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Publication numberUS3903925 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1975
Filing dateJul 20, 1973
Priority dateJul 20, 1973
Publication numberUS 3903925 A, US 3903925A, US-A-3903925, US3903925 A, US3903925A
InventorsPerry John C
Original AssigneePerry John C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor fuel metering valve with mid-range fuel adjustment
US 3903925 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Perry Sept. 9, 1975 CARBURETOR FUEL METERING VALVE WITH MID-RANGE FUEL ADJUSTMENT John C. Perry, 971 Mira Mar Dr Vista, Calif. 92083 Filed: July 20, 1973 Appl. No.: 381,013

lnventor:

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS [/1973 Perry 261/41 Primary Examiner-Henry T. Klinksiek ABSTRACT A carburetor and carburetor fuel metering valve for an internal combustion engine. The metering valve has slidably interfitting valve sleeves which are relatively rotatable by adjustment of the carburetor throttle valve and contain fuel metering ports whose overlap defines a fuel metering orifice having an area which is progressively varied by such relative rotation to meter fuel to the engine in relation to air flow. The metering valve includes at least two sets of fuel metering ports which may be selectively disposed in fuel metering re lation to provide a mid-range fuel adjustment independent of throttle setting. The metering valve may also include an idling fuel adjustment for adjusting the effective orifice area of each metering port set and thereby fuel flow in the idling setting of the throttle valve and a high speed fuel adjustment for adjusting fuel flow in the high or full speed setting of the throttle valve.

10 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures 28 35 A 31 24 30 R AM I l l i F -2sM P 20- I I is G (12 PATENTEB an a IHlb SHEET Fig. 4

CARBURETOR FUEL METERING VALVE WITH MID-RANGE FUEL ADJUSTMENT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to the field of carburetors for gasoline powered engines and more particularly to a novel carburetor fuel metering valve and carburetor embodying the valve.

2. Discussion of the Prior Art As will become evident from the ensuing description, the fuel metering valve of this invention may be used to advantage in a variety of gasoline carburetors. However, the valve is designed primarily for use in the carburetors of my prior Pat. Nos. 3,547,415 and 3,7l L068. For this reason, the valve will be disclosed in connection with the latter carburetors.

The carburetors of my prior patents have a body containing a rotary throttle valve barrel with a transverse passage which defines the throat of an induction air Venturi having an inlet in the body at one end and an outlet in the body at the other end of the barrel passage. Rotation of the valve barrel between idling and high speed positions regulates air flow through the Venturi and hence the vacuum in the Venturi throat.

Extending through the carburetor body on the axis of the throttle valve barrel is a bore containing a fuel metering valve including a pair of slidably interfitting valve sleeves. The inner end of the inner valve sleeve projects axially through the valve barrel into its Venturi throat passage to provide a fuel jet opening to the passage and is fixed to the barrel for rotation with the barrel.

Rotation of the throttle valve between its idling and high speed positions rotates the inner valve sleeve relative to the outer valve sleeve between idling and high speed positions. Opening through the sleeve walls are a pair of circumferentially overlapping fuel metering ports whose overlap area varies progressively to regulate fuel flow to the Venturi fuel jet upon rotation of the inner valve sleeve between its idling and high speed positions with the throttle valve relative to the outer valve sleeve.

The carburetors of my prior patents are provided with idling and high speed fuel adjustments for regulating fuel flow to the fuel jet independently of the throttle valve setting. My prior carburetors thus permit optimization of the air/fuel ratio to the engine within its idling and full speed operating ranges. These carburetors, however, lack a mid-range fuel adjustment, that is, an adjustment for regulating the air/fuel ratio to the engine independently of throttle valve setting, in the midrange of engine operation between idling and full speed. A mid-range fuel adjustment is desirable to compensate or correct for altitude changes, differing engine operating characteristics, and other factors, to permit breaking in of a new engine with a rich air/fuel mixture, and for other reasons.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention provides an improved carburetor and carburetor fuel metering valve having such a mid-range fuel adjustment. The improved fuel metering valve is basically similar to the metering valves of my prior patents and comprises interfitting relatively rotatable valve sleeves containing fuel metering ports whose overlap region defines a fuel metering orifice whose area is varied progressively by relative rotation of the sleeves.

