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Publication numberUS3904041 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1975
Filing dateFeb 15, 1974
Priority dateFeb 15, 1974
Publication numberUS 3904041 A, US 3904041A, US-A-3904041, US3904041 A, US3904041A
InventorsMedgebow Irving
Original AssigneeJackson Products Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Commercial kitchen rack structure
US 3904041 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Medgebow Sept. 9, 1975 [54] COMMERCIAL KITCHEN RACK 1,843,513 2/1932 Inman 248/315 X 1,921,462 8/1933 Graham 21 1/88 1,958,266 5/1934 De Foe et a1. [08/46 Inventor: Irving Medgebow, p 2,279,442 4 1942 Burns ct a1 1 224/48 D 1731 AS9999 Jackson Products Company, Tampa, 53233333 13513;? ESL ZJQJQITII i (2 i 3,738,601 6/1973 Gehringer 248/310 x [22] Filed: Feb. 15, 1974 D Primar ExaminerRo .Frazier [211 App! 442837 Assistaiz t ExaminerR dney H. Bonck Attorney, Agent, or FirmMeyer, Tilberry & Body [52] US. Cl. 211/72; 211/75; 21 l/88;

248/215; 2 8/ [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl. A47G 29/00 A rack is disclosed which is adapted to be ramovably [58] Field of Search 211/75, 72, 88; 150/51; Supported by an edge rail ofasupport member Such as 108/26'2 47; 248/247 a table in a commercial kitchen. The rack is con- 315; 224/45 45 structed of strips of light gauge stainless steel includ- 48 48 D; 220/1316 15; D7/70; ing a wall defining strip and a pair of bracket strips. 139/248 The rack is slidable along the support rail and the bracket strips provide an open bottom structure which [56] References C'ted facilitates supporting a wide variety of accessories em- UNITED STATES PATENTS ployed in a commercial kitchen. A bracket structure is 893,930 7/1908 Lederman 108/47 X disclosed for interengaging the end of a kitchen acces- 1,237,622 8/1917 Dickinson 21 1/74 gory the edge rail of a up ort member 1,356,085 10/1920 Ottem 248/310 X 1,426,787 8/1922 Spencer 108/46 x 9 Clams, 5 a a Flgures 1,720,876 7/1929 Anderson 248/310 X PATENTED SEP 91975 SHEET 1 BF 2 22 FIG. 2

COMMERCIAL KITCHEN RACK STRUCTURE The present invention relates to the art of commercial kitchen accessories and, more particularly, to stainless steel accessories adapted to be removably and slidably supported by the edge rail of a support member such as a table in the service area of a commercial kitchen.

Commercial establishments such as restaurants, cafeterias and the like have a kitchen, service, or work area into which soiled eating utensils such as plates, cups, saucers, glasses and silverware are brought after use for preliminary cleaning prior to washing thereof. Such utensils most often include scraps of food and are placed on a support surface such as a table for sorting and preliminary cleaning by one or more kitchen attendants stationed at the table. Such sorting and preliminary cleaning includes, for example, the separation of the silverware and the deposit thereof in corresponding receptacles, the scraping of food scraps from plates, and the sorting and stacking of plates, cups, saucers, glasses and the like. Often, the sorted utensils are stacked or placed in receptacles on the top surface of the table, whereby the unoccupied surface area of the table available for receiving incoming utensils can be quickly and considerably reduced, especially during periods of heavy workload.

