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Publication numberUS3907289 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateMay 15, 1974
Priority dateMay 15, 1974
Also published asCA1002982A1
Publication numberUS 3907289 A, US 3907289A, US-A-3907289, US3907289 A, US3907289A
InventorsBondu Sr David M
Original AssigneeBondu Sr David M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf tee
US 3907289 A
Abstract
An improved golf tee having a tubular, elongated body form, the body having at one end a planar cross-sectional end surface cut at approximately a 45 DEG angle to the longitudinal axis of the tee body and a pointed, solid opposite end portion which may be received into the earth. In use the tee is positioned in the earth at approximately a 45 DEG angle with the sharp pointed end capable of being driven into hard turf, while the planar 45 DEG cross-sectional end forms a ball receiving surface adapted to receive and support a golf ball thereon. The tee provides driving alignment for the player by exposing a portion of the tee body, the longitudinal axis being directed along the intended flight path of the ball. The angular disposition with the turf reduces tee breakage by allowing the club face to strike the surface body of the tee obliquely. Increased ball driving distance is achieved due to direct ball, club face contact.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Bondu, Sr.

[ Sept. 23, 1975 GOLF TEE [76] Inventor: David M. Bondu, Sr., 1161 N.W.

57th St., Miami, Fla. 33127 [22] Filed: May 15, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 470,204

[57] ABSTRACT An improved golf tee having a tubular, elongated body form, the body having at one end a planar crosssectional end Surface cut at approximately a 45 angle to the longitudinal axis of the tee body and a pointed, solid opposite end portion which may be received into the earth. In use the tee is positioned in the earth at approximately a 45 angle with the sharp pointed end capable of being driven into hard turf, while the planar 45 cross-sectional end forms a ball receiving surface adapted to receive and support a golf ball thereon. The tee provides driving alignment for the player by exposing a portion of the tee body, the longitudinal axis being directed along the intended flight path of the ball. The angular disposition with the turf reduces tee breakage by allowing the club face to strike the surface body of the tee obliquely. Increased ball driving distance is achieved due to direct ball, club face contact.

2 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures GO LF TEE A BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION? i This invention relates'generally to an improved golfing tee which is utilized to position a ball above the surface of the earth allowing a player to drive a golf'ball from a particular position ona golf course.

In the past, golf tees have been utilized position'ed perpendicularly into the earth which support the golf 1 ball on the top, portionofthe tee. Contact with tihe club face while driving oftentimes breaks thetee-o r cause s the tee to take flight resulting in a loss of the teefApplicants device overcomes these problems by providing a tee that is positioned substantially at a 45 angle to the earth, exposing the tee body which is longitudinally positioned in the direction of the intended flight path of the ball. By providing a tee which supports the ball at this angle, as shown by Applicant, contact with the club face is oblique and thus does not cause a sheer force across the body of the tee which would otherwise destroy the tee. The Applicant has also discovered that such positioning can actually increase the distance which the ball travels due to either the particular spin placed on the ball or the reduced contact with the tee resulting in more momentum from the club face itself.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION An improved golf tee comprising a tubular body, said tubular body having a first end face substantially cut at a 45 angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the tubular body, the opposite end being substantially reduced in diameter and solid, having a pointed end portion for receipt into the earth. The body portion is elongated so that receipt into the earth will expose the outer circumference of the tee which may be aligned in the direction of the flight of the ball. The planar end which receives the ball is cut relative to the tee longitudinal axis so that in operation it is disposed horizontal to the earth for receiving a ball to be driven.

In operation, the player determines the direction of the flight of the ball, places the tee into the earth at a 45 angle, and places the ball upon the cross-sectional end surface. The ball is then supported thereupon above the earth's surface. The player drives the golf ball in the normal manner utilizing the tee as a direction indicating means.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved golfing tee.

And yet another object of this invention is to provide an improved golfing tee which reduces or eliminates damage to the tee, increases the driving distance of the ball supported thereon, and provides an alignment feature for the player while driving a golf ball.

In accordance with these and other objects which will be apparent hereinafter, the instant invention will now be described with particular reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 shows a side elevational view of Applicants invention.

FIG. 2 shows a side cross-sectional view of Applicants invention with a ball (dotted) supported thereon.

FIG. 3 shows a front elevational view of Applicants invention.

2 PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF Tnn i vi mrio Referring now'to the drawings, Applicants improved golf tee 'is shown generally at l0'comprising' a tubular I body portion l2having a hollow interior l8 withthe uppere'nd surfacebe'ing cut at a 45 plane to the longi-' tudinal axis of the tubular body portion 12, a's-shown-by surface 16. Surface 16 is adapted to receive'a golf ballwith a dotted golf ball 20 positioned upon upper tee surface 16 as would be utilized for driving a golf ball. The tee 10 is shown disposed in the surface of the earth which may be turf or grass orthe like with the solid portion 14 being firmly wedged into the earths surface at approximately a 45 angle. The spiked point 22 allows the tee to be positioned within hardened soil without excess physical force required by the player when positioning the tee. The upper tubular portion of the tee body is shown with tubular portion 12 having a hollow interior and terminating at its upper surface in the obliquely and angularly cut end face 16. A vertical plane passing through the tee will represent the desired direction and flight path of the ball so that the upper tubular portion 12 is exposed beyond the outer surface of the ball when viewed by an observer from above which helps provide alignment to the player. The solid lower portion of the tee may be extended upward to include a wider, diametrial section of the tubular body 12 to improve the structural rigidity of the tee. The tubular hollow portion allows for increased flexibility along the longitudinal axis of the tee when being struck by a golf club face.