The throttle valve and inner fuel metering valve sleeve are rotatable in unison by the throttle arm between idling and high speed positions to regulate air flow through the carburetor and meter the fuel in relation to the air flow in the same manner as in the carburetors of my prior patents. Rotation of the ow ,r valve sleeve relative to the inner valve sleeve provides an idling fuel adjustment independent of throttle setting, and adjustment of a needle valve extending through the inner sleeve provides a high speed fuel adjustment, also in the same manner as in my patented carburetors.

According to a primary feature of this invention, the fuel metering valve has at least two sets of fuel metering ports which may be utilized selectively to meter the fuel. The particular fuel metering valve described, for example, has three such metering port sets. These metering port sets are sized such that shifting or adjusting the metering valve from one of these metering port sets to the other provides a mid-range fuel adjustment which regulates fuel flow independently of throttle valve setting in the mid-range between idling and high speed to correct for differences in altitude and/or engine characteristics, permit break-in engine operation with a rich fuel/air mixture, or other reasons.

According to another feature of the invention, the metering sleeve ports are uniquely shaped to extend the total idling adjustment angle or range of the outer metering valve sleeve. This permits finer and more accurate adjustment of the idling fuel flow at each midrange adjustment setting of the outer sleeve.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a small gasoline powered engine, such as a model airplane engine, equipped with a carburetor embodying an improved fuel metering valve according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the carburetor looking in the direction of the arrows on line 22 in FIG. 1',

FIG. 3 is a further enlarged section through the carburetor;

FIG. 4 is a section taken on line 4-4 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged section through the fuel metering valve taken on line 5-5 in FIG. 4;

FIGS. 6a, 6b, 6c illustrate flat developments of the fuel metering ports in the outer sleeve of the fuel metering valve;

FIG. 7a is an enlarged fragmentary front elevation of the inner sleeve of the fuel metering valve illustrating its fuel metering port;

FIG. 7b is a side elevation of the valve sleeve in FIG. 7a;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation of the assembled valve sleeves of the fuel metering valve illustrating the sleeves in one mid-range adjustment setting; and

FIGS. 9a, 9b, 9c are enlarged semi-diagrammatic views illustrating the fuel metering action of the fuel metering valve during throttle valve adjustment between idling and full speed positions with the valve positioned in one mid-range adjustment setting.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The drawings illustrate a carburetor 10 which is identical, except for its fuel metering valve, to the carburetors of my prior patents, mentioned earlier. Carburetor 10 is shown mounted on a gasoline engine 11. In this instance, the engine is a small two-cycle gasoline engine of the type used on radio controlled model airplanes, boats, and the like. Carburetor 10 has a body 12 through which extends an induction air passage P defining a Venturi having an inlet 1, an outlet 0, and an intervening throat T. Mounted within the passage P is a throttle valve V, which is movable between idling and high speed positions through a series of mid-range positions to regulate induction air flow through the passage. A fuel jet J projects into the carburetor Venturi throat T. Fuel jet J communicates to a fuel inlet F on the body through the improved fuel metering valve V,, of this invention. This valve has variable area fuel metering means M through which fuel flows from the inlet to the jet. About the fuel metering valve is an annular fuel reservoir R communicating the fuel inlet F to the fuel metering means M. The throttle valve V, and the metering valve V are interconnected for adjustment of these valves in unison to regulate fuel flow to the fuel jet J concurrently with regulation of induction air flow through the carburetor Venturi.

Embodied in the metering valve V is a low speed fuel adjustment A and a high speed Fuel adjustment A,,. These adjustments permit regulation of fuel flow to the fuel jet J independently of the setting of the throttle valve V and, as will be explained presently, are set with the throttle valve in its idling and high speed positions, respectively, to attain optimum fuel/air mixtures at these settings. According to a primary feature of this invention, the fuel metering valve embodies a midrange adjustment A for regulating fuel flow to the fuel jet independently of throttle valve setting over the midportion of the throttle adjustment range to attain a desired fuel/air mixture in the midoperating range.