Accordingly, it becomes desirable to provide for maximizing the available table surface area in a commercial kitchen or the like to facilitate the various functions which take place therein, such as the utensil sorting and preliminary cleaning functions described above. Moreover, it becomes desirable in connection with increasing the table surface area to provide for selectively locating the working position of a kitchen helper relative to the table while, at the same time, providing the capability of selectively locating any one of a variety of utensil receptacles, scrap removal receptacles, and the like at the particular location of the helper. Still further, it becomes desirable to enable the kitchen helper to adjust or to completely change his working position along the table and to avoid the worker having to, for example, carry utensils from an input area at one end of the table to a stacking area or utensil receiving receptacle located at the other end of the table. When is it considered that there may be several helpers working along a given table or the like, it will be appreciated that minimizing such movement of the helpers not only reduces their physical exertion but also leads to increased efficiency in the work functions being performed.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a rack structure is provided for use in the kitchen or service area of a commercial establishment and which enables both maximizing the available surface area of a work table or the like, and achieving the foregoing desired capabilites with respect to the work functions performed by a kitchen helper working at the table. In this respect, the rack structure extends laterally outwardly from the table edge. Accordingly, preliminarily cleaned or stored utensils placed in a receptacle or the like supported by the rack are removed from the table surface to maximize the available area thereof. Moreover, the rack is slidably and removably supported by the edge rail provided on tables or the like in service areas of commercial kitchens to retain utensils and the like on the table surface. By sliding the rack along the edge rail a kitchen helper can readily adjust his position along the table, and removability of the rack enables the worker to quickly change his work location relative to the table.

The rack is constructed from strips of stainless steel to provide an open bottom structure which facilitates use of the rack in connection with a wide variety of accessories used in a commercial kitchen in connection with the sorting and preliminary cleaning of soiled utensils. Such accessories include, for example, cuplike receptacles for supporting sorted silverware and plastic trays or pans for receiving plates, saucers, cups, glasses and the like. Heretofore, such accessories were generally placed on the table surface, thus decreasing the available work area or utensil receiving area. Moreover, the rack structure includes a unique bracket or mounting arrangement cooperable with an edge rail to support the rack in cantilever fashion under heavy loads and against displacement from the edge rail as a result of the weight of a load thereon.

The sheet metal strip structure of the rack, in accordance with the present invention provides, in addition to the utility mentioned above, for minimizing material and production costs and for minimizing the likelihood of injury to a kitchen helper as the result of bodily contact with the rack structure. In this respect, especially during periods of maximum activity in the service area, the kitchen helpers hands are rapidly moving back and forth between the table surface and rack in performing their work duties. It becomes most important therefore, for purposes of sanitation and personal welfare, that sharp corners or edges which could cut or scratch the workers hands or catch and tear his clothing be avoided. The sheet metal strip structure of the rack of the present invention provides these advantages.

Material and manufacturing costs are minimized in that it is only necessary to cut sheet metal strips of the desired width and length, bend the strips to predetermined contours, and interconnect the strips such as by welding. The sidewalls and the bottom and bracket defining components are each defined by a single strip, whereby the forming and assemblying operation is simplified by minimizing the number of forming operations and alignment procedures necessary prior to the joining operation.

Accordingly, it is an outstanding object of the present invention to provide a rack of sheet metal strip structure removably supportable by the edge rail of a support member in a commercial kitchen or the like.

Another object is the provision of a rack of the foregoing character which is structurally adapted to selectively support any one of a wide variety of accessories used in a commercial kitchen in conjunction with the sorting and preliminary cleaning of eating utensils.

Yet another object is the provision of a rack of the foregoing character which is simple to construct and is comprised of a minimum number of component parts.

Still a further object is the provision of a rack comprised of sheet metal strips contoured and interengaged to provide protection against injury of a person or persons clothing by contact therewith.

Still another object is the provision of a rack of the foregoing character which is light weight, easy to attach or remove from a support rail therefor and which, when attached, is readily slidable along the support rail.

Yet a further object is the provision of a mounting or bracket structure for a kitchen rack or other kitchen accessory to be interengaged with and supported by the edge rail of a sheet metal table or the like, and which bracket structure minimizes stresses imposed on the edge rail by the accessory or a load thereon, especially when the accessory is supported in cantilever fashion.

