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Publication numberUS3905406 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1975
Filing dateApr 17, 1974
Priority dateApr 17, 1974
Publication numberUS 3905406 A, US 3905406A, US-A-3905406, US3905406 A, US3905406A
InventorsCruse Brentwood A
Original AssigneeCruse Brentwood A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag support stand
US 3905406 A
Abstract
The apparatus of this invention is directed to a wire stand which is to support a flexible walled container in the open condition, such containers normally comprising paper or plastic bags. The stand of this invention is adapted to be placed within the flexible walled container. The stand of this invention includes an upper base which is hingedly connected at the fore and aft longitudinal ends to first and second U-shaped leg assemblies. The extremities of each of the leg assemblies are to be in contact with the upper base being located adjacent the open mount of the flexible wall container. The longitudinal wire elements of the upper base includes means to facilitate adjustment of the stand to different sized flexible walled containers.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Cruse [451 Sept. 16, 1975 BAG SUPPORT STAND Brentwood A. Cruse, 5283 Bardwell Ave., Riverside, Calif. 92506 22 Filed: Apr. 17,1974

21 Appl. No.: 461,495

[76] inventor:

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,653,393 12/1927 Cox l41/39O Primary Examinerl-louston S. Bell, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or FirmJack C. Munro ABSTRACT The apparatus of this invention is directed to a wire stand which is to support a flexible walled container in the open condition, such containers normally comprising paper or plastic bags. The stand of this invention is adapted to be placed within the flexible walled container. The stand of this invention includes an upper base which is hingedly connected at the fore and aft longitudinal ends to first and second U-shaped leg assemblies. The extremities of each of the leg assemblies are to be in contact with the upper base being located adjacent the open mount of the flexible wall container. The longitudinal wire elements of the upper base includes means to facilitate adjustment of the stand to different sized flexible walled containers.

10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures BAG SUPPORT STAND BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The improved stand of this invention find particular utility in the support of paper bags or plastic trash bags in the open condition so that the bags constitute appropriate receptacles for receiving and accumulating of matter, particulary trash.

A flexible walled container such as a plastic bag does not have sufficient side wall strength to set on the supporting surface, such as a floor in the open position. Paper bags, frequently do have sufficient side wall strength to set upon a floor in an open position. However, such paper bags normally arrive at the consumer in a folded position. The paper bag tends to return to this folded position when open.

Previously, there have been attempts at designing collapsible stands in order to support flexible walled containers. However, the known such collapsible stands support the flexible walled container from the exterior. As a result, such a stand will normally prohibit the insertion of the flexible walled container within an enclosure such as within a cabinet or the like. Additionally, such a stand makes the overall size of the stand substantially greater than merely the container by itself.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The collapsible stand of this invention is provided with an upper base section which is formed in substantially a rectangular configuration. This upper base section is made out of wire stock as well as all the other main components of the stand. The upper base includes longitudinal side rods which are interconnected by end rods to form the rectangular configuration. The longitudinal dimension of the upper base may be made adjustable by the inclusion of a spring means within each longitudinal side rod. A U-shaped base assembly is hingedly connected to each end. The U-shaped base assembly is pivotable from a collapsed position against the upper base to an extended position substantially ninety degrees with respect to the plane of the upper base. The entire stand of this invention is to be coated with a paint or plastic material so as to permit easy cleaning of the stand of this invention.

The primary advantage of the stand of this invention is to position a flexible walled container in an open position to conveniently position such in a manner to readily receive articles of matter.

A further advantage of the stand of this invention is to not be located exteriorly of the flexible walled container thereby not making the container and stand any larger than the container itself which permits the container to be easily stored within enclosures.

A further advantage of the apparatus of this invention that it is coated with material which readily facilitates cleaning.

A still further advantage of the apparatus of this invention is that it can be readily collapsed when not in use and stored in a small space.

A still further advantage of the stand of this invention is that the stand is adjustable to accommodate different sizes of flexible walled containers, such adjustment being accomplished in a relatively simple manner.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the stand of this invention in the collapsed position;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the stand of this invention in the extended position showing how such would be employed within a flexible walled container such as a paper bag;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged segmental view of one of the hinged joint connections between the upper base of the stand of this invention and a leg assembly,

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 but of a modified form of the stand of this invention;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the stand of this invention accommodating a smaller sized container than was accommodated in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross-sectional view through the adjustment means employed upon the upper base of the stand of this invention in order to facilitate adjustment to accommodate various sizes of flexible walled containers.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE SHOWN EMBODIMENT Referring particularly to the drawings, there is shown in FIG. 1 the stand 10 of this invention in the collapsed state. The stand 10 includes a rectangularly shaped upper base 12. The upper base 12 is to include a pair of longitudinal sides 14 and 16 which are interconnected by ends 18 and 20. It has been discovered that most paper bags have approximately the same width, that being seven inches. However, some paper bags fluctuate in length from ten and a half inches to twelve inches. Within the stand of this invention, the ends 18 and 20 are always of a constant length. Within FIG. 2 of the drawing, the sides 14 and 16 are shown also of a constant length and do not include any means for adjustability. The structure of FIG. 2 will be adapted to fit within most sizes of paper bags, a paper bag being depicted in phantom within FIG. 2. However, the structure shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 is directed to employing an adjustment means within the upper base 12.

