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Publication numberUS3908120 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1975
Filing dateJun 18, 1974
Priority dateJun 18, 1974
Also published asCA1044674A, CA1044674A1, DE2524510A1
Publication numberUS 3908120 A, US 3908120A, US-A-3908120, US3908120 A, US3908120A
InventorsGreene Albert Alfonso
Original AssigneePreformed Line Products Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotational collar alignment device
US 3908120 A
Abstract
A self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture for installation in a conventional incandescent lamp socket which permits selective adjustment of the fluorescent lamp fixture through a substantial arc and which readily facilitates retention of the fixture in the adjusted position. The new fixture includes a body cover which is adapted to receive a conventional fluorescent tube as well as the other components required to make the tube operational. This cover includes a pair of opposed, generally centrally located arcuate slots and is mounted between upper and lower fixture collars by a pair of threaded fasteners. The fasteners pass between the collars through the arcuate slots whereby the cover may be selectively rotated in a plane normal to the axis of the fixture. The upper collar includes means for threadedly mounting the entire fluorescent fixture in an incandescent type lamp socket. A generally flat, compressible member is received between the lower collar and the fixture body cover such that as the upper and lower collar are brought into a closely spaced relationship with each other, the member is compressed. This action places a continuous biasing force against the cover urging it toward positive engagement with the upper collar. The fixture body cover, including the fluorescent tube, may then be rotated for alignment purposes and will be retained in the aligned position by means of the frictional force created by the compressible member urging the body cover toward engagement with the upper collar. The arcuate slots define a generally circular configuration and each extends through an arc of approximately 170 DEG whereby the cover body may be moved through an arc of approximately 170 DEG for alignment purposes.
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United States Patent [191 Greene [451 Sept. 23, 1975 ROTATIONAL COLLAR ALIGNMENT DEVICE [75] Inventor: Albert Alfonso Greene, Cleveland,

Ohio

[73] Assignee: Preformed Line Products Co.,

Cleveland, Ohio [22] Filed: June 18, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 480,419

[52] US. Cl ..240/51.1l R; 240/521; 240/78 R; 339/8 R; 339/135 [51] Int. Cl. H05B 33/02 [58] Field of Search 240/51.l1 R, 51.12, 52 R, 240/521, 78 R; 339/135, 197 R, 8 R

Primary Examiner Richard L. Moses Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Fay & Sharpe [57] ABSTRACT A self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture for installation in a conventional incandescent lamp socket which permits selective adjustment of the fluorescent lamp fixture through a substantial arc and which readily facilitates retention of the fixture in the adjusted position. The new fixture includes a body cover which is adapted to receive a conventional fluorescent tube as well as the other components required to make the tube operational. This cover includes a pair of opposed, generally centrally located arcuate slots and is mounted between upper and lower fixture collars by a pair of threaded fasteners. The fasteners pass between the collars through the arcuate slots whereby the cover may be selectively rotated in a plane normal to the axis of the fixture. The upper collar includes means for threadedly mounting the entire fluorescent fixture in an incandescent type lamp socket. A generally flat, compressible member is received between the lower collar and the fixture body cover such that as the upper and lower collar are brought into a closely spaced relationship with each other, the member is compressed. This action places a continuous biasing force against the cover urging it toward positive engagement with the upper collar. The fixture body cover, including the fluorescent tube, may then be rotated for alignment purposes and will be retained in the aligned position by means of the frictional force created by the compressible member urging the body cover toward engagement with the upper collar. The arcuate slots define a generally circular configuration and each extends through an arc of approximately 170 whereby the cover body may be moved through an arc of approximately 170 for alignment purposes.

20 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures US Patent Sept. 23,1975 Sheet 1 Of2 3,908,120

. hum. /20/ ROTATIONAL COLLAR ALIGNMENT DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention pertains to the art of lamp fixtures and more particularly to fluorescent type lamp fixtures.

The invention is particularly applicable to selfcontained fluorescent fixtures adapted to be installed in a conventional incandescent lamp socket outlet and will be described with particular reference thereto; however, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the invention has broader applications and may be employed in other environments where it is desired to adapt self-contained electrical fixtures for use with a different type of electrical fixture socket.

