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Publication numberUS3907496 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateMay 13, 1974
Priority dateJan 18, 1971
Also published asDE2202017A1, DE2202017B2
Publication numberUS 3907496 A, US 3907496A, US-A-3907496, US3907496 A, US3907496A
InventorsNeel Jean, Papillon Bernard
Original AssigneeRhone Progil
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dry cleaning various articles
US 3907496 A
Abstract
A bath for dry cleaning solid articles, consisting essentially of at least one usual hydrocarbon dry cleaning solvent having 2 to 8 carbon atoms, which contains per liter 0.5 to 50 grams of water, 1 to 20 grams of isopropylamine-dodecylbenzene sulfonate, and 0.05 to 10 grams of a copolymer of at least 10 moles of a first monomer selection from the group consisting of methacrylic acid with at most 90 moles of a second monomer and consisting of alkyl acrylate and alkyl methacrylate the alkyl of which has 1 to 8 atoms, the molecular weight of the copolymer being 2,000 to 100,000.
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United States Patent Nel et al.

DRY CLEANING VARIOUS ARTICLES Inventors: Jean Nel, Lyon; Bernard Papillon, Lyon-La-Mulatiere, both of France Assignee: Societe Rhone-Progil, Paris, France Filed: May 13, 1974 Appl. No.1 469,364

Related US. Application Data Continuation of Ser. No. 218.021. Jan. 14. 1972. abandoned.

Foreign Application Priority Data Jan. 18, 1971 France 71.01434 US. Cl. 8/142; 252/D1G. 15 Int. Cl D061 l/OO Field of Search 8/142 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1934 Fikentscher 8/62 1/1971 Galven et al 252/D1G. 15

3.310.409 3/1967 Michael et a1. 8/142 X 3.310.498 3/1967 Michael ct al..... 8/142 X 3,523,088 8/1970 Dean ct a1. 252/89 X 3,535,258 10/1970 Sabatelli 252/105 3.628.911 12/1971 Grunevalder 8/142 Primary E.raminerDonald Levy Attorney. Agent. or Firm-Norman S. Blodgett; Gerry A. Blodgett [57] ABSTRACT A bath for dry cleaning solid articles. consisting essen tially of at least one usual hydrocarbon dry cleaning solvent having 2 to 8 carbon atoms. which contains per liter 0.5 to 50 grams of water. 1 to 20 grams of isopropylaminc-dodecylbenzene sulfonate. and 0.05 to 10 grams of a copolymer of at least 10 moles of a first monomer selection from the group consisting of methacrylic acid with at most 90 moles of a second monomer and consisting of alkyl acrylatc and alkyl methacrylate the alkyl of which has 1 to 8 atoms. the molecular weight of the copolymer being 2.000 to 100.000.

9 Claims, No Drawings DRY CLEANING VARIOUS ARTICLES This is a continuation, of application Ser.- No. 218,021 filed Jan. 14, 1972, now abandoned.

The invention relates to an improvement to drycleaning various articles, inter alia textile articles, i.e. the washing of textile or other fibres or articles with nonaqueous solvents. The invention relates more par ticularly to the use of a novel kind of adjuvant which improves cleaning and gives better stain removal and whiteness. Accordingly, the invention comprises a novel agent which prevents soil redepositionon an article from which stains have been removed in an organic solvent bath. The invention also relates to baths containing the aforementioned agent.

Dry-cleaning is very widely used at present, and its usefulness is becoming more evident every day. Whether, the solvent used is dry or contains a little water, it is usually necessary to add surface-active agents soluble in the given solvent to the cleaning bath, in order to improve stain removal. It has thus become conventional to mix the solvents with intensifiers, more particularly agents such as amine alkyl-arylsulphonates ethoxylated derivatives or amines or of aliphatic alcohols, or alkyl-polyethoxy phenols. In spite of these admixtures, which are often accompanied by optical bluing agents and bleaching agents, the degree of stain removal or whiteness of washed articles is often reduced because dirt in the baths is redeposited on the washing. To obviate this disadvantage, the invention provides a novel means which can give much better cleaning than can be obtained with conventional baths.

The novel anti-redeposition agent for dry-cleaning baths comprises one or more polymers of acrylic or methacrylic acid or a copolymer of one of the aforementioned acids with an acrylic or methacrylic ester which is soluble in or at least swells considerably in wa ter.

Usually, the esters which can form copolymcrs with acrylic and/or methacrylic acids, are aliphatic; in practice they are usuallyalkyl esters containing from 1 to 8 carbon atoms and, more particularly, methyl, ethyl. propyl, isopropyl, butyl, isobutyl and tert-butyl acrylates and/or methacrylates.

In order to satisfy the required conditions of solubility or at least of adequate swelling in water, the polymers according to the invention preferably have a molecular weight of between 2,000 and 100,000, or preferably between 5,000 and 50,000.

