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Publication numberUS3905511 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1975
Filing dateSep 7, 1973
Priority dateSep 7, 1973
Publication numberUS 3905511 A, US 3905511A, US-A-3905511, US3905511 A, US3905511A
InventorsBruce C Groendal
Original AssigneeBruce C Groendal
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Jacket for canned beverages
US 3905511 A
Abstract
An insulated jacket for cylindrical beverage containers utilizes lower and upper cylindrical body portions of insulating material wherein the upper body portion has an opening so shaped as to enable a person to consume the beverage without previous removal of it from the container. The body portions combine to form a closed-top jacket and have a hinge opposite from the opening and a latch below the opening for detachably holding the body portions in a closed relationship. The jacket thermally insulates the beverage and is reusable. Means are provided within the jacket to compensate for tolerances in both the jacket and the container and still retain the container firmly within the jacket.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Groendal [451 Sept. 16, 1975 1 JACKET FOR CANNED BEVERAGES [22] Filed: Sept. 7, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 395,057

[52] US. Cl 220/90.2; 220/1 BC; 220/9 F [51] Int. Cl. A47G 19/22 [58] Field of Search 220/90.2, 90.4, 90.6, 38.5, 220/31.5, 1 BC, 9 F, 335,, 334, 337, 339;

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 2,018,018 11/1971 Germany 215/12 A Primary Examiner-William 1. Price Assistant Examiner--Allan N. Shoap Attorney, Agent, or FirmPrice, Heneveld, l-luizenga & Cooper [5 7] ABSTRACT An insulated jacket for cylindrical beverage containers utilizes lower and upper cylindrical body portions of insulating material wherein the upper body portion has an opening so shaped as to enable a person to consume the beverage without previous removal of it from the container. The body portions combine to form a closed-top jacket and have a hinge opposite from the opening and a latch below the opening for detachably holding the body portions in a closed relationship. The jacket thermally insulates the beverage and is reusable. Means are provided within the jacket to compensate for tolerances in both the jacket and the container and still retain the container firmly within the jacket.

3 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTED SEP'] 6 I975 SHEET 1 {15 2 JACKETFOR CANNED BEVERAGES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field Of The Invention This invention relates to US. Patent Office Manual of Classification, Class 215, subclass l3, relating to insulating type bottles or jars.

2. Description Of The Prior Art Since one of the most common methods of packaging commercial beverages is in cylindrical beverage containers, i.e., cans, there is great demand for reusable individual insulators for these beverage containers. Characteristic of reusable insulated devices known in the art is a two piece insulated jacket taught in US. Pat. No. 3 092 277 entitled THERMAL JACKET FOR BEVER- AGE CONTAINER issued June 4, 1963 to J. K. Brim, one piece of which can be removed to permit replacement of the container. These and other similar jackets now found in the prior art, however, do not permit the beverage to be consumed from the container without either removal of the jacket from the container or dispensing the beverage into some type of holder such as a glass. In either case, the top of the insulating jacket must be removed before the beverage is accessible. The present invention teaches a jacket which permits the consumption of beverage from the container without removal of the insulated jacket by using upper and lower cylindrical body portions of insulating material wherein the upper body portion has an opening therethrough which permits consumption of the contents without removal of thejacket. Thejacket being separableenables reuse of it.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 1. General Statement Of The Invention An insulated jacket for cylindrical beverage containers having an opening in the upper portion thereof through which the contents of the container can be consumed without previous removal from the container comprises upper and lower cylindrical body portions wherein the upper body portion has an opening of a size and shape to permit access for the users mouth whereby the contents of the container can be consumed without removal of the jacket, the body portions combine to form a closed top cylindricaljacket, a hinge means for joining upper and lower body portions, the hinge means being opposite from the opening and a latch for detachably holding the upper body portion in closed relationship to the lower body portion. This insulated jacket permits beverage consumption directly from the beverage container without removal of the jacket. The insulated jacket may be reused since the beverage container is removable from the separable body portions of the jacket. 2. Utility Of The Invention The containerjacket of this invention is useful for allowing consumption of beverages from cylindrical containers while at the same time thermally insulating the beverage.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the insulated jacket containing a beverage can;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the jacket and beverage can;