In many lighting applications, it is particularly desired to employ fluorescent lighting inasmuch as such lighting generally provides the same level of illumination but consumes approximately only one-fourth to one-third as much electrical energy as does conventional incandescent type lighting. A secondary benefit of fluorescent lighting is that fluorescent tubes have a life expectancy which is between and times longer than incandescent bulbs. Such advantages, of course, operate to reduce electrical power requirements, labor costs required in maintaining or replacing inoperative bulbs and the cost of the bulbs themselves. These savings can be substantial when considered on the basis of large buildings and the like. Therefore, from an economic standpoint, fluorescent lighting offers substantial economic advantages over conventional incandescent lighting.

In many applications where, for example, a building presently has incandescent type lighting, the advantages of fluorescent lighting have not been fully developed due to the changeover costs involved in convert ing from incandescent to fluorescent lighting. These initial costs have often been prohibitive inasmuch as fluoresccnt lighting normally requires special or auxiliary hangers or straps for each lighting fixture, special wiring or rewiring, supplemental electrical connectors and the extensive requirement for technical labor to perform such installations or conversions. Thus, such a changeover previously involved substantial modification both electrically and structurally. For these reasons, and although over a long term fluorescent type lighting does produce substantial power, labor and parts savings, many concerns who would normally undertake conversion have not done so because of the high initial changeover costs involved.

To overcome these problems, it has long been desired to make available a self-contained fluorescent lighting fixture which could be installed directly into a conventional incandescent type lamp socket. Heretofore, there have been several attempts to develop such structures of a commercially feasible nature. By and large, however, these attempts have not been alto gether satisfactory structurally and asthetically. Although the prior art has rather comprehensively addressed itself to various means for achieving a self contained fluorescent lamp fixture for use in a conventional incandescent lamp socket outlet, the problem primarily encountered is one having to do with align ment and retaining alignment of the fluorescent fixture once it has been so installed.

As is known, conventional incandescent lamp fixtures threadedly received the incandescent bulb so that when the bulb is replaced with a selfcontained fluorescent fixture, it too must be threadedly received into the incandescent socket. Inasmuch as rotational alignment is not a concern when an incandescent bulb is to be used, the mountings for the fluorescent tubes in the self-contained fixtures must provide for some measure of adjustability to assure that the tubes of one fixture may be aligned with those of another following installation. Otherwise, because of the threaded arrangement employed in conventional incandescent sockets, the fluorescent tubes may be askew in their mountings so as to yield inefficient use of the light generated by the fluorescent tubes and to present an undesirable asthetic appearance. Thus, for example, in a hallway, it is normally desired to position the fluorescent tubes so that they extend generally longitudinally or transversely across the hallway at spaced intervals. This not only yields the most efficient use of the available light but also presents a pleasing and neat appearance. However, if the fluorescent tube mountings for these selfcontained fixtures are not adjustable in some manner, it would be virtually impossible to assure that such alignment would be realized.

Most prior art fixture developments of the type to which the subject invention pertains have included some means for rotating at least the fluorescent tube mounting portion of the fixture about a plane generally transverse to the longitudinal axis of the fixture itself. Although some prior fixtures employ arcuate slotted areas as well as other pivotal connections for this purpose, none of them have included easy and convenient means for maintaining alignment once it has been achieved. Such means are necessary to assure that alignment will not be affected by vibrations, inadvertent nudges and the like to which the fixtures are normally subjected in most environments.

Some prior self-contained fluorescent fixtures of this type have included some type of arrangement for positively retaining at least the fluorescent tube portion of the fixture in a desired aligned position. However, these arrangements have generally proved unsatisfactory inasmuch as they are complex and require substantial dismantling of the fixture components in order to gain access to them. Such disassembly, particularly of the fluorescent tube and ancillary components, adds further undesired installation and labor costs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT INVENTION The present invention contemplates a new and im proved self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture adapted for installation in a conventional incandescent type lamp socket which overcomes all of the foregoing problems and others and provides a new and improved fixture which is simple in design, economical in construction, provides readily adjustable means for the fluorescent tube through a substantial are and which includes convenient locking means for retaining the fluorescent tube in a desired aligned position.

