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Publication numberUS3907172 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateAug 8, 1974
Priority dateAug 8, 1974
Publication numberUS 3907172 A, US 3907172A, US-A-3907172, US3907172 A, US3907172A
InventorsCurtis Gary Martin
Original AssigneeIllinois Tool Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container spouts and strainers
US 3907172 A
Abstract
The embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is directed to a pour spout for a container. The pour spout comprises a thin flexible plastic sheet material member encircling the container. One margin of the sheet plastic material member is straight and engages the container adjacent an annular bead formed about the openable end of the container. The opposite margin of the sheet of flexible plastic material is substantially elliptical in configuration to form an elliptical opening for the pour spout when it is placed in a pouring position. The thin flexible plastic material about the container is doubled back upon itself along the annular periphery adjacent the bead to form a fluid-tight seal therewith. The pouring area of the pour spout is reinforced to increase its rigidity to support the liquid when being poured.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Curtis [451 Sept. 23, 1975 CONTAINER SPOUTS AND STRAINERS [75] Inventor: Gary Martin Curtis, Elgin. Ill.

[73] Assignee: Illinois Tool Works Inc., Chicago,

Ill.

[22] Filed: Aug. 8, 1974 [2]] Appl. No.: 495,775

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS l0/l966 Rousselet 222/565 X 4/1973 Klygis 222/567 Primary E.\'aminerRobert B. Reeves Assistant ExaminerJohn P. Shannon Attorney. Agent. or FirmOlson. Trexler. Wolters. Bushnell & Fosse. Ltd.

[57] ABSTRACT The embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is directed to a pour spout for a container. The pour spout comprises a thin flexible plastic sheet material member encircling the container. One margin of the sheet plastic material member is straight and engages the container adjacent an annular bead formed about the openable end of the container. The opposite margin of the sheet of flexible plastic material is substantially elliptical in configuration to form an elliptical opening for the pour spout when it is placed in a pouring position. The thin flexible plastic material about the container is doubled back upon itself along the annular periphery adjacent the bead to form a fluid-tight seal therewith. The pouring area of the pour spout is reinforced to increase its rigidity to support the liquid when being poured.

21 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures US Patent Sept. 23,1975 Sheet 1 of 3 3,907,172

FIG]

US Patent Sept. 23,1975 Sheet 2 of3 3,907,172

US Patent Sept. 23,1975 Sheet 3 of3 3,907,172

CONTAINER SPOUTS AND STRAINERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to pour spouts for containers such as cans and the like, and more particularly to pour spouts for use in conjunction with cans containing any desired liquid or solid product adapted to be poured from the container.

Heretofore, pour spouts have been provided for cans to facilitate pouring of fluids such as transmission oil, motor oil and the like from the can into a relatively small opening leading into an automobile transmission or engine crank case. Some prior art pour spouts are made of thin sheet metal and the like encircling the can and adapted to slide into position along the can body when the pour spout is to be used. However, sheet metal pour spouts of this type are relatively expensive and difficult to manufacture. Furthermore, these type of pour spouts, as well as others, have the problem of the liquid leaking back from the upper ridge of the can around the fitting between the pour spout and the can and then leaking or dripping down the outside of the pour spout. This problem is particularly troublesome in the case of relatively thin liquids such as transmission fluid, and the like.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a new and improved pour spout structure which can be made relatively inexpensively of thin flexible plastic material.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved pour spout for use with cans which forms a fluid-tight seal between the upper peripheral ridge of the can and the pour spout to prevent backflow or leaking of the fluid as it is being poured.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved pour spout for containers which is made of inexpensive thin flexible plastic material of either the flat sheet of fattened tubing types.

Briefly, the pour spout of this invention incorporates a sheet or tube of thin flexible plastic material which is wrapped about the outer peripheral surface of a container such as a can. The sheet of thin flexible plastic material is tightly held on the tin can either by providing a tight fit, heat-shrinking, adhesives, or any other suitable means. One margin of the tubular member may be doubled over to insure engagement with the container and a fluid-tight seal. The configuration of the pour spout, when in the unused position, has a second or opposite marginal edge encircling the can in an elliptical fashion. This second margin member of the pour spout is adapted to be pulled or peeled back beyond the first margin and an openable end of the container so that the member is substantially turned inside-out and extended to an operative position.