The carburetor 10 is installed on the engine 11 by coupling the carburetor outlet to the engine air intake. During engine operation, induction air flow to the engine occurs through the carburetor Venturi. Fuel flow occurs from the carburetor fuel inlet F, through the metering valve V,,,, to the fuel jet J from which the fuel is discharged into the Venturi throat T to mix with the induction air. The throttle V, and the valve V are adjustable in unison to concurrently regulate induction air flow and fuel flow through the carburetor. The low speed fuel adjustment A and high speed fuel adjustment A are set with the throttle valve V, in its idling position and its high speed position, respectively, to provide optimum fuel air mixtures at these throttle settings. The mid-range fuel adjustment A is set to provide the optimum fuel air mixture over the intervening mid-operating range of the engine.

Referring now in greater detail to the drawings, the body 12 of the carburetor has a generally blocklike configuration and may be machined or injection molded from plastic or metal. Extending centrally through the body is a bore 13, one end of which is counterbored at 14. Rotatably fitted within the counterbore 14 is a valve barrel 15 which constitutes the throttle valve V,. Valve barrel 15 has an outer end face substantially flush with the adjustment end face of the carburetor housing 12. Seating against this end face of the valve barrel is a throttle arm 16. Throttle arm 16 is firmly clamped to the valve barrel 15 by a screw 17, whereby the barrel may be rotated by the application of a force to the outer end of the arm. Extending through the outer end of the thronle arm 16 are a pair of holes 16a, l6b for receiving operating links 18a, 18b. These links will be referred to again presently.

Extending diametrically through the throttle valve barrel 15 is a bore 20 communicating a pair of diametrically opposed openings 21 and 22 at opposite sides of the carburetor body 12. Bore 20 and openings 21, 22 collectively define the carburetor Venturi and individually define, respectively, the Venturi throat T, inlet 1, and exit 0. The inlet and exit openings 21, 22 have inwardly convergent tapers and diameters at their inner ends which are substantially equal to the diameter of the valve barrel throat bore 20. in the particular embodiment of the invention illustrated, the carburetor body 12 is injection molded in one piece, preferably from plastic, and the inlet opening 21 has a conically tapered wall 21a which is molded integrally with the body. The exit opening 22 has an externally cylindrical wall 22a formed by a sleeve which is fabricated separately from the carburetor body and is pressed fitted in or otherwise secured to the body.

Fuel metering valve V has a pair of slidably interfitting metering valve sleeves 23, 24. lnner sleeve 23 extends coaxially through and is firmly secured at one end to the inner end of the throttle valve barrel 15. This end of the inner valve sleeve projects into the valve barrel throat bore 20 to form the fuel jet 1. The opposite end of the inner valve sleeve extends centrally through the carburetor body bore 13 and beyond the adjacent end face of carburetor body. The outer valve sleeve 24 fits rotatably on the inner valve sleeve within the body bore 13 and has an outer diameter substantially smaller than the bore to provide the fuel reservoir R about the outer sleeve, as explained later.

The fuel metering means M of the fuel metering valve V,, comprises a single fuel metering port 25 in the wall of the inner valve sleeve 23 and three fuel metering ports 26L, 26M, 26H in the wall of the outer valve sleeve 24. The inner sleeve port 25 is essentially a rectangular port with circumferentially spaced boundary edges 25a and 25b. Each outer sleeve port 26L, 26M, 261-! has a relatively narrow slit-like central portion 27a extending circumferentially of the outer valve sleeve and terminating at one end in an enlarged opening 27b and as its other end in a boundary edge 270. For reasons which will become apparent as the description proceeds, the central portion 270 of each port 26L, 26M, 26H is hereafter referred to as its mid-range portion, the enlarged opening 27 b of each port as its high speed portion, and the opposite end of each port as its idling portion.

The three ports 26L, 26M, 261-1 are uniformly spaced circumferentially about the outer valve sleeve 24 and are located in a common plane normal to the sleeve axis. These three ports are identical except for the width of their mid-range portions 27a. in this regard, it will be observed that the mid-range portion of port 26L is slightly narrower and that of port 261-! is slightly wider than the mid-range portion of the port 26M.

As will be explained in more detail presently, the outer metering valve sleeve 24 is rotatably adjustable to locate any one of its three metering ports 26L, 26M, 26H in fuel metering relation to the inner valve sleeve port 25, wherein the outer sleeve port is disposed in overlapping relation to the inner sleeve port. This adjustment of the outer sleeve is referred to as its midrange adjustment and the corresponding three positions of the outer sleeve are referred to as its mid-range adjustment positions or settings. Moreover, the outer valve sleeve has a limited range of rotatable adjustment at each mid-range setting. This latter adjustment is hereafter referred to as a low speed or idling adjustment.

