pivotally lifting the control panel element 30 out of container 12 by means of knob 40, as indicated in FIGS. 1 and 4, and securing folding supports 42, shown in FIGS. I and 3, in brackets 44, shown in FIGS. 1 and 5, which are secured to panel supports 38 by any convenient means such as welding. With control panel element 30 in the vertical position, the sophistication of the gas samplers l0 compact design is apparent with all components readily accessible and easily removed and replaced.

Control panel element 30, as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and is comprised of a number of components. Plug 46, attached to electrical cord 48, is connected by said cord 48 to terminal lug 50, which in turn is connected to power light 52, fuse 54, switch means 56, pump light 58, vacuum pump motor 60M, switch means 62, fan light 64, fan motor 66M, switch means 68, outlet light 70 and outlet 72, as illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5 and I1. Terminal lug 50 is secured to control panel element 30 by any convenient means such as screws 74, as shown in FIG. 5. All other electrical components are secured to control panel element 30 by frictionally fitting said components into appropriately sized holes cut in said panel element 30 or by other convenient means.

Control means 76, shown in FIGS. 4, 5, and 9, is comprised of a three-way valve and is connected to the particulate matter filter means 78 by means of insulated flexible tubing 80 and said filter means 78 is in turn connected to the flue bulkhead tubing connector 82 by insulated flexible tubing 84. Particulate matter filter means 78, as illustrated by FIG. 6, is comprised of an Erlenmeyer flask 86, containing glass wool 88 and tubing 90, and is sealed with stopper 92. Said filter means 78 is secured to container [2 by means of bracket 94 and screw 96 as indicated in FIGS. 1 and 6.

Control means 76 is also connected to the moisture and acid trap means 98 by means of flexible tubing 100 and said trap means 98 is also connected to vacuum pump 60 by means of flexible tubing I02 and tubing Connector I04, shown in FIGS. 1, 5, and 9. Vacuum pump 60 exhausts into the atmosphere by means of nipple 106 which extends through hole 108, cut in container 12, as indicated in FIGS. 1 and 5, and is secured to container I2 by bolts 110, also shown in FIG. I. Vacuum pump 60 as well as fan 66 are enclosed by vacuum pump cover means II2 which is secured to container I2 by means of screws 114, while fan 66 is secured to container 12 by means of bolts I15, as indicated in FIG. I. A series of holes 116 are cut in the front and rear sides of container 12, allowing air to be conveyed by fan 66 past vacuum pump 60 to remove excess heat, see FIGS. 1 and 3.

Moisture and acid trap means 98, illustrated in FIG. 7, is comprised of a transparent jar 118, filled with solid drying agent 120, such as indicating Drierite", and fitted with lid means I22, which is equipped with filter means 124. Tubing connectors 126 are attached to lid means 122 which in turn are connected to flexible tubing and 102. Said trap means 98 is secured to container 12 by means of bracket I28 and screw 130 as illustrated in FIG. 1.

Control means 76 is further connected by insulated flexible tubing I32 to temperature measuring means 134, indicated in FIGS. 5 and 9, which in turn is connected to Tee assembly 136 by means of insulated flexible tubing 138. Tee assembly 136 is further connected to the sample flask bulkhead tubing connector 140 and Tee assembly 142 by insulated flexible tubing 144 and I46 respectively, also shown in FIGS. 5 and 9.

Temperature measuring means I34 is illustrated in FIG. 8 and is comprised of a dial thermometer element I48, whose stem member is attached to reducer means by means of ferrules 152 and nut 154, with said reducer means I50 in turn attached to union tee element I56 by means of ferrules 158 and nut I60. Temperature measuring means 134 is secured to the control panel element 30 by cutting a hole in said panel element 30 and forcing reducer means 150 and nut I54 firmly against said panel element 30 as nut 154 is tightened onto reducer means 150. Insulated flexible tubing 132 and I38 are also attached to union tee element I56 by means of ferrules I58 and nuts 160.