The elliptical marginal edge may be formed by cutting a flattened tube of plastic diagonally on its longitudinal axis, or by cutting a parabolic shape marginal edge in a flat sheet of plastic material. The flat sheet is then wrapped about the can and has the major lengths thereof overlapping one another to provide a reinforced pour surface extending from the openable end of the can to the end of the pour spout. The reinforced pour surface also may be formed by a separate heavier gauge plastic or paper member secured to the pour spout. In another embodiment of this invention the pour spout is made sufficiently long and of flexible material to facilitate tying closed the container after the container has been opened. In still another embodiment of the pour spout of this invention the pour spout is provided with a multitude of apertures so that after peeling back, the pour spout can be folded over the opening of the container to act as a strainer for pouring off of packing liquids such as those commonly found in canned fruits and vegetables.

Many other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be more fully realized and understood from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals throughout the various views of the drawings are intended to designate similar elements or components.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view illustrating one means for forming a pour spout of thin flat flexible plastic material in accordance with the principles of this invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates one means of forming a pour spout of thin tubular flexible plastic material in accordance with the principles of this invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates the tubular plastic sheet material in an opened condition;

FIG. 4 illustrates the pour spout positioned on a can in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 5 illustrates the initial lifting of the pour spout to be peeled back upon itself;

FIG. 6 illustrates one view of the pour spout in a pouring position;

FIG. 7 illustrates another view of the pour spout in a pouring position;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary view taken along line 8-8 in FIG. 7;

FIG. 8a is similar to FIG. 8, but shows a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 9 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the pour spout of this invention having a glue strip formed along one portion thereof to facilitate subsequent sealing of the tin can after initial opening;

FIG. 10 illustrates the pour spout of FIG. 9 in a tiedclosed position;

FIG. 11 illustrates the pour spout of FIG. 9 with the tab portion adhesively secured to the peripheral surface of the can associated therewith, and

FIG. 12 illustrates still another alternate embodiment of the pour spout of this invention and shows a multitude of apertures formed in the pour spout to form a strainer for pouring off packing liquids from fruits and vegetables and the like; and' FIG. 13 illustrates the pour spout of FIG. 10 being used.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIG. 1 there is seen a thin flat sheet of flexible sheet material, designated generally by reference numeral 10, and illustrates one means of forming a pour spout in accordance with the principles of this invention. The thin flat sheet may be clear or opaque plastic having one marginal edge 1 1 cut along a straight line to provide a can-gripping area 11a. The cangripping area 11a is immediately adjacent a second area 1 1b which in the embodiment shown best in FIG. 8 is folded over upon the area 11a to provide a double thickness of material which relatively tightly grips the container and insures a fluid-tight seal. Preferably the marginal portion of the blank is doubled over prior to assembly with the container. When the pour spout is peeled back and placed in a pouring position as shown in FIG. 7, the main body of the sheet material member is stretched over the double thickness margin and still further aggressively urges the margin against the can to prevent the spout from being pulled from the can and to insure the fluid-tight seal. In some instances, however, a sufficiently fluid-tight seal may be obtained without initially doubling the margin as shown in FIG. 8a.

The sheet of plastic material 10 also has straight side marginal portions 14 and 16 extending from the straight marginal edge 1 l and at substantially right angles thereto. The length of the marginal edge 11, and hence the distance between marginal edges 14 and 16, is greater than the circumference of the container to receive the pour spout. The amount of material in excess of the circumference of the container is indicated by broken lines 17 and 18 along the margins 14 and 16, respectively, and is overlapped when the sheet is secured to the can.

Most advantageously, the sheet 10 has a marginal edge 21 cut in a somewhat parabolic configuration to form the pouring spout when the sheet is wrapped about the can and pulled into the pouring position.

The sheet member 10 is adapted to be secured to a container or can 13 having a body 13a and a closure 13b at one end which is adapted to be opened so that the contents of the can may be removed. The longitudinal marginal portions 14 and 16 are doubled over one another and secured together by heat sealing, glue, or other suitable means. This provides a reinforced area, as indicated between the broken lines 17 and 18. This double thickness of material forms a more rigid pouring surface which extends from the top of the can to the terminating edge of the pour spout to contents of the can being dispensed. The terminating edge 20 of the pour spout also forms a pull-tab to facilitate the user peeling back thin flexible material upon itself and, in effect, turning the sheet material member insideout upon beng manually manipulated from the original po sition shown in FIG. 4 to the operative spout providing positions shown in FIGS. 6-8.

