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Publication numberUS3907736 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateMay 20, 1974
Priority dateMay 20, 1974
Publication numberUS 3907736 A, US 3907736A, US-A-3907736, US3907736 A, US3907736A
InventorsBarton Kenneth R, Vachon Raymond N
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finishing agents for textiles
US 3907736 A
Abstract
Aqueous blends of (1) a water-dissipatable linear copolyester; (2) an amino resin crosslinking agent; and (3) a poly(oxyethylene)-containing glycol are useful for modifying the hand of fabrics and for reducing the tendency of knitted and woven polyester containing fabrics to snag or pick on sharp or abrasive objects in wear.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Barton et al.

[ Sept. 23, 1975 FINISHING AGENTS FOR TEXTILES lnventors: Kenneth R. Barton; Raymond N.

Vachon, both of Kingsport, Tenn.

Assignee: Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester. NY.

Filed: May 20, 1974 Appl. No: 471,427

US Cl 260/29.4 R; 260/850; 260/849; 428/254; 428/272 Int. Cl. C08L 67/00 Field of Search 260/850, 29.4; 117/1395 A References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1970 Shields et al. 260/40 P 3.631,l36 12/1971 Spiller 7. 260/292 E 3,652,583 3/1972 Tajima et a1... 260/849 3,734,874 5/1973 Kibler et a1. v. 260/29.Z E

Primary Examiner-John C. Bleutge Assistant ExaminerArthur H. Koeckert Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Elliott Stern; Daniel B. Reece, Ill

[ ABSTRACT Aqueous blends of (l) a waterdissipatable linear copolyester; (2) an amino resin crosslinking agent; and

10 Claims, No Drawings FINISHING AGENTS FOR TEXTILES This invention relates to compositions useful as finishing agents for textile articles. More specifically, this invention relates to compositions useful as finishing agents for textile articles containing polyester fibers. The compositions of this invention are useful for modifying the hand or handle of polyester fabrics as well as reducing the tendency of knitted and woven fabrics constructed from texturized polyester yarns to snag or pick on sharp or abrasive objects during wear.

Knitted and woven fabrics constructed from texturized polyester yarns or yarns containing polyester fibers have the unfortunate tendency to snag or pick during normal wear. Snags detract from the appearance of garments and shorten acceptable wear-life. The hand or handle of polyester-containing fabrics, particularly those containing only texturized polyester yarns, is also difficult to modify permanently with conventional finishing agents in that many have a tendency to lose their finish during dry cleaning and washing procedures.

lt is an object of this invention to provide compositions useful as finishing agents that impart a durable handle to textile articles containing polyester fibers and that reduce the tendency of fabrics constructed from textured polyester yarns to snag 'or pick on sharp or abrasive objects in wear. It is a further object of this invention to provide crosslinkable, aqueous blends when applied to fabrics which provide excellent adhesion to polyester and many other fibrous substrates, good wash resistance, excellent dry cleaning resistance, and excellent handle. It is a further object of this invention to provide novel compositions which have applications in the areas of spray binding for staple fibers as a nonwoven fabric binder, a knit fabric hand builder, an antipick resin, a flocking adhesive and a fabric finish.

Water-dissipatable copolyesters derived from at least one dicarboxylic acid component, at least one diol component, at least 20 mole percent of said diol being a poly(ethylene)glycol, and a difunctional monomer containing a -SO M group wherein M is a monovalent alkali metal are disclosed in US. Pat. Nos. 3,734,874, 3,546,008 and 3,779,993. Furthermore, aqueous dispersions of coating compositions consisting of the above type copolyesters dispersed together with a melamine-formaldehyde resin have been sold under the trade name of WDX-743, WDX-744 and Eastman Binder DFB, products of Eastman Kodak Company. These aqueous coating compositions, however, provide coatings which produce a very stiff, unpleasant hand or feeling to polyester fabrics. The compositions of this invention improve over the prior art compositions in that they impart a durable handle to textile articles and have advantageous picking and snagging properties.

