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Publication numberUS3907107 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateMay 28, 1974
Priority dateMay 28, 1974
Publication numberUS 3907107 A, US 3907107A, US-A-3907107, US3907107 A, US3907107A
InventorsVercollone Flora M
Original AssigneeVercollone Flora M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dress form method and means
US 3907107 A
Abstract
A kit for making a custom dress form comprises in combination a packaging container containing a stretchable, tubular jersey for wearing on a model's torso, a sheet of thin, flexible fabric material of sufficient size to form the components of a standard garment pattern, a container containing a spray adhesive for application to the fabric material to adhere the material to the jersey, a sheet of fabric-foam laminate material comparable in size to the sheet of fabric material, and instructions for combining the materials and adhesive and jersey to make the form.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Vercollone [451 Sept. 23, 1975 1 DRESS FORM METHOD AND MEANS [76] Inventor: Flora M. Vercollone, 17A Ginn Rd.,

Winchester. Mass. 01890 [22] Filed: May 28, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 473,682

[52] U.S. C1. 206/223; 223/68; 206/232; 2/243 B [51] Int. Cl. B65D 69/00; B65D 71/00 [58] Field of Search 206/223, 232, 229, 45.31, 206/278; 2/243 B; 223/68 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,720,964 10/1955 Hopper 206/223 2,985,345 5/1961 Hiscock l. 223/68 3,075,677 1/1963 Meisenberg. 223/68 3,096,916 7/1963 Ronell v 223/68 3,136,412 6/1964 Karosen 206/4531 3,140,023 7/1964 Cella 223/68 3,313.044 4/1967 Glass et a1. 223/68 3,334,003 8/1967 Edwards 206/229 Primary ExaminerWi1liam T Dixson, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Ces.ari and McKenna [57] ABSTRACT A kit for making a custom dress form comprises in combination a packaging container containing a stretchable, tubular jersey for wearing on a models torso, a sheet of thin, flexible fabric material of sufficient size to form the components of a standard garment pattern, a container containing a spray adhesive for application to the fabric material to adhere the material to the jersey, a sheet of fabric-foam laminate material comparable in size to the sheet of fabric material, and instructions for combining the materials and adhesive and jersey to make the form.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures US Patent Se t. 23,1975 3,907,107

"iillll lmnmmm FIG. 4 Fig. 5

DRESS FORM METHOD AND MEANS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a method and means for making a dressmaking form and to the form itself. It relates more specifically to a form of this type which can be constructed by the dressmaker herself in her own home.

There are numerous dressmaking forms on the market which are intended to help women make wellfitting dresses, blouses, skirts and other garments. Invariable, these dress forms reproduce as closely as possible the body measurements of the particular model. Present-day forms are even adjustable so that as the models body measurements change, corresponding changes can be made in the dress form.

Because they are made to exact body measurements, conventional dress forms do not provide perfectly fitted garments. Figure abnormalities and singularities are not accounted for; nor do prior dress forms account for the ease and comfort required by the particular model, which factors may vary substantially from one person to the next. Consequently, when using the prior dress forms, the dressmaker must estimate where and how much to modify the basic commericl pattern to allow for them. That is very difficult for a non-professional to do. Most women end up by fitting the garment to the dress form after it is partially assembled and estimating the changes that must be made to make the garment fit. This is not only a timeconsuming process, but is is quite difficult. It requires the ability to analyze the particular problem and steps needed to correct it. Even then, there is a good possibility that the user has already cut away the fabric needed to make the required corrections. It is also difficult to transfer corrections from a basic pattern of different style as has been suggested. This is because such transfer requires knowledge of flat pattern drafting.

Because of these and other difficulties with conventional dress forms, they are not used as much as they should be to facilitate the making of custom-fitted garmerits.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved method of making a custom dress form.

A further object of the invention is to provide an im proved method for making a dress form for use primarily to correct commercial dress patterns.

A further object of the invention is to provide a kit for making the above-described dress form.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a dress form which substantially eliminates the need to estimate corrections to a commercial dress pattern to accommodate ease or singularities in the models figure.

Other objects will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the several steps and the relation of one or more such steps with respect to the others and the article embodying the features of construction. combination of elements and arrangements of parts which are adapted to effect such steps. all as exemplified in the following detailed disclosure. and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

Briefly, my method entails the making of a dress form which allows for ease and does account for all the models relevant figure singularities. As such, the form is ideally suited to correct standard commercial dressmaking patterns.