When the agent is a copolymer of an acid with an cster, ther e should be at least 10 molecules of acrylic and/6r methacrylic acid per 100 molecules ofmonomer which it contains.

Since the preparation of acrylic homopolymers and copolymers is well known, it will not be described here.

It has unexpectedly been found that the aforementioned polymers, when added in small proportions to dry-cleaning baths, are very effective in preventing soil redeposition, when the bath contains a small proportion of water, e.g. up to 100 g H O per liter of solvent.

It is found that acrylic polymers according to the invention containing from 10 to 100 acid groups per 100 acrylic or methacrylic groups have the most effective anti-redeposition action when the organic solvent contains between 0.5 and 50 g of water per liter.

Preferably, the adjuvant according to the invention is used with one or more other additives of known kind,

inter alia with cleaning intensifiers. Usually the proportion of the adjuvant is small compared with the proportion of intensifier; it may be eg as low as 1% of the weight of the intensifier and is preferably between 2 and 20%. Compared with the quantity of solvent, the quantity of the adjuvant according to the invention may advantageously vary between 0.05 and 10 gliter; of course, these figures are approximate and the proportion may vary outside the afore-mentioned limits depending on the nature of the solvent, the water content, the nature and proportion of the intensifier and the particular nature of the chosen anti-redeposition agent.

Very advantageously, known amine alkyl-arylsulphonates may be associated with the acrylic homopolymers or copolymersaccording to the invention.

The agents according to the invention can be used with all solvents commonly used for drycleaning, inter alia chlorinated, fluorinated or chlorofluorinated hy drocarbons, more particularly aliphatic hydrocarbons, and especially trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene; benzene hydrocarbons, inter alia benzene, toluene or xylene; or aliphatic hydrocarbons such as hexane, heptane, octane, petroleum distillate, petroleum ether, etc.

The agents according to the invention can be used in cold or hot cleaning and are of use in all known methods of cleaning with organic solvents, provided that the latter contain a certain proportion of water as explained hereinbefore.

The invention is non-limitatively illustrated in the following examples.

GENERAL METHOD OF OPERATlON In all the examples, the bath comprised 500 ml perchloroethylene in which the quantities stated in each example of the intensifier and acrylic polymer according to the invention had been dissolved. Cleaning was performed at 22C for 30 minutes, with agitation at reciprocations per minute. The operations were performed in a machine known as a Tergotometer (standardised), containing 4 tubs for making 4 tests simultaneously.

In each test, a strip of cotton fabric measuring 13 X 21 cm which had been artificially soiled (EMPA soil of Fabric Incorporated (New York)) was treated in the presence of a clean strip of the same cloth.

After cleaning, the whiteness of the previously soiled strip and of the accompanying clean strip were determined in known manner with an Elrepho apparatus having a number 8 filter. The whiteness of the first strip after washing shows the degree of cleaning, whereas the whiteness of the second strip shows the extent to which soil redeposition has beenreduced. In the following examples, use is made of the two aforementioned parameters and their sum is also noted, since this is important in showing the total effect of the adjuvant tested.

The following abbreviations are used in the examples:

TS: soiled cloth TP: clean cloth DBSI: isopropylamine-dodecyl-benzene sulphonate ABSA: another amine aryl alkyl sulphonate GIL: an agent according to the invention comprising a copolymer of 50 mols of acrylic acid with 50 mls of isopropyl acrylate and having a molecular weight of approx. 10,000.

EXAMPL S 1 to i The perchloroethylcnc bath contained 6 g of water per liter and 5 g/l of an intensifier, which was DBSl in Examples 1 to 3 and ABSA in Examples 4 and 5. In a first series of'tests. the measured whiteness was asfollows:

WHITENESS EXAMPLES No. TS Total 1 .DBSl 59.2 (15.3 124.5 2 DBSl +0.3 g/l c111. 63.7 77- 140.7 3 'DBSl +0.05 g/l (111. 59.5 72.5 132.0 4 .ABsA m.- (19, 130.- 5 BSA 013 g/l G11. (11.11 75.4 137.2

As can be seen. the addition of small quantities of .-G1L acrylic polymer according to the invention subliter of solvent. The observed results were as follows:

EXAMPLES WHITENESS No. TS TP Total (1 D851 (15.- 15.5 130.5 7 [)BS1 0.3 g/l (ill. 67.] 79.6 146.8 8 DBSl +0.1 g/l (ill. (17.7 78.- 145.7 9 ABSA 014.- 72.- 136.-

ABSA 0.3 g/l (ill. (14.4 110.7 145.1

These results, by comparison with Examples'l to 5. show that an increase in the water content is accompanied by an increase in the antiredeposition effect of the adjuvant according to the invention. 0

' EXAMPLES 11 1Q 16 Tests were made using a still larger content of water. Le. g per liter of'solvent. all the other conditions remaining the same as in the preceding examples.