As will also be explained in greater detail later, the outer metering valve sleeve 24 is initially adjusted to and then left in optimum mid-range and idling adjustment positions or settings. During actual carburetor operation, the outer sleeve remains fixed in these optimum settings, and the inner valve sleeve 23 rotates relative to the outer sleeve to meter fuel to the engine in accordance with the setting of the throttle valve.

The idling and mid-range fuel adjustments A,, A of the valve V,, comprises a peripherally serrated disc 28 rigidly secured to the outer end of the outer metering valve sleeve 24. This disc projects edgewise beyond two opposite side faces of the carburetor body 12, as shown in FIG. 4, to permit rotation of the disc by hand to turn the outer valve sleeve relative to the inner valve sleeve 23. The inner face of the disc seats slidably against the adjustment end face of the carburetor body. The outer end of the inner valve sleeve 23 projects a small distance beyond the outer face of the disc and is externally circumferentially grooved to receive a snap ring 30.

Surrounding the outer valve sleeve 24 of the metering valve V,, are a pair of 0 rings 31. These 0 rings are contained within circumferential grooves in a pair of radially enlarged axially spaced shoulders 32 which are integrally formed on the outer valve sleeve. 0 rings 31 bear against the wall of the carburetor body bore 31 to define with this wall and the outer valve sleeve the annular fuel reservoir R.

The high speed adjustment A of the fuel metering valve comprises a needle valve 33 which is threaded in the outer end of the inner valve sleeve 23. The inner end of this needle valve is reduced in diameter to provide the valve needle 33a proper and an annular space about the needle. Valve needle 33a extends through the fuel passage in the inner valve sleeve, past the valve sleeve metering orifices 26L, 26M, 26H, into the opening through an annular valve seat 34 adjacent the fuel jet 1. Surrounding the needle valve between its knurled knob and the low speed adjustment disc 28 is a compression spring 35. This spring exerts axial pressure on the knob to effect frictional retention of the needle valve in its current setting.

Referring now to FIG. 1, it will be observed that the carburetor I0 is mounted on the engine 11 in the same way as the conventional model engine carburetor. Thus, the carburetor outlet sleeve 22a is coupled to the engine air intake so that induction air flow to the engine occurs through the carburetor Venturi passage P. The carburetor throttle arm 16 is connected to a throttle actuator, such as a servo actuator, through the link 180. Link 18b connects the throttle arm to the usual pivoted exhaust shutter 11a on the engine 11 for adjustment of the shutter and carburetor throttle valve in unison. The curburetor fuel inlet is connected to a fuel tank (not shown) through fuel line 36.

From the description to this point, it is evident that the outer sleeve 24 of the fuel metering valve V, is rotatable by means of its disc 28 relative to the inner valve sleeve 23 and throttle valve to locate any selected outer sleeve fuel metering port 26L, 26M or 26H in fuel metering position wherein the selected outer port and the inner port 25 are disposed in overlapping relation to form a fuel metering orifice. Rotation of the throttle arm 16 rotates the inner valve sleeve and throttle valve in unison and the inner sleeve relative to the outer valve sleeve. The outer valve sleeve is frictionally held against turning with the inner valve sleeve during rotation of the inner sleeve and throttle valve by the throttle arm. As mentioned earlier and explained in detail below, the outer valve sleeve is rotated relative to the inner valve sleeve to effect the idling and mid-range fuel adjustments for regulating fuel flow independently of throttle setting. Rotation of the inner valve sleeve with the throttle valve by rotation of the throttle arm regulates fuel flow in relation to induction air flow to regulate engine power and speed.

The above idling and mid-range adjustments and fuel regulating actions of the fuel metering valve V will now be explained in more detail by reference to FIGS. 8-9. The fuel metering ports 25, 26L, 26M, 26H of the metering valve have already been described and hence need not be redescribed at this point. Suffice it to say that FIGS. 8 and 9 show the outer metering valve sleeve 24 in one of its three mid-range adjustment positions, specifically the adjustment position wherein its midside fuel metering port 26M is located in fuel metering position, i.e., in overlapping relation to the inner valve sleeve port 25. In this position, the ports define a fuel metering orifice 0 through which fuel flow occurs from the fuel reservoir R to the fuel jet J during engine operation.

