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Publication numberUS3905061 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1975
Filing dateJul 29, 1974
Priority dateJul 29, 1974
Publication numberUS 3905061 A, US 3905061A, US-A-3905061, US3905061 A, US3905061A
InventorsCradeur Robert R
Original AssigneeBrowning Ferris Industries
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for flame-cleaning pipe
US 3905061 A
Abstract
Apparatus for flame cleaning the internal surface of a pipe including a movable carriage having an oscillating mandrel thereon, and a series of torch units and brush units mounted on the oscillating mandrel for first burning and then removing flamed residue during an oscillating cycle of the mandrel.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Cradeur 1 Sept. 16, 1975 [54] APPARATUS FOR FLAME-CLEANING PIPE 2,987,741 6/1961 Feldman et a1. 15/4 3 4 491 B [75] Inventor: Robert R. Cradeur, Houston, Tex. H1965 mcken et 15/104 05 X 73 A" :B '-F'ldt',l. I bslgnee rownmg ems n us mes nc Primary Examiner-Edward L. Roberts [22] Filed: July 29, 1974 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Pravel & Wilson [21] Appl. No.: 492,717

[52] US. Cl. 15/4; 15/88; 15/l04.05; [57] ABSTRACT 1 18/47 Apparatus for flame cleaning the internal surface of a 113tincluding a movable carriage having an n [58] Field of Search 15/4, 88, 104.05, 104.1; ing mandrel thereon, and a series of torch units and 118/47 l0 brush units mounted on the oscillating mandrel for first burning and then removing flamed residue during ['56] References C'ted an oscillating cycle of the mandrel.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,645,796 7/1953 Leece 15/88 X 19 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEU SEP 1 s 1975 SHEET 2 BF 3 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The field of this invention is pipe cleaning devices.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, the letter A generally des- Pipe lengths utilized for large pipelines or the like ignates the pipe cleaning device of the preferred emlocal environment; rather, the residue must be containerized and removed for processing, which is obviously very costly.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a pipe cleaning apparatus for cleaning a film or coating off of the internal, end surface of a pipe utilizing oscillating torch means in combination with oscillating brush means for reducing the film or other coating to a residue which can be brushed off of the internal surface.

In the preferred embodiment of this invention, the pipe cleaning apparatus includes a movable carriage means which is mounted for movement on a main frame member. The movable carriage means has counted thereon an oscillating mandrel which is insertable into the pipe end by the carriage means. An oscillating means is mounted with the mandrel and the carriage means for oscillating the mandrel through a cleaning cycle in which the mandrel is rotated in a first direction during a first half of the cleaning cycle and in a second direction during the second half of the cleaning cycle. Torch means are mounted with the mandrel for oscillation therewith for burning a film off of the internal pipe surface during the first half of the cleaning cycle and a brush means is mounted with the mandrel for removing residue of the burned film or other coating during the second half of the cleaning cycle. A water spray header means is also mounted with the mandrel to direct a water spray radially outwardly onto the internal surface of the pipe inorder to prevent any damage to the pipe film or coating in areas not contacted. by the torch means.

The oscillating means oscillates the mandrel, the torch means and the brush means less than a full revolution during the first half or the second half of the oscillating, cleaning cycle. The actual angular displacement of the mandrel and torch means, which consists of a plurality of circumferentially spaced torch units, is approximately determined by the actual number of torch units utilized.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the pipe cleaning device of the preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2' is a side view of the pipe cleaning device inserted into a pipe end for cleaning thereof;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2 illustrating the retractable feature of the circumferentially spaced brush units of this invention; and

FIG. 4 is an isometric view of one of the brush units of this invention.

bodiment of this invention for flame-cleaning a film or coating off of an internal end portion generally designated as 10 of a pipe member P. The internal end portion 10 includes an internal surface portion 10a and a pipe end rim 10b, both of which are covered with a film or coating which must be removed prior to welding the pipe member p to a pipeline.

The pipe cleaning device A includes a main frame member 11 of rectangular construction. The main frame member 11 includes inside U-shaped, channel track portions 11a and 11b. A movable carriage assembly 12 includes a moving pedestal 12a having rollers 12b mounted on either side thereof for rollably engaging the inside track portions 11a and 11b of the main frame 11. The movement of the pedestal 12a is controlled by hydraulic power unit 14 which is pivotally mounted at 140 to front frame end and is also pivotally mounted at 1417 to the pedestal 12a. Such pivotal connections at 14a and 14b are well known in the art and may simply consist of aligned lugs which are inter connected by a suitable pin. The power unit 14, in the preferred embodiment of this invention, is a doubleacting hydraulic cylinder assembly wherein the application of fluid under pressure may extend and retract rod thereby causing movement of the carriage pedestal 12a along the inside track frame portions 11a and 11b.