The dress form is constructed from components preferably supplied in kit form including nylon pattern material, adhesive spray, a fabric-foam laminate and a cotton jersey. The nylon material is cut in accordance with a commercial dressmaking pattern, with the various datum points, seam lines, darts, etc. being transferred from the pattern to the nylon material. The model then dons the jersey and the usual dressmaking points and lines indicating the neckline, shoulder seam, armholes, etc. are marked on the body and the jersey.

Next, adhesive spray is applied to each section of the nylon fabric which is fitted to and molded against the corresponding area of the body. Then, the points and lines previously marked on the body are transferred to the nylon fabric. Following this, the nylon fabric sections are removed and stitched together along the indicated seam lines. The model then dons the resulting nylon fabric sheel and additional alterations in the various points, lines, darts, etc. are made to insure a proper fit.

The nylon sections are then taken apart and used as pattern masters for making corresponding pattern sections on the fabric-foam laminate. Various points and lines are transferred from each nylon section to the corresponding laminate section. The laminate is cut in accordance with the master and the various laminate sections stitched together to create the finished form.

The form not only corresponds to the models figure, but also allows for the ease and comfort best suited to that particular model. Accordingly, the form can be used to correct most commercial patterns to compensate for ease, comfort and any singularities in the models figure. These modifications to the commercial dress pattern need not be estimated. The dressmaker simply molds the pattern sections to the form whereupon the neededalterations are readily apparent and can be marked on the pattern. Accordingly, very wellfitting garments can be made from commercial patterns in most styles.

The technique disclosed here greatly simplifies the art of home dressmaking. The kit for making the dress form is relatively inexpensive and the components thereof used as directed will produce a dress form matched to the needs of the model in terms of figure singularities, ease and comfort.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a dress form made in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of the kit from which the FIG. 1 form is made;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view illustrating a component of the FIGv 2 kit used to make the form,

FIG. 4 is a view of another component fitted and molded to a model; and

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of another component of the FIGv 2 kit being cut to shape to make the FIG. 1 form.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Turning to FIG. 1 in the drawings, a hollow dress form indicated generally at is conveniently supported by any suitable means such as, for example, the waste basket indicated in dotted lines at 12 projecting into the bottom of the dress form. The form is made of a fabric-polyurethane foam laminate and, when formed into the indicated generally tubular shape, it is self- .supporting. If desired, the form may be filled with suitable stuffing (not shown) tomake it more rigid.

The form 10 is shaped to include any figure abnormalities or singularities of the person represented by the form and the form also allows for the ease and comfort required in the garments for that person.

lndicia representing the usual dressmaking points and lines are provided on the outside of the form. These lines include a neckhole line 14, the armhole lines 16, the center front and center back lines 22, waistline 24, dart seams 25, side seam lines 26, balance line 27, as well as others. By draping the various sections of a commercial dress pattern at the corresponding locations on form 10, the various points and lines on the pattern may be corrected to correspond with those on the form. In this way, the commercial pattern can be altered to accommodate any specific figure problem of the model, as well as to allow for the required amount of ease in the finished garment.

In addition to using the form 10 to correct commer cial patterns as noted above, it can also be used for designing details or draping fabrics.

Turning now to FIG. 2, the form 10 is made from components sold in the form of a kit 32. The kit in cludes a supply of nylon pattern fabric material 34, a can 36 of adhesive spray, a supply of fabricpolyurethane foam laminate 38 and a tubular cotton jersey 42. The fabric materials are all stored conveniently in roll form in kit 32 which is packaged and sold as a unit along with an instruction booklet 44.

Referring now to FIGS 3 and 4, to construct the form, the nylon fabric material is taken from the kit and spread out flat. Then, using the various pattern sections from a standard commercial dress pattern, the nylon material is cut to form corresponding pattern sections. FIG. 3 shows the commercial pattern section P for the front bodice superimposed on fabric 34 with the fabric cut to allow a two inch seam allowance all around. Using the other sections of the commercial pattern, similar sections of nylon material 34 are made to form the remaining pattern sections (not shown) for the garment. Thus, in addition to pattern sections for the sides, there is a skirt pattern, say, sixteen inches long and a sleeve pattern which allows ease at the bicep of approximately one-quarter to two inches according to the fullness of the arm.