When the sheet 10 is secured to the can 13, as best seen in FIG. 4, the straight marginal edge 1 l is preferably placed immediately adjacent an annular bead 12 formed at the openable end of the can and the opposite margin 20 is located toward the opposite can end. In order to manipulate the spout member into the dispensing position as shown in FIGS. 5-8, the tab poriton of the margin 20 is pulled to cause the sheet material to be folded back upon itself. This, as indicated above, will cause the can-gripping area 1 la to grip the can still tighter as a result of the stretching action of the material overlapping area 1111. When the pour spout is placed in the pouring position as seen in FIGS. 6 and 7, and with the area 11a located immediately beneath the annular ridge 12, the sheet material is stretched over and engages the annular ridge or bead, as best seen in FIG. 8, to provide a preliminary fluid-tight seal. In addition, leakage is positively precluded by the sealing engagement of area 11a with the can body.

The reinforced pour surface is designated by reference numeral 24 and, as mentioned above, is formed in the illustrated embodiment by overlapping of the sheet material. However, the reinforced surface 24 may be formed by a separate member secured to the sheet material. For example, the sheet material forming the pour spout may be formed of extremely thin plastic which may be in the order of about two or three thousandths thick. However, the reinforced pour surface member may be formed by plastic material in the order of about ten thousandths thick or more.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3 there is seen an alternate means of constructing a pour spout in accordance with this invention. Here a length of flat tubing 25 is cut to have one edge portion 26 thereof straight across the tube and another edge portion 28 thereof diagonally across the tube. This diagonal cut may be curved to form one half of a parabola if desired. The diagonal cut 28 forms an elliptical configuration 28a when the tube is opened and placed about the periphery of a can, as best seen in FIG. 3. The can-gripping portion and overlapping portion are also provided by this structural arrangement and operate in the same manner as set forth with regard to the embodiment of FIGS. 1, 8 and 8a. Here a separate reinforcing member 29 is illustrated adjacent the area to which it is to be secured for providing the double thickness of material along the pour surface.

Referring now to FIGS. 9, l0 and 11 there is seen an alternate embodiment of the pour spout of this invention, and is'designated generally by reference numeral 30. This pour spout may be made by either means described above. Here a pour spout 30 may be associated with containers for solid articles such as nuts or the like. The pour spout is designated generally by reference numeral 30 and is secured to the outer periphery of a can 31 substantially in the same manner as described above with regard to the pour spout of FIGS. 2-6. However the pour spout 30 is made sufficiently long so that after being peeled back upon itself to ex tend upwardly from the top of can 31, it can be tied closed by forming a knot 32 as seen in FIG. 10. The pour spout 30 may also be provided with pressure sensitive adhesive 33 at a free end thereof which enables the user to fold the spout down upon the side of the can and secure it thereto by pressing firmly. The marginal portion in the region of the adhesive 33 may also form a tab when the pour spout is in its initial position about the periphery of the can to facilitate lifting and peeling of the pour spout over'the edge 34 of the can 31. It will be noted that while the knot 32 is utilized to seal the flexible pour spout, it will be understood that other means such as wire twist devices, plastic twist devices, clips or tape may be used.

Referring now to FIGS. 12 and 13 there is seen still another alternate embodiment of a pour spout constructed in accordance with this invention and designated generally by reference numeral 40. The tubular member or pour spout 40b is constructed and applied to the can in the same manner as the embodiment of FIGS. l-8a and preferably has a substantially straight upper marginal edge portion 41 in close tight proximity to the annular rim 42 of a can 43. In this embodiment the pour spout 40 has a plurality of apertures 44 formed therein. It is contemplated that the can 43 may have its contents submerged in a packing liquid as is often the case with canned fruits and vegetables. It is often desirable to drain this packing liquid from the can before removing the fruits and vegetables. The pour spout 40 is adapted to be peeled back and turned inside-out in the same manner as all of the pour spouts described above. In addition, the spout member is adapted to be pulled and folded across the open end of the can to provide a strainer for holding the solids while the packing liquid is poured through the apertures 44, as best seen in FIG. 13.