The carriage pedestal 12a further includes an upper, mounting sleeve portion 12b which mounts therein a rotary mandrel or shaft 15. The rotary mandrel 15 is supported in the carriage sleeve portion by a suitable bushing 16 and is retained in position by suitable retainer rings such as 16a and 16d. The rotary mandrel 15 includes a front mandrel portion which extends laterally for insertion into the pipe end portion 10. The front mandrel portion 15a has mounted therewith a torch means generally designated as 18 and a brush means generally designated as 19 for alternately burning and removing a film or coating from the internal surface 10a and the end rim 10b of the pipe P during oscillation of the rotary mandrel 15 by means of oscillating means 20. Annular water spray means generally disignated by the number 21 are also mounted with the front mandrel portion 15a for spraying the internal surface of the pipe P with water in order to prevent undesired ignition of the internal pipe surface which is not actually burned by the torch means 18.

The oscillating means 20 is a hydraulic power unit formed by hydraulic cylinder 20a which is pivotally connected at 20b to the carriage pedestal 12a. Power rod 200 is mounted in the power cylinder 20a in a wellknown manner and extends into pivotal connection at 20d with the rear mandrel portion 15b. Both pivotal connections 20b and 20d are provided by a series of spaced lugs having aligned openings therein for receiving mounting pins. Thus the stroke of the power rod 200 actually determines the amount of angular displacement which is translatable to the rotating mandrel 15.

The torch means 18 includes four, circumferentially spaced torch units 18a, 18b 18c and 18d mounted onto the front mandrel portion 15a. The units 18a-18d are each identical andthus like numbers and letters will be used to describe the actual structure of the individual units. Referring in particular to FIG. 2, the torch units 18b and 18d each include a radial support rod 22a having mounted thereon a lateral nozzle bar 22b. The nozzle bar 22b supports a series of spaced torch nozzles 220 which are capable of directing outwardly sufficient flame to burn the inside pipe surface portion a. The nozzle support bar 22b further includes a curved portion 22d which terminates in a nozzle 22:: for applying a torch flame to the pipe end rim 10b.

The nozzle support bar 22b is connected to a fluid mixing chamber 23a which is coupled to fluid lines 23b and 23c which supply the mixing chamber with gas such as acetylene gas and oxygen.

The four torch units 18a18d are equally spaced about the front mandrel portion a such that there is a 90 angular displacement between adjacent torch units. The oscillating means or power unit mounted onto the carriage pedestal 12a operably engages the rear mandrel portion 15b for rotating the mandrel 15, with the torch units l8a18d mounted thereon, through a cleaning cycle. In the preferred embodiment of this invention, four torch units are used. Therefore, in order to cover an entire 360 annular band of the internal coated surface 10a of the pipe P, it is necessary for the power rod 20a to displace the rotary mandrel 15 at least 90. This required 90 angular displacement is determined by dividing 360 by the number of torch units 18a-18d mounted onto the mandrel. It is additionally necessary to provide for some overlap to insure that the entire 360 internal surface is indeed burned by the torch units 18a-18d during one extension stroke of the power rod 200; therefore, it is necessary to pre-design the extension stroke 200 such that the actual angular displacement of the torch units 18a-18d during the first half of the cleaning cycle is 90 plus an overlap displacement such as an additional 5. Thus the hydraulic power unit 20 is utilized to rotate the mandrel 15 with the torch units 18a-18d mounted thereon through an angular displacement of 95 by suitable extension of the power rod 20c within the power cylinder 20a. The

torch units 18a-18d are actually turned on, by suitable valve sequencing, (not shown, but well-known in the art) after the front mandrel portion 15a has been moved into the pipe end 10. After the torch units 18a-18d have been turned on and the series of nozzles 220 are directing outwardly a burning flame or torch, the power unit 20 is actuated to cause power rod 200 to move upwardly sufficiently to rotate the mandrel l5 and the torch units l8a-18d through an angular displacement of 95, which is one half of a full cleaning cycle for the oscillating means power unit 20.

First, second and third annular support rings, 23a, 23b and 230, respectively, are mounted onto the front mandrel portion 15a in a spaced relationship. Each of the support rings 230-230 are mounted onto the front mandrel portion 150 by a series of four radially directed spokes 24 which are circumferentially spaced about the mandrel front portion 15a.

