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Publication numberUS3908311 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1975
Filing dateNov 21, 1973
Priority dateJul 10, 1972
Publication numberUS 3908311 A, US 3908311A, US-A-3908311, US3908311 A, US3908311A
InventorsFelix B Romberg
Original AssigneeFelix B Romberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traction gate
US 3908311 A
Abstract
In a traction gate, a wire barrier extends between a pair of end standards. One of the end standards is pivotally supported on a first gate post, and the lower end of the other end standard is adapted for engagement with and support by structure projecting from a second gate post. A traction mechanism is mounted on the upper end of the second gate post for engagement with pivot means on the upper end of the adjacent end standard. When not in use, the traction mechanism rests on top of the gate post and is therefore readily accessible from either side of the gate.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 1111 3,908,31 1

Romberg 1 1 Sept. 30, 1975 l l TRACTION GATE [76] Inventor: Felix B. Romberg, PO. BOX 218, 1 1 ABSTRACT Hollandi 76534 In a traction gate, a wire barrier extends between a [22] Filed: 21, 1973 pair of end standards. One of the end standards is pivotally supported on a first gate post, and the lower end PP 417398 of the other end standard is adapted for engagement Related us. Application Data with and support by structure projecting from a sec- [62] Division of S81. No. 270,308, July 10, 1972,P21I.N0. nd gm post A mono mechamsm mounted on 3 825 051 the upper end of the second gate post for engagement with pivot means on the upper end of the adjacent end 152 US. Cl 49/381; 292/247 Standard' when in F mechanism [51] int. Cl.- E06B 11/00 rests top of h gate? post and ls therefore readily [58] Field of Search 49/381, 386, 394; 292 247, ccessblc from ethcr of the gate" 292/246; 160/323 The gate is closed by engaging the traction mechanism with the pivot means and then pivoting the traction 5 References Ci d mechanism over center, whereby the gate is secured in UNITED STATES PATENTS traction by toggle action. Structure is provided for 79S i6) V1884 Lockling k retaining the traction mechanism in the actuated 5951160 1i/1s97 Stauffcr i t tl ltiiiii :1 60/528 l thcfreby both sccurmg gm 639573 12/1899 Hobart 160/328 traction and locking the gate. Two embodiments of 777800 12/1904 Mast [60/328 the invention are disclosed, one comprising a wire 887,676 5/1908 MlllOflC 160/328 traction g and the other Comprising 11 lawfully 1,268,471 6/1918 Jones 292/247 swinging traction gate. ln the laterally swinging 2,613,972 /1952 Gifford 292/247 traction gate the end standards are secured to a Primary E.\'uminerDennis L. Taylor Attorney, Agent, or Firn1-Richards, Harris &

Medlock Ml g 4 H.e .l 2.

-14 40 l' i 32- l T 1 1 l 11 J a to 7 i a I I w." se i l longitudinal frame member which interconnects the lower ends of the end standards.

11 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 1 of 7 3,908,31 1

FIG."

US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 2 of 7 3,908,311

DEC: j

US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet30f7 3,908,311 v US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 5 of 7 3,908,311

US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Shet 7 of 7 3,908,311

TRACTION GATE This is a division of application Ser. No. 270,308, filed July 10, 1972, now US. Pat. No. 3,825,053.

BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to traction gate improvements, including gate traction mechanism improvements useful both in conjunction with a novel laterally swinging traction gate and with traction gates generally.

Barbed wire combines the quality of repelling livestock with that of tensile strength. However, when an oridinary barbed wire gate barrier becomes slack the individual wires assume the curves and crooks that existed in the wire previous to tensioning, such as the coils the wire had in the spool.

It is common practice on farms and ranches to utilize simple wire gates (also called gaps). Such a gate typically comprises a barbed wire barrier strung between vertical standards which are in turn supported by spaced gate posts. In many instances no means is provided for exerting traction on such a gate. Instead, the operator simply positions the standard at the openable end of the gate as close as possible to the adjacent gate post and then loops a wire extending from the gate post over the standard.

Such gates do not utilize the potential of the wire. They are economical, but at many fence line locations there would be greater over-all economy if the tension of the wire barrier of the gate would be equal to and thereby support the tension of the fence line wires. Otherwise, the tension of the fence line wires must be supported by other means, such as tall gate posts interconnected with wire at the top.