What has been described are several embodiments of a simple and efficient pour spout arrangement which forms a fluid-tight seal about the upper marginal periphery of a container such as a can to which it is attached to prevent backward dripping of the fluid when it is poured therefrom. Accordingly, variations, modifications may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concepts disclosed and claimed herein.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A container and pour spout structure comprising a container body adapted to be opened at one end thereof, a tubular flexible sheet material pour spout member about and substantially in contact at opposite ends thereof with said body, said flexible sheet material member having a first margin continuously encircling and tightly engaging and fixed with respect to said body adjacent said one end of the body and a second margin spaced substantially away from said one body end toward an opposite end of said body, said first margin having a continuous inner surface in sealing contact with said container body around its circumference and provided in its entirety by a single surface portion of said tubular member, said flexible sheet material member being manually manipulatable by peeling said second margin back over and past said first margin and beyond said one end of the body so that the sheet material member is turned inside-out and provides said pour spout, said first margin remains fixed adjacent said one end of the container body during said peeling back of said second margin.

2. A container and pour spout structure as defined in claim 1 wherein said second margin includes a pull-tab portion extending farther from said first margin than remaining portions of the second margin.

3. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1, wherein said first margin of said sheet material comprises a double thickness of the sheet material providing a fluid-tight seal between the pour spout member and said container body.

4. A container and pour spout structure as defined in claim 1 wherein said container includes a radially projecting annular ridge at said one end of the body, said flexible shet material member being stretchable over said ridge during said manual manipulation.

5. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein said flexible sheet material member is of double thickness along an axially extending portion thereof and to form a stiffener for the pour spout.

6. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein said flexible sheet material member extends from said container when peeled back upon itself a length sufficient to be tied to close off the top of the container.

7. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 2 wherein said ridge is circular in configuration and said body is cylindrical.

8. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1 further including stiffening means secured to said flexible sheet material along a longitudinally extending portion thereof to provide support along a pour surface.

9. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein said first margin is in contact with an underside of said ridge and includes a container engaging portion extending therefrom when the pour spout is in the pouring position, said flexible sheet material member further including an integral portion overlying said container engaging portion to increase gripping thereof with said container when the flexible sheet material is peeled back upon itself.

10. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein said flexible sheet material member is a flat sheet of plastic, said flat sheet of plastic having one marginal portion thereof cut substantially in parabolic fashion to have poriton of maximum length formed along opposite sides of the sheet, said opposite sides being folded uponthemselves to form a double thickness along said portion of maximum length for stiffening a pour area extending along said portion of maximum length.

1 l. A container and pour spout structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein said flexible sheet material member if formed of flattened tubing and wherein said first marginal portion is cut perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of said tubing and said second marginal portion is cut diagonally across said tubing with a portion of maximum length formed along one side thereof.

12. A container and strainer structure comprising a container body adapted to be opened at one end thereof, a tubular flexible sheet material strainer member about and substantially in contact at opposite ends thereof with said body, said flexible sheet material member having a first margin continuously encircling and tightly engaging and fixed with respect to said body adjacent said one end of the body and a second margin spaced substantially away from said one body end toward an opposite end of said body, said first margin having a continuous inner surface in sealing contact with said container body around its circumference and provided in its entirety by a single surface portion of said tubular member, said flexible sheet material member being manually manipulatable by peeling said second margin back over and past said first margin and beyond said one end of the body so that the sheet material member is turned inside-out, said first margin remaining fixed adjacent said one end of the container body during said peeling back of said second margin, said flexible sheet material member having a portion with a plurality of apertures to form a strainer adapted to be pulled over the top of the container for pouring of fluids therethrough.

13. A pour spout structure for a container body adapted to be opened at one end thereof, said pour spout structure comprising a tubular flexible sheet material pour spout member for encircling said body, said flexible sheet mateiral member having a first uninterrupted margin having an annular inner surface provided in its entirety by a single surface of said tubular member for continuously encircling and tightly sealingly engaging and fixedly holding said body adjacent said one end of the body, and a second margin spaced substantially away from said first margin for positioning toward an opposite end of said body, said flexible sheet material member being manually manipulatable by peeling said second margin back over and past said first margin and beyond said one end of the body so that the sheet material member is turned inside-out for providing a pour spout while said first margin remains fixed adjacent said one end of said body during said peeling back of said second margin.

