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Publication numberUS3904029 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1975
Filing dateOct 5, 1973
Priority dateJul 7, 1972
Publication numberUS 3904029 A, US 3904029A, US-A-3904029, US3904029 A, US3904029A
InventorsIrving Morton Koltz
Original AssigneeInt Inpak Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Visual display package
US 3904029 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Koltz 1 VISUAL DISPLAY PACKAGE [75] Inventor: Irving Morton Koltz, Toronto,

[21] Appl. No.: 403,871

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 272,112, July 17, 1972, abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of Scr. No. 160,806, July 4, 1972, abandoned.

[52] US. Cl. 206/4534; 206/4412; 206/80 G; 229/16 D; 229/31 FS; 229/38 [51] Int. Cl B65d 25/54 [58] Field of Search 206/4531, 45.33, 45.34, 206/4412, 80 G; 229/16 D, 31 PS, 31 R, 38

[56] Reterences Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,865,635 7/1932 Klein 229/31 FS 2,421,748 6/1947 Fink 229/31 R 2,545,802 3/1951 Bergstein.... 229/31 FS 2.896853 7/1959 Curran l 206/80 G 3,072,247 1/1963 Fielding i 206/4531 3,078,027 2/1963 Keith 206/4531 3,199,670 8/1965 Palmer 206/4534 3.358320 12/1967 Fairbaim 206/4531 3,416,656 12/1968 Addiego r 206/78 3,608,705 9/1971 Moshel 206/4531 FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLlCATIONS 959,208 5/1964 United Kingdom 229/31 FS 1 Sept. 9, 1975 Primary Examiner-William it Price Assistant Examiner-Bruce H. Bernstein Attorney, Agenl, or Firm-Sheldon Hr Parker [57] ABSTRACT A container for merchandise which has at least one transparent panel section in combination with a means for closure which does not obstruct the transparent panel. The closure includes a flange which extends outwardly from the container on each end thereof with gusset panels connected thereto. The gusset pan els are unfolded to lie adjacent to the side panels. End closures are provided with positive locking means wherein each of said end closures includes an end panel foldable to a closed position inward of the side marginal edges of an back panel, and being foldable along a first fold line common to an front panel and said end panel; a closure flap having three free edges and reversely foldable over the inner exposed surface of said back panel along a second fold line common to said back panel and said closure flap, each of said top and bottom panels including at least one gusset panel extenting between said top and bottom panels and an end panel, said closure flap being dimensioned such that when it is in its folded position, it physically engages an adjacent member and is thereby locked in place.

16 Claims, 23 Drawing Figures PATENTEB 9 75 SHEET 1 OF 6 IRVING M. KOLTZ PATENTEIJSEP 91915 3. 904.029

sum 2 [If g FIGS Inventor mvms M. KOLTZ by: gave PATENTED SEP' 91975 SHEET 3 UF 6 IRVING M. KOLTZ VISUAL DISPLAY PACKAGE REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATIONS This patent application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 272,112, filed July 17, 1972 now abandoned. which is, in turn, a continuation= in-part of US. patent application Ser. No. 160,806, filed July 4, 1972 and is now abandoned in the U.S., the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to containers formed of cardboard, paper, plastic, foil, or the like material and preferably provided with a window. More particularly, the invention relates to an end closure for the container and locking means for the closure.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art Modern marketing techniques require that products and articles of merchandise be packaged in boxes or containers which themselves create a point of purchase display in a retail store or other outlet. Boxes, containers or the like which conceal their contents are undesirable since, in order to display the merchandise for sales, one or more such boxes must be opened, and the remainder stored elsewhere. Thus, for many years it has been the practice to provide cardboard or paper boxes or packages for a wide variety of merchandise, in which a portion of one side of the container is cut out, and covered with a thin sheet of transparent material such as acetate or the like to provide a so-called window". Typical window packages of this kind are only partially successful. Since the window is cut out from only one side of the carton or container, the merchandise remains to a large extent completely hidden. In addition, such windows cannot be provided extending the full width or length of the container since the vast majority of containers are closed at each end by conventional tuck-in flaps. In some cases, it has been proposed to provide such a window extending around two sides of the container, but even in this case, the window does not extend the full length of the container, and as a result, the ends of the product or merchandise within the container still remain concealed. Typical examples of such window packages are shown in US. Pat. No. 1,761,249; 2,409,736; 3,186,622; 3,273,702; 3,351,188; 3,380,575; 3,448,853.