Laterally swinging gates have generally been used instead of wire gates at locations where traffic demands a more easily handled or more pretentious looking gate. Mass production of the metal panel gate constructed of straight flanged sheet metal channel sections (US. Pat. No. 2,515,754) has made that gate popular on farms and ranches. However, that gate is difficult to open and close in a stiff wind on account of its broadside surface area. Moreover, the considerable length now required for gates by the width of modern farm equipment makes panel gates heavy and rather burdensome on the supporting gate post. In contrast, wire gates are virtually insensitive to wind and, with adequate tension, are well adapted for wide openings.

The present invention provides an improved traction gate of the type in which a wire barrier is supported between two end standards. In one disclosed embodiment the end standards are interconnected by a frame member at the bottom to provide a light swinging traction gate for which wires with end loops can be assembled over the ends of the standards.

In its closed position this swinging traction gate is anchored at all four corners between two gate posts. One end is hingedly mounted on one of the gate posts. At the other end the top of the gate is secured to the other gate post by means of a traction mechanism which also generates a downward thrust that holds the lower gate corner on a seat bolt extending through that post.

The traction mechanism is operated with a lever handle whereby the operator couples the traction mechanism to the gate standard and then draws the standard towards the post until the lever moves over center in toggle action to a final position where it can be padlocked. Concurrently with the releasing of traction, the lever handle uncouples the gate and comes to rest on top of the gate post to which the traction mechanism is adjustably secured.

The lever handle projects from the top of the gate post when the gate is not in traction and angles upwardly above the wire barrier when the gate is in traction. At each of these locations the handle is easily grasped and easily moved to the other location from either side of the gate without changing the grip on the handle.

After traction is released, the frame of this swinging traction gate supports the wire barrier in limited tension and that limited tension reciprocally supports the openable end of the gate so that it can be lifted very easily from the seat bolt and swung to the open position.

In another disclosed embodiment of the invention, the wire traction gate, the gate end standards are not interconnected by a frame member, but the gate is secured in traction by basically the same traction mechanism in the same way. In the second embodiment a T- bolt is used as seat bolt for the end standard at the openable end of the gate and that standard has hook forks at the bottom for straddling and gripping the T- bolt.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a more complete understanding of the present invention and for further objects and advantages thereof, reference may now be had to the following Detailed Description taken in conjunction with the accompanying Drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side view of a wire traction gate incorporating a first embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary side view of the openable end of the gate of FIG. I, with dotted lines showing the position of the traction lever and traction link when the lever is positioned on the gate post;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 33 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the traction mechanism shown in FIG. 2, with the traction lever in the terminal position;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the traction mechanism shown in FIG. 4 in which certain parts have been broken away more clearly to illustrate certain features of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, but with the traction lever on the pivot in an upended position;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along the line 77 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along the line 88 of FIG. 4, with optional retaining means shown in dashed lines;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged framentary view of a vertical wire wrapped around a horizontal wire;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary side view of a laterally swinging gate incorporating a second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a detailed fragmentary side view of the frame of the gate of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary plan view of the frame of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary detailed longitudinal sectional view of the lower frame corner at the swinging end of the gate of FIG. 10 resting on the bolt of the gate post;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary detailed plan view of the traction mechanism of the gate of FIG. 10, in its clamped position;

FIG. 15 is a side view of the traction mechanism of FIG. 14 in which certain parts have been broken away more clearly to illustrate certain features of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a plan view of the traction lever on a smaller scale than FIGS. 14 and 15;

FIG. 17 is a detailed vertical longitudinal sectional view of the traction lever of FIG. 16 on the scale of FIGS. 14 and 15;

FIG. 18 is a detailed sectional view taken along the line of 1818 of FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a sectional view of the spring retaining plate only, taken along the line 19-19 of FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary plan view showing how a previously formed terminal loop of longitudinal wire is slipped over the top of the frame standard of FIG. 15; and,

FIG. 21 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 21-21 of FIG. 10, showing details of the lower end of the stay.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION WIRE TRACTION GATE A wire traction gate incorporating a first embodiment of the invention is shown in FIGS. 1 to 9, inclusive. The gate 30 is mounted between gate posts 32 and 34 (FIG. 1) and comprises tubular end standards 36 and 38 and a barrier of longitudinal barbed wires 40 strung between the end standards. The longitudinal wires may be connected by one or more stays 42 intermediate the end standards 36 and 38.

