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Publication numberUS3907115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateAug 28, 1973
Priority dateAug 28, 1973
Publication numberUS 3907115 A, US 3907115A, US-A-3907115, US3907115 A, US3907115A
InventorsSatchell Helen Spence
Original AssigneeSatchell Helen Spence
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boot support device
US 3907115 A
Abstract
A boot support device which serves to support the leg portions of a pair of boots in an upright configuration and to retain the pair of boots in a secured relationship with respect to one another. The device consists of a frame having a pair of elongated leg members adapted to be inserted into the leg portions of a pair of boots. The leg members are connected at their upper ends and extend downwardly therefrom in sufficiently close proximity to one another to receive the leg portions of the boots therebetween and to support the leg portions in an upright configuration.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Sept. 23, 1975 BOOT SUPPORT DEVICE [76] Inventor: Helen Spence Satchel], 390

Cairncroft Rd., Oakville, Ontario, Canada 22 Filed: Aug. 28, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 392,207

[52] US. Cl. 211/34; 24/84 C [51] Int. Cl. A44B 21/00; A47F 7/08 [58] Field of Search 211/34, 38; 24/84 C, 84 H, 24/84 B, 84 A, DIG. 29, 84 R, 255, 259, 261,

1,686,297 10/1928 Trimble 24/259 SP 1,746,962 2/1930 Perry 24/255 GP 2,529,565 11/1950 Mills 211/34 UX 2,779,076 1/1957 Schenck 24/84 R UX Primary Examiner-Donald A Griffin Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Fatherstonhaugh & Co.

[57] ABSTRACT A boot support device which serves to support the leg portions of a pair of boots in an upright configuration and to retain the pair of boots in'a secured re1ationship with respect to one another, The device consists of a frame having a pair of elongated leg members adapted to be inserted into the leg portions of a pair of boots. The leg members are connected at their upper ends and extend downwardly therefrom in sufficiently close proximity to one another to receive the leg portions of the boots therebetween and to support the leg portions in an upright configuration.

1 Claim, 5 Drawing Figures m I P FIG.1

Boor SUPPORT DEVICE FIELD OF INVENTION This invention relates to a boot support device. In particular this invention relates to a device for supporting the legs ofa pair of boots in an upright position and for storing a pair of boots in a secured relationship with respect to one another.

PRIOR ART Considerable difficulty has long been experienced in attempting to store calf length boots in an orderly fashion when not in use. It is quite common practice to stuff the leg portion of the boot so that it will remain in an upstanding position during storage. This is often achieved simply by stuffing the leg portion with paper, cardboard or the like. This practice is not satisfactory and the stuffing materials are not always immediately available. Furthermore, it is important to maintain the leg portions of the boot in an upright position during storage so as to avoid creasing of the leg portion Because boots cannot be stored in a shoe rack, the individual boots of a pair of boots tend to become separated from one another because they are riot held together during storage and difficulty may be experienced in finding a matching pair of boots. This problem is particularly inconvenient when boots of the overshoe type are removed prior to entering an establishment in winter and left in a storage area along with a large number of other boots.

SUMMARY The present invention overcomes the difficulties of the prior art and provides a simple and inexpensive boot support device which serves to support the leg portions of the boots in an upright configuration and to retain a pair of boots in a secured relationship with respect to one another in storage.

According to an embodiment of the present inven tion, a boot support device for supporting the leg portions of a pair of boots in an upright position comprises a frame having a pair of elongated leg members adapted to be inserted into the leg portions of a boot, the leg members having an upper end and a lower end, the leg members being connected at their upper ends and extending downwardly therefrom in sufficiently close proximity to one another to receive the leg portions of a pair of boots therebetween to support the leg portions of the boot in an upright configuration.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The invention will be more clearly understood after reference to the following detailed specification read in conjunction with the drawings, wherein FIG. I is a pictorial view ofa boot support device ac cording to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a front view of the device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic illustration of the manner in which the support device of FIG. 1 is applied;

FIG. 4 is a front view of a boot support device according to a further embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a side view of the boot support device of FIG. 4.

With reference to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the reference numeral It) refers generally to a boot support device according to an embodiment of the present invention. The device 10 consists of a wire frame formed to provide leg members 12 and 14, which are connected at their upper ends by a narrow bridge portion 16. The legs 12 and 14 extend downwardly from their upper end in a spaced parallel relationship. The lower portions 18 and 20 of the legs 12 and 14 are outwardly flared. .The legs 12 and 14 diverge in a direction away from the upper end thereof so that the legs 12 and 14 are of a greater width at the lower end thereof than they are at the upper end. A suspension hook 22 extends upwardly from the upper end of the legs 12 and 14 and serves to support the frame from an overhead support when required. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the legs 12 and 14 and the hook 22 are formed from a unitary wire which is bent upon itself to provide the required configuration illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings. The ends of the wire are welded to one another in the area of the bridge piece 16 or butt welded] at any other convenient point on the length of the wire frame, and the bridge piece 16 is preferably spot welded to the adjacent sections of legs 12 and 14. This serves to secure the wires on each side of the legs 12 and 14 with respect to one another and to secure the legs 12 and 14 with respect to one another. The frame is preferably constructed from a wire which has a substantial resilience, such as spring wire, so that the legs may be spread apart a sufficient distance to receive the boots without being permanently deformed. It will be understood that the frame may also be made from more than one length of wire.