Tee assembly 142 is further connected to vacuum measuring means 162, which is comprised of a vacuum gauge, by means of insulated flexible tubing I64 and tubing connector 166. Tee assembly 142 is also connected to control means 168, which is comprised of a valve, by insulated flexible tubing I70 as indicated in FIGS. 5 and 9. Control means 168 is further connected by insulated flexible tubing 172 to manometer bulkhead tubing connector 174, also illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 9.

Vacuum measuring means 162 is mounted on control panel element 30 by placing the smaller portion of said gauge 162 through a hole cut in said panel element 30 and securing the same with screws 176 which fasten onto the cover plate of said gauge 162 as indicated in FIG. 5. Both control means 76 and control means I68 are mounted on said panel element 30 by cutting appropriate sized holes therein, placing the neck element of the respective control means through the respective holes, and securing the same by means of jam nuts as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5.

Pitotube bulkhead connectors 178 and 180 are also attached to control panel element 30 by cutting appropriate size holes in said panel element 30 and securing the same by means of jam nuts as indicated by FIGS. 4 and 5. As illustrated by FIGS. 5 and 10, pitotube bulkhead connector I78 is connected to the highpressure port of pressure measuring means I82, which is comprised of a high-range draft gauge, by means of flexible tubing I84, which in turn is connected by means of flexible tubing 186 to valve means 188, which is also connected to the high-pressure port of pressure measuring means 190, comprised of a low-range draft gauge, by means of flexible tubing 192.

Pitotube bulkhead connector 180 is similarly connected to said high-range draft gauge 182, but to the low-pressure port, by means of flexible tubing 194, said draft gauge 182 in turn is connected to valve means 196 by means of flexible tubing 198. Valve means 196 is further connected to the low-pressure port of said low-range draft gauge 190 by means of flexible tubing 200.

Said draft gauges 182 and 190 are installed on the control panel element 30 by cutting appropriate sized holes in said panel element 30, mounting said gauges 182 and 190 in their respective positions and securing the same by means of screws 202, which attach to said gauges 182 and 190 by means of brackets 204, and which tighten against said panel element 30 as illustrated in FIG. 5. As indicated in FIGS. 4 and 5, both valve means 188 and 196 are also mounted on control panel element 30 by cutting appropriate sized holes in said panel element 30, placing the neck element of the respective valves 188 and 196 through the respective holes and securing the same by means of jam nuts.

In order to evaluate gaseous emissions from flues with the gas sampler a number of standard items are also necessary as illustrated by FIG. 3: a sampling probe 206, such as a small piece of stainless steel or glass tubing; a piece of flexible tubing 208, which is connected to the sampling probe 206 and the flue bulk head tubing connector 82', a foam encased glass sample flask with valve 210; and a piece of insulated flexible tubing 212, which is connected to the valve on said sample flask 210 and the sample flask bulkhead tubing connector 140. A standard 110 volt AC. power source with standard female outlet is also necessary to operate the vacuum pump motor 60M. To determine the flue gas velocity and volumetric flow rate, a Type-S pitotube 214, equipped with flexible tubing and tubing connectors 216, also illustrated in FIG. 3, a flue thermometer for measuring flue gas temperature and a ruler for measuring the diameter of the flue 218 are necessary.

The gas sampler 10 is quickly set up to collect flue gas samples by first pivotally opening the cover element 14 until the folding support 18 is engaged by lug 20 as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. The gas sampler 10 can be operated with the control panel element in either a horizontal position, as illustrated in FIG. 4, or in a vertical position, as indicated in FIG. 3, which is accomplished as previously described. A list of operation instructions 220 are contained on control panel element 30 as illustrated in FIGS. I, 3 and 4, to facilitate operation of the gas sampler l0.

Plug 46 is connected to a 110 volt AC. power source, which causes power light 52 to glow, and flexible tubing 208 is connected to the sampling probe 206 and flue bulkhead tubing connector 82 by pushing the same on by hand. Insulated flexible tubing 212 is also pushed securely onto sample flask bulkhead tubing connector 140 and the valve on the sample flask 210 as illustrated in FIG. 3.