The foregoing objects, and others, will in part be obvious and in part pointed out more fully hereinafter in conjunction with the written description of a preferred embodiment of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a rack made in accordance with the present invention mounted on the edge rail of a table;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the rack in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional elevation view of the rack of FIG. 1, the view being along line 33 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a detailed sectional elevation view of the rack taken along line 44 in FIG. 2; and,

FIG. 5 is a perspective view, partially in section, of a modification of the bracket structure of the present invention.

Referring now in greater detail to the drawings wherein the showings are for the purpose of illustrating a preferred embodiment of the present invention only and not for the purpose of limiting the invention, FIG. 1 shows a rack A made in accordance with the present invention and mounted on the edge rail B of a support member such as a table. In a commercial kitchen, such a table or other support member is generally produced from stainless steel to provide a flat table surface C with which edge rail B is integrally formed to peripherally bound surface C. Edge rail B includes an inner leg D extending upwardly from surface C to provide a wall for retaining utensils on the surface, and a semi-circular bridging portion E which has a terminal edge F spaced above the plane of surface C.

As set forth more fully hereinafter, rack A is supported by edge rail B in cantilever fashion to in turn support one of a variety of accessories to facilitate working operations such as the preliminary cleaning and sorting of eating utensils randomly placed on surface C. For example, rack A, which may be one of several racks supported by edge rail B, is shown supporting an apertured plate G which in turn supports a plurality of flanged receptacles H adapted to receive sorted pieces of silverware. It will be appreciated that rack A can be positioned along the support rail where desired, thus providing for silverware to be sorted and removed from surface C so as to keep the surface relatively clear for incoming soiled utensils. Other racks may be positioned along the table in a similar manner and provided with other accessories such as plastic trays to receive glasses, dishes, and the like, or a tray having an aperture in the bottom thereof to direct scraps of food scraped from the dinnerware into a receptacle therebeneath.

As illustrated in FIGS. 24, rack A is comprised of a pair of spaced apart generally parallel sidewalls l0 and 12, and spaced apart generally parallel front and rear walls 14 and 16, respectively. Walls 10, 12, 14 and 16 are of the same vertical height and have coplanar top edges and coplanar bottom edges. Moreover, the walls are defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel.

The rack further includes a pair of unitary stainless steel bracket strips 18 of identical structure including a bottom portion 20 extending between front and rear walls 14 and 16 adjacent the bottom edges thereof.

Each bracket strip further includes a front flange 22 extending upwardly in facial engagement with the inner surface of front wall 14, and a mounting portion 24 adjacent rear wall 16. Mounting portions 24 of the bracket strips are defined by a rear flange 26 extending upwardly from bottom portion 20 in facial engagement with the outer surface of rear wall 16, U-shaped bridg ing portion 28, and a downwardly extending terminal section 29. Bridging portion 28 preferably is semicircular for mating relationship with bridging portion E of edge rail B. Further, bridging portion 28 has a radius of curvature R, and terminal section 29 terminates in a bottom edge 30 spaced below a horizontal diametrical line through the center point of the radius of curvature and between the inner and outer ends of the bridging portion.

Bracket strips 18 are parallel to one another and to sidewalls 10 and 12 and are spaced apart from one another to define a bottom structure in which a major portion of the area between walls 10, 12, 14 and 16 is open. Preferably, bracket strips 18 are of a width corresponding to the height of walls 10, 12, 14 and 16, front flange 22 terminates in coplanar relationship with respect to the top edge of front wall 14, and the center point for the radius of curvature of bridging portion 28 is on a line coplanar with the top edges of walls 10, 12, 14 and 16.