The nylon pattern sections are marked with the usual center front line 46 (FIG. 4) and the crossgrain is marked at:

l. armpit level on back bodice section 1 inch above underarm seam) shown at 52 in FIG. 4,

2. chest level on front bodice section (4 inches below mid-shoulder seam) indicated at 54 in FIG. 3,

3. derriere level on back skirt section (1 inch below end of dart),

4. derriere level on front skirt section (same level as back),

5. armpit level on sleeve section 1 inch above underarm seam), and

6. the length grain on sleeve section.

Following the formation and marking of each nylon pattern section, the pattern darts marked on the nylon fabric sections are all pinned together on the outside and the sleeve pattern is machine basted.

After this, the tubular jersey 42 is removed from the kit and donned by the model. If needed, a string is tied around the Waist to make the jersey conform to the body. Then the following conventional dressmaking points and lines are marked onto the models body:

1. high point 62 juncture of neck and shoulder approximately 1 inch behind lobe of ear,

2. shoulder point 64 outer edge of shoulder bone (or where the sleeve is to be set in),

3. shoulder seam 66 between the above two points,

4. front armhole seam (not shown) from shoulder point down to arm crease,

5. back armhole seam 68 from shoulder point down to arm crease,

6. neckline 72 front and back,

7. armhole depth 74 inch below armpit,

8. crossgrain (not shown) front chest (4 inches below mid-shoulder seam),

9. crossgrain 76 back armpit level,

10. crossgrain 78 right arm armpit level, and

l 1. length grain 82 right arm.

The following points are marked on the jersey:

1. center front and center back lines 86,

2. side seam lines,

3. bust points (not shown), and

4. crossgrain 92 at derriere level front and back.

In this connection, it should be noted that the shoulder seam should lie on the crest of the shoulder and, in profile, should dissect the body. The side seam should be a continuation of the shoulder seam and in line with the middle finger when the models arm hangs at her side. Also, a string should be tied around the body, high in the armpit area, as a guide for the armpit crossgrain. In the event the model has a low or sway-back, scotch tape can be placed on the string at the waist to hold it in position.

After the body and jersey are marked as aforementioned, the various nylon pattern sections are fitted to the body, starting with the back bodice section P as shown in FIG. 4. More particularly, the fabric material is sprayed with adhesive from can 36 contained in the kit 32 and then positioned on the armpit line 76 and center back line 86 inscribed on the model. These cross and length grain lines should be kept firmly in position when fitting. The dressmaker then smooths the fabric pattern from the back armhole to the shoulder point and fits the shoulder dart. Next she smooths the pattern at the underarm seam and waist and fits the waist dart.

All seam lines are then marked in red to indicate the right side following the lines on the models body. The fabric pattern is then removed from the body and the dart lines are marked.

Next, the back bodice fabric section is sprayed with adhesive on the outside and molded to the left side of the body. The body is checked for disproportion and the section remarked if necessary. Any of these changes are marked in black, signifying the left side. If the left side of the body is extremely different from the right, a separate pattern should be molded in the same way as described above for the right side. If the model has particular body singularities such as prominent shoulder blades, hollow back, etc., the various darts are enlarged or redirected and seam lines changed as needed to obtain a proper fit.

Next, the front bodice pattern is sprayed with adhesive and positioned on the chest and center front lines (not shown) marked on the models body. These cross and length grain lines should also be kept in position when fitting. The neck and armhole lines 72 and 68 are indicated on the'pattern fabric and these lines are desirably clipped into for better fit as seen on the rear bodice section in FIG. 4. Following this, the pattern is smoothed to the waist and the underbust dart which corresponds to the dart 98 on the commercial pattern illustrated in FIG. 3 is repositioned, ending approximately one inch from the bust point 102 also shown in that pattern. The pattern fabric is smoothed to'the side seam and the side dart is repinned. This is the dart that corresponds to dart 104 on the FIG. 3 commercial pat-.

tern. This dart should also end approximately one inch from the bust point 102. Then all of the seam lines are marked on the fabric in red to signify the right side as was done with the back bodice section, following which the front bodice pattern section is removed from the body and the dart lines marked thereon. Then, the pattern is molded to the left side of the body and remarked in black as was done with the back bodice. Again, if there are any figure singularities, these may be accommodated by enlarging or repositioning the darts or allowing moreease in the pattern.

Similar steps are followed with the back skirt fabric section and the front skirt fabric section. Each section is first sprayed with adhesive and positioned on the derriere line 92 and either the center front line (not shown) or the center back line 86, is smoothed to the body with the waist darts fitted and positioned as needed to accommodate singularities in that body area.