In order to overcome the shortcomings of the various types of conventional window package, an entirely different technique for packaging was developed known as blister" packaging. In this technique, a sheet of transparent thermoformable material is formed, usually by vacuum forming techniques around the article of merchandise, with the periphery of the plastic sheet adhesively bonded to a backing card. This type of packaging has proved very popular, and has been successfully employed in the retailing ofa very wide variety of merchandise. The principal advantage, of course, is the fact that the merchandise remains in full view at all times, constituting its own point of purchase display.-

retaller does not have to remove the contents of the packwhich may be desired can be printed on the backing sheet. such that the articles itself is fully exposed to view, along with advertising material and directions.

However, blister packaging has been found to be a costly procedure since the manufacturer of the merchandise must normally ship the merchandise, unpackaged. and therefore, unprotected, to a blister packager who then packages the merchandise one by one in his own plant in the manner described above. This involves substantial unnecessary expense and is timeconsuming. and leads to delays between the manufacture of the merchandise and its delivery to the retailer. In most cases, blister packaging adds very substantially to the retail cost of the article and, in many cases, blister packaging is simply too expensive to be suitable for the packaging of various kinds of merchandise. As a result, many types of merchandise in which the retailing mark-up is restricted, have been packaged in unsuitable containers or window packages which conceal the merchandise from view, which has, in turn, tended to somewhat increase the retailing costs of such articles and simultaneously decreased their appeal. Conversely, articles where a higher retailing mark-up could be obtained have been packaged by blister packaging techniques where unnecessarily high packaging costs were incurred which substantially reduced the manufacturer's profit, and such increased costs have inevitably been passed on to the consumer who in the end is forced to pay a higher price for the article than is necessary.

Another factor which is of great importance in the selection of the most suitable package for an article of merchandise is the nestability or stacking qualities of the package. In many cases, point of purchase displays are made up by stacking the packages or containers one above the other. Conventional containers of cardboard or window packages formed principally of carboard were readily adapted to nesting and stacking in this way. and in fact, provided for economical bulk shipping of such articles, and at the same time provided a simple, yet attractive, counter display in the retail outlet. on the other hand, blister packages being by their very nature of random contour and shaping, dependent upon the article contained therein and the vacuum forming process employed, were generally speaking, not nestable, and not stackable one above the other. As a result, such blister packages are normally required to be supported on some form of specially manufactured counter display such as a support column or a system of wire hangers or the like arranged on a peg board. In either case, the retailer is obliged to invest in point of purchase display supports for such blister packages which still further increases his retail ing costs.

A still further factor of importance in the selection of the most suitable package is that fact that in many cases, the customer will wish to check the actual article of merchandise he is purchasing to make sure that there are no defects. This, of course, involved removing the article from its container or package. In the case of a conventional cardboard container this presents no problem. One end flap is simply withdrawn from the package, and the article can be removed and inspected and then replaced and the end flap closed. On the other hand, in the case of a package, the only way in which the article can be removed from the package is by actually destroying the package. Once the package is destroyed, and if the customer should finally decide not to purchase the article, then of course, the article cannot readily be repackaged by the retailer, and it must be either thrown away or sold at a reduced price. For example, in the case of the sale of a toothbrush, the customer may wish to check the bristles to select a toothbrush of the appropriate type. If he should test one, and then discard it in favor of another, then the discarded product must be sold at a reduced price. On the other hand, if the retailer should refuse to allow the customer to check the product, then the customer may very well refuse to buy it.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION One form of the present invention, therefore, seeks to provide a package or container for articles of merchandise, of generally rectangular shape, having four sides and two ends, in which one or more sides are formed of any transparent such material extending across the full width and length of the box or container, thereby rendering the entire contents of the container visible, the remainder of the container being formed of conventional cardboard materials or the like, or board, paper, or even wholly of such transparent materials.