As mentioned hereinabove, walls 10, 12, 14 and 16 are defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel, which strip is bent to provide the spaced apart parallel relationship between the walls and, preferably, to provide for the opposite ends of the unitary strip to be disposed in end-to-end abutting relationship overlying the front or rear flange of one of the bracket strips 18. In the embodiment illustrated, this relationship is achieved by providing for the ends of the unitary wall strip to abut along a line 32 overlying the inner surface of rear flange 26 of the left hand bracket strip 18 in FIG. 2, as illustrated in FIG. 4. Further, the wall strip and bracket strips are preferably interconnected such as by spot welds 34 between the rack walls and bracket flanges. The abutting and overlying relationship of the wall strip ends relative to the rear flange of bracket 18 advantageously provides for the rack walls to be interconnected with one another and with the bracket strips by a common welding operation. This relationship avoids having to preliminarily interconnect the ends of the wall strip, and further avoids exposure of the end edges of the wall strip such as would exist if the abutting ends were welded or otherwise interconnected at a corner of the rack, for example. The unitary wall strip structure further enables providing rounded corners between walls 10, 12, 14 and 16 to minimize exposed edges which could injure a person or damage his clothing.

As best seen in FIG. 3 of the drawing, bridging portion E of support rail B has a terminal edge F disposed in close proximity to the horizontal diametric line through the center point of radius R. The mating semicircular contours of bridging portions E of rail B and 28 of mounting portion 24 together with the location of edge F promote rotation of rack A clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3 about the center point of the radius of curva ture R. To prevent such rotation, bottom portion 20 of each bracket strip is provided with an abutment strip including a leg portion 36 which projects rearwardly of rear flange 26 and is suitably secured to bottom portion 20 such as by spot welds 38. The abutment strip is stainless steel and, preferably, is of the same width and thickness as the wall and bracket strips described above. The abutment strip terminates in an upwardly extending abutment flange 40 which engages wall D of edge rail B. Rear face 42 of flange 40 is spaced forwardly of inner face 44 of the terminal section 29 of mounting portion 24 a distance corresponding to the thickness of wall D of edge rail B. This relationship together with the location of the abutment strip below the center point of radius R provides for the rack to interengage with the edge rail in a manner which precludes separation by clockwise rotation of the rack and which provides for the bottom of the rack to be maintained substantially horizontal. The location of edge 30 of terminal section 29 enhances retention of the rack on the edge rail. While the abutment strip is preferably a separate elemment fastened to the bracket strip, it will be appreciated that the abutment strip could be integral with strip 18 and defined by appropriate bending of the strip.

An abutment strip may not be necessary in those instances where edge rail B includes an outer wall extending below the horizontal diametrical line across bridging portion E, and which wall would be engaged by rear flanges 26 to preclude rack rotation. It will be appreciated, however, that such an abutment strip serves the further purpose of relieving strain otherwise imposed on rail B and, accordingly, is desirable even when the rack is to be used with an edge rail of the latter structure. In this respect, in the absence of an abutment strip, the tendency of the rack and any load carried thereby to rotate the rack imposes forces on rail B which concentrate in the area of bridging portion E. These forces act in the direction to constrict bridging portion E. The abutment strip operates to minimize the constricting forces imposed on the bridging portion of the rail and to redirect the forces imposed on the rail so that an inward pressing force is imposed on wall D of the rail below bridging portion E and an outward pulling force is imposed on wall D adjacent the bridging portion. Accordingly, the load forces on the edge rail are advantageously divided as opposed to being concentrated and this minimizes the possibility of damag ing the edge rail. Still further, the abutment strip adds rigidity to the rack to restrain bending of bracket strips 18 at the juncture between bottom portion and rear flange 26.