In one aspect of this invention there is provided textile finishing agents which are prepared from aqueous blends of l a water dissipatable linear copolyester of the type disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,734,874 and US Pat. No. 3,546,008, (2) an amino crosslinking resin, and (3) a polyoxyethylene containing glycol. An acid or latent acid catalyst is used to effect a thermallyinduced crosslinking reaction which, when carried out on the surface of textile fibers, leaves a water-insoluble film having good adhesion to textile fibers. The compositions thus formed, which partially or wholly covers the fiber surfaces and in some instances forms interfiber bonds, imparts an illusion of added weight and bulk to the fabric and reduces the tendency of the fabric to snag or pick. The handle of the finished fabric may be controlled by judicious selection of the ratio of the three components in finishing agent formulation as hereinafter described.

The compositions of this invention can be more specifically defined as an aqueous blend of the following components:

I. from about 50 to about 85 (preferably about to about parts by weight of a linear, waterdissipatable polyester derived from components (A), (B) and (C) as follows:

A. at least one dicarboxylic acid,

B. at least one diol, at least 20 mole percent of said diol component being a poly(ethylene)glycol having the formula H-OCH CH ),,OH wherein n is an integer of from 2 to about 14, and

C. at least one difunctional dicarboxylic acid sulfomonomer containing a SO M group attached to an aromatic nucleus, wherein M is Na", Li, K, or a combination thereof, said sulfomonomer component constituting at least about 8 mole percent to about 45 mole percent of the sum of the moles of said components (A) and (C);

2. from about l5 to about 50 (preferably about 20 to about 30) parts by weight of at least one waterdissipatable amino resin having atleast two reactive groups, said resin being selected from the group consisting of melamine-formaldehyde condensates, methylated melamine-formaldehyde condensates, urea-formaldehyde condensates, methylated urea-formaldehyde condensates, guanamineformaldehyde condensates and methylated guanamine-formaldehyde condensates; and

3. from about 10 to about (preferably about 10 to about 60) parts by weight of a water-dissipatable nonionic linear poly(oxyethylene) containing glycol having the formula (I) HO-(-CH CH O)-,, ,H wherein m is an integer from about 4 to about I50,

wherein x, y, and z are integers, the sum of which results in a glycol having a molecular weight from about 1,000 to about 14,000, and the ratio of x z to y is such that the hydrophile/lipophile balance is from about 4.5 to about 30.5.

ln one preferred embodiment of this invention the above aqueous blends contain about 0.5 to about 50 percent by weight of combined solids supplied by components l), 2) and 3).

The dicarboxylic acid component (A) from which the linear water-dissipatable polyester component of this invention is prepared can be any aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, or aromatic acid. Examples of such dicarboxylic acids include oxalic; malonic; dimethylmalonic; succinic; glutaric; adipic; trimethyladipic; pimelic; 2,2-dimethylgultaric; azelaic; sebacic; fumaric; maleic; itaconic; l,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic; 1,2- cyclohexanedicarboxylic, 1,3- cyclohexanedicarboxylic; l,4-

cyclohexanedicarboxylic; phthalic; terephthalic; isophthalic; 2,5-norbornanedicarboxylic; l,4-naphthalic; diphenic; 4,4'-oxydibenzoic; diglycolic; thiodipropiglycol;

onic; 4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoic; and 2,5-

naphthalenedicarboxylic acids. In a preferred embodiment of this invention isophthalic acid is the dicarboxylic acid utilized. If terephthalic acid is used as the dicarboxylic acid component of the polyester, especially good results are achieved when at least five mole percent of one of the other acids listed above is used.