More particularly, it is an objective of the present inve ntion to provide a carton or box having the foregoing advantages.

More particularly, it is an objective of the present in vention to provide a box or carton having the foregoing advantages which may be manufactured and shipped flat to the manufactuercr of the merchandise to be packages therein, thereby occupying a minimum of space, and at the packaging zone on the production line, the cartons may be then set up, filled and closed in a relatively simple inexpensive operation.

More particularly, it is an objective of the present in vention to provide a box or carton having the foregoing advantages which is provided with end closure means which may be opened and closed without actually destroying the box, if desirable, but which are, to all in tents and purposes tamperproof and can only be opened with considerable difficulty.

More particularly, it is an objective of the present invention to provide a box or carton having the foregoing advantages which may be manufactured together with a hang tag or display card formed intregrally therewith out of a single blank of material.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. I is an upper perspective illustration of a carton according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the carton shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional and elevational view along the line 3--3 of FIG. I;

FIG. 4 is a partial perspective view of one end of the box shown in FIG. 1, shown open prior to insertion of an article therein;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a blank of cardboard or the like material at a stage in the manufature of the box show in FIG. 1',

FIG. 6 is a sectional end elevational view along the line 66 ff FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a partial perspective illustration of one end of the carton of FIG. 1 shown in a semi-closed position;

FIG. 8 is an end clcvational illustration of a further embodiment of the carton of FIG. I, in which two such cartons as shown in FIG. 1 are formed in pairs;

FIG. 9 is a partial perspective illustration of an end of the carton as shown in FIG. 1, in a further semiclosed position;

FIG. 10 is an illustration of a further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged perspective of one end of the embodiment of FIG. 10',

FIG. I2 is a further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 13 is a further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 14 is a perspective illustration of a further embodiment of the invention showing a container or box having a window, and a re-closeable flap;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged perspective of a detail of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a perspective illustration of a further embodiment of the invention in which the window is left open;

FIG. 17 is a perspective illustration of a box without any window at all, being completely closed in, and,

FIG. 18 is a perspective illustration of an alternate embodiment of FIG. I showing a box or container wholly of transparent material with a cardboard insert.

FIG. 19 is an aupper perspective illustration of another embodiment of a carton according to the invention',

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of one end of the carton of FIG. 19, shown open prior to insertion of an article therein;

FIG. 21 is a plan view ofa blank used fo form the car ton of FIG. 19;

FIG. 22 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of an end of the carton as shown in FIG. 20, in a further semiclosed position, and

FIG. 23 is a fragmentary perspective illustration of another embodiment of a carton in accordance with the present invention.

The foregoing and other related advantages will be come apparent from the following descriptions of preferrcd embodiments of the invention given here by way of example only with reference to the following drawings, in which like reference devices refer to like parts thereof throughout the various views and diagrams, and wherein:

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIGS. 1 through 7, it will be seen that this embodiment of the invention comprises of a box or carton indicated generally by the reference 10. The carton 10 will be seen to comprise a bottom wall or panel 11, a back wall or panel 12, and end walls or panels 13 and I4. A hang tag or display card 15 extends upwardly from the carton 10 for display purposes, and may be provided with a hole 16 by which the same may be hung from a wire rack or peg board or the like.