FIG. 3 is a frontal vertical cross section of the insulating jacket and beverage can along reference line III- III in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a vertical cross section of the insulated jacket along reference line IVIV of FIG. 2 without the beverage can;

FIG. Sis an enlarged fragmentary view of the latch shown in the cross section of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is a side view of the insulated jacket showing the jacket in the container loading or removing configuration.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows a preferred embodiment of the insulated jacket 1 wherein an upper body 10 rests on a lower body 20 and forms a hollowed cylindrical shaped shell 1. The upper body 10 and lower body 20 are made of thermally insulating material, preferably expanded polystyrene. Beverage container 30 rests inside of the hollow shell or jacket 1. The means for securing upper body 10 and lower body 20 consists first of pivotally securing upper body 10 with hinge 40 to lower body 20. As can be seen particularly in FIG.,6, hinge 40 allows pivotal, upward rotation of upper jacket or cover 10 about hinge 40. Hinge 40 is preferably made from some reinforced material. i.e., Lamical belting which is an acetate product of Cel' anese Corporation of America. The hinge can consist of a strip of any suitable material which is flexible and has a high resistance to fatigue. It must also be of a material which can be effectively bonded to the jacket. The same material can be utilized for the hereinafter described latch arm 51.

The hinge 40 is bonded to the lower body portion 20 and the closure 10 by a suitable adhesive compatible with both the hinge and jacket materials. Such adhesives are commercially available and are well within the skill of the art to select.

In the preferred embodiment of the jacket the rear wall of the closure 10 at the hinge line is short. Therefore, to obtain an adequate area of bonding between the hinge 40 and the closure 10, the upper end of the hinge 40 is preferably extended over onto the top surface of the closure. This provides a strong, strain resistant bond to the top.

Opposite to hinge 40 on shell 1, latch 50 acts detachably to secure upper body 10 to lower body 20 so that when latch 50 is engaged as particularly shown in FIG. 4, pivotal rotation or opening of the upper body 10 about hinge 40 is prevented. As seen in FIG. 4 and more particularly in FIG. 5, the preferred embodiment of the latch 50 utilizes a flexible latch arm 51 which is attached to the cylindrical wall of upper body 10. A strip or patch of flexible material such as fabric equipped with a large plurality of loop elements 52 is attached to that portion of arm 51 which extends below junction 12, which is the innerface between upper body 10 and lower body 20. A corresponding strip or patch of material comprising a plurality of hook elements 53 is affixed to the external surface of lowerjacket 20. The loops 52 and hook elements 53 are resilient and deformable and when pressed together become removably entangled, securing latch 50 and thus securing upper body 10 to lower body 20. Loops 52 and hooks 53 can be released from entangled engagement by positively pulling on the hook elements away from the loop element or vice versa. The loop and hook fabric elements 52 and 53 are available under the trademark Velcro, more specific details of which may be had from US. Pat. No. 2 717 437 entitled VELVET TYPE FABRIC AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME issued Sept. 13, 1955 to George de Mestral and US. Pat. No. 3 114 951 entitled DEVICE FOR JOINING TWO FLEXIBLE ELEMENTS issued Dec. 24, 1963 to George de Mestral. The material is hereinafter referred to as Velcro loop material and Velcro hook material, a product of American Velcro, Inc.

The patches 52 and 53 can be small since a small area of interface between the loops and hooks will provide an adequate attachment between the upper and lower body portions of the jacket. The patches may be se cured by any suitable adhesive. The particular adhesive selected will depend upon the base material. For example, if the latch arm is fabric, the adhesive for the patch would be different from that which would be used if the latch arm is a vinyl. If the jacket is of foamed polystyrene an adhesive compatible with this material must be used. Such adhesives are commonly available on the market and the choice of a suitable adhesive requires only a review of technical data on adhesives.