It should be understood that the use of the corresponding acid anhydrides, esters, and acid chlorides of these acids is included in the term dicarboxylic acid." The esters are preferred, examples of which include dimethyl l,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate; dimethyl 2,6- naphthalenedicarboxylate; dibutyl 4,4-sulfonyldibenzoate; dimethyl isophthalate; dimethyl terephthalate; and diphenyl terephthalate. Copolyesters may'be prepared from two or more of the above dicarboxylic acids or derivatives thereof.

At least about mole percent of the diol component (B) used in preparing the water-dissipatable polyester component of the invention is a poly(ethylene)glycol having the formula H+OCH CH ),,OH wherein n is an integer of from two to about ten. Examples of suitable poly(ethylene)-glycols include diethylene, triethylene, tetraethylene, pentaethylene, hexaethylene, heptaethylene, octaethylene, nonaethylene, and decaethylene glycols, and mixtures thereof. Preferably the poly(ethylene)glycol employed in the polyester of the present invention is diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol, or mixtures thereof. The remaining portion of the diol component is at least one aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, or aromatic diol. Examples of these diols include ethylene propylene glycol; 1,3-propanediol; 2,4- dimethyl-Z-ethylhexanel ,3-diol; 2,2-dimethyl-l ,3- propanediol, 2-ethyl-2-butyl-l,3-propanediol; 2-ethyl- 2-isobutyl-l ,3-propanediol, l,3-butanediol; 1,4- butanediol; l,5-pentanediol; 1,6-hexanediol; 2,2,4- trimethyl-l ,6-hexanediol; l,2 cyclohexanedimethanol; 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-l ,3-cyclobutanediol; and pxylylenediol. Copolymers may be prepared from two or more of the above diols.

The third component (C) used to prepare the waterdissipatable polyester is a difunctional monomer containing a SO M group attached to an aromatic nucleus, wherein M is hydrogen or a metal ion. This difunctional monomer component may be either a dicarboxylic acid (or derivative thereof) containing a SO M group or a diol containing a -SO M group.

The metal ion of a sulfonate salt group may be Nafi,

Li or K".

Other effective difunctional monomers containing a SO M group attached to an aromatic nucleus include metal salts of aromatic sulfonic acids (or esters thereof). These monomers have the general formula ROOC o -O-Y-SO3 M ROOC/ o SO M group attached to an aromatic nucleus include metal salts of sulfodiphenyl ether dicarboxylic acids (or esters thereof). These monomers have the general formula wherein R is hydrogen, an alkyl group of one to eight carbon atoms, or phenyl, M is Na Li, or K*, and a is l, 2, or 3. Examples of preferred monomers here are dimethyl 5-[4-(sodiosulfo)phenoxy]isophthalate, dimethyl 5-[4-(sodiosulfo)phenoxy]terephthalate, and 5-[4-(sodiosulfo)phenoxy]isophthalic acid.

The water-dissipatable polyester should contain at least about eight mole percent of the monomer based on total acid content, with about 10 mole percent giving particularly advantageous results. Greater dissipatability is achieved when the difunctional monomer constitutes from about 10 mole percent to about 45 mole percent of the total content of acid of the polyester.

To obtain the polyester component of this invention, the difunctional monomer containing the SO M group may be added directly to the esterification reaction mixture from which the polyester will be made. Thus, these monomers can be used as a component in the original polyester reaction mixture. Other various processes which may be employed in preparing these polyesters are well known in the art and are illustrated in such patents as US. Pat. Nos. 2,465,319; 3,018,272; 2,901,466; and 3,075,952. These patents illustrate ester interchange and polymerization processes.

Whenever the term inherent viscosity (I.V.) is used in this description, it will be understood to refer to viscosity determinations made at 25C. using 0.5 gram of polymer per ml. of a solvent composed of 60% phenol and 40% tetrachloroethane as parts by weight. In addition, whenever the terms dissipatable, dissipated or dissipate," are used in this descrip tion, it will be understood to refer to the action of water or aqueous solutions on the components of the blends of this invention. The terms are specifically intended to cover those situations wherein the solution dissolves and/or disperses these blends. Furthermore, whenever the word water is used in this description, it includes not only aqueous solutions but also hot aqueous solutions.