The carton 10 will further seen to comprise a front panel 17, and a top panel 18 made of a continuous sheet of transparent material such as acetate plastic, vinyl or the like, and extends the full width or length of the carton, that is to say from end panel I3 to end panel 14, and extends the full width of the sides 17 and I8, thereby rendering the entire interior of the carton III vissible. The end panels I3 and 14 of the carton 10 will be seen to be joined integrally with the flange portions 19, 20 and 21, 22 respectively which extend endwisc relative to the carton l0, substantilly the same plane as the top panel 18 and the bottom II. An intermediate gusset panel extends between each side of end panels 13 and 14, and their rexpeetive flange panels 19, 20, 21 and 22, the gusset panels being referenced respectively as 23, 24, 25, and 26. The end panels 13 and I4, as best shown in FIG. 4, are provided with endwise closure flap means 27 and 28 respectively. Slotted openings respectively referenced at 29 and 30 are provided along the line of juncture between the respective end panels 13 and 14 and their respective flaps 27 and 28, the flaps 27 and 28 being designed to fold outwardly with respect to the interior of the carton 10, and lie against endwise extensions of the back panel 12 thereof. In order to close and fasten the end panels 13 and 14, locking flaps 31 and 32 are provided as integral endwise extensions of the rear side 12 of the carton 10, and they in turn are provided with locking tabs 33 and 34 dimensioned and arranged to enter the slotted openings 29 and 30 respectively.

With particular reference to FIG. 5, it will be noted that the front and top panels 17 and 18 formed of plastic material are in fact formed of a single integral sheet of plastic shaped and dimensioned to overlap margional portions of bottom panel 1 l, as at the glue area referenced as 35, and that it overlaps the display panel as at the glue area 36. In addition, the plastic forming front and top panels 17 and I8 overlaps the end panels 13 and 14, the gussets 23 and 25, and the flange portions 19 and 21, as at the glue areas 37 and 38.

It will have been noted that the flange portions 19, 20, 2! and 22, and their corresponding gusset panels 23, 24, 25 and 26, when folded in forms the shape of an irregular quadrilateral. This is caused by the cutting out of a generally rectangular portion lying between each flange and its associated gusset panel, as shown best in FIG. 4 with reference to the flange 21 and its associated gusset panel 25. It would of course be understood that in some cases, it is permissible to cut away more or less of the flange 21 and the associated gusset panel 25, and that if none is cut away at all, then when folded together they will adopt a more or less triangular shape. Obviously, in this latter case, the overall width of the package or container will be substantially greater, but this may produce a package having a better appearance, or slightly greater strength in some cases as will be described below.

In addition, in order to hold the whole package together, a glue flap panel 39 is attached to the free edge of back panel 12, and is adapted to overlap a portion of all of the rear surface of the display panel as at the glue area 40. The glue area 40, in fact, overlaps the glue area 36 between the edge of the plastic top panel 18, and the display panel 15, and as best shown in FIG. 5, forms a sandwich therewith.

In operation. the package is, of course, manufactured by cutting out the blank as shown in FIG. 5. and then gluing the transparent material forming the front and top panels I7 and 18 in position over the gluing areas 35, 36, 37 and 38. The glue flap 39 is then glued in place over the glue area 40, and the package is then shipped flat to the manufacturers or packagers plant.

At point of packaging, by either hand labour or any suitable machine for the purpose (not shown), the package may be set up" i.e. opened up so that panels 1], 12, 17 and 18 form a hollow square-shaped tube. Depending upon the design of the machinery at the point of packaging. the item of merchandise can then be inserted into the hollow square-shaped tube, afterwhich both ends would then be closed simultaneously. Alternatively, one end can then be closed, the article of merchandise inserted, and then the other end closed. It will be appreciated that the two ends of the container 10 are mirror images of one another and accordingly, the process of closure at each end is the same. Thus, in order to close one said end, the end panel 14 is folded inwardly towards the back panel 12, with the gusset portions 25 and 26 and the flange portions 21 and 22 flexing outwardly to permit such closure. The end panel 14 is preferably pushed inwardly in the direction of the arrow A, of FIG. 7 until it is standing more or less at right angles to the back panel 12, with its closure flap 28 lying flat against the endwise portion of back panel 12 as shown in FIG. 7. The gusset portions 25 and 26 are then pressed tight against the flange portions 21 and 22 as shown in FIG. 9, and the locking flap 32 is then folded inwardly into the space between the flange member 21 and 22 along the line of the arrow A2 of FIG. 9. The flap 32 is pressed flat against the underlying portion of the back panel 12, and the closure flap 28, and the tab 34 will then flap into place in the slotted opening 30. This will securely hold the end panel 14 in position against any unauthorized opening of the pack age.