As explained above, during engine operation, the throttle valve 15 and inner fuel metering valve sleeve rotate in unison with the throttle arm 16 and relative to the outer valve sleeve 24 to regulate fuel flow to the engine relation to air flow to the engine. In this regard, it will be observed in FIGS. 8 and 9 that during rotation of the inner valve sleeve relative to the outer valve sleeve 24, the boundary edge 25a of the inner sleeve port 25 moves back and forth along the outer sleeve port currently in fuel metering position, i.e., port 26M. This back and forth movement of the edge along the outer port varies the effective area of the fuel metering orifice O and hence the rate of fuel flow through the orifice.

FIG. 9A shows the position occupied by the inner port boundary edge 25a when the throttle valve I5 and inner valve sleeve 23 are in their full speed or full open position. In this position, the inner sleeve port 25 uncovers the entire outer sleeve port 26M and hence the metering orifice O has maximum area. Maximum fuel flow thus occurs to the engine. Rotation of the throttle valve and inner valve sleeve from the full open or full speed position of FIG. 9A to the idling position of FIG. 9C results in movement of the inner port boundary edge 25a along the outer metering port 26M toward its tapered end 270. Port 26M is thereby progressively covered by the inner valve sleeve 23 and the fuel metering orifice O is progressively reduced in area to progressively reduced fuel flow to the engine to the idling level. Rotation of the throttle valve and inner valve sleeve from their idling position to full open position has the opposite effect of progressively increasing fuel flow to the engine.

As noted earlier, the idling fuel adjustment A, involves rotatable adjustment of the outer metering valve sleeve 24 with the throttle valve 15 and inner valve sleeve 23 in idling position (FIG. 9c). This adjustment moves the tapered boundary edge 270 of the outer sleeve port currently in fuel metering position (i.e., port 26M) back and forth across the boundary edge 25a of the inner sleeve port 25 to vary the area of the fuel metering orifice O and hence fuel flow to the engine at idling. in connection with this adjustment, it is significant to note that the port boundary edges 25a, 27c are inclined in opposite directions to intersect one another. Accordingly, in the idling adjustment range, the metering orifice O is tapered, as shown. This tapered orifice configuration effectively extends the idling adjustment range, as compared to the adjustment range which would exist if the boundary edges 250, 270 were parallel, thereby permitting more precise idling fuel adjustment. The idling fuel adjustment is set to attain an optimum air/fuel ratio to the engine and hence optimum engine operation at idling.

The mid-range fuel adjustment A, involves rotation of the outer metering valve sleeve 24 to locate one of its fuel metering ports 26L, 26M, 26H in fuel metering position relative to the inner valve sleeve port 25. In this regard, it will be observed that the central, midrange portions 270 of the three ports 26L, 26M, 26H differ in width. Accordingly, adjustment of the outer valve sleeve from one mid-range adjustment setting to another effectively varies the area of the fuel metering orifice over the mid-operating range of the engine independently of throttle valve setting. Thus, rotation of the outer valve sleeve from its setting of FIGS. 8 and 9 to the setting in which port 26L is located in metering position reduces fuel flow to the engine in any given mid-range throttle valve setting. Rotation of the outer valve sleeve to the setting in which port 26H is located in metering position increases the fuel flow in any given mid-range throttle valve setting. This mid-range fuel adjustment is set to attain the optimum air/fuel ratio and hence engine operation over the mid-operating range and may be utilized, for example, to compensate for different altitudes, atmospheric conditions, to provide a rich mixture for engine break-in and for other purposes.

Needle valve 33 is set to attain optimum air/fuel ratio and engine operation at full speed, where the throttle valve and inner valve sleeve 23 occupy their full open position. ln this position, the entire outer fuel metering port 26L, 26M, 26H, including its high speed enlargement or aperture 27b, is uncovered. This enlargement provides additional fuel to the engine in the full open position of the throttle valve 15 to the same mannet and for the same purpose as the high speed port in the fuel metering valve of my prior Pat. No. 3,71 1,068. The needle valve 33 is effective to regulate the fuel flow at this full throttle position in the same manner as in the latter patent.