14. A pour spout structure as defined in claim 13 wherein said second margin includes a pull-tab portion extending farther from said first margin than remaining portions of the second margin.

15. A pour spout structure as set forth in claim 13, wherein said first margin of said sheet material member comprises a double thickness of the sheet material for providing a fluid-tight seal between the pour spout member and said container body.

16. A pour spout structure as set forth in claim 13 wherein said flexible sheet material member is of double thickness along an axially extending portion thereof and to form a stiffener for the pour spout.

17. A pour spout structure as set forth in claim 13 wherein said flexible sheet material member extends from said container when peeled back upon itself a length sufficient to be tied to close off the top of the container.

18. A pour spout structure as set forth in claim 13 further including stiffening means secured to said flexible sheet material member along a longitudinally extending portion thereof to provide support along a pour surface.

19. A pour spout structure as set forth in claim 13 wherein said flexible sheet material member is a flat sheet of plastic, said flat sheet of plastic having one marginal portion thereof cut substantially in parabolic fashion to have portion of maximum length formed along opposite sides of the sheet, said opposite sides being folded upon themselves to form a double thickness along said portion of maximum length for stiffening a pour area extending along said portion of maximum length.

20. A pour spout structure as set forth in claim 13 wherein said flexible sheet material member is formed of flattened tubing and wherein said first marginal portion is cut perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of said tubing and said second marginal portion is cut diagonally across said tubing with a portion of maximum length formed along one side thereof.

21. A strainer structure for a container body adapted to be opened at one end thereof, said strainer structure comprising a tubular flexible sheet material strainer member for encircling said body, said flexible sheet material member having a first uninterrupted margin having an annular inner surface provided in its entirety by a single surface of said tubular member for continuously encircling and tightly sealingly engaging and fixedly holding said body adjacent said one end of the body, and a second margin spaced substantially away from said first margin for positioning toward an opposite end of said body, said flexible sheet material member being manually manipulatable by peeling said second margin back over and past said first margin and beyond said one end of the body so that the sheet material member is turned inside-out while said first margin remains fixed adjacent said one end of said body during said peeling back of said second margin, said flexible sheet material member having a portion with a plurality of apertures to form a strainer adapted to be pulled over the top of the container for pouring of fluids therethrough.

UNITED STATES PATENT omits CERTIFICATE OF CORREQHQN Patent 3, 907 J 172 iegtenibe ilw Inventor(s) Gary Martin Curtis It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. 4, line 6, "or" should be --to--= Col. 5, line 51, "she t" should be sheet-=- Col. 5, line 67, after "material" insert member-- Col. 6, 15.1 18 16, "poriton" should be "portion-- Col. 6, line 24, "if" should be --is-= gigned ahd Sealed this twentieth D y January 1976 [SEAL] A ttes t:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner ufPatents and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3279657 *Mar 15, 1965Oct 18, 1966Pogo Tool CorpPowdered insecticide or fertilizer distribution device
US3726447 *Feb 26, 1971Apr 10, 1973Illinois Tool WorksPlastic container spout
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4715510 *Feb 28, 1986Dec 29, 1987Leendert van der MeulenSet up piece for mounting on a can, containing a beverage
US4717037 *Oct 14, 1986Jan 5, 1988Meulen Leendert Van DerBeverage can drinking attachment
US5732851 *Mar 29, 1996Mar 31, 1998Griffin; Patrick J.Detachable beverage can attachment
US7690329 *Dec 21, 2007Apr 6, 2010Lixit CorporationPortable water container and drinking bowl for pets
US8955687 *Feb 13, 2012Feb 17, 2015Stratford DewsSeparation apparatus and method for extracting plant material
US20130248564 *Mar 14, 2013Sep 26, 2013Jaques Andre HumanDispensing guide
DE8710391U1 *Jul 29, 1987Sep 17, 1987K. Blattner Gmbh - Metall- Und Kunststoffverarbeitung, 8964 Nesselwang, DeTitle not available
WO2006005850A1 *Jun 17, 2005Jan 19, 2006Mc3Device for assisting transfer of liquid or particulate material for a pouring or receiving container and container equipped with same
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/189.7, 222/573, 222/527
International ClassificationB65D25/42, B65D25/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D25/42, B65D2517/0049
European ClassificationB65D25/42