In an especially preferred embodiment of this invention the water-dissipatable polyester component is derived from 90 mole percent isophthalic acid, mole percent of 5-sodiosulfoisophthalic acid, and 100 mole percent of diethylene glycol and having an inherent viscosity (l.V.) of at least 0.30 as measured at 25 using 0.50 gram of polymer per 100 ml. of a solvent com posed of 60 percent phenol and 40 percent tetrachloroethane. The copolyester useful in this invention may be terminated with either hydroxy or carboxy end-groups. In addition, the end-group functionality of the copolyester, and therefore its crosslinkability, may be increased by reaction of the high molecular weight linear polyester with trior tetrafunctional hydroxy or carboxy compounds such as trimethylolpropane, pentaerythritol, or trimellitic anhydride in a manner known in the art.

Examples of the water-dispersible amino resins useful in this invention include the melamine-formaldehyde condensates, the methylated (wholly or partially) melamine-formaldehyde condensates, the ureaformaldehyde condensates, methylated (wholly or partially) urea-formaldehyde condensates, the methylated (wholly or partially) guanamine-formaldehyde condensates, and the like. These amino resins are known in the art and can be prepared by known means or obtained commercially. The properties of these resins, as well as some of their uses in textiles applications, are set forth in Mark, Wooding, and Atlas, Chemical Aftertrealment of Textiles, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (1971), pages 267-355. Preferred amino resins useful in this invention are hexamethoxymethyl melamine (Cymel 300, a registered trademark of American Cyanamid Company), partially methylated melamine formaldehyde adduct sold also under various trade names (for example, Aerotex M-3, a registered trademark of American Cyanamid Company), and various urea-formaldehyde condensates such as Aerotex Resin 802, a registered trademark of American Cyanamid Company.

Examples of poly(oxyethylene) containing glycols useful in this invention are those which have an average molecular weight of from 200 to about 7,000, the only requirement being that the poly(oxyethylene)-glycols be dispersible in water. Especially preferred poly(oxyethylene)-glycols useful in this invention are those having an average molecular weight of from about 1000 to about 6000 (eg., having the formula HO(CH CH O),,,H wherein n is an integer of from about to about 130), sold under the trade name Carbowax, a registered trademark of Union Carbide Corporation. Examples of the specific Carbowaxes useful in this invention are Carbowax 200, Carbowax 4000, and Carbowax 1000, Carbowax 4000 being especially preferred. Also useful as the poly(oxyethylene)glycol component of this invention are the water-dispersible ethylene oxidepropylene oxide block copolymer glycols which are also sold commercially under the trade name of Pluronics, a registered trademark of Wyandotte Chemicals Corporation. These glycols are the condensates of ethylene oxide with hydrophobic bases formed by condensing propylene oxide with propylene glycol and have the general formula H+ocH,CHrmocucHm vocn cumon where .r, y, and z are integers, the sum of which results in molecular weights ranging from about 1,000 to 14,000, preferably 3,000 to 10,000. The ratio ofx z/y is such that the HLB (hydrophile/lipophile balance) is from about 4.5 to about 30.5, preferably 6.6 to 24.5. [The HLB of a nonionic surfactant is defined as the approximate weight percent of ethylene oxide in the surfactant divided by 5. See W. C. Griffin, J. Soc. Cosmetic Chemists, l, 311 (1949).]

Examples of useful Pluronics are Pluronic F38, L35 and P65.

The ratio of poly(oxyethylene) containing glycol to combined parts of copolyester and amino resin used in the dispersions of this invention determines the softness of the cured film and therefore the softness of the finished textile article. If no poly(oxyethylene)glycol is used, the finished article tends to be rather stiff and boardy. Softness increases with increasing poly(oxyethylene)glycol content. Surprisingly, it has been found that the articles coated with the compositions of this invention show better softness or handle properties than the prior art compounds. In a preferred embodiment of the invention 10 to 60 parts by weight of poly (oxyethylene)glycol per parts of copolyester- /amino resin is used to produce commercially attractive hands of increasing softness.