The standard 38 has integral elongated plates 44 and 46 extending perpendicularly across its top and bottom ends, respectively. The plates 44 and 46 are perforated on each side of the end standard 38. The perforations nearest the gate post 34 are aligned with the eyelets of a pair of eye bolts 48 and 50 which pass through the gate post 34 and which are located above and below the plates 44 and 46., respectively. A pivot shaft 52 extends through the perforations of the plates 44 and 46 and through the eyelets of the eye bolts 48 and 50. The ends of the eye bolts 48 and 50 opposite the eyelets are threaded and receive washers and nuts 54, whereby the spacing between the pivot shaft 52 and the gate post 34 may be adjusted.

The perforations in plates 44 and 46 on the opposite side of the end standard 38 from the pivot shaft 52 re ceive the ends of a vertical wire 56. The wire 56 is successively wrapped around each longitudinal barbed wire 40 in the manner shown in FIG. 9. By this means vertical spacing is maintained between the longitudinal wires 40 adjacent the end standard 38 of the gate 30.

The end standard 36 is provided with integral plates 58 and 60 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 3) extending in the same plane at the top and bottom of the standard, respectively. The bottom plate 60 is adapted for engagement with a T-bolt 62 extending through the adjacent gate post 32. The opposite end of the T bolt 62 is threaded and receives a washer and a nut 64, whereby the positioning of the T-bolt may be adjusted.

The T-bolt 62 is formed by welding a short shaft 66 perpendicularly across the end of a threaded shaft 68.

The bottom plate 60 of the end standard 36 is adapted to rest on the shaft 66 and has a pair of downwardly extending forks and 72 which are positionable beyond the shaft 66 on each side of the threaded shaft 68 of the T-bolt 62. The forks 70 and 72 define a downwardly widening opening therebetween which simplifies the positioning of the lower end of the standard 36 in engagement with the T-bolt 62.

The plate 60 is perforated at the end opposite the forks 70 and 72 to receive a vertical wire 74. The wire 74 is wrapped around the longitudinal barbed wires 40 in the manner shown in FIG. 9. By this means vertical spacing is maintained between the wires 40 adjacent the end standard 36 of the gate 30.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 4, the plate 58 at the top of the end standard 36 includes a pair of laterally spaced upstanding lugs 76 and 78 which are integral with the plate 58. The lugs 76 and 78 support a transverse pivot bolt 80 which is mounted in aligned openings formed through the lugs. The lugs 76 and 78 are parallel to the longitudinal axis of the plate 58 and the pivot bolt 80 is perpendicular to the lugs 76 and 78.

The wire traction gate 30 further includes a traction mechanism 82 comprising a traction lever 84, a trac-.

tion link 86, and an eyebolt 88 which supports the traction mechanism 82 on the gate post 32. As is best shown in FIGS. 4, 5, and 6, the traction lever 84 of the traction mechanism 82 includes a forked end 90 comprising opposed lips 92 and 94 and a curved portion 96 having substantially the same radius as the pivot bolt 80 on the end standard 36. By this means the forked end 90 of the traction lever 84 is adapted for pivotal engagement with the pivot bolt 80. The lip 94 is wider than the remainder of the traction lever 84 and it is substantially equal in width to the space between the upstanding lugs 76 and 78 on the end standard 36. The lip 94 thus functions to center the traction lever 84 relative to the lugs 76 and 78.

The end of the traction lever 84 remote from the forked end 90 comprises a handle 98. A lug de pends from the handle 98 and is provided with an aperture 102. The plate 58 on the end standard 36 is provided with an aperture 104 which receives the lug 100 when the traction lever 84 is manipulated from the position shown in FIG. 6 to the position shown in FIG. 5. At this point the aperture 102 is positioned beneath the plate 58.

The traction link 86 comprises spaced straps 106 and 108 which are integrally connected by a web 110. The traction lever 84 is pivotally supported on one end of the traction link 86 by a bolt 112 which extends through aligned apertures formed in the straps 106 and 108 of the traction link 86 and through an aperture formed through the traction lever 84 at a point between the forked end 90 and the handle 98. By this means the bolt 112 provides a fulcrum for the traction lever 84 during pivotal movement of the lever about the pivot bolt 80. The opposite end of the traction link is pivotally supported on the eye bolt 88 by a bolt 114 which passes through aligned apertures formed in the straps I06 and 108 and through the eyelet of the eye bolt 88.