Finally, the sleeve pattern section (not shown) is sprayed with adhesive in the cap only and positioned on the armpit and legnth grain lines 78 and 82, respec' tively. The pattern section is fit for comfort at the bi cep, elbow and wrist. The dressmaker molds the cap to the top of the arm, creasing for appropriate ease. The pattern section is marked following the armhole lines on the body and notches are marked at the shoulder seam, chest line, front and approximately one inch above the back armpit line 76. Then the models elbow is bent and the elbow and wrist length marked on the fabric pattern section.

The dressmaker unpins the darts on the pattern and corrects the lines with the aid of straight and curved rulers. As noted above, some ease has been included when molding the various pattern sections. Desirably, the following additional case should be added for movement:

I. 42 inch to side seams of bodice back and front,

2. /8 inch to length at waist,

3. inch to side seams of skirt at area level tapering to 41 inch at waist. back and front, and

4. Vs inch to sleeve cap.

Then all of the pattern sections are stitched together with all seams and darts on the inside and the pattern tested for comfort. If more case is needed, this should be added. Next. a sheet of paper folded to one inch wide is placed high in the armpit and the underseam line remarked at the lower edge. The sleeve pattern section is then stitched into the armhole and tested for comfort. Using a yardstick, the balance line is marked all around the skirt at the derriere level. The pattern. is then removed and marked. clearly to indicate all corrections and seam. lines, endsof seam lines, darts, etc. and carefully taken apart.

Next the dressmaker takes the roll of fabric-laminate material 3.8 from kit 32 and lays it, foam side down, on a flat surface. Then each fabric pattern sectionis laid on top of the laminate, outside ,up. Pattern adhesive may be sprayed on the pattern to hold .it in position. Then the pattern outline, center front line 46, center back line 48, darts 98 and 104, butt point 102 and balance lines are transferred to the laminate. with a felt tip pen which will penetrate the nylon patternmaterial. Care-'should be taken not to distort the fabric pattern material by pressing too hard with the pen. Following this, the laminate is cut on the outline except at the .back and front necklines and armholes where there is left a /8 inch seam allowance. Then the darts are cut out and-all of the darts and seams are stitched together with a .waxed double thread. When sewing the darts,

their edges are butted together and an overcast or followed i .3. side seams from the waistline up to the underarm from the-waistline down to the bot-tom, and" 4. shoulder seams. i Upon completion of the form, if the waistline will not hold its shape, the skirt section may be folded up on the bodice and featherboning hand-stitched to the 'waistline seam.

The form may then be supported on the wastebasket 12 as shown in FIG. 1. For this, an S'inch Wide strip of polyethylene may be pinned around the top of the has ket with the top half width of th strip being flipped inside the wastebasket which is'weighted with suitable magazines, etc.

When the dressmaker makes her first dress, she should select a simple style of commercial pattern 'and use a non-stretchable fabric. First she corrects the pat tern for the right side. If there is a difference between the right and leftsides of body, these corrections can be marked with a red felt-tipped pin on the rightside. Then the pattern is turned over and another color pen used for marking the corrections for the left side. In many cases, the differences between the two sides of the bodies will be so minimal that they can be ignored. Then the dressmaker marks /8 inch seam allowances to all seams except the side seams which may be marked one inch wide. Then she measures down from the balance line on the pattern to the length of skirt required plus the hem and marks the cutting line. The fabric is then cut and the darts and shoulder seams stitched and the side seams basted. Then she should try on the dress and any alterations which she considers must be made should be noted also on the form.

Although the size of a commercial pattern to be corrected is not important, it is easier to alter the size which is closest to that of the front bodice of the form. In this connection, the extra paper from the pattern should not be trimmed until the user finds that it will not be needed for the alterations. The pattern section for the front bodice should be altered first. Its center line should be placed in position on the form and the pattern pinned to the form in the position which will necessitate the least correction of lines and points.

Next the pattern is smoothed from the neck to the underarm dart. That dart, which may need to be enlarged, made smaller, raised or lowered to correspond with the form, is then pinned. Usually the dart should be directed toward the bust point but ending approximately one inch away.

The waist dart is then pinned and the pattern pinned at the side seam. Following this, the seam lines are corrected with a felt-tip to correspond with the seam lines of the form and the bust point and any new stitching lines for the darts are indicated. Then, leaving the front bodice pattern positioned on the form for reference, the back bodice and skirt are corrected.