The brush means 19 includes four circumferentially spaced, retractable brush units 19a, 19b, 19c and 19d mounted for rotation with the front mandrel portion 15a. The rotary brush units 1911-1911 are mounted onto the front mandrel portion 15a for movement between a retracted position during the first half of a cycle of the oscillating means or power unit 20 and an extended position during the second half of the oscillating means cleaning cycle, in which extended position the brush units 19al9d resiliently engage the inside annular surface portion 10a for removing film or coating residue therefrom.

Each of the brush units 19a19d are identical except for the spatial mounting thereof about the front mandrel portion 150, and thus like numbers and letters will be used to describe the details of the brush units. The brush unit 19a illustrated in FIG. 4 in a perspective view will be described in particular; however, it is understood that the same description applies identically to the brush units l9b-l9d.

Referring in particular to FIGS. 3 and 4, the brush unit 19a as well as the brush units l9b19d are each mounted onto laterally extending shafts 25, which shafts 25 are mounted to the inside of each of the three annular support rings 23a-23c for rotation with respect thereto. The support shafts 25 are mounted on the inside of the support rings 2311-230 for rotation by means of ring mounted lugs 25a, 25b and 25c which are welded onto and extend inwardly from the three support rings 2311-230, respectively. Each of the mounting lugs 25a-25c have openings therein to receive the rotating support rod 25. The support shaft 25 has mounted thereon between support rings 23a and 23b a brush mounting means generally designated by the number 26 for mounting a rotary brush 28 for movement between the extended and retracted positions. The brush mounting means 26 includes a support arm arrangement 27 which includes space support arms 27a and 27b which are mounted onto the support shaft 25 for rotational movement with the support shaft. The brush 28 is a rotary brush which is mounted for rotation by a shaft 28a which is journalled into the support arms 27a and 27b. The brush shaft 28a and the brush 28 are rotated by means of a hydraulic motor 29 which is hydraulically connected to a suitable source of hydraulic fluid under sufficient pressure to drive the hydraulic motor and thus the brush 28.

The brush mounting means 26 further includes a substantially radially directed hydraulic power unit 30 which includes hydraulic power cylinder 30a mounted -for pivotal movement onto the front mandrel portion 1511 by a suitable pin and lug connection at 30b. The hydraulic power unit 30 further includes a power rod 30c which terminates in a mounting disk 30d. The mounting disk 30d is resiliently connected to a mounting ring 30c mounted on the support arm transverse bar 27c through a coil spring 31. In this manner, the hydraulic power unit 30 serves to resiliently mount the rotary brush 28.

The hydraulic cylinders 30a of the power units 30 are double-acting and thus cause the power rod 30c to extend and retract thus extending and retracting the support arm arrangement 27 with the brush 28 attached therewith. Proper application of hydraulic fluid under power to the hydraulic power cylinder 30a will thus cause extension and retraction of the rotary brush 28 as desired. In practice, the rotary brushes 28 are maintained in a retracted position during the first half of the cycle for the oscillating means or power unit 20, which occurs when the power rod 20c is moved from a retracted to an extended position. Of course, during this first half of the cleaning cycle, the torch units l8a-l8d are activated and thus move over the entire annular surface of the internal end portion 10a to burn the film or coating off of the internal surface. After the power rod 20 has been moved to a fully extended position, the hydraulic power cylinders 30a are actuated by the application of suitable hydraulic fluid to cause the power rod 30c therefore to move outwardly to an extended position in which the rotary brushes 28 actually engage the inside or internal annular surface of the pipe P. The hydraulic motors 29 are then actuated and the oscillating means power rod 200 is moved to a retracted position, thus returning the front mandrel portion 15a with the torch means 18a-18d mounted thereon to its initial position. In this second half of a cleaning cycle, the brush units are also moved through a 90 angular displacement (plus 5 for overlap) such that the brushes 28 of the brush units 19a-l9d serve to cover the entire 360, annular internal surface portion a which has been burned by the torch units 180-1811.

The support rings 23b and 23c are actually annular water headers having a series of circumferentially spaced nozzles 23d positioned therein to direct outwardly water against the internal pipe surface.

In operation and use of the pipe end cleaning device for cleaning the internal surface portion 102. and end rim portion 10b of the pipe P, the pipe is first positioned to receive the front mandrel portion a with the brush units 19a-19d and the torch units 18a-18d mounted thereon. The pipe P is held in position by means of retractable pipe positioners generally designated as 35. The retractable pipe positioners may be located on each side of the desired location for the pipe P and may include curved shoe portions 35a which are. mounted for movement between a pipe positioning position as illustrated in FIG. 1 and a retracted position by suitable hydraulic power unit means 36. Thus the pipe P is rolled or otherwise moved into a position across from the apparatus A and aligned with the front mandrel portion 15a and the pipe positioning shoes 35a are moved upwardly to engage and holdthe pipe P in position.

v The hydraulic power unit 14 is then actuated to move the carriage pedestal 12a to the position illustrated in FIG. 2 wherein the front mandrel portion 15a is inserted into the pipe end P. As the front mandrel portion 15a is moved into the pipe P, the annular water headers 23b and 230 are actuated to spray the inside pipe surface. The water headers continue spraying throughout the entire operation.