FIG. 3 shows a view of Applicants tee without a golf ball disposed thereon as it would appear when directed along the flight of the ball prior to placing the ball thereupon and prior to placing it into the earth. The upper ball receiving surface 16 is sized so that it may receive and support a conventional golf ball so that the ball will rest on the surface face 16 itself.

Referring back to FIG. 2, in operation, the ball 20 is positioned upon the tee 10 which is disposed in the earth at approximately a 45 angle. By positioning the tee in the earth at this angle, the upper surface face 16 will then be substantially parallel to the surface of the earth, thus allowing for the ball to rest in a stable condition atop the tee. When the tee is placed in the earth, the vertical plane through the tee allows the tee to be aligned in the direction which it is desired for the player to position and strike the ball. When the ball is struck by a player, should the driver face of the golf club strike the tee, it will do so at a glancing or oblique angle thus minimalizing the possibility of damage to the tee. Also with the tee positioned at this angle, the possibility of the tee itself taking flight is also minimalized so that the tee does not become lost. The angular disposition provides other benefits to the player which include, as is believed by Applicant, to provide particular spin characteristics on the ball which is desirable to improve the flight characteristics.

The golf tee is constructed of a flexible, resilient material which is sturdy enough to support the golf ball but which can. be struck by a golf club face without shattering or destroying the material. in the preferred embodiment, the material is shown as plastic.

The instant invention has been shown and described herein in what is considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiment. It is recognized, however, that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention and that obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the art.

What I claim is:

l. A golf tee comprising:

a unitary body having an upper end face, said body further having a hollow cylindrical interior portion adjacent its upper end and a solid body portion angle to the longitudinal axis of said body.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1554721 *May 1, 1925Sep 22, 1925Getchell Herbert EGolf tee
US1588815 *Sep 30, 1925Jun 15, 1926Sillcocks Miller CoGolf tee
US2107706 *Jul 17, 1935Feb 8, 1938Morgan Maurice JGolf tee
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4192504 *Jun 9, 1977Mar 11, 1980Clugage Robert GMethod and apparatus for supporting a golf ball
US4205841 *Jul 7, 1978Jun 3, 1980Robert B. UvallesGolf tee
US5085431 *Oct 12, 1989Feb 4, 1992Mcguire Robert MGolf tee and placement tool
US5186455 *Jan 27, 1992Feb 16, 1993Rosetta James AProtective collar for golf tees
US5193803 *Dec 6, 1991Mar 16, 1993Flick Iii ConradGolf tee
US5413330 *Jan 19, 1994May 9, 1995Velocity Golf Products, Inc.Vented golf tee
US5626612 *Sep 19, 1994May 6, 1997Bartlett; Edwin C.Apparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US5683313 *May 8, 1995Nov 4, 1997Velocity Golf Products, Inc.Vented golf tee
US5759118 *Sep 26, 1996Jun 2, 1998Sroczynski; JanetGolf tee with crown-shaped head
US5782863 *Jul 30, 1996Jul 21, 1998Bartlett; Edwin C.Apparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US5879372 *May 5, 1997Mar 9, 1999Bartlett; Edwin C.Apparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US5961538 *Apr 10, 1996Oct 5, 1999Mitek Surgical Products, Inc.Wedge shaped suture anchor and method of implantation
US6004228 *Mar 24, 1998Dec 21, 1999Adam; John M.Vented angular golf tee
US6176794 *Jan 21, 1999Jan 23, 2001Frank Y. H. KimImpact boosting power tee for golf ball
US6270518Oct 5, 1999Aug 7, 2001Mitek Surgical Products, Inc.Wedge shaped suture anchor and method of implantation
US6726707Aug 7, 2001Apr 27, 2004Mitek Surgical Products Inc.Wedge shaped suture anchor and method of implementation
US6749620Mar 25, 2002Jun 15, 2004Edwin C. BartlettApparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US6923823Nov 9, 2000Aug 2, 2005Edwin C. BartlettApparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US6960143 *Apr 25, 2003Nov 1, 2005Sato Factory Co., Ltd.Golf tee
US7217280Mar 29, 2004May 15, 2007Bartlett Edwin CApparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US7232455May 26, 2004Jun 19, 2007Depuy Mitek, Inc.Wedge shaped suture anchor and method of implantation
US7850550 *Jun 30, 2009Dec 14, 2010Nania John JMultipurpose golf tool
US7914398 *Mar 10, 2009Mar 29, 2011Vaughan TuckGolf training aid
US7998171Aug 2, 2005Aug 16, 2011Depuy Mitek, Inc.Apparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US8021390Dec 13, 2006Sep 20, 2011Bartlett Edwin CApparatus and method for anchoring sutures
US20130190108 *Jan 23, 2013Jul 25, 2013Lon KleinGolf tee
WO1995019819A1 *Jan 13, 1995Jul 27, 1995Velocity Golf Products IncVented golf tee
WO1996035486A1 *May 8, 1996Nov 14, 1996Thomas A DiscoVented golf tee
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/403
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0018
European ClassificationA63B57/00C