More particularly, the back bodice is placed in position with its center line corresponding to that on the form and the pattern pinned to the form in the position which will necessitate the least correction of lines. With the cross grain lines level at the armhole, the pattern is smoothed to the shoulder and the dart pinned, altering it as necessary. Also, the dressmaker pins in the waistline dart and the pattern at the side seam. She then corrects the seam lines and the dart stitching lines of the back bodice. lf correction has been made to a neckline of the front bodice, the back bodice neckline and shoulder seam must be corrected accordingly. The center front line of the skirt is then pinned on the form at the waist and the pattern smoothed out to the side seam which should curve gradually into the waist. Additional darting or easing should be made if needed in the waist seam.

If the width of the pattern at the high hip level is corrected, the side seam should be redrawn to the hem in accordance with the style of the pattern. Then the balance line should be drawn on the pattern to correspond with that form. Followingthis, the skirt back pattern should be pinned on the form at the waist and the pattern smoothed out to the side seam. The side seams should curve gradually into the waist. Additional darting or easing should be made, if needed, in the waist seam. If the width of the pattern at the high hip level is corrected, the side seam should be redrawn to the hem in accordance with the style of the pattern. Then the balance line should be drawn on the pattern to correspond with that of the form. Following this, the skirt pattern should be pinned on the form and similar corrections made to complete the alterations for the commercial pattern.

When the commercial pattern is corrected as afore said to accommodate the models figure singularities and to allow for ease and comfort, the dressmaker can make a dress from the corrected commercial pattern in the usual way.

It will be seen from the foregoing, then, that a dress form made in accordance with my method considerably simplifies the ability of the average person to make well-fitting garments from a commercial pattern. Using the components and directions found in the abovedescribed kit, the dressmaker can make the form in her own home, allowing for any figure singularities or abnormalities in the model for the form, and also allowing for the needed ease and comfort required by the particular wearer. This obviates the necessity of correcting commercial patterns of differing styles to take these factors into consideration. Accordingly, the subject kit and dress form should be invaluable tools for those interested in custom dressmaking.

lt will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained and, since certain changes may be made in carrying out the above method and in the construction set forth above without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

For example, instead of stitching the darts and seam lines of the laminate to make the completed form, a strong, colored adhesive tape may be used for that purpose which will also mark the seam or dart location. Also, the cost of the kit may be lessened by substituting for the spray can and nylon fabric, a sheet of polytetrafluoroethylene (Saran) or the like plastic which has electrostatic attractive qualities that will cause it to conform and adhere to the models body.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described.

I claim:

1. A kit for making a custom dress form comprises in combination a packaging container containing a stretchable, tubular jersey for wearing on a models torso, a sheet of thin, flexible fabric material of sufficient size to form the components of a standard garment pattern, a container containing a spray adhesive for application to the fabric material to adhere the material to the jersey, a sheet of fabric-foam laminate material comparable in size to the sheet of fabric material,

and instructions for combining the materials and adhe-

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4074480 *Feb 12, 1976Feb 21, 1978Burton Henry W GKit for converting single-glazed window to double-glazed window
US4127191 *Mar 4, 1977Nov 28, 1978Cave Jerry KKits for making latch hook rugs
US4147576 *Mar 2, 1977Apr 3, 1979Beem Lewis WMethod of repairing a vehicle body
US4239106 *Jan 11, 1979Dec 16, 1980Gentex CorporationIndividually fitted helmet and method of and apparatus for making the same
US4293959 *Dec 26, 1979Oct 13, 1981Gioello Debbie AStretch knit body suit with padded areas
US5129522 *Mar 14, 1991Jul 14, 1992Sue DruskocziDenim book cover and kit for making same
US5566867 *Apr 4, 1995Oct 22, 1996Goray; JillCustomizable garment form system
US6013563 *Feb 19, 1998Jan 11, 2000Silicon Genesis CorporationControlled cleaning process
US6978549Jun 5, 2002Dec 27, 2005Ellis Stacey LPatterning system for a selected body type and methods of measuring for a selected body type
US20030038397 *Nov 9, 2001Feb 27, 2003Macallister MelApparatus and method for molding an animal body part
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/574, 223/68, 206/232, 206/225, 206/231
International ClassificationB65D85/18, A41H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41H3/00, B65D85/18
European ClassificationA41H3/00, B65D85/18