In order to make the beverage container readily accessible to insertion and removal and to facilitate proper meshing of upper body to lower body 20, a means for indexing the body portions to each other is incorporated in this invention. In the preferred embodiment, the line of separation 12 forms an angular plane through shell I, particularly shown in FIG. 4. By so doing, upper body 10 and lower body have a preferred alignment in which latch 50 and hinge 40 are opposite from one another, when the body portions are meshed to form junction 12. Another means for preferentially aligning the upper and lowerjacket could also incorporate the use of one or more indentions and projections between upper body 10 and lower body 20.

Jacket opening 11 along the top of the insulator, as seen in FIG. 2, conforms generally with the pie-shaped container opening 31. Jacket opening 11 also extends downwardly along the cylindrical wall of upper jacket or closure 10 in general alignment with container opening 31 so as to allow ready accessibility of the opening 31 to the users mouth. As seen in FIG. 1, the opening 11 is generally diamond-shaped. Such a generally diamond-shaped opening may be used with almost any shape of presently commercially available container opening, i.e., triangular, circular, etc. If the container is the type requiring two openings in the top, i.e., one serving as a vent and the other for discharging the liquid, as shown in FIG. 2 in phantom. the opening 32 would have air supply because of the space created by the chime 33.

The air passage between container and upper body 10 in the embodiment shown, traps air which aids in thermally insulating the beverage container. In another embodiment, seals might also be utilized around container opening 11 and along junction 12 so as to render the jacket essentially air tight when the container is inserted and the jacket is closed.

The maximum width of the opening 11 is along the juncture 16 between the top and sidewalls of the closure. This arrangement provides maximum access to the container opening 31 while exposing a minimum area of the container surface, thus minimizing thermal transfer. Jacket opening 11 in the preferred embodiment is generally placed along the center plane of the insulator as formed through latch 50 and hinge shown by reference line IV-IV in FIG. 2.

A disc of resilient padding 60 is mounted in the bottom of the jacket. The disc may be of any suitable spongy material such as foam rubber or urethane. It may be secured to the jacket by a suitable adhesive or it may be left detached so it can be readily removed to facilitate cleaning the jacket.

OPERATION To insert or remove a beverage container from the insulated jacket of the embodiment shown in the drawings, latch is released by disentangling of the Velcro loops 52 and Velcro hooks 53. As shown in FIG. 6, the upper jacket 10 is then pivoted upwardly about hinge 40 to provide unobstructed access to the lower body 20 and permitting removal of or replacement of container 30. The container opening 31 in the beverage container 30 is approximately lined up by the user along the center plane between hinge 40 and the Velcro hooks 53. After approximate alignment of container 30 between hinge 40 and Velcro hooks 53, upper body 10 is pivoted downwardly about the hinge 40 to close the jacket. Because of the angle of junction 12, the latch arm 51 will be automatically aligned with the Velcro hooks 53. Pressure on arm 51 behind Velcro loops 52 will secure the Velcro loops 52 with the Velcro hooks 53, thus securing upper body 10 and lower body 20.

The pad forms a resilient biasing means which urges the container upwardly. The space between the top of this pad and bottom face of the closure is slightly less than the height of the container 30. Thus, when the lid or closure 10 is closed the container is pushed downwardly against the pad 60. This forces the container to seat firmly against the closure 10 preventing the container from shifting lengthwise of the jacket or rotating to misalign the openings 31 and 11.

It will be understood that the various changes, details, materials, steps and arrangements of the parts, which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An insulated jacket for removably receiving cylindrical beverage containersof the type from which the contents can be consumed by drinking directly from an opening in one end of the container, said jacket comprising: a lower cylindrical body portion of insulating material, an upper cylindrical body portion of insulating material, said upper body portion having an opening thcrethrough having a maximum width along the juncture of its side wall and top wall, said opening extending into both said side and top walls and being of a size to provide access for the users mouth whereby the contents of the container can be consumed without removal of said jacket, said body portions combining to form a substantially closed-top cylindrical jacket, hinge means for joining said upper and lower body portions, said hinge means being opposite from said opening; a latch for detachably holding said upper body portion in closed relationship to said lower body portion.