In accordance with the present invention, the new fluorescent fixture includes a socket adaptor which may be threadedly received in an incandescent type lamp socket for supporting or suspending the entire fixture while simultaneously furnishing electrical energy to operate the fluorescent lamps. The fixture includes a fixture body cover associated with the socket adaptor and which is adapted to receive and support a fluorescent light tube along with the other conventional operative components required to excite the tube. The fixture body includes generally centrally located areuate slots for receiving mechanical fasteners therethrough to locate the fixture body cover relative to the socket adaptor. When in position, the fixture body cover is se lectively movable about the slots in a plane generally normal to the longitudinal axis of the socket adaptor. Force means are also provided adjacent the body cover to continuously exert a biasing force against the cover to retain it in a desired aligned position while still allowing for selected forced rotational movement thereof about the arcuate slots.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the fixture further includes interconnected upper and lower collars. The upper collar is associated with the socket adaptor with the fixture body cover and force means being received between the two collars.

In accordance with still another aspect of the present invention, the force means comprises a generally flat, compressible annular member and the mechanical fasteners comprise threaded fasteners. The fasteners provide means for bringing the lower collar into a closely spaced relationship with the upper collar with the fixture body cover and compressible member disposed therebetween. With this arrangement, the compressible member is placed in a compressed state in order to exert a continuous biasing force against the body cover toward the upper collar whereby the body cover will be retained in any desired pre-set position.

In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, there is provided an improvement for a selfcontained fluorescent lamp fixture of the type adapted for installation in a conventional incandescent type lamp socket. The fluorescent lamp fixture is of the type which includes a fixture body cover adapted to receive a fluorescent tube and other conventional operational components required for the tube and which fixture body is selectively rotatable through an arc in a plane transverse to the longitudinal axis of the fixture itself. The improvement comprises force means associated with the fixture in communication with the fixture body cover for continuously exerting a biasing force against the fixture body cover whereby the cover may be rotated by hand relative to the incandescent lamp socket for alignment purposes and then retained in that position by means of the frictional or biasing force created by the force means.

In accordance with still another aspect of the present invention, the force means comprises a generally flat compressible member which is compressed between upper and lower collars as they are brought into a close spaced relationship with each other in order that the member will apply a continuous biasing force against the fixture body cover.

The principal object of the present invention is the provision of a new and improved self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture which is adapted for installation directly into a conventional incandescent type lamp socket.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a new and improved self-contained fluorescent type lamp fixture which includes convenient means to facilitate alignment of the fluorescent tube following installation of the fixture into an incandescent lamp socket.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a new and improved self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture which includes means for automatically retaining alignment of the fluorescent tube and tube supporting structure once the same has been aligned as desired.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention may take physical form in certain parts and arrangements of parts, a preferred embodiment of which will be described in detail in the specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings which form a part hereof and wherein:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of a fluorescent light fixture which includes the concepts of the subject invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the assembled light fixture of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a crosssectional view taken along lines 3-3 of FIG. 2 and including cut away areas for ease of illustration;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along lines 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of an alternative preferred embodiment taken along the same lines as FIG. 3; and,

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the same alternative preferred embodiment taken long the same lines as FIG. 4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings wherein the showings are for purposes of illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention only and not for purposes of limiting the same, the FIGURES show a conventional incandescent lamp fixture generally designated A and a self-contained fluorescent fixture generally designated B which comprises the focus of the subject invention.

The conventional incandescent light fixture generally comprises a ceramic or porcelain base 10 having an outwardly extending protrusion 12 which includes a female socket outlet 14 therein. This female socket is conventionally threaded and is connected to a source of electricity. Mounting slots 16, 18 disposed in base 10 provide convenient means for receiving conventional screws to mount the fixture to a wall, ceiling or the like as is known.