The optimum ratio of copolyester to amino resin depends upon several factors, including amino resin functionality and reactivity, copolyester end-group concentration and reactivity, and molecular weight and concentration of poly(oxyethylene)glycol. The copolyester/amino resin ratios found useful in practice of the invention range from about 1:1 to 6:1, the preferred ratio being about 3:] copolyester/amino resin.

The above components 1), 2) and 3) are, for convenience in commercial handling, dispersed in enough water to bring the total solids content to approximately 30 percent. This concentration can then be readily diluted to the desired level for application to textile substrates when ready for use. It is desirable but not essential to include 1 to 10 parts (4 to 5 parts preferred) of a poly(oxyethylated) alkyl phenol to the 30 percent solid dispersion. This type of nonionic surfactant improves the storage life and electrolyte stability of the formulation and serves as a wetting agent for the substrate. Poly(oxyethylated) alkyl phenols are sold under various trade names, such as Triton, a registered trademark of Rohm & Haas Company, and Igepal, a registered trademark of CAP Corporation.

To apply a finish of the type disclosed in this invention to a textile substrate, a pad bath containing the desired component is prepared either by direct addition of the individual components to water or by dilution of a high solids (30 percent, for example) dispersion. The solids content of the pad bath is adjusted so as to obtain about 0.5 to 5 percent (1 to 3 percent preferred) addon of finish on the fabric when dried. in order to accelerate the curing or crosslinking reaction which insolubilizes the finish on the fabric, it is necessary to include an acid or a latent acid catalyst in the pad bath. Generally, from 0.5 to 3 percent (based on weight of solids in the pad bath) of catalyst is sufficient to effect a cure under typical textile processing conditions. The optimum catalyst concentration depends upon the catalyst used, the nature of the amino resin, and the time and temperature of curing. Examples of such suitable catalysts which may be used to promote the reaction of the amino resin with the hydroxy or carboxy groups available in the dispersion are well known in the art and include p-toluenesulfonic acid, citric acid, glycolic acid, oxalic acid, amine hydrochloride, zinc fluoborates, and

solids). To 500 g. of the diluted formulation is added 0.45 g. of citric acid (3% catalyst based on weight of bath solids). A 100% textured polyester (1-50 denier) double-knit fabric (8 oz./sq. yd., Ponti de Roma style) magnesium chloride. Citric acid and p-tolueriesulfonic is padded with the above formulation, dried at 220F. acid are preferred. Further examples of'these useful for minutes and cured at 340F. for 90 seconds. The catalysts are described in Mark, Wooding, and Atlas, dry weight increase of the fabric is 2.1%. In comparison Chemical Aftertreatment ofTextiles, John Wiley & Sons with the original, untreated fabric (heated in the same 1971 pages 332334. The optimum catalyst concenmanner), the finished fabric feels considerably heavier tration depends upon the catalyst used, the nature of 10 and Slightly stiffer. The handle of the treated fabric is the amino resin, and the time and temperature of curnot changed significantly by typical home laundering ing. For a given formulation the optimum catalyst and procedures. Resistance of the treated fabric to snagging catalyst concentration are best determined by experias measured by the Mace Test (.1. A. Finnigan, Textile mentation. The formulation containing catalyst is ap- Institute and Industry, PP- 164467, e, 1972) is also li d to h il bst t b ddi (di i nd increased. The Mace rating of the original fabric is 2.5, i i b verpray or b ki l Th ti l i whereas the Mace rating of the treated fabric is 4.0. (5 then dried and thermally cured by passing it through, n gg g; l y bad gg g)- for example, an oven or a bank of infrared heaters. No EXAMPLE 3 additional treatments are necessary, but the article may be ft h d if desired Pad baths (approximately 3%total solids) containing The following examples illustrate the invention. the ingredients listed in Table l a P p in the manner described in Examples 1 and 2 except 1% (on EXAMPLE 1 weight of solids) of p-toluenesulfonic acid catalyst is PREPARATION OF 30% CONCENTRATE used instead of citric acid. Several 100% polyester fab- I rics are padded with the formulations shown so as to v To 313 Parts of Warm demmefallzed obtain about 2% dry add-on (based on initial fabric is added 75 parts of the 90/10 copolyestcr 0f weight). The padded fabrics are dried at 220F. and phthalic a d/5-S0di0S P acid and y cured as shown in the table. Each fabric is evaluated for @116 gly l (inherent sc s y 25 Parts of handle (subjective test) and snagging tendency as meaamethoxymethyl melam ne ym l 300), P of 30 sured by the Mace Test. All of the treated fabrics ap- P yw y y w y average molecular Weight pear subjectively to be heavier than the original, un-