With sampling probe 206 placed in flue 218 and with control means 168 in the ofF' position, as illustrated in FIG. 4, control means 76 is turned to the evacuate" position, (E) on the dial, and switch means 56 is pushed on, activating vacuum pump motor 60M and pump light 58 as well as fan motor 66M and fan light 64. The valve on sample flask 210 is then slowly opened, causing sample flask 210 to be evacuated. Gas in sample flask 210 is withdrawn through insulated flexible tubing 212, sample flask bulkhead tubing connector 140, insulated flexible tubing 144, Tee assembly 136, tempera ture measuring means 134, and i sulated flexible tubing 132 and 138 before entering control mean 76 and exhausting into the atomosphere by means of vacuum pump 60 as indicated in FIGS. 5 and 9. As the gas flows through the temperature measuring means 134, the gas passes over the stem member of dial thermometer element 148 inducing a temperature reading. The gas in vacuum gauge 162 is also withdrawn and exhausted to the atmosphere by means of vacuum pump 60, also indicated in FIGS. 5 and 9.

When vacuum gauge 162 maintains a constant reading, control means 76 is turned to the purge position, (P) on the dial, and readings of vacuum gauge 162 and dial thermometer element 148 are taken and recorded on a data sheet. With said control means 76 in the purge position, flue gas is withdrawn from the flue 218 and through sampling probe 206, flexible tubing 208, flue bulkhead tubing connector 82, insulated flexible tubing 84, particulate matter filter means 78 (where particulate matter in the flue gas withdrawn is removed), insulated flexible tubing 80, control means 76, flexible tubing and mositure and acid trap means 98 (where any moisture or acid in flue gas withdrawn is removed by the solid drying agent before entering vacuum pump 60. The dry, acid free extracted flue gas is exhausted into the atmosphere by means of nipple 106 as indicated in FIG. 5. If it should be necessary to heat the sampling probe 206 and flexible tubing 208, heating tape may be wrapped around these items and operated by plugging said heading tape into outlet 72 and engaging switch means 68 which will also cause outlet light 70 to glow as indicated in FIGS. 4 and 1].

Vacuum pump 60 and fan 66 are now turned off by switch means 56. If additional cooling of vacuum pump 60 is desired, fan 66 can be selectively operated by switch means 62 as indicated in FIGS. 4 and 11. A sample of flue gas is then allowed to be drawn into the evacuated sample flask 210 by slowly turning control means 76 to the sample position, (S) on dial, so the needle on vacuum gauge 162 slowly moves toward zero (0.0). When vacuum gauge 162 indicates a pressure slightly above zero (0.0), control means 76 is again turned to the purge position and readings of vacuum gauge 162 and dial thermometer element 148 are taken and recorded on the data sheet. (Maintaining a slight vacuum in said sample flask 210 will prevent the valve thereon from working loose.) The valve on sample flask 210 is then closed and insulated flexible tubing 212 disconnected from said sample flask 210, which now contains a measured volume of flue gas.

Vacuum gauge 162 should be periodically calibrated to insure maximun accuracy. This is easily accomplished by connecting a standard mercury-filled U-tube manometer, with a scale of at least 25 inches, to the manometer bulkhead tubing connector 174, illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5 and 9, with a piece of flexible tubing. When control means 168 is opened, the standard mercury-filled U-tube manometer indicates the amount of vacuum existing in vacuum gauge 162. By following the procedure previously described for collecting a sample of flue gas, but substituting air for the flue gas, vacuum gauge 162 readings are compared with readings on said manometer to determine an appropriate correction factor to be applied to vacuum gauge 162 readings. Said manometer may also be substituted for vacuum gauge 162 in the manner heretofore described when collecting a flue gas sample.