2. The insulated jacket for cylindrical beverage containers of claim 1 wherein the junction of the upper and lower cylindrical bodies forms an angular plane through said insulated jacket, the maximum spacing of said plane from the juncture of the side and top walls of said upper portion being opposite from said hinge.

3. The insulated jacket for cylindrical beverage con

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4478265 *Jan 19, 1983Oct 23, 1984Cool-Zip Inc.Reusable insulating jacket for beverage containers
US4510665 *Apr 18, 1983Apr 16, 1985Texas Recreation CorporationContainer insulation apparatus
US4561563 *Aug 10, 1984Dec 31, 1985Woods David EInsulated cooler for beverage containers
US4615463 *Jul 26, 1985Oct 7, 1986Stephen A. KatzInsulated container for a fluid receptacle
US4690300 *Dec 31, 1986Sep 1, 1987Woods David EInsulated cooler for beverage containers
US4735333 *Dec 12, 1986Apr 5, 1988Terry W. LayInsulated holder
US4802602 *Dec 8, 1987Feb 7, 1989Kover-Up, Inc.Insulating device for a beverage container
US4872577 *Dec 23, 1988Oct 10, 1989Smith Jimmy LHinged closure attachment for insulated beverage can container
US4927047 *Jul 31, 1989May 22, 1990Cantainer CorporationInsulated jacket for beverage container
US4974744 *Oct 18, 1989Dec 4, 1990Tdj, Inc.Holder for ultra-pasteurized drink carton
US5058757 *Aug 28, 1990Oct 22, 1991Proa Pedro OBeverage insulator with retractable shader
US5259529 *Dec 10, 1992Nov 9, 1993Coalewrap CompanyCollapsible insulated receptacle for beverage containers
US5450979 *Apr 19, 1993Sep 19, 1995Servick; SteveFootball shaped throwing toy with other uses
US5535851 *Jan 27, 1995Jul 16, 1996Huang; Fu-ShiangCombination structure of a protective cover, cup structure and machine body of an air pressure adjusting device
US5752687 *Jul 31, 1997May 19, 1998Lynch; MichelleCup holder with lid retainer
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US5934495 *May 27, 1997Aug 10, 1999Chiodo; MaurizioProtective film for cans or drink and food containers in general
US6039207 *Jul 17, 1998Mar 21, 2000Adamek; Thad R.Lidded insulator for a beverage container
US6349846Dec 22, 2000Feb 26, 2002Robert B. MezaFold up insulated beverage holder having a lid
US6604649 *May 22, 2000Aug 12, 2003Agnoplast Di Campi Dottor Dino E.C.-S.N.C.Container for the thermostatic preservation of liquids
US6799693Jun 18, 2002Oct 5, 2004Robert B. MezaFold up insulated bottle holder
US8387790 *Nov 12, 2010Mar 5, 2013General Motors LlcHolder for a telecommunications device
US8695842 *Sep 28, 2010Apr 15, 2014Jose Francisco Gonzalez SanchezProtector for containers
US20120305571 *Jun 2, 2011Dec 6, 2012Martin Alan LarsenPortable beverage can cooler
US20120318804 *Jun 18, 2012Dec 20, 2012Wamack Jr Ralph ReeseInsulated beverage container holder with cover
US20130043259 *Sep 28, 2010Feb 21, 2013Jose Francisco Gonzalez SanchezProtector for Containers
EP0485948A2 *Nov 11, 1991May 20, 1992Hans BröderInsulating device for containers or bottles
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/739, 220/703, 220/592.24, 220/740, 220/23.87, 220/903, 220/902, 220/906
International ClassificationB65D81/38
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/902, B65D81/3879, Y10S220/903, B65D2313/02, Y10S220/906
European ClassificationB65D81/38K1