4000 (CafbOWaX 4000), and Part5 g p CO treated fabrics and the original handle is not greatly (GAF Corp.) The mixture is stirred until all materials changed by 1 d have either dissolved or dispersed in the water medium. Hydroxyl of the polyester is defined as the EXAMPLE 2 number of milligrams of potassium hydroxide consumed per gram of sample in the titration of the acetic APPLICATI 0F FINISH To FABRIC acid liberated by the reaction of acetic anhydride with A portion of the 30% concentrate from Example 1 is the hydroxyl end groups of the polyester dissolved in diluted 10-fold with demineralized water (3% final bath pyridine.

Table 1 Poly( oxyethylenc Containing Glycol Cure Time/Temp. Fabric Fabric Polyester. Parts Amino Resin. Parts Mol. Wt.. Parts scc./F. Num- Handle Mace Rating her 1 75 A 25 4000* 0 90 340 1 firm. dry 4.0 l 75 B 25 4000 90 340 1 soft, smooth 3.5 2 A 25 200** 30 240/300 11 soft. smooth 4.5 2 50 A 50 200 30 240 300 11 medium soft 4.0 3 s5 8 i5 60()()*** 40 90/340 111 Y. soft. smooth 4.5 3 C 15 6000 20 60/355 in medium soft 4.0 1 75 A 25 29(l0**** 40 /340 1 medium soft 3.5 2 75 B 25 l40()()***** 20 L)0/340 l crisp. smooth 3.5

Polyester l )(l/IU (opolyestcr of isophthalic/5-sodiosultoisophthalic acids and diethylene glycol. inherent viscosity 0.42. hydroxyl number 14. Polyester 2 45/45/l0 Copolycster of isophthalic/adipiC/5- li is pbthalic acids and dicthylene glycol. inherent viscosity 0.35. hydroxyl number 18. Poly-ester 3 Polyester 1 reacted with 3 weight percent trimetbylol propane, inherent viscosity 0.25. hydroxyl'number -11.

Aminoresin A Hcxamethoxymethyl melamine (Cymel 300).

Aminoresin 8 Partially methylated melamine-formaldehyde condensate (Acrotex M-3 resin).

Aminnresin C Ureiribrmaldchydc condensate (Acrotcx X02 Resin).

Fabric 1 Ponti dc Roma double-knit. X ozJsq. yd.. made from denier tcxturized continuous filament polyester yarn. Mace rating 2.5 after heat-setting (wales direction).

Fabric 2 Patterned warp knit. 7.5 ozJsq. yd.. made from 151) denier icxtiirizcd continuous filament polyester yarn, Mace rating 2.0 after heat-setting (warp direction).

Fabric 3 Plain weave 90 X 60, 6 OZJSq. yd.. made from 150 denier texturized continuous filament polyester yarn (Warp and filling). Mace rating (warp direction) 3.0

after heat-setting.