What is claimed as new in support of Letters Patent is:

l. A carburetor fuel metering valve comprising:

a pair of slidably interfitting valve sleeves which are relatively rotatable to a plurality of mid-range fuel adjustment settings and are relatively rotatable at each mid-range setting through an operating fuel metering range between idling and full speed positions,

said sleeves having fuel metering ports which overlap at each mid-range setting to form a fuel metering orifice whose effective area is varies by relative rotation of the sleeves through the corresponding fuel metering range, and said sleeves being relatively rotatable to corresponding fuel metering positions within the fuel metering ranges and the fuel metering ports being so sized that the effective orifice areas differ at said corre sponding fuel metering positions. 2. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 1 wherein.

said valve sleeves are relatively rotatable to two midrange settings to provide two fuel metering orifices having different areas at any given corresponding fuel metering positions within the fuel metering ranges. 3. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 1 wherein:

said valve sleeves are relatively rotatable to three mid-range settings to provide three fuel metering orifices having different areas at any given corresponding fuel metering positions within the fuel metering ranges. 4. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 1 wherein:

said fuel metering ports include a plurality of circumferentially spaced ports in the outer valve sleeve and a port in the inner valve sleeve which registers with the outer sleeve ports, respectively, in said mid-range settings to provide the fuel metering orifices, each outer sleeve port is totally uncovered by the inner sleeve port in the corresponding full speed position of said valve sleeves and is progressively covered by the inner sleeve upon relative rotation of the sleeves to the corresponding idling position, and said outer sleeve ports differ in size. 5. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to 35 claim 4 wherein:

said outer sleeve ports comprise slots of different width extending circumferentially of said outer sleeve. 6. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 4 wherein:

said outer sleeve has two fuel metering ports, whereby said sleeves are relatively rotatable to two mid-range settings. 7. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 4 wherein:

said outer sleeve has three fuel metering ports, whereby said sleeves are relatively rotatable to three mid-range settings. 8. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 7 wherein:

said outer sleeve ports comprise slots of different width extending circumferentially of said outer sleeve. 9. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to claim 8 wherein:

said inner sleeve port has an edge which undergoes movement along each outer fuel metering slot toward one end edge of the slot during rotation of the sleeves toward idling position at the corresponding mid-range setting, the fuel metering orifice at the corresponding midrange setting is formed between said port and slot edges, whereby the orifice area is progressively reduced by said sleeve rotation to idling position, and said port and slot edges are oppositely inclined at oblique angles to the common axes of the sleeves. 10. A carburetor fuel metering valve according to 65 claim 9 wherein:

the opposite end of each outer sleeve fuel metering slot is enlarged.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3711068 *Sep 25, 1970Jan 16, 1973J PerryCarburetor fuel metering valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4369149 *May 29, 1981Jan 18, 1983Violett Robert SHaving circular duct and multibladed fan
US4655976 *Apr 27, 1981Apr 7, 1987Buttner Horace JudsonCarburetor components and carburetor
US5942160 *Oct 29, 1997Aug 24, 1999U.S.A. Zama, Inc.Rotary throttle valve type carburetor
US6142455 *Apr 30, 1999Nov 7, 2000U.S.A. Zama, Inc.Rotary throttle valve type carburetor
US6217004Apr 22, 1998Apr 17, 2001Safematic OyFlow control arrangement in a circulation lubrication system
US6231033Mar 27, 2000May 15, 2001U.S.A. Zama, Inc.Rotary throttle valve type carburetor
WO1998048214A1 *Apr 22, 1998Oct 29, 1998Safematic OyFlow control arrangement in a circulation lubrication system
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/625.3, 251/207, 261/44.2
International ClassificationF02M7/00, F02B1/00, F02B75/00, F02M9/08, F16K1/32, F02B9/00, F02B9/06, F16K1/38, F02M7/18, F02B75/34, F02M9/00, F02B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02B1/04, F02B9/06, F02M7/18, F02B75/34, F16K1/38, F02M9/085
European ClassificationF02B75/34, F16K1/38, F02B9/06, F02M7/18, F02M9/08B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 10, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: VANDERHOOF, RICHARD
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PERRY, JOHN;REEL/FRAME:005964/0643
Effective date: 19910707