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Publication numberUS3905521 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1975
Filing dateMay 21, 1974
Priority dateMay 21, 1974
Publication numberUS 3905521 A, US 3905521A, US-A-3905521, US3905521 A, US3905521A
InventorsMarshall E Deutsch, Louis W Mead
Original AssigneeThyroid Diagnostics Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reagent dispenser
US 3905521 A
Abstract
A standard syringe is converted into a highly reproducible reagent dispenser by the addition of a coiled spring and a sleeve. The coiled spring is a compression spring arranged on the piston rod of the syringe between the finger actuating flange of the rod and barrel of the syringe for biasing the piston toward the open end of the barrel, while the sleeve is arranged in the barrel between the open end thereof and the piston for limiting movement of the piston toward the open barrel end.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Mead et al. Sept. 16, 1975 [5 REAGENT DISPENSER 3,570,659 3/1971 Richey 222/340 x [75] Inventors: Louis w. Mead, Lexington; 3,759,425 9/1973 Lee.. 222/390 Marshall E. Deutsch, Sudbury, both FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS of Mass- 208,502 4/1960 Austria 128/218 PA Assigneez Diagnostics, Inc, Bedford Germany Mass.

Primary Examinerfl+Robert B. Reeves [22] Filed: May 1974 Assistant Examinef-Charles A. Marmor [21] Appl. No.: 471,958 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Clarence A. OBrien;

Harvey B. OBrien [52] US. Cl. 222/309; 222/340; 128/218 PA; I

128/218 0; 128/234; 128/278 ABSTRACT lnt. CL2 A tandard syringe is converted into a repro- Field of Search 222/309, 340, 386, ducible reagent dispenser by the addition of a coiled 222/43, 49; 73/4256; 128/234, 218 A, 218 spring and a sleeve. The coiled spring is a compression C, 218 F, 218 PA, 215 spring arranged on the piston rod of the syringe between the finger actuating flange of the rod and barrel References Cited of the syringe for biasing the piston toward the open UNITED STATES PATENTS end of the barrel, while the sleeve is arranged in the 3,290,946 12/1966 Pursell 1. 222 340 x barrel between the Open end thereof and the piston 3,327,904 6/1967 Goda et al. 222/309 for limiting movement of the Piston toward the Open 3,346,147 [0/1967 Higgins et al.. 222/389 X barrel end. 3,458,090 7/1969 Scoggin, Jr. 222/309 3,464,412 Schwartz 222/386 x 1 Claim, 4 Drawing Figures Inlilrnanllnllllnanuu 1",, IllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII III! 111 REAGENT DISPENSER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention I This invention relates generally, to a reagent dispenser, and particularly to the conversion of a standard syringe to a highly reproducible reagent dispensen 2. Description of the Prior Art Devices for dispensing predetermined amounts of a liquid are generally known to those skilled in the pertinent art. See, for example, US. Pat. No. 2,530,909, issued Nov. 2l, 1950 to G. S. Riggs, US Pat. No. 3,343,539, issued Sept. 26, 1967 to J. H. Moorhouse, U.S. Pat. No. 3,327,904, issued June 27, I967 to G. G. Goda et al., and US Pat. No. 3,430,813, issued Mar. 4, I969 to R. Gilmont. These known devices, however, are generally of special construction, and the cost for obtaining a desired level of reproducibility of dosage with these known devices is relatively high.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a reagent dispenser having simple yet economical construction of the dispenser and its constituent parts.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an inexpensive reagent dispenser havingreproducibility that far exceeds that of much more elaborate commercially available devices.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a reagent dispenser constructed by converting a standard syringe.

These and other objects are achieved according to the present invention by providing a reagent dispenser having: a barrel member provided with an open end and a discharge end; a piston slidably arranged in the barrel for movement between the open end andthe discharge end; a piston rod connected to the piston and arranged extending through the open end of the barrel; a spring for biasing the rod toward the open end of the barrel; and a sleeve arranged in the barrel for limiting movement of the piston toward the open end of the barrel. As will be appreciated from the following description, a reagent dispenser according to the present invention may be formed by adding a suitable spring and sleeve to a conventional syringe.

The open end of the barrel is advantageously constricted, with the sleeve being arranged in the barrel between the constricted open end and the piston. By forming the sleeve as a split sleeve from a bent sheet of suitable material, the sleeve may be slipped into the barrel of a syringe by reducing the size of the sleeve so as to fit between the constricted opening and the associated piston rod.

The piston rod is preferably provided with a finger actuating flange on an end of the rod extending out of the barrel, so that a coiled compression spring may be arranged on the piston rod between this flange and the open end of the barrel.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a reagent dispenser according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, sectional view taken generally along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken generally' along the line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a sleeve used in forming a reagent dispenser according to the present invention.

' DESCRIPTION or THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2 'of the drawings, a reagent dispenser 10 according to the present invention has a barrel 12 provided with finger grips 38, an open end 14. and a discharge end 16. Barrel 12, together with theends thereof, maybe a, for example, standard disposable plastic syringe, and the like, having a conventional cannula 18 attached thereto as by the standard luer fitting 20'.

A piston 22 is slidably arranged in barrel 12 for movement between the ends 14 and 16 thereof. This piston may be of conventional construction, such as well known in the manufacture of the aforementioned disposable syringe. A piston rod 24 is connected to piston 22 in the conventional manner for moving the piston toward the discharge end 16. This piston rod 24, which is arranged extending through open end 14 of barrel 12, has provided on the end thereof extending out of barrel 12 a finger actuating flame 26. This flange 26 is conventionally provided on standard syringes for selectively depressing rod 24, and thereby piston 22, toward the discharge end 16 of the syringe barrel 12.