*Carhowax 400i) **(arbo\\ax Z00 **"Carbo\vtix 600i) ****'Pluronic L64. HLB 15.0 *****Pluronic FIUX. HLB 27.0

EXAMPLE 4 A mixture of 48.5 grams (0.25 mole) of dimethyl isophthalate, 24.2 grams (0.125 mole) of dimethyl terephthalate, grams (0.075 mole) of hexahydroisophthalic acid, 14.8 grams (0.05 mole) of dimethyl 5-sodiosulfoisophthalate, 68.9 grams (0.65 mole) of diethylene glycol, and 0.8 ml. of a 21 percent catalyst solution of titanium isopropoxide in isopropanol is stirred and heated at 200C. and a vacuum of 0.3 mm. is applied. Heating and stirring is continued for one hour under these conditions. After cooling the polymer obtained has an [.V. of 0.53 and is tough and rubbery. To 313 parts of warm (160F.) demineralized water is added 75 parts of the above copolyester, parts of hexamethoxymethyl melamine (Cymel 300), parts poly(oxyethylene)glycol, average molecular weight about 2000 and 4.0 parts of Igepal CO 970. The mixture is stirred until all materials have either dissolved or dispersed in the water medium.

Example 2 is repeated with similarly advantageous results.

EXAMPLE 5 TABLE 11 Molt: Mole Mole Polymer Dicarboxylie Acid Percent Sulfonate Percent Diol Percent 1.V.

Isuphthulic 52.5 17.5 DEG" 100 0.54 A Terephthulic 25 SIP Hexuhydroisophthulic 5 B lsophthulic 90 SIP l0 DEG 100 0.53 C Hcxuhydrotercphthalie 90 SIP l0 DEG 100 0.73 lsophthulic (DEC 80-) 0.60 D Terephthulit: Z5 SIP l0 (EG Z0) Hexahydmisuphthulie l5 lsophthulie 50 l E Terephthulie 25 (4) l0 DEG 100 0.42

Hexuhydroisophthalic 15 i F lsophthtllic )0 (5) l0 DEG 100 0.48 G lsophthulic (5) l0 DEG 100 0.55

Hcxuhydrutercphthulic 30) H lsophthulie 90 (6) l0 DEG I00 0.42 l Terephthulic 92 SW 8 TEG 100 0.33 J lsnphthulic 92 SIP 8 TEG 100 0.59 K lsophthulic 9o SIP 10 lCHDM" 30) 0.45

(DEG l. Adipic SIP l0 DEG 0.69 M lsophthulic 90 SIP l0 (CHDM 50) 0.48

(DEG 50l N lsophthalic 90 51F 10 (CHDM a0 0.51

(DEG 40) 0 lsophthalic 80 SIP 20 (CHDM 70 l 0.32

(DEG 30 l P lsophthalic so SIP 20 (CHDM 60 0.38

(DEG 40 '4-sodiosulfnphenyl-3.5-dicarboxybcnzcnesulfonate.

HOOC

"5-[4-(sodiosulfo)phenoxylisophthalic acid.

.'2( 2'-sodiosulfophcnyl )-2-cthylmalonic acid.

(IIOOH i-cui. OOH

I lO Na TEG-triethylene glycol.

CHDM- l A-eyclohexunedimethanol.

Although the invention has been described in considerable detail with particular reference to certain preferred embodiments thereof, variations and'modifications can be effected within the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim: p

1. An aqueous blend of components (I), (2) and (3) as follows:

1. from about 50 to about 85 parts by weight of-a linear, water-dissipatable polyester derived from components A, B and C as follows:

A. at least one dicarboxylic acid,

B. at least one diol, at least 20 mole percent of said diol component being a poly( ethylene)glycol having the formula H(-OCH CH;),,OH wherein n is an integer of from 2 to about 14, and

C. at least one difunctionaldicarboxylic acid sulfomonomer containing a SO M group attached to an aromatic nucleus, wherein M is Na, Li", or a combination thereof, said sulfomonomer component constituting at least about 8 mole percent to about 45 mole percent of the sum of the moles of said components (A) and (C).