After the front mandrel portion 15a has been sufficiently moved into the pipe end that the torch units 18a18d are properly positioned within the internal annular surface, with the end rim torch 23:: positioned to engage the pipe end rim 10b, the torch units are then activated. The amount of oxygen supplied through supply line 230 may be varied, and actually increased at this point, to make the torch flame more intense. The oscillating means power unit 20 is then activated to cause the oscillating power rod 200 to move from its retracted position to an extended position. As the mandrel is thus rotated through the first half of a cleaning cycle, the mandrel front portion 15a and the actuated or operating torch units 18a-18d are moved through an angular displacement of 95. At this point, the torch units are entirely shut off or else the supply of oxygen is substantially reduced to reduce the flames coming from the nozzles 23c and 22e to a lower level.

The brush power units are then actuated for each brush assembly 19a-l9d to move the brush power rods 30c to an extended position thereby causing the brushes 28 mounted on arms 27a and 27b to pivot outwardly to an extended position in resilient engagement with the internal pipe wall. The power unit 20 is then actuated to cause the oscillating power rod 206 to retract thereby moving the front mandrel portion 15a and the brush units 19a19d through the second half of the cleaning cycle and returning the mandrel 15a to its initial position. Prior to contraction of the power rod 200 by the suitable application of hydraulic fluid under pressure into the oscillating power cylinder 20a, the hydraulic motors 29 are activated by suitable hydraulic power to cause the brushes 28 to rotate. Thus as the rotating brushes 28 are moved about the internal pipe surface in the second half of the cycle, the rotating brushes 28 serve to engage the the internal pipe surface and brush off the film or coating residue left by the torch units l8al8d. The resilient mounting of the rotary brushes 280 by means of the coil spring 31 serves to resiliently urge the brushes 28 against the inside sur face and consistently engage the inside surface with suitable pressure to cause the residue to be brushed off.

The main frame power unit 14 is then activated to move the carriage 12a with the mandrel 15a, torch units l8al8d, brush units 19a-19d and Water headers 23b and 23c outwardly of the pipe end for subsequent use. The water headers 23b and 230 continue to spray water as the torch units 18a-18d and brush units 19a19d are moved out of the pipe end thereby cooling off the cleaned internal annular portion of the pipe end and washing away the loose coating residue.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape, and materials as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for cleaning the internal surface of a pipe or other tubular member, comprising:

a main frame;

carriage means mounted with said main frame for movement toward and away from a pipe end;

a rotating mandrel mounted for rotation on said carriage means for insertion into said pipe and oscillating means mounted with said carriage means for oscillating said mandrel through a cleaning cycle, said mandrel being rotated in a first direction in a first half of said cleaning cycle and in a second direction in the second half of said cleaning cycle;

torch means mounted on said mandrel for oscillation with said mandrel for burning a film or other coating off the internal surface of said pipe during said first half of said cleaning cycle; and

brush means mounted on said mandrel for removing any residue of said burned film or other coating during said second half of said cleaning cycle.

2. The structure set forth in claim 1, including:

said oscillating means rotating said mandrel less than a full revolution in said first half of said cleaning cycle.

3. The structure set forth in claim 1, wherein said torch means includes:

a plurality of circurnferentially spaced torch units mounted on said mandrel for burning said film off an entire annular, internal surface portion of said pipe during said first half of said cleaning cycle of said mandrel.

4. The structure set forth in claim 1, wherein said brush means includes:

a plurality of circumferentially spaced, brush assemblies mounted on said mandrel for engaging entire annular, internal surface portion of said pipe during said second half of said cycle.

5. The structure set forth in claim 4, wherein each of said brush assemblies includes:

a rotary brush for engaging said internal pipe surface;

and

brush mount means mounting said brush for retraction during said first half of said cleaning cycle and for extension into engagement with said internal pipe surface during said second half of said cleaning cycle.

6. The structure set forth in claim 5, including:

resilient means mounting said brush of each brush assembly for resilient engagement with said internal pipe wall during said second half of said cycle.