Fluorescent fixture B includes a socket adaptor generally designated 30 which includes a base portion 32 and an outwardly extending male socket outlet 34. This outlet, of course, is adapted to be threadedly received in the female socket outlet 14 in full electrical and mechanical mating contact. This male socket outlet also includes an uppermost center electrical contact 35 which is outwardly spring biased within socket outlet 34 in order to provide positive electrical contact upon installation into female socket outlet 14. This feature is known and used in the art to circumvent overtightening of male socket outlet 34 into female socket outlet 14 which could otherwise result in ripping or tearing the female screw shell out of its receptacle. On the other side of base portion 32 from the male socket outlet is 1 a generally flat engaging surface 36 which includes therein a pair of oppositely disposed threaded fastener receiving holes 38,40. These holes are spaced apart in surface 36 to assure a good mechanical connection with other components of the fixture as will be described hereinafter. In electrical and mechanical contact with the male socket outlet 34 are a pair of electrical lead wires 42,44 which extend outwardly from engaging surface 36 for use in supplying current to the fluorescent tube and supportive components as will be described hereinafter.

Disposed adjacent socket adaptor 30 is an upper collar generally designated 50. This collar includes a base portion 52 having an upper engaging surface 54 and a lower engaging surface 55 with a protrusion or upper spool shank 56 extending outwardly from surface 55. This shank, as well as base portion 52, includes a hole 58 extending therethrough to facilitate passage of leads 42,44. In addition, base portion 52 includes a pair of oppositely disposed threaded fastener clearance holes 60,62 therein which may be aligned with threaded receiving holes 38,40. Threaded fasteners or set screws 64,66 may then be passed through holes 60,62 and into receiving holes 38,40, respectively, in order that socket adaptor 30 and upper collar 50 may be brought into engagment with engaging surfaces 36,54 which are in close physical contact. A quarter turn out of alignment with holes 60,62 in base portion 52 and oppositely disposed from each other are a pair of threaded fastener receiving holes 68,70 for purposes of receiving threaded fasteners as will be described.

Any number of suitable insulative type materials may be employed in constructing adaptor 30 and collar 50 and, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, threaded fasteners 64,66 are constructed from nylon. It will also be appreciated that for purposes of manufacturing convenience, adaptor 30 and upper collar 50 could be conveniently constructed as a single unitary or integral component without affecting the scope and intent of the present invention.

A fluorescent tube fixture body cover is generally designated 80 and comprises an elongated generally U- shaped member constructed from this metal or other suitable material. This cover includes a top or main wall 82 having side walls 84,86 depending therefrom along the opposed longitudinal edges thereof. Centrally disposed within top or main wall 82 is a circular spool receiving hole 88 adapted to facilitate close sliding receipt of the cover over spool 56 and to permit the pass ing of electrical lead wires 42,44 therethrough. Disposed slightly outwardly of spool receiving hole 88 are a pair of arcuate slots 90,92 which are employed to positively mount the fixture body cover to the fixture and to facilitate rotational movement thereof relative to the remainder of the fixture B.

In this regard, slots 90,92 are aligned with threaded receiving holes 68,70 in base portion 52 of upper collar 50. Arcuate slots 90,92 are oppositely disposed from each other and each extends over an arc of approximately 170. Although this are may be varied if desired without departing from the intent and scope of the present invention, it does provide adjustment of the fixture body cover for alignment purposes over an arc of 170 as will be apparent in subsequent description.

Disposed on the other side of top or main wall 82 from upper collar 50 is a force or biasing means generally designated 100. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, this means comprises a generally flat washer-like member constructed from a resilient, compressible material. Although neoprene has proved acceptable for constructing biasing means 100, it will be appreciated that other such materials or arrangements could be employed without departing from the intent and scope of the present invention. The washerlike member includes a pair of opposed generally flat faces 102,104 and further includes a generally centrally located spool receiving hole 106 adapted to be slidably received over spool 56 as well as to permit passing of electrical leads 42,44. Face 10.2 is adapted to be placed in physical engagement with top or main wall 82 and face 104 is adapted to be placed in physical engagement with a lower collar which will be described hereinafter. This washer-like or annular member includes a pair of oppositely disposed threaded fastener clearance holes 108,110 which are aligned with threaded receiving holes 68,70 and arcuate sl-ots 90,92.