As is best shown in FIG. 2, the eye bolt 88 passes through the gate post 32. The end of the eye bolt 88 opposite the eyelet is threaded and receives a washer and a nut 116 whereby the positioning of the traction mechanism 82 relative to the gate post 32 may be adjusted. The positioning of the eye bolt 88 in the gate post 32,

the overall height of the gate post 32, and the length of the traction link 86 of the traction mechanism 82 are interrelated in such a way that the traction lever 84 of the traction mechanism rests on the upper end of the gate post 32 when the traction mechanism 82 is not in use. This is advantageous in that the traction mechanism 82 is thereby rendered readily accessible from ei ther side of the wire traction gate 30.

The plate 58 at the upper end of the end standard 36 extends first angularly upwardly to a pointtjust beyond the aperture 104 and then angularly downwardly and terminates in an upstanding lug 118. The upper longitudinal barbed wire 40 is connected to the lug 118, and

the vertical wire 74 is secured to the upper longitudinal wire 40 at a point adjacent the lug 118. This construction is advantageous for a number of reasons. First, sufficient spacing is provided between the traction lever 84 of the traction mechanism 82 and the upper longitudinal wire 40 that the handle 98 is easily grasped in one hand of an operator. Second, sufficient spacing is pro vided between the end standard 36 and the vertical wire 74 that the end standard 36 is easily grasped in the other hand of the operator. Third, the offset positioning of the lug 118 relative to the end standard 36 provides a lever arm of sufficient length that the end standard 36 is automatically aligned when it is moved to the closed position, notwithstanding the fact that it may have been misaligned when it was in the open position.

To close the wire traction gate 30, the operator first advances the botton end of the end standard 36 and engages the forks 70 and 72 of the plate 60 with the T- bolt 62. Next the upper end of the end standard 36 is moved towards the gate post 32, thereby tensioning at least the lower longitudinal barbed wires 40 of the gate 30. This tensioning positions both of the laterally spaced forks 70 and 72 against the terminal portion 66 of the T-bolt 62, thereby automatically pivoting the end standard 36 into proper alignment, assisted by the offset position of the lug 118 relative to the standard 36.

When the end standard 36 is positioned adjacent the gate post 32, the forked end 90 of the traction lever 84 of the traction mechanism 82 is moved from the position shown in dashed lines in FIG. 2 to the position shown in FIG. 6 and is simultaneously engaged with the pivot bolt 80 at the upper end of the end standard 36.

As is best shown in FIG. 7 this action is facilitated by beveled upper edges on the lugs 76 and 78 whereby first the lip 94 of the traction lever 84 and subsequently the straps of the traction link 86 are centered between and received by the lugs 76 and 78. After the traction lever 84 is engaged with the pivot bolt 80 it is moved from the position shown in FIG. 6 to the position shown in FIG. 5. During this action the traction mechanism 82 operates as a toggle in that the fulcrum provided by bolt 112 moves over center, or beyond dead center, relative to alignment with pivot bolts 1 14 and 80 to secure the wire traction gate 30 in traction and the traction erture 102 of the lug to latch the traction mechanism in its over center position.

The straps 106 and 108 of the traction link are arched to fit on or closely over the pivot bolt 80 when the traction mechanism is in the terminal over center position shown in FIG. 5. Hence the lower end of the end standard 36 cannot be raised from the T-bolt 62 while a padlock or other retaining means is maintained through the aperture 102.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate thefact that the tension of the longitudinal wires 40 comprising the wire traction gate 30 may be regulated by adjusting the positioning of the nuts 54, 64, and 116 on their respective bolts. This is preferably accomplished while the gate 30 is in the closed position in that the tension of the wires 40 is more readily determinable at that time. Any natural resiliency of the upper ends of the gate posts 32 and 34 imparts resilient tension to the longitudinal wires 40 comprising the upper portion of the wire traction gate 30.

The traction gate 30 is opened by moving the traction lever 84 of the traction mechanism 82 from the position shown in FIG. 5 through the position shown in I FIG. 6 to the position shown in dashed lines in FIG. 2.