If it has not already been filled, the package or con tainer 10 may then be filled from the opposite end, and that end may then be closed in exactly the same manner as described above. The package may then be shipped out.

It is particularly noteworthy. that since the package is provided with symmetrical sides 11, 12, I7 and 18, that it can be very readily nest in a large packaging case by simply laying two such containers l0 face to face with the display panel 15 of one overlying the front panel 17 of the other.

If desired, in order to ensure that the package or con tainer 10 stands upright on a flat surface, a foot or leg 41 may be struck out of the bottom panel 11, so as to tilt the package 10 slightly forwardly, thereby overcoming any tendency for the panel 15 to cause it to overbalance rearwardly.

The invention is, of course, capable of many different modifications for different specific applications.

For example, FIG. 8 shows a further alternative embodiment, in which two packages or containers 10 are formed out ofa single blank of material, by simply cuttingout a blank similar to that shown in FIG. 5 and cutting out a mirror image of that blank as an endwise extension of the display panel 15, and then simply folding it along a median line indicated as 42 so that two containers 10 are provided back to back. They then can of course be supported by simply hanging them over a rail or the like.

Another alternative embodiment is shown in FIG. 10. In this embodiment, a container referenced as 50 is provided with a lower side wall 51 formed of cardboard or the like and three transparent side walls, namely the front panel 52, the upper side wall comprising front and rear upper panels 53a and 53b and the back panel 54 are all formed out of transparent plastic material such as acetate or the like thereby providing an even better opportunity for inspection of the contents of the package 50 than in the case of the container 10.

In this embodiment, the cardboard portion of the package 50 comprises the bottom panel 51 and the overlapping end panels 55, 56 and 57, 58. The header flaps 59 and 60 are also formed of cardboard material integrally with the end flaps 55, 56, 57 and 58, and extend upwardly along a median line of the container 50. The end flaps S5, 56 respectively are formed integrally with respective upper and lower flange portions 61 and 62. only the upper flange portions being shown in FIG. 10, and the end flaps 57, and 58 are likewise provided with upper and lower flange portions 63 and 64.

Between the end flap S7 and its upper and lower flange portions 63, infolding gusset portions 65 are provided, and likewise between the end flap 58 and its associated upper and lower flange portions 64, infolding gusset portions 66 are provided. At the opposite end of the container 50, similar gusset portions (not shown) are provided between the end flaps 55 and 56 and their respective upper and lower flange portions 61 and 62.

As shown in FIG. 10, the transparent panels 52 and 54, and the front and rear top panels 53a and 53b, may be composed of two separate pieces of plastic, having a marginal portion 67 sandwiched between the front and rear header flaps 59 and 60 as shown in FIG. 10.

Locking of the two ends of the container 50 is ef fected by locking tabs 68, provided on the flanges 57 and 55, fitting within the struck out openings 69, only one such opening being shown in FIG. 11 for the sake of clarity.