Finally, fluorescent fixture assembly B includes a lower collar member generally designated 120. This collar includes a base portion 122 having an upper engaging surface 124 adapted to engage face 104 of the washer-like member. Extending outwardly from the other side of base portion 122 is a lower spool shank 126 having an upper spool shank receiving hole 128 disposed therein. This hole is dimensioned to closely slidably receive upper shank 56 when the fixture is assembled to assist in providing rigidity to the overall structure as well as in aligning the component parts thereof. Oppositely disposed from each other to extend through base portion 122 are a pair of threaded fastener clearance holes 130,132 which are in alignment with holes 68,70, arcuate slots 90,92, and clearance holes 108,110. A pair of threaded fasteners or set screws 134,136 preferably constructed from nylon are then received through holes 130,132, 108,110, slots 90,92 to be respectively threadedly received in holes 68,70 to facilitate assembly of the fixture.

Attention is now particularly directed to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 which show the exploded fluorescent fixture assembly B of FIG. 1 in the assembled condition. It should be appreciated that electrical leads 42,44 are adapted to be connected to the fluorescent tube and the other necessary ancillary operative components as, for example, ballast, starters, wiring, lamp holders, diffusers, connectors and so on. The tube, as well as these other components, are all included within the fixture body cover in any conventional or convenient manner. Inasmuch as these components are known and do not in and of themselves comprise a portion of the present invention, they are not shown or described further herein. It should be noted, however, that in order to circumvent lateral displacement and undesirable cantilever forces upon female socket outlet 14 of incandescent lamp fixture A, all operative components contained within and upon fixture body cover 80 should be mounted and affixed in positions which, in cumulative total, provide uniform and even weight distribution as transmitted to the axial fulcrum of socket adaptor 30.

As will be seen in FIGS. 3 and 4 and with the fixture in the assembled condition, engaging surface 36 of socket adaptor 30 engages upper engaging surface 54 of upper collar 50; lower engaging surface 55 of upper collar 50 engages the upper surface of top or main wall 82, face 102 of force means engages the lower surface of top or main wall 82; and, lower surface 104 of force means 100 engages upper engaging surface 124 of lower collar 120. Although upper and lower collars 50,120 as well as force means 100 are shown as being circular and as having substantially the same outside diameters, other configurations and dimensions could be employed if desired. The preferred arrangement,

however, provides satisfactory results insofar as the intent and scope of the present invention are concerned. As shown in FIG. 3, nylon threaded fasteners or set screws 64,66 operate to retain upper collar 50 and socket adaptor 30 in position relative to each other. In FIG. 4, nylon threaded fasteners or set screws 134,136 are threadedly received in threaded receiving holes 68,70 of upper collar 50 and operate to retain fixture body cover 80, force means 100 and lower collar 120 in position relative to upper collar 50. In this regard, spool 56 passes through spool receiving hole 88 in cover 80, receiving hole 106 in force means 100 and into receiving hole 128 of lower collar 120 to retain these components in their relative aligned positions and to provide stability for the overall fixture structure.

As will be best seen in FIG. 2, threaded fasteners or set screws 134,136 pass through arcuate slots 90,92 in top of main wall of the fixture body cover to facilitate rotation of the cover relative to the remainder of the fixture. The directions of rotation are shown in FIG. 2 as a and b and extend about the entire arc defined by the two slots. Inasmuch as the slots oppositely disposed from each other extend through arc of 170, the overall arc through which the fixture body cover may be rotated in a plane generally normal to the longitudinal axis of the remainder of the fixture elements is 170, i.e., from the point where the theaded fasteners 134,136 engage one end and then the other of their associated slots respectively. As shown in FIG. 2, the fasteners are disposed in the central portion of their respective slots for purposes of illustration.