As mentioned hereinabove, the sheet metal strip structure provides for the rack to have relatively large openings through the bottom thereof and at the same time for the bottom portions of the bracket strips to provide adequate support for accessories employed in conjunction therewith. The open bottom relationship advantageously provides three parallel corridors 46, 48 and 50 having a length corresponding to that of sidewalls 10 and 12 and a width determined by the width of front and rear walls 14 and 16, the width of the bracket strips, and the spacing of the bracket strips from one another and from sidewalls 10 and 12. In the specific embodiment illustrated, bracket strips 18 have a width of about 2 inches, corridors 46 and 50 have a width of about twice the width of strips 18, and corridor 48 has a width of about three times the width of strips 18. With further regard to the embodiment illustrated, the wall defining strip and bracket strips 18 are each of a width of about 2 inches and are produced from ll-gauge stainless steel. Bottom edge of terminal section 29 of mounting portions 24 is disposed approximately threefourths inch below the center point of radius of curvature R, and the latter radius of curvature is approximately three-fourths inch. The ll-gauge stainless steel strips of the above width are formed to provide a rack which extends outwardly from the edge rail approximately 13% inches and has a length along the edge rail of approximately 18 /2 inches. The 11- gauge stainless steel strips of 2 inch width interconnected as shown provides a light weight rack having the necessary structural integrity to support kitchen utensils disposed in the accessories supported by the rack. Further, the spacing between the bracket strips and sidewalls advantageously accommodate accessories such as silverware receptacles H or other accessories requiring large openings in the bottom of the rack, such as a tray apertured to permit food scraps to be directed to a garbage receptacle beneath the rack. Moreover, it will be appreciated that the structure is defined basically by three strip elements which are readily formed by bending to the prescribed dimensions and are readily associated with one another in aligned relationship and rigidly interconnected by spot welding. The abutment strips are likewise readily formable and attachable to the bracket strips. The corners between walls 10, 12, 14 and 16 preferably have a radius of curvature of about one-eight inch to avoid sharp edges, and the disposition of front flanges 22 of bracket strips 18 inside front wall 14 of the rack further eliminates the exposure of sharp edges along the outer periphery of the rack wall.

The particular bracket structure described hereinabove in conjunction with rack A can, of course, be used to advantage with other rack structures or with other kitchen accessories mounting on an edge rail of a sheet metal table, or other support member. Moreover, the specific bracket structure of rack A can be modified in connection with its association with rack A or with accessories structurally distinct from that of rack A. FIG. 5 of the drawing illustrates one such modification of the bracket structure in association with an accessory other than a rack.

Referring now to FIG. 5, a kitchen accessory is il lustrated in interengagement with the side rail of a support member similar to that described hereinabove. In this respect, the support member includes a sheet metal edge rail B including a sidewall D extending upright from top surface C of the support member, and a generally semi-circular top wall or bridging portion E. Wall E terminates in an edge F which is generally coplanar with respect to a horizontal diametrical line between the opposite ends of semi-circular top wall E.

Kitchen accessory 60 may be a tray, an extension table, or the like, adapted to extend outwardly from the edge rail of the support member. In the particular embodiment illustrated, accessory 60 is a stainless steel sheet metal extension table which depending on the length thereof, may be provided adjacent its outer end with support legs 62 adapted to engage the kitchen floor to lend stability to the accessory. The extension table includes a bottom wall 64 and an integral edge wall 66 extending about the side edges thereof and the end thereof spaced from the support member. The sidewall, preferably, terminates in a generally semicircular top edge 68, whereby wall 66 is structurally similar to edge rail B. It will be appreciated, therefore, that wall 66 enables additional extension tables or other accessories such as rack A described herein to be interengaged with table 60 if desired.

The end of bottom wall 64 facing the support member terminates in an outwardly and downwardly extending wall 70 having a curved upper portion 72 and a generally planar lower portion 74. The curvature of portion 72 conforms with the curvature of top wall E of edge rail B, and planar wall portion 74 extends downwardly from portion 72 to terminate in a bottom edge 76 spaced below the horizontal diametric line across the opposite ends of top wall E of the edge rail.