For other applications, where no header flaps are required, for example in the case of packaging a long thin article which may be allowed to lie on a counter or the like, a further modification of the invention may be employed as best shown in FIG. 12. In FIG. 12, container generally referenced as 70 is shown having a bottom panel 71 and a back panel 72 formed of cardboard or the like opaque material, and a front panel 73 and a top panel 74 formed of transparent material. End closure flaps 75 and 76 are provided, in the same way as in the embodiment of FIG. 1, formed integrally with end flange portions 77 and 78. Infolding gusset portions 79 and 80 extend between respective end flaps 75 and their flanges 77 and end flaps 76 and their flanges 78. Each of the end flaps 75 and 76 is closed by a closure flap 8] and 82 respectively, provided with locking tabs 83 locking in a slotted opening 84, only one such tab 83 in opening 84 being shown for the sake of clarity. A opening 85 is provided at one end for supporting the same on a hook or rail if desired. It is noteworthy that in the embodiment of FIG. 12, the end flanges 77 and 78 are of essentially triangular shape, unlike the end flanges of the embodiment of FIG. 1 which are essentially quadrilateral in shape. In this embodiment, as shown in FIG. 12, where the package or container 70 is somewhat more elongated, and has a smaller crosssection, the greater length of the triangular shaped end flanges is found both to enhance the appearance of the container or package 70, and also to provide slightly greater strength.

In some cases, it may be desirable to make a container according to the invention in which the width of the container is essentially no greater than the width of the article to be supported therein, and in such event, the arrangement of the end flanges of FIG. 1 can be altered and modified so that they extend upwardly and downwardly with reference to the interior of the container rather than out to either side. As shown there fore in FIG. 13, such a modified form of container is shown generally as 90, and having bottom and top panels 91 and 92 formed of cardboard or the like opaque material, and a back wall 93, and a header panel 94, all being formed of cardboard or the like opaque material in this embodiment. Three sides of the container in this embodiment are provided of transparent material, namely the left and right hand end panels 95 and 96 and the front panel 97, formed of a single sheet of transparent material such as transparent plastic or acetate or the like material wrapping around the two sides and the front of the container 90 as shown. End flange portions 98 are provided on either side of the bottom panel 91, and end flange portions 99 are provided on either side of the upper end panel 92. Respective in folded gusset portions are provided. namely gusset portions 100, adjacent the lower end flange portions 98, and upper gusset portions 101 provided adjacent the upper end flange portions 99. A lower end closure flap 102 is provided to interlock with the bottom panel 91, and is provided with any suitable locking tab means, (not shown). An upper end closure panel 103 is provided, being in fact a folded over portion of the header panel 94, and provided with a locking tab 104 adapted to interlock with the slotted opening 105 in the upper end panel 92 as shown. Any suitable opening such as 106 may be provided for supporting the same from a rail or peg if desired.

In certain cases, it may be desirable to provide a package which the purchaser can rip open and then reclose, thereby extending the life of the package. without going through the necessity for folding the end panels in and out. Such a further embodiment of the invention is shown with reference to FIGS. 14 and 15. Essentially, in this embodiment, a container 110 is shown, es sentially identical to that shown in FIG. I, and having a bottom panel 111, a back panel 112, and end panels 1 l3 and 114 (not shown) and front and top transparent panels 117 and H8. Essentially, the only difference is in the construction of the back panel 112, which in this embodiment is provided with a perforated trap door panel 120 which is normally adhered to the back of the display panel 115, along a modified glue area 121. The glue in the area 121 is of a modified nature, and pro vides less holding power than the glue holding the remainder of panel 1 12 to the display panel 1 l5, and ena bles the purchaser to grasp the upper portion 122 and tear it open, afterwhich the upper portion 122 can be folded downwardly, and may be slipped back into the interior of the box or container 110. Note that the por tion 122 tapers inwardly at either side so that it may more readily enter into the opening left by the panel 120, in the back panel 112 as shown in FIG. 15.