A particularly important aspect of the present invention is the provision of means whereby rotation of fixture body cover 80 is readily permitted to facilitate alignment of the fluorescent tube following installation of the fixtures in a socket and which also includes means to retain the cover in an aligned position when the fixture itself is subjected to vibrations, slight nudges and the like as would normally be encountered in most environments. Inasmuch as the operational components required to make the fluorescent tube operative, that is, self-contained ballast, starters, wires, lamp holders, diffusers, connectors and so on are disposed within the U-shaped areas defined by the body cover, it would be very difficult and virtually impossible to gain access to threaded members 134,136 in order to loosen and/or tighten them each time an adjustment was desired. Such an arrangement would necessitate removal of at least some of the operative component parts and thus increase labor costs connected with using the type of self-contained fluorescent fixture to which the subject invention is directed.

Therefore, force means 100, which again in the preferred embodiment comprises a resilient, compressible washer-like or annular member plays an important role in overcoming these adjustment problems. When the fixture is initially assembled, threaded members or set screws 134,136 are tightened sufficiently to compress member 100 to an extent whereby it will place a contin uous upwardly biasing force against top or main wall 82 of the fixture body cover to urge it into positive, forced contact with lower engaging surface 55 of upper collar 50. Thus, a frictional type force is created between the upper collar and the upper surface of top or main wall 82 which resists rotation of the body cover through arcuate slot 90,92 relative to the remainder of fixture B. This resistance may, of course, be overcome by a workman or the like applying a rotative force against the cover but this frictional force has been found sufficient to eliminate undesired rotational movement of the fixture caused by normal vibrations, nudges and the like. Naturally, the greater the degree of compression of the compressible washer, the greater the amount of frictional force generated between washer surface 102 and the inside portion of top or main wall 82 to resist rotation of the body cover relative to the remainder of the fixture. This adjustment is simply made by tightening or loosening threaded members 134,136 prior to installation of the operative components into the cover and prior to installation of fixture B into the conventional incandescent light socket A. Likewise, if a greater resistance to rotational movement was desired for some particular installation, the diameter of engaging surface 124 and faces 102, 104 could be increased to provide a greater surface area over which the force means would operate. Also for purposes of increasing resistance to rotational movement, it is possible to include a second force means which is substantially identical to force means between engaging surface 55 of upper collar 50 and the upper surface of top or main wall 82. Such provisions may be deemed advisable and necessary for installations of the invention in locations which may be especially vulnerable to inadvertent physical contact, nudges or excessive vibrations.

Along the same lines, when using the preferred neoprene structure for force means 100, a definite advantage, insofar as intended results are concerned, is obtained. That is, neoprene force means 100 and metallic fixture body cover 80 have different coefficients of thermal expansion whereby the active electrical component contained within the fixture body become heated during electrical operation to thereby cause an increased frictional resistance at the juncture interface between the neoprene washer and the thin metallic fix ture body cover. Typically, the structures will be assembled and installed in an ambient temperature of approximately 77F. and after 4 hours of electrified operation, the interior of the fixture body cover can be expected to reach a temperature value of approximately 197F. The F. difference in temperatures will cause the neoprene washer to expand at a greater rate than the metallic fixture body cover to increase the compressive forces between the two dissimilar materials and members. The modulus of elasticity is a measurable value and the net end results, as specifically applicable to an installed and electrical functioning lamp fixture which incorporates the concepts of the subject invention, is that the compressive forces are increased which, of course, causes a corresponding increase in the frictional drag resistance to rotational movement of the fixture.

Turning now to an alternative preferred embodiment of the present invention as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, certain structural modifications are included for purposes of facilitating manufacturing, mounting and operational convenience. In this second preferred embodiment and for ease of illustration, like numerals which include a primed suffix are used to identify like components and new numerals will be employed to identify new components.