2. from about 15 to about 50 parts by weight of at least one water-dissipatable amino resin having at least two reactive groups, said resin being selected from the group consisting of melamineformaldehyde condensates, methylated melamineformaldehyde condensates, urea-formaldehyde condensates, methylated urea-formaldehyde condensates, guanamine-formaldehyde condensates and methylated quanamine-formaldehyde condensates; and

3. from about 10 to about 100 parts by weight of a water-dissipatable nonionic linear poly(oxyethylene)glycol having the formula (I) HO(CH C- H O),,.H wherein m is an integer from about 4 to about 150, or

wherein x, y, and z are integers, the sum of which 2 results in a glycol having a molecular weight from about 1000 to about 14,000 and the ratio of x.+ z to y is such that the hydrophile/lipophile balance is from about 4.5 to about 30.5.

2. The aqueous blends of claim 1 comprising 1. from about 70 to about 80 parts by weight of component (l);

2. from about 20 to about 30 parts by weight of components 2; and

3. from about 10 to 60 parts by weight of component 3. The aqueous blend of claim 2 wherein component (1) is derived from i A. isophthalic acid, I

B. S-sodiosulfoisophthalic acid, and C. diethylene glycol; component (2) is selected from the group consisting of wholly methylated melamine-formaldehyde condensates, partially methylated melamine condensates, partially methylated urea-formaldehyde condensates and wholly methylated urea- I formaldehyde condensates; and

component (3) is a polyethylene glycol having the formula-HO(CH CH O-)-,,,OH wherein m is an integer from 20 to about 130. 1

4. The aqueous blend of claim 1 containing 0.5 to about 50% by weight of the combined components l (2) and (3) based on the weights of components (1), (2) and (3) and water added together.

5. The aqueous blend of claim 2 containing 0.5 to about 50% by weight of the combined components l (2) and (3) based on the weights of components (1), 2) and (3) and water added together.

6. The aqueous blend of claim 3 containing 0.5 to about 50% by weight of the combined components l (2) and (3) based on the weights of components (I), (2) and (3) and water added together.

7. The aqueous blend of claim 4 containing 25 to about 35% by weight of the combined components l (2) and (3).

8. The aqueous blend of claim 5 containing 25 to about 35% by weight of the combined components l (2) and (3).

9. The aqueous blend of claim 6 containing 25 to about 35% by weight of the combined components l (2) and (3).

10. An aqueous blend of components (A), (B) and (C) as follows:

A. about parts by weight of a linear waterdissipatable polyester derived from mole percent isophthalic acid, 10 mole percent 5-sodiosulfoisophthalic acid and mole percent diethylene glycol;

B. about 25 parts by weight of hexamethoxymethyl melamine; and

C. from about 20 to about 60 parts by weight of a poly-(oxyethylene)glycol having an average molecular weight of about 4000.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3546008 *May 27, 1968Dec 8, 1970Eastman Kodak CoSizing compositions and fibrous articles sized therewith
US3631136 *Aug 18, 1965Dec 28, 1971Ransburg Electro Coating CorpWhite to light-colored detergentresistant coating composition
US3652583 *Mar 11, 1969Mar 28, 1972Sumitomo Chemical CoCondensates of imidazolidone derivatives and polyalkylene glycol useful for improving textile materials
US3734874 *Feb 27, 1970May 22, 1973Eastman Kodak CoPolyesters and polyesteramides containing ether groups and sulfonate groups in the form of a metallic salt
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification524/539, 442/102, 525/443, 524/377
International ClassificationD06M15/423, D06M15/37, D06M15/507
Cooperative ClassificationD06M15/507, D06M15/423
European ClassificationD06M15/507, D06M15/423