During this movement the tension of the longitudinal wires 40 of the gate 30 on the traction mechanism 82 imparts a sharp impulse to the movement of the lever 84 so that the operator naturally releases the lever on the top of the gate post 32. While the traction lever is being lifted with one hand, the operator grips the upper end of the end standard 36 in the other hand. After the top of the end standard has been disengaged from the traction mechanism 82, the lower end of the end stan dard 36 is disengaged from the T-bolt 62 and the gate 30 is opened.

LATERALLY SWINGING TRACTION GATE A laterally swinging traction gate 128 incorporating a second embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 10 through 21, inclusive. The gate 128 is mounted between spaced gate posts 130 and 132 (FIG. 10) and has a frame 134 comprising a longitudinal tubular member 136 (FIGS. 10, 11, and 12) and tubular .end standards 138 and 140 extending upwardly from the ends of the longitudinal member 136 and supporting a barrier of longitudinal barbed wires 142. Flat plates 144 and 146 are sandwiched diagonally between the end standards 138 and 140 and the longitudinal member 136 of the frame 134, as by welding to each member of each joint. The plates 144 and 146 extend horizontally outward beyond each joint as shown.

The outward extension of the plate 144 has an aperture 148 formed in it for receiving the upper end of a round bar 150 (FIGS. 10 and 15) integral with the end of a bolt 152 which extends through the gate post 130. The bolt 152 is threaded at the opposite end to receive a washed and nut 154 by means of which the bolt 152 can be adjusted longitudinally until the upper end of the bar 150 centers in the aperture 148, the latter being somewhat larger in diameter than the bar 150. The bolt 152 thus supports the plate 144 when the gate 128 is closed. The bar 150 extends downwardly from the bolt 152 and into a socket or narrow vertical groove in the gate post 130, thereby maintaining an upright position. The upper end of the end standard 140 comprises an integral plate 156 (FIGS. 10 and 11) which extends horizontally toward the adjacent gate post 132 and has a perforation 158 formed in it. The plate 146 includes a similar perforation 160. A pivot shaft 162 passes through the perforations 158 and 160 and through eyelets in eye bolts 164 and 166 which extend through the gate post 132 and which are threaded to receive nuts and washers on each side of the post. The upper bolt 164 is thus positionable longitudinally by means of opposed nuts 168 and 170, and the lower bolt 166 is similarly positionable by means of opposed nuts 172 and 174. The plate 146 is located above and is therefore supported by the bolt 166. The plate 156 is positioned beneath the bolt 164 to prevent the hinged end of the gate 128 from being raised.

The plate 156 is bent upwardly on the opposite side of the end standard 140 from the pivot shaft 162 and receives an eye bolt 176 to which the upper end of a diagonal guy wire 178 is secured. The eye bolt 176 has a long threaded shank which passes through a perforation 180 in the plate 156 and is adjustable longitudinally by means of a nut 182 in the manner shown in FIG. 10. The opposite end of the guy wire 178 extends around the end standard 138, whereby the guy wire 178 prevents the gate 128 from sagging.

The end standard 138 has an integral block 184 (FIGS. 11 and 12) at its upper end. The block 184 has an upstanding lug 186 including a concave socket 188 which is occupied in traction by a pivot bolt 190 (FIGS. 14 and 15) extending between and secured to a pair of parallel forks 192 and 194 of a traction lever 196. The forks 192 and 194 are spaced to receive the lug 186 and have a common connection 198 which forms a base for a tubular handle 200. Aligned perforations (FIG. through the forks 192 and 194 receive a pivot bolt 202 by means of which the ends of a pair of parallel straps 204 and 206 of a traction link 208 are pivotally connected to the traction lever 196. The straps 204 and 206 are perforated for this purpose and are spaced to receive the forks 192 and 194 of the traction lever 196 between them. The straps 204 and 206 of the traction link 208 are joined by a web 210 and preferably fit closely over the block 184. By this means any upward movement of the standard 138 is prevented when secured in traction. This in turn assures that the plate 144 is not disengaged from the bar 150 when the gate is secured in traction.

The opposite ends of the straps 204 and 206 receive the eyelet end of an eye bolt 212 and are pivotally connected thereto by means of a transverse bolt 214 which passes through the eyelet of the eye bolt and through aligned openings in the straps. The eye bolt 212 passes through the upper end of the adjacent gate post 130 and is threaded at the opposite end to receive a washer and the adjusting nut 216 whereby the bolt can