In some cases, it may be desirable to employ the end closures of the invention in a package without any transparent material whatever, the articles themselves simply being gripped at either end, and otherwise being completely exposed. Such a modified form of package is shown in FIG. 16. The package referenced generally as will be seen to consist of a one piece back panel and display panel referenced 131, a front display panel 132, and a reverse back display panel 133. Note that the front display panel 132 is in fact formed simply by doubling over the end of the panel 131, and the reverse panel 133 is simply the end of such doubled over panel, glued to the back of the panel 131. At each end of the package 130. enclosure cuff portions are formed by struck out portions of the back panel 131. Such struck out portions comprise the top panel 134, and the front panel 135 which at its lower end joins with the folded over portion of the front display panel 132 as shown. Preferably. the walls 134 and 135 form end enclosures. spaced apart a predetermined distance and adapted to enclose the ends of particles such as pens, pencils or the like indicated by the general reference arrow P. one such article being shown in 'phantom. In-order to insert and remove such articles P, end closures areprovided, essentially in accordance with the invention as shown in FIGS. 1 to 15. Such end closures comprises the end panels 136, provided with end flanges 137, and associated infolded gusset portions 138. Locking flaps 139 are provided as endwise extensions of each such end panel 136, and closure flaps 140 are provided having locking tabs 141 adapted to fit within slotted openings 142 as described above. Obviously, articles such as the pencils or pens P can be inserted and each of the ends of the article is then closed exactly as described in connection with the embodiment of FIG. 1, front such articles are effectively trapped, although exposed to view, and unprotected by any window material. Such articles cannot be removed without effectively either opening one or other end of the package 130, or tearing it apart.

In some cases, it may be desirable to employ the closure means as shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1 in a package without any window opening at all, perhaps for the sake or economy or additional security or the like. Such a modified form of package is shown in FIG. 17 as reference 150. It will of course consist of a bottom panel 151, a back panel 152, end panels 153 and 154, a display panel 155 and front and top panels 156 and 157, all formed of opaque cardboard material or the like without any window opening, whether or not covered with transparent materials. The end closure means are provided exactly as shown in FIG. 1, and further description is deemed unnecessary.

In certain cases. it may be desirable to manufacture a package such shown in FIG. 1 entirely out of transparent material, without any cardboard supporting material whatever. Such a modified form of package is shown in FIG. 18 and referenced 160. It will be seen to have a bottom panel 161. a back panel 162, end panels 163 and 164, a display panel 165, and front and top panels 166 and 167. All of these panels will be formed of a single blank of transparent material as shown, and the end closures will be formed essentially as described in connection with the embodiment of FIG. 1, further explanation being deemed to be unnecessary.

For display purposes only, a sheet of printed material or cardboard or the like referenced as 168 may be laminated together with the display panel 165, to provide for directions and point of purchase advertising material, although obviously, if desired the transparent material itself could be used as the printing surface for whatever descriptive material is required.

Referring now to the embodiment of FIGS. 19 through 22, it seen that this embodiment of the invention comprises a carton or container indicated generally by the reference numeral 210. The carton 210 includes a back display panel 212, a top side panel 222, a second top side panel 221 and a front display panel 215,

The carton is provided with end closures, indicated general by reference numbera 230. Each of the end closures include an end panel 213 and an end tab 227. The closure flap 23] is provided with two locking tabs 233 which are positioned such that when the end closure 230 is in the closed position as illustrated in FIG.

19, they will lie under the marginal edges 240 of the gusset panels 223 and 243.

It should be noted. as illustrated in FIG. 23, that the closure flap 231A can be dimensional such that it is equal in length to the fold line 244, in which case the locking tabs 253 must be positioned on the outermost edge 254 of the closure flap 231A. It is apparent at this point that the angle of inclination of the end panels 213 can be varied to any aesthetically desired degree. In each case. the distance between the fold line 256 which divides the back display panel 212 and the closure flap 231A is selected to produce the required angle of inclination of the end panels 213. It should be further noted that the distance between the fold line 258 and the fold line 227 which separates the end tab 227 from the end panel 213 can be selected so that in the closed position the edge of the end panel will be proximate the back panel 212 or it can remain the same in which case the fold line 258 edge of the end panel 213 will vary in its distance from the back panel.