A coiled compression spring 28 is arranged with coils 30 of same around rod 24 and between flange 26 and open end 14 for resiliently biasing rod 24 and piston 22 toward the open end of the barrel. A recess 32 is desirably provided in open end 14 of barrel 12 adjacent finger grips 38 to assist in retaining spring 28 in position.

Open end 14 of barrel 12 is advantageously constricted, as is conventional with syringes, and a sleeve 34 arranged in barrel 12 between the constricted open end 14 and the piston 22 for limiting movement of piston 22 toward open end 14. Sleeve 34 is preferably a split sleeve formed by a sheet of suitable material, such as steel, bent to close on itself and form a split 36. In this manner, sleeve 34 may be reduced to a size which is less than the size of the constricted open end 14 for permitting passage of sleeve 34 through end 14 and into barrel 12. Thus, the constriction of open end 14 will retain sleeve 34 in place, while the construction of sleeve 34 will permit same to be inserted into a standard syringe. I

A reagent dispenser according to the present invention can be made to dispense any desired volume up to the capacity of the syringe, which conventionally comes in different capacities. Such dispensing is repetitive because of the use of the split sleeve 34. By selecting a sleeve of appropriate size for a volume to be repetitively dispensed, a reagent dispenser according to the present invention can achieve reproductibility that far exceeds that of much more elaborate commercially available devices. Models have been constructed that dispense with a reproductibility better than plus or minus 1%.

As can be appreciated from the above description and from the drawings, when the insert or sleeve 34 is slipped into the barrel 12 of the syringe, the limited space available in constricted open end 14 forces the sleeve toward its closed, or even into an overlapping, position. Its tendency to open, however, causes the sleeve to be retained in position once inside of barrel 12.

Alternatively to the illustrated embodiment, it is also possible to construct an arrangement according to the present invention wherein the dispenser is sealed into the cap of a reagent bottle (not shown). When such an arrangement is employed, it has the further advantage of permitting inversion of the entire assembly during filling of the dispenser. Thus, it is possible in this manner to eliminate all air bubbles from the device in the process of filling it.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination with a standard syringe including a barrel member provided with finger grips, a constricted open end and a discharge end, a piston slidably arranged in the barrel, and a piston rod having a crossshaped cross section and connected to the piston and arranged extending through the open end of the barrel, the open end being substantially larger than the cross section of the piston rod and a gap formed between the open end and the rod, a flange being provided on an end of the rod extending out of the barrel, and an annular recess being provided in the constricted open end adjacent the finger grips and arranged facing the flange; a coiled compression spring being arranged with coils of the spring around the rod and seated between the flange and the recess in the constricted open end of the barrel for biasing the rod and piston toward the open end; and a sleeve arranged in the barrel between the open end of the barrel and the piston for limiting movement of the piston toward the open end of the barrel, the sleeve being a split sleeve formed by a sheet having a thickness less than the gap between the piston rod and open end, and bent to close on itself and of a size which is less than the size of the constricted open end for permitting passage of the sleeve through the constricted open end and into the barrel, the constricted open end and the bias of the sleeve against the barrel causing the sleeve to be retained inside the barrel abutting the constricted end.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3290946 *May 25, 1964Dec 13, 1966Dow Chemical CoPipetting device
US3327904 *Jan 11, 1966Jun 27, 1967Greiner Scient CorpLiquid dispensing devices
US3346147 *Aug 18, 1966Oct 10, 1967Brunswick CorpDental compound syringe
US3458090 *Dec 1, 1967Jul 29, 1969Cook Chem CoFluid dispenser with adjustable stroke pump piston
US3464412 *Jun 12, 1967Sep 2, 1969Schwartz BorisIntermixing syringe
US3570659 *Mar 25, 1969Mar 16, 1971Richey Robert CCombined tobacco pipe charger and tobacco pouch
US3759425 *Jun 23, 1970Sep 18, 1973Cooper Mcdougall & RobertsonPiston valve syringe gun
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4346708 *Apr 20, 1981Aug 31, 1982Leveen Harry HSyringe
US4405249 *Mar 19, 1981Sep 20, 1983National Research Development CorporationDispensing apparatus and method
US4444335 *Sep 14, 1981Apr 24, 1984Merck & Co., Inc.Delivery of adjustable quantities of materials
US4612010 *Aug 14, 1985Sep 16, 1986Hamacher Edward NInfiltration pump
US4713060 *Jun 20, 1986Dec 15, 1987Becton, Dickinson And CompanySyringe assembly
US4861401 *Dec 15, 1987Aug 29, 1989Konishi Co., Ltd.Method of injecting adhesives into cracks
DE3709783C1 *Mar 25, 1987Apr 14, 1988Blendax Werke Schneider CoDosierspritze
DE4037271A1 *Nov 23, 1990Jul 18, 1991Konishi Co LtdKlebstoff-spritze
EP0253949A2 *Mar 12, 1987Jan 27, 1988Becton Dickinson and CompanySyringe assembly having a flexible cover for the plunger rod
WO2006032070A1 *Sep 21, 2005Mar 30, 2006Pro Med Medizinische ProduktioDevice for the dosed intake and delivery of a liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/309, 604/208, 422/923, 222/340
International ClassificationA61M5/31, B01L3/02, A61M5/315
Cooperative ClassificationB01L3/0217, A61M2005/3115, A61M5/31591
European ClassificationB01L3/02C3