7. The structure set forth in claim 5, including:

opposing annular support members mounted onto said mandrel for rotation therewith; and

pivotal means mounting said rotary brush onto said opposing annular frame members for pivotal movement of said rotary brush between a retracted positon and an extended position in engagement with said internal pipe surface.

8. The structure set forth in claim 7, wherein said pivotal means for each brush assembly includes:

a shaft extending between said annular support member; and

a support arm arrangement being pivotally mounted into said shaft and having said rotary brush mounted therewith.

9. The structure set forth in claim 8, including:

rotary power means for rotating said rotary brush of each brush assembly with said brush in said extended position.

10. The structure set forth in claim 8, including:

a hydraulic power unit pivotally mounted onto said mandrel and extending into connection with said support arm arrangement for moving said brush between said retracted and extended positions.

11. The structure set forth in claim 1, including:

said torch means includes a plurality of torch assemblies and said brush means includes a plurality of brush assemblies both mounted onto said mandrel for rotation therewith; and

the angular displacement of said mandrel and torch assemblies during said first half of said cleaning cycle is approximately equal to the number of said torch assemblies divided by 360.

12. The structure set forth in claim 1, including:

said torch means including a plurality of torch units mounted onto said mandrel and circumferentially spaced thereabout; and

said brush means includes a plurality of brush units located between said torch units in a circumferential spacing about said mandrel.

13. The structure set forth in claim 1, includes:

spray means mounted with said mandrel for spraying water radially outwardly onto said internal pipe surface.

14. The structure set forth in claim 1, including:

an annular water spray header mounted onto said mandrel for spraying water onto said internal pipe surface.

15. The structure set forth in claim 7, including:

one of said annular support means including a series of circumferentially spaced water nozzles for spraying water onto said internal pipe surface.

16. The structure set forth in claim 1, wherein said oscillating means including:

a hydraulic power unit; and

means pivotally connecting said hydraulic power unit to said carriage and to said mandrel.

17. The structure set forth in claim 1, including:

said main frame having a track;

said carriage means includes a pedestal having rollers thereon for supporting said carriage pedestal for rolling movement along said track; and

said mandrel includes a shaft mounted on said pedesinternal surface end portion.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2645796 *Jun 24, 1948Jul 21, 1953Leece Neville CoApparatus for removing insulation from the terminal leads of electrical members
US2987741 *Nov 13, 1956Jun 13, 1961Feldman Harry WMachine for removing painted markings from pavement
US3164491 *Aug 22, 1960Jan 5, 1965Crose Perrault Equipment CorpApparatus for internally cleaning and coating pipe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4027349 *Mar 12, 1976Jun 7, 1977Midcon Pipeline Equipment Co.Apparatus for brush-cleaning the interiors of pipes
US4504437 *May 26, 1982Mar 12, 1985Westinghouse Electric Corp.Seismic restraint means for a nuclear radiation detector mounted in a tubular thimble
US5417169 *Aug 17, 1993May 23, 1995Systech Environmental CorporationApparatus for removing viscous material from barrels
US5503033 *Aug 8, 1994Apr 2, 1996Tric Holdings LimitedMethod and servicing interior of large container and service apparatus
US5674042 *Nov 1, 1996Oct 7, 1997Gerritse Beheer B.V.Apparatus for emptying containers
US5741108 *Apr 22, 1996Apr 21, 1998Rolfe; John I.Drum emptying apparatus
US6154953 *Aug 10, 1998Dec 5, 2000CoflexipMulti-tool system that can be used for connecting pipes
CN100496895CNov 14, 2007Jun 10, 2009张景远Spraying and rust-removing device for pipeline inner wall and its using method
EP1344591A2 *Mar 5, 2003Sep 17, 2003Delphi Technologies, Inc.Process for reducing contaminants on surfaces of die cast component
EP2481490A1 *Jan 31, 2011Aug 1, 2012GeoSea NVDevice and method for cleaning hollow piles that have been provided into a substrate
WO2013017501A1 *Jul 25, 2012Feb 7, 2013Siemens AktiengesellschaftCleaning robot
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/4, 15/104.5, 15/88, 118/47
International ClassificationB08B9/04, B08B9/02, B08B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB08B9/045, B08B7/0071
European ClassificationB08B7/00T2, B08B9/045
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 17, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BROWNING-FERRIS INDUSTRIES, INC.
Owner name: MAINTECH INTERNATIONAL, INC., HOUSTON TX A CORP OF
Effective date: 19850228
Jun 17, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: MAINTECH INTERNATIONAL, INC., HOUSTON TX A CORP OF
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BROWNING-FERRIS INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004432/0165
Effective date: 19850228