Wall 70 of table 60 defines a portion of the bracket structure by which the table is interengaged with edge rail B. The bracket further includes a pair of stainless steel strip components 78 attached to the bottom surface of bottom wall 64 of the table. More particularly, each strip 78 includes a leg 80 rigidly secured to bottom wall 64 such as by spot welding, a leg 82 depending from bottom wall 64 and defining a wall generally parallel to and spaced from lower portion 74 of wall 70. A leg 84 of strip 78 extends from leg 82 toward wall portion 74 and defines an abutment member adapted to engage edge rail wall D on the side thereof opposite wall portion 74. More particularly, leg 84 terminates in an upwardly extending flange 86 providing an abutment end for the abutment member. The top edge of flange 86 and the bottom edge 76 of wall portion 74 are vertically spaced apart a distance sufficient to provide for semi-circular top wall E of the edge rail to pass therebetween during engagement and disengagement of the accessory with the edge rail.

It will be seen from the foregoing description that wall portion 74 and the abutment member of the bracket structure engage opposite sides of sidewall D of edge rail B to achieve a force distribution as described hereinabove in connection with the bracket portion of rack A in FIGS. 1-4. Further, while a pair of strip components 78 are illustrated, it will be appreciated that a single strip of suitable width could be employed for the same purpose. It will be further appreciated that curved portion 72 of wall 70 and the portion of bottom wall 64 between curved portion 72 and the forward edges of legs 80 of strip 78 together define a bridging portion of the bracket by which strip legs 82 and wall portion 74 are interconnected in parallel spaced apart relationship. Moreover, legs 82 and wall portion 74 are spaced apart a distance corresponding to the diameter of the outer surface of semi-circular top wall E of the edge rail, whereby legs 82, wall portion 74 and the bridging portion of the bracket are adapted to receive the edge rail therebetween with the bridging portion seated on top wall E.

As many possible embodiments of the rack and bracket structures of the present invention may be made, and as many possible changes may be made in the embodiments herein illustrated and described, it is to be distinctly understood that the foregoing descriptive matter is to be interpreted merely as illustrative of the present invention and not as a limitation.

What is claimed is:

l. A rack mountable on an edge rail of a support member comprising, a pair of spaced apart generally parallel planar sidewalls and spaced apart generally parallel planar front and rear walls, said walls having top and bottom edges and being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel, and a pair of bracket strips, each bracket strip being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel and including a bottom portion extending between said front and rear walls adjacent the bottom edges thereof, an upwardly extending front flange fastened in facial engagement with said front wall, and a mounting portion adapted to receive said edge rail, said mounting portion including an upwardly extending rear flange fastened in facial engagement with said rear wall, a terminal section spaced rearwardly from said rear flange and a bridging portion extending between said rear flange and terminal section, said terminal section having a bottom edge spaced below said bridging portion, said bracket strips being generally parallel to one another and to said sidewalls and being spaced apart from one another and from the adjacent one of said sidewalls to define parallel longitudinally coextensive and uninterrupted openings between said front and rear walls, each of said bracket strips having a width and each of said openings having a width laterally of said sidewalls greater than said width of said bracket strips, said strip defining said walls having opposite ends fastened in facial engagement with one of said front and rear flanges of one of said bracket strips.

2. The rack according to claim 1, wherein said front and rear flanges of said bracket strips are spot welded to said front and rear walls.

3. The rack according to claim 1, wherein said bridging portion is semi-circular, and said bottom edge of said terminal section is spaced below a horizontal diametrical line across the opposite ends of said bridging portion. A

4. The rack according to claim 1, wherein said stainless steel strips defining said walls and bracket strips are of the same width and gauge.

5. The rack according to claim 1, wherein said front flange of said bracket strip facially engages the inner surface of said front wall.

6. The rack according to claim 1, wherein said stainless steel strips defining said walls and bracket strips are of the same width, said bracket strips being spaced from said sidewalls approximately twice said width and from one another approximately three times said width.