In FIGS. 5 and 6, adaptor 30' and upper collar 50' are constructed as a single unitary or integral component. Such construction, of course, eliminates the necessity for threaded fastener receiving holes 38,40 and clearance holes 60,62 as well as the necessity for set screws 64,66 as required in the FIGS. 1-4 embodiment. Further, lowercollar member 120 merely comprises a washer-like member without including a spool shank corresponding to shank 126 as shown in FIGS. 14. Thus, upper spool shank 56 is merely closely received in spool shank receiving hole 128 of the lower collar. Satisfactory alignment and support results are obtained with this last noted modification.

In the FIGS. 5 and 6 arrangement, conventional threaded fasteners or screws 150,152 pass through opposed threaded fastcner clearance holes 154,156 in base portion 52' of upper collar 50, arcuate slots 90',92 in body cover 80', clearance holes 108', 110 in force means 100 and threaded fastener clearance holes 130', 132 in lower collar 120. Conventional nuts and lock washers are then received on threaded fasteners 150,152 to facilitate retention of the fixture in an assembled condition. These threaded fasteners perform the same function as do fasteners 134,136 in the FIGS. l-4 embodiment.

With the alternative preferred structure of FIGS. 5 and 6, the installation, operation and advantages of the subject invention as hereinabove described in detail with reference to FIGS. 1-4 are all similarly obtained. Likewise, the minor alterations and modifications discussed with reference to the structure shown in those FIGURES are equally applicable to the structure shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

In using the subject invention which has been described in detail hereinabove, prior problems encountered with fluorescent light fixtures of the type which are adapted to be mounted in conventional incandescent light fixtures have been successfully overcome. Although fixtures of this type have been known, there have been many problems encountered with them with respect, first, to adjusting the fluorescent tubes to secure proper alignment and, second, to retaining that alignment in a reasonably permanent manner without requiring difficult, time consuming adjustment steps which often involve disassembly of much of the fluorescent fixture itself.

The invention has been described with reference to the preferred embodiment. Obviously, modifications and alterations will occur to others upon the reading and understanding of the specification. It is my intention to include all such modifications and alterations insofar as they come within the scope of the appended claims or the equivalents thereof.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture adapted for installation into a conventional incandescent lamp socket comprising in combination:

a socket adaptor receivable in said socket for supporting said fluorescent fixture;

a fixture body cover in operative association with said adaptor which is adapted to receive and support a fluorescent light tube and its operative components, said fixture body including means for locating said body cover relative to said socket adaptor while permitting said body cover to be selectively rotated about the longitudinal axis of said socket adaptor in a plane generally normal thereto; and,

force means for continuously exerting a biasing force against said body cover to urge said cover toward engagement with said socket adaptor to retain said cover in a desired position relative to said socket adaptor, said force means allowing forced rotational movement of said cover relative to said socket adaptor for alignment purposes.

2. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 1 wherein said force means comprises axially compressible spring means disposed adjacent said] fixture body cover to continuously force said cover axially of said fixture toward a close fitting relationship with said socket adaptor.

3. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 2 wherein said locating means comprises generally centrally located arcuate slots adapted to receive mechanical fasteners therethrough.

4. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 3 wherein said spring means comprises a generally fiat compressible member, said fixture further including a lower collar having a member engaging surface, said lower collar being disposed on the other side of said fixture body cover from said socket adaptor with said compressible member disposed intermediate said body cover and member engaging surface, said collar being affixed to said fixture by mechanical fasteners passing through said arcuate slots in said body cover whereby said compressible member may be compressed between said body cover and said member engaging surface as said lower collar is brought into a close spaced relationship with said socket adaptor.

5. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 4 wherein said compressible member is constructed from neoprene.

6. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 1 further including interconnected upper and lower collars, said upper collar being associated with said socket adaptor wherein said body cover and force means are received between said collars.

7. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 6 wherein said upper and lower collars each includes a generally flat engaging surface and one of said collars includes means for locating at least said body cover and the other of said collars relative thereto.

8. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 7 wherein said force means comprises a compressible spring means received between said fixture body and said lower collar, said upper and lower collars being interconnected by mechanical fasteners.

9. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 8 further including a second compressible spring means which is received between said fixture body cover and said upper collar.

10. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 8 wherein said'compressible spring means comprises a generally flat, compressible member and said mechanical fasteners comprise threaded fasteners, whereby said lower collar may be brought into close spaced relationship to said upper collar with said fixture body cover and compressible member therebetween with said compressible member placed in a compressed condition to exert a continuous biasing force against said body cover toward the engaging surface of said upper collar.

11. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 8 wherein said locating means comprises :a pair of arcuate slots oppositely disposed from each other to define a generally circular configuration, said mechanical fasteners comprising a pair of threaded fasteners oppositely disposed from each other with one of said fasteners extending through each of said pair of slots.

12. The lamp fixture as defined in claim 11 wherein each said slot extends over an arc of approximately 170 whereby said fixture body cover may be rotated in a plane generally normal to the longitudinal axis of said socket adaptor through an arc of approximately 170.

13. In a self-contained fluorescent lamp fixture of the type adapted for installation in a conventional incandescent lamp socket wherein there is included a fixture body cover adapted to receive a fluorescent tube and its operative components and at least the fixture body cover is selectively rotatable through an arc in a plane generally normal to the longitudinal axis of said fixture, the improvement comprising:

force means associated with said fixture in communication with said fixture body coverfor continuously exerting a biasing force axially of said fixture against said fixture body cover to retain said cover in a desired position relative to Said fixture, said force means allowing forced rotational movement about said plane for alignment purposes.

14. The improvement as defined in claim 13 further including upper and lower interconnected collars with said fixture body cover and force means disposed therebetween.

15. The improvement as defined in claim 14 wherein said upper collar includes a socket adaptor adapted to be threadedly received in said conventional incandescent lamp socket and said upper and lower collars each includes a pair of opposed arcuate slots to receive a pair of oppositely disposed mechanical fasteners passing between said upper and lower collars whereby said collars may be brought into close spaced relationship to each other with said force means disposed therebetween.

16. The improvement as defined in claim 15 wherein said force means comprises a generally flat compressible member which is compressed as said collars are brought into said close spaced relationship to apply a continuous biasing force against said fixture body cover,

17. The improvement as defined in claim 16 wherein said compressible member is disposed on the other side of said cover from said upper collar whereby said compressible member operates to continuously bias said cover toward the engaging surface of said upper collar.

18. The improvement as defined in claim 17 further including a second compressible member, said second member being disposed between said upper collar and said body cover.

19. The improvement as defined in claim 16 wherein one of said collars includes an outwardly protruding spool shank which passes through said compressible member and said fixture body cover for locating en gagement with the other of said collars.

20. The improvement as defined in claim 16 wherein said pair of arcuate slots define a generally circular configuration with each slot extending over an arc of approximately whereby said fixture body cover may be rotated about said plane through an arc of ap proximately 170.

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US2878372 *Feb 13, 1957Mar 17, 1959Ben L FryCircular lighting fixture
US2943238 *Nov 22, 1957Jun 28, 1960Edward G ReavesFluorescent lighting
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4039821 *Dec 2, 1974Aug 2, 1977Conserve-A-Watt CorporationSelf-contained fluorescent lamp fixture
US4045665 *Jun 25, 1975Aug 30, 1977Preformed Line Products Co.Diffuser attachment for a fluorescent lamp fixture
US4096554 *Oct 19, 1976Jun 20, 1978Conserve-A-Watt CorporationRotational collar alignment device
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US7832889Sep 21, 2006Nov 16, 2010Usai LlcRecessed light housing with a rotatable aperture
US8469536Sep 9, 2010Jun 25, 2013Usai, LlcRecessed light housing with rotatable aperture
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US20060126235 *Feb 7, 2006Jun 15, 2006Steve CampoloLamp holder with ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle
US20110085320 *Apr 14, 2011Frank CoglianoRecessed light housing with rotatable aperture
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Classifications
U.S. Classification362/457, 439/13
International ClassificationF21V23/00, F21V23/06, F21V21/02, F21S8/04
Cooperative ClassificationF21V23/06, F21V21/02
European ClassificationF21V23/06, F21V21/02