Formed within each of the ends 18 and 20 are a pair of notches 22. The notches 22 are spaced apart within each end 18 and 20. A leg assembly 24 is adapted to be connected to end 18 and in a similar manner a leg assembly 26 is adapted to be connected to end 20. Both leg assemblies 24 and 26 are basically U-shaped in configuration. The leg assembly 24 includes legs 28 and 30 which are connected together through an apex 36. In a similar manner, the leg assembly 26 includes legs 32 and 34 which are connected together through an apex 38. Each of the apexes 36 and 38 include notches 44 which are basically similar to the notches 22.

In order to assemble the stand 10 of this invention, the notches of the apexes 36 and 38 are positioned adjacent the notches of its particular end 18 and 20, respectively. A wire band 42 is wound about each of the pair of aligned notches and secured as by soldering or other similar connecting means. The wire band forms a frictional binding action between the end 18 and 20 and its particular apex 36 or 38, respectively. This frictional connection is such that when the legs are extended as shown in FIG. 2, they tend to maintain this position, but at the same time are also readily pivotable from the collapsed position in FIG. 1 to the extended position.

The free end of each of the legs 28, 30, 32 and 34 terminate in a plastic or rubber foot 40. The purpose of the foot 40 is to prevent puncture of the paper bag.

The entire stand of this invention is to be formed of a wire stock of a sufficient temper to hold its shape and if per chance it is bent out of shape can be readily bent back into shape. The stand 10 of this invention is to be coated with a plastic coating or a paint which will readily permit cleaning of the stand.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 4 and 5, the longitudinal sides 14 and 16 are cut into two pieces and interconnected by a tightly wound spring 46. This spring 46 is frictionally secured in a tight fitting manner to each of the separated segments of each longitudinal side 14. Therefore, each stand 10 includes a pair of such springs 46. The spring 46 is sufficiently flexible as to permit deformation of the upper base 12 into the configuration shown in FIG. 5. This permits the stand 10 of this invention to accommodate smaller sized paper bags. The spring 46, when placed within a smaller sized paper bag, exerts a small amount of bias against the sides of the paper bag. This bias further tends to maintain the paper bag in the open position. The stand 10, using the spring 46 of this invention, is shown within a normal size paper bag within FIG. 4 with the longitudinal sides 14 positioned in a straight manner and not deformed.

What is claimed is:

1. A stand for supporting a flexible walled container in an open position comprising:

an upper base section formed of a narrow element formed in substantially a rectangular configuration having longitudinal sides interconnected together by end elements;

a first U-shaped leg assembly having a pair of substantially parallel legs interconnected together by a first apex element, a second U-shaped leg assembly having a pair of substantially parallel legs interconnected together by a second apex element, said first apex element connected by connecting means to one of said ends, said second apex element connected by said connecting means to the other of said ends, said connecting means permitting pivotal movement of each of said leg assemblies with respect to said upper base, whereby said leg assemblies are capable of being pivotably moved and located adjacent said upper base to thereby position said stand in a collapsed position.

2. A stand for supporting a flexible walled container in an open position comprising:

an upper base section formed of a narrow element formed in substantially a rectangular configuration having longitudinal sides interconnected together by end elements;

a first U-shaped leg assembly having a pair of substantially parallel legs interconnected together by a first apex element, a second U-shaped leg assembly having a pair of substantially parallel legs interconnected together by a second apex element, said first apex element connected by connecting means to one of said ends, said second apex element connected by said connecting means to the other of said ends, said connecting means permitting pivotal movement of each of said leg assemblies with respect to said upper base, whereby said leg assemblies are capable of being pivotably moved and located adjacent said upper base to thereby position said stand in a collapsed position; and

each of said longitudinal sides of said upper base being split into two segments and connected together by a tightly wound coiled spring, said coil spring permitting deflection of said upper base to thereby lessen the longitudinal dimension of said upper base to permit said stand to accommodate smaller sized flexible walled containers.

3. The stand as defined in claim 1 wherein:

each said connecting means comprises a thin wire band assembly.

4. The stand as defined in claim 1 wherein:

each of said leg assemblies and said upper base being constructed of a wire stock material.

5. The stand as defined in claim I wherein:

each of said leg assemblies and said upper base being coated with a thin layer of material in order to facilitate cleaning.

6. The stand as defined in claim 1 wherein:

each of said ends including notch means, each of said apexes including notch means, each of said notch means of a said apex to connect with each said notch means of its respective said end.

7. The stand as defined in claim 1 wherein:

The free end of each of said leg assembly terminating in a enlarged foot portion.

8. The stand as defined in claim 2 wherein:

each said connecting means comprises a thin wire band assembly, each of said leg assemblies and said upper base being constructed of a wire stock material.

9. The stand as defined in claim 8 wherein:

each of said ends including notch means, each of said apexes including notch means, each of said notch means of a said apex to connect with each said notch means of its respective said end.

10. The stand as defined in claim 9 wherein:

each of said leg assemblies and said upper base being coated with a thin layer of material in order to facilitate cleaning.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1653393 *Aug 23, 1927Dec 20, 1927Cox Joseph DHolder for bags during filling operation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3206448 *Jul 23, 1962Sep 14, 1965Phillips Petroleum CoPolymerization process and catalyst
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US4509570 *Jan 24, 1983Apr 9, 1985Jeffrey EbyElastic top bag
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US4643380 *Jan 27, 1986Feb 17, 1987Cardioptic Inc.Trash bag filling and packing form
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US8070006 *Dec 6, 2011Evergreen Innovation Partners I, LpDeployable and disposable container assemblies with bendable support members
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US8201780May 26, 2010Jun 19, 2012Richard NaujoksGarbage bag holder
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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/390, 248/95, 53/390
International ClassificationB65B67/00, B65B67/12
Cooperative ClassificationB65B67/1205
European ClassificationB65B67/12B