7. A rack mountable on an edge rail of a support member comprising, a pair of spaced apart generally parallel planar sidewalls and spaced apart generally parallel planar front and rear walls, said walls having top and bottom edges and being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel, and a pair of bracket strips, each bracket strip being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel and including a bottom portion extending between said front and rear walls adjacent the bottom edges thereof, an upwardly extending front flange fastened in facial engagement with said front wall, a mounting portion adapted to receive said edge rail, said mounting portion including an upwardly extending rear flange fastened in facial engagement with said rear wall, a terminal section spaced rearwardly from said rear flange and a bridging portion extending between said rear flange and terminal section, said terminal section having a bottom edge spaced below said bridging portion, said bracket strips being generally parallel to one another and to said sidewalls and being spaced apart from one another and from the adjacent one of said sidewalls to define parallel longitudinally coextensive and uninterrupted openings between said front and rear walls, each of said'bracket strips having a width and each of said openings having a width laterally of said sidewalls greater than said width of said bracket strips, said bridging portion being semi-circular and said bottom edge of said terminal section being spaced below a horizontal diametrical line across the opposite ends of said bridging portion, and a positionally fixed abutment strip rigidly fastened to the bottom portion of each of said bracket strips and projecting rearwardly of said rear wall.

8. A rack mountable on an edge rail of a support member comprising, a pair of spaced apart generally parallel planar sidewalls and spaced apart generally parallel planar front and rear walls, said walls having top and bottom edges and being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel, and a pair of bracket strips, each bracket strip being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel and including a bottom portion extending between said front and rear walls adjacent the bottom edges thereof, an upwardly extending front flange fastened in facial engagement with said front wall, and a mounting portion adapted to receive said edge rail, said mounting portion including an upwardly extending rear flange fastened in facial engagement with said rear wall, a terminal section spaced rearwardly from said rear flange and a bridging portion extending between said rear flange and terminal section, said terminal section having a bottom edge spaced below said bridging portion, said bracket strips being generally parallel to one another and to said sidewalls and being spaced apart from one another and from the adjacent one of said sidewalls to define parallel longitudinally coextensive and uninterrupted openings between said front and rear walls, each of said bracket strips having a width and each of said openings having a width laterally of said sidewalls grearter than said width of said bracket strips, said bridging portion being semicircular and said bottom edge of said terminal section being spaced below a horizontal diametrical line across the opposite ends of said bridging portion, said stainless steel strips defining said walls and bracket strips being of the same width, said bracket strips being spaced from said sidewalls approximately twice said width and from one another approximately three times said width, and said strip defining said walls having abutting opposite ends fastened in facial engagement with one of said front and rear flanges of one of said bracket strips.

9. A rack mountable on an edge rail of a support member comprising, a pair of spaced apart generally parallel planar sidewalls and spaced apart generally parallel planar front and rear walls, said walls having top and bottom edges and being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel, and just two bracket strips, each bracket strip being defined by a unitary strip of stainless steel and including a bottom portion extending between said front and rear walls adjacent the bottom edges thereof, an upwardly extending front flange spot welded in facial engagement with the inner surface of said front wall, and a mounting portion adapted to receive said edge rail, said mounting portion including an upwardly extending rear flange spot welded in facial engagement with said rear wall, a terminal section spaced rearwardly from said rear flange and a semicircular bridging portion extending between said rear flange and terminal section, said terminal section having a bottom edge spaced below a horizontal diametrical line across said bridging portion, said strip defining said walls having abutting ends in facial engagement with one of said front and rear flanges of one of said bracket strips and fastened thereto by the corresponding spot welded connection between said walls and flanges, said bracket strips being of the same width and parallel to one another and to said sidewalls, said bracket strips being spaced apart from said sidewalls approximately twice said width and from one another approximately three times said width, and an abutment strip fastened to the bottom portion of each of said bracket strips and projecting rearwardly of said rear wall.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/72, 248/315, 211/88.1, 211/75, 248/215
International ClassificationA47G23/00, A47G23/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47G23/0641
European ClassificationA47G23/06J