For measuring the velocity of the flue gas, gas sampler 10 should be positioned on the sampling site in such a manner that the operation can manipulate the gas sampler 10 while also traversing the flue 218 with the Type-S pitotube 214. The upstream side of said pitotube 214 is connected to pitotube bulkhead connector 178 while the downstream side of said pitotube 214 is connected to pitotube bulkhead connector 180, by means of flexible tubing and tubing connectors 216 as illustrated in F 10. 3. With said pitotube 214 placed in said flue 218, observe the reading on high-range draft gauge 182, see FIG. 4. If this reading is lower than the maximum value on the low-range draft gauge 190, open valve means 188 and 196, which will allow the pitotube velocity pressure differential to be read on the low-range draft gauge 190, thus giving a more accurate reading.

Traverse said flue 218 with said pitotube 214, taking velocity pressure differential readings at points representing the center of equal area segments in the crosssection of said flue 218. The static pressure of said flue 218 is determined by disconnecting the tubing connector on the upstream side of said pitotube 214 at pitotube bulkhead connector 178 and reading the appropriate draft gauge, 182 or 190.

The temperature of said flue 218 is determined by the flue thermometer and the diameter of said flue 218 at the point traversed is determined by means of the ruler. This data is also entered on the data sheet and returned with sample flask 210 to a laboratory for appropriate chemical analysis and calculations.

Additional sampling equipment such as the flexible tubing and tubing connectors 216, insulated flexible tubing 212, sampling probe 206, Type-S pitotube 214, flue thermometer, and ruler as well as an electrical extension cord and emergency tool kit may be easily stored in the gas sampler 10, in the cavity generally referred to by numeral 222, as indicated in FIG. 5, and transported to the sampling site. Therefore, all necessary sampling equipment may be transported within the gas sampler 10, which also provides added security from equipment breakage.

The gas sampler 10 is quickly dismantled by reversing the set up procedure heretofore described. This, it can be seen that the gas sampler 10 of this invention accomplished at least all of its stated objectives.

1 claim:

1. A gas sampler for collecting and measuring gaseous emissions from flues and the like, comprising,

a container,

a vacuum pump positioned in said container,

3 gas conducting means connecting said vacuum pump to a flue and to a sample flask,

a vacuum measuring means in communication with said gas conducting means, and

a selective control means interconnecting said vac uum pump and said gas conducting means whereby gas present in said flask and in said flue can be lectivcly purged, gas from said flue can be selectively conveyed to said flask. and the pressure of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the pressure of said gas vonveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured.

2. A gas sampler according to claim 1 wherein said gas conducting means is in communication with a temperature measuring means whereby the temperature of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the temperature of said gas conveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured.

3. A gas sampler according to claim 2 wherein said container includes a pressure measuring means, and a fluid conducting means for connecting said pressure measuring means to a pitotube, whereby the velocity pressure of gases within said flue can be measured.

4. A gas sampler according to claim 3 wherein said conducting means is comprised of a control means for connecting said vacuum measuring means to a calibration manometer whereby said vacuum measuring means can be calibrated according to said manometer, and whereby the pressure of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the pressure of said gas conveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured by said manometer.

5. A gas sampler according to claim 4 wherein said gas conducting means is further comprised of a particulate matter filter means, whereby particulate matter in the gas purged and conveyed from said flue can be removed before said gas enters said flask and said vacuum pump, and a moisture and acid trap means, whereby moisture and acid in the gas purged from said flue can be removed before entering said vacuum pump.

6. A gas sampler according to claim 1 wherein said container includes a pressure measuring means, and a fluid conducting means for connecting said pressure measuring means to a pitotube, whereby the velocity pressure of gases within said flue can be measured.

7. A gas sampler according to claim 1 wherein said gas conducting means is comprised of a particulate matter filter means, whereby particulate matter in the gas purged and conveyed from said flue can be removed before said gas enters said sample flask and said vacuum pump, and a moisture and acid trap means, whereby moisture and acid in the gas purged from said flue can be removed before entering said vacuum pump.

8. A gas sampler according to claim 7 wherein said container is comprised of a fan, a vacuum pump cover means enclosing said vacuum pump and said fan, openings in said container, whereby air can be conveyed by said fan over said vacuum pump to remove excess heat, means securing said vacuum pump to said container, means securing said fan to said container, and means securing said vacuum pump cover means to said eontainer.