EXAMPLES WHITENESS No. TS TP Total 11 0851, 71.5 30.6 152.1 12 DBS1+0.3 g/l (111. 71.5 11-15 155.3 13 DBSI +0.1 g/l (111. 73.x 113.0 157.4 14 ons1+005 g/l (111. 72.5 in.- 154.5 15 ABSA (111.3 7x.- 140.3 16 ABSA +0.1 g/l (111. 71.4 x55 154.0

Example 13. compared with the other results. shows that the optimum content of GIL acrylic polymer was about 0.1 g/l under the test conditions.

We claim:

1 A bath for dry cleaning solid articles, consisting essentially of at least one usual hydrocarbon dry cleaning solvent having 2 to 8 carbon atoms. which contains per liter 0.5 to 5.0 grams of water. 1 to 20 grams of isopropylamine-dodecyl-benzene sulfonate. and 0.05 to 10 grams of a.copolymer of at least 10 moles of a first monomer selectionfrom the group consisting of acrylic acid and methaerylic acid with at most moles of a second-monomer and consisting of alkyl acrylate and alkyl methacrylate the alkyl of which has 1 to 8 carbon atoms, the molecular weight of the copolymer being 2,000 to 100,000..

2. Bath according to claim 1, wherein said solvent is trichloroethylene.

3. Bath according to claim 1, wherein said solvent is perchloroethylene.

4. Bath according to claim 1, wherein said copolymer is formed by about 5.0'moles of acrylic acid with 50 moles of isopropyl aerylate. the molecular weight of the copolymer being in the range of 5. 000 to 50.000.

5. Bath according to claim 4, wherein said solvent is trichloroethylene.

6. Bath according to claim 4, wherein said solvent is perchlorocthylenc.

7..A bath for dry cleaning solid articles, consisting essentially of at least one usual hydrocarbon dry cleaning solvent having 2 to 8 carbon atoms. which contains per liter 0.5 to 50 grams of water. 1 to 20 grams ofa surface active agent which is isopropyl-amine dodecyl-benzene sulfonate. and 0.05 to 10 grams of a copolymer of 50 moles of acrylic acid with 50 moles of isopropyl acrylate.

8. A bath for dry cleaning solid articles, consisting essentially of at least one usual hydrocarbon dry cleaning solvent which is trichloroethylenc. which contains per liter 0.5 to 50 grams of water. 1 to 20 grams ofa surface active agent selected from the group consisting of amine alkyl-aryl-sulfonates. and 0.05 to 10 grams of a copolymer of at least 10 moles of a first monomer selection from the group consisting of acrylic acid and mcthacrylic acid with at most'90 moles of a second monomer and consisting of alkyl acrylate and alkyl methacrylate the alkyl of which has 1 to 8 carbon atoms. the molecular weight of the copolymer being 5,000 to 50.000.

9. A bath for dry cleaning solid articles. consisting essentially of at least one usual hydrocarbon dry cleaning solvent which is'perchloroethylene. which contains per liter 0.5 to 50 grams of water. 1 to 20 grams ofa surface active agent selected from the group consisting of amine alkyl-aryl-sulfonates. and 0.05 to 10 grams of a copolymer of atleast 10 moles of a first monomer selection from the group consisting of' acrylic acid and methacrylic acid with at most 90 moles of a second monomer and consisting of alkyl aerylate and alkyl methacrylate the alkyl of which has 1 to- 8 carbon atoms. the molecular weight of the copolymer being 5.000 to 50.000. I

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4115061 *Jan 26, 1977Sep 19, 1978Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AktienCombination method for cleaning greatly soiled textiles
US4118344 *Jun 23, 1977Oct 3, 1978The Dow Chemical CompanyDrycleaning detergent solution
US5547476 *Oct 17, 1995Aug 20, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyDry cleaning process
US5591236 *Oct 17, 1995Jan 7, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPolyacrylate emulsified water/solvent fabric cleaning compositions and methods of using same
US5630847 *Oct 17, 1995May 20, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPerfumable dry cleaning and spot removal process
US5630848 *Oct 17, 1995May 20, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyDry cleaning process with hydroentangled carrier substrate
US5632780 *Oct 17, 1995May 27, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyDry cleaning and spot removal proces
US5681355 *Aug 8, 1996Oct 28, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyHeat resistant dry cleaning bag
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US7446083Nov 21, 2007Nov 4, 2008Dry, Inc.Dry-cleaning article, composition and methods
US7744654Jun 29, 2010Dry, Inc.Dry-cleaning article, composition and methods
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Classifications
U.S. Classification8/142, 510/287, 510/342, 510/476, 510/290, 510/361
International ClassificationD06F43/00, D06L1/04, D06L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06L1/04, D06F43/007
European ClassificationD06L1/04, D06F43/00D