As illustrated in FIG. 3 of the drawings, in use the leg portion 12 is located within the leg of one boot 24 and the leg portion 14 is located within the leg portion of a second boot 26. The'leg portion 12 and 14 are disposed in sufficiently close proximity to one another to receive the legs of a pair of boots therebetween and to retain the leg portions of the boots in an upright configuration. Preferably the leg portions 12 and 14 are spaced apart from one another a distance which is less than twice the thickness of the wall of the leg portions of the boots which are to be supported so that the legs 12 and 14 have to be forced outwardly with respect to one another to receive the boots therebetween so that when the boots are positioned between the legs, the resilient nature of the material of which the frame is made serves to clamp the leg portions of the boots therebetween. The degree of clamping may be sufficient to enable the boots to be retained on'the frame when the frame is supported from an overhead support by means of the hook end 22. In use the boots will normally rest on their soles when the support device is in use. The primary purpose of the hook 22 is to support the device 10 in a storage location when not in use.

The increased width of the clamping members towards their lower end serves to assist in retaining the leg portions of the boot in an upright configuration when the support device is in use with the boots resting on their soles.

It has been found that a boot support device of the type described above may have leg members measuring about 15 inches in length and having a width of about 2%inches at the lower end thereof and being spaced apart a distance of about A; inch. The hook portion 22 at the upper end thereof is preferably proportioned substantially in accordance with the proportions of the hook portion of a conventional clothes hanger.

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, the boot support device has a pair of leg members 32 and 34 which are in the form of narrow elongated strips of a resilient material, such as a spring steel or other metal or plastic material. The legs 32 and 34 have short portions 36 and 38 at their upper ends. The portions 36 and 38 are connected by a short bridge portion 40. The

portions 36 and 38 converge in a direction downwardly from the bridge portion 40 and the legs 32 and 34 are disposed in an intimate face-to-face contact over a major portion of their length. The portions 42 and 44 at the lower end of the legs 32 and 34 respectively are flared outwardly so as to facilitate the location of the leg portions of boots therebetween in use. The hook portion 46 extends upwardly from the bridge portion 40 and'serves to support the leg members 32 and 34 from an overhead extension as required.

As previously indicated, the frame of the embodiment of the invention illustrated in H05. 4 and 5 of the drawings is made from a resilient material so that the legs 32 and 34 may be forced apart to permit the leg 32 to be located within the leg opening of one boot and to permit the leg 34 to be located within the leg opening of another boot of a pair of boots to clamp the leg portions of the pair of boots therebetween to support the boots in an upright position.

Various modifications of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the scope-of the invention. For example, leg portions having the same general outline as those illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings may be made from a unitary plastic body. In addition, the connection between the legs 12 and 14 may be effected at the upper end of the hook portions rather than at the lower end of the hook portion. A support device may also be provided which does not include a hook portion.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the present invention provides a simple and inexpensive form of boot supporting device which may be used to support the leg portions of a pair of boots in an upstanding configuration and which serves to retain the boots in pairs when in storage. The device also has the advantage that it may be stored when not in use by suspending it from its hook member.

What I claim as my invention is:

l. A boot support device for supporting the flexible leg portions of a pair of boots in an upright position comprising: a frame having a pair of elongated leg members adapted to be inserted one into each leg portion of a pair of boots arranged in a side-by-side relationship, said leg members having an upper end and a lower end, said leg members being rigidly connected at their upper ends and extending downwardly th'erefrom in sufficiently close proximity to one another to clamp the leg portions of a pair of boots therebetween, said leg members having a sufficient length to extend longitudinally over substantially the full length of the leg portions of a pair of boots to be supported thereby to support the leg portions in an upright configuration, said frame being resiliently deformable to permit said leg members to move away from'one another to receive the leg portions of a pair of boots therebetween, suspension hook means extending upwardly from said upper end of said legs for suspending said frame from an overhead support, said frame being formed from a unitary wire member which is bent upon itself to form said legs and suspension hook, said legs diverging in width in a direction towards the lower end thereof to provide a greater width at the lower end of each leg member than at the upper end of each leg member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US505655 *Mar 25, 1893Sep 26, 1893 Overshoe-holder
US721071 *Jul 7, 1902Feb 17, 1903George W McgillSpring-wire paper-clip.
US731597 *Aug 20, 1902Jun 23, 1903George W McgillSpring-clip for holding papers, &c.
US1528454 *Oct 24, 1924Mar 3, 1925Nichols Frank MHairpin
US1637936 *Feb 10, 1926Aug 2, 1927Christian GrossMoney holder
US1686297 *Jul 6, 1925Oct 2, 1928Trimble Ernest LWindow-shade pull-cord clip
US1746962 *May 10, 1927Feb 11, 1930Perry Harry WDevice for suspending and retaining footwear
US2529565 *Jun 15, 1946Nov 14, 1950Mills Donald ABoot drying tree
US2779076 *Jan 5, 1954Jan 29, 1957Sr Walter J SchenckLaundry aid
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4023762 *Jan 9, 1976May 17, 1977John Thomas Batts, Inc.Article suspension device
US4073457 *Apr 28, 1976Feb 14, 1978John Thomas Batts, Inc.Article suspension device
US4149290 *Mar 29, 1978Apr 17, 1979Sansen Millard DBoot straightening device
US4238865 *Apr 4, 1979Dec 16, 1980Bertil IngemannBoot support device
US5655669 *Aug 27, 1996Aug 12, 1997The Moore Company, Inc.Boot storage for a secure clothing article facility
US6402105 *Sep 2, 1999Jun 11, 2002Principle PlasticsDisplay hanger
US20130055510 *Sep 2, 2011Mar 7, 2013Xinzhong BaoTool for boot and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/34, D06/317, 24/349
International ClassificationA47G25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/005
European ClassificationA47G25/00B