9. A gas sampler according to claim 1 wherein said conducting means is comprised of a control means for connecting said vacuum measuring means to a calibration manometer, whereby said vacuum measuring means can be calibrated according to said manometer, and whereby the pressure of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the pressure of said gas conveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured by said manometer.

10. A gas sampler for collecting and measuring gaseous emissions from flues, and the like. comprising,

a container having an open top,

a vacuum pump positioned in said container,

a gas conducting means connecting said vacuum pump to a flue and to a sample flask.

a vacuum measuring means in communication with said gas conducting means,

a selective control means interconnecting said vacuum pump and said gas conducting means whereby gas present in said flask and in said flue can be selectively purged, gas from said flue can be selectively conveyed to said flask, and the pressure of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the pressure of said gas conveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured, and

a pivotal control panel element on the top of said container.

1 1. A gas sampler according to claim wherein said gas conducting means is in communication with a temperature measuring means whereby the temperature of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the temperature of said gas conveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured 12. A gas sampler according to claim 11 wherein said container includes a pressure measuring means and a fluid conducting means for connecting said pressure measuring means to a pitotube, whereby the velocity pressure of gases within said flue can be measured.

13. A gas sampler according to claim 12 wherein said conducting means is further comprised of a control means for connecting said vacuum measuring means to a calibration manometer whereby said vacuum measuring means can be calibrated according to said manometer, and whereby the pressure of said gas remaining in said flask after said purging and the pressure of said gas conveyed from said flue to said flask can be measured by said manometer.

14. A gas sampler according to claim 13 wherein said gas conducting means is further comprised of a particu late matter filter means, whereby particulate matter in the gas purged and conveyed from said flue can be removed before said gas enters said flask and said vacuum pump, and a moisture and acid trap means, whereby moisture and acid in the gas purged from said flue can be removed before entering said vacuum pumpv 15. A gas sampler according to claim 14 wherein said container is further comprised of means securing said control panel element to said container, means horizontally supporting said control panel element, a piv' otal cover element and lock latches, said cover element being comprised of a handle, a clip means for securing articles thereon, a folding support cooperating with said container to hold said cover element in a rigid inclined position when open, means securing said clip means to said cover element, and means securing said support to said cover element, said control panel element comprised of said vacuum measuring means, said selective control means, said temperature measuring means, said pressure measuring means, said control means for connecting said vacuum measuring means to said manometer, means for pivotally lifting said control panel element to a vertical position, folding supports cooperating with said container to vertically hold said control panel element therein, and means for securing said folding supports to said control panel element.

16. A gas sampler according to claim 15 wherein said vacuum measuring means is comprised of a vacuum gauge, said pressure measuring means is comprised of high-range and low-range draft gauges with valve means interconnecting said draft gauges to selectively control fluid pressure on said low-range draft gauge, said selective control means interconnecting said vacuum pump and said conducting means is comprised of a three-way valve, said control panel element is further comprised of an electrical cord with plug, an electrical outlet for operating additional electrical accessories, a fuse and power light, switch means with lights for selectively operating said vacuum pump, said fan, and said outlet, said container is further comprised of a cavity in which auxiliary sampling equipment and items can be stored and transported to the sampling site, a fan, a vacuum pump cover means enclosing said vacuum pump and said fan, openings in said container, whereby air can be conveyed by said fan over said vacuum pump to remove excess heat, means securing said vacuum pump to said container, means securing said fan to said container, and means securing said vacuum pump cover means to said container.

17. A gas sampler according to claim 10 wherein said container includes a pressure measuring means, and a fluid conducting means for connecting said pressure measuring means to a pitotube, whereby the velocity pressure of gases within said flue can be measured.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification73/863.21, 73/864.91, 73/431, 73/863.23, 73/864.34
International ClassificationG01N1/24, G01N1/22
Cooperative ClassificationG01N1/2258, G01N1/24
European ClassificationG01N1/22F3