The locking of the closure can also be achieved by dimensioning the closure flap such that the distance between the lateral edges 260 and 262 is slightly greater than the corresponding distance between the two gusset panels 223 and 224. In this manner a friction fit can be achieved. Additionally, as shown in FIG. 13, the lateral edges of the closure flap 103 can underlie the marginal edges of the gusset panels. In this case, the locking tabs 104 and slotted opening can be omitted.

What is claimed is:

1. A blank for a container comprising a piece of material foldable to form a carton, including:

a. a front panel having a predetermined width and height;

b. a back panel having a width greater than that of said front panel and a height at least equal to that of said front panel;

c. a top panel and bottom panel having a width equal to that of the front panel;

d. a pair of end closures, each of said end closures including an end panel foldable to a closed position inward of the side marginal edges of said back panel, and being foldable along a first fold line common to said front panel and said end panel; a closure flap having three free edges and reversely foldable over the inner exposed surface of said back panel along a second fold line common to said back panel and said closure flap, each of said top and bottom panels including at least one gusset panel extending between said top and bottom panels and an end panel, said closure flap being dimensioned such that when it is in its folded position, it physically engages an adjacent member and is thereby locked in place.

2. The structure of claim 1, wherein, in each end closure, a second gusset panel is positioned between said at least one gusset panel and said end panel.

3. The structure of claim 1, wherein each end panel has an end tab extending therefrom and is foldable along a third fold line common to said end panel and said end tab.

4. The structure of claim I, wherein a side tab extends from each of said first gusset panels and is foldable along a fourth fold line common to said first gusset panel and said side tab.

5. The structure of claim 1. wherein said closure flap includes at least one locking tab, said locking tab being dimensioned and positioned such that when said closure flap is in its folded position. said at least one locking tab interlocks with an adjacent member.

6. The structure of claim 5, wherein said closure flap includes two locking tabs which engage with a marginal edge of said second gusset edge when said blank is in its folded position, in the form of a container.

7. The structure of claim 1, wherein said closure flap is dimensioned such that it frictionally engages one of said gusset panels when said blank is folded into a container.

8. A container for merchandise comprising a generally rectangular container having four sides and two ends defining a generally rectangular interior;

end panel means hingeably connected along fold lines to a said side of said container and swingable towards and away from the opposite side thereof;

end flange means extending outwardly with respect to said container from each end thereof constituting endwise extension of the other two sides of said container, and

gusset panel means connected between said end panel means and said end flange means and foldable to lie against said end flange means when said end panels means is swung towards said opposite side of said container as aforesaid.

9. A container as claimed in claim 8 including closure flap means on the free end of said end panel means adapted to lie between said gusset panel means.

10. A container as claimed in claim 9 including locking tab means on said locking flap means, and locking opening means in said end panel means for reception of said locking tab means.

H. A container as claimed in claim 10 including locking tab means on said end panel means for reception of said locking tab means.

12. A container as claimed in claim 11 including a window opening formed in at least one said side.

13. A container as claimed in claim 12, including transparent window panel means covering said opening.

14. A container as claimed in claim 12. including cuff means formed integrally with said end panel means and said end flange means.

15. A container as claimed in claim 9 including a window opening and transparent window panel means therefore, said transparent window means overlapping marginal portions of said end flange means and said end panel means and being adhesivcly bonded thereto.

[6. A container as claimed in claim 9 wherein said end panel means comprises respective pairs of end panels adapted to fold over one another, and respective encl flange means and gusset panel means on each side of each said end panel.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/102.5, D06/567, 206/807, 229/162.7, 229/138, 206/806
International ClassificationB65D5/02, B65D5/42
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/807, B65D5/4204, B65D5/0263, Y10S206/806
European ClassificationB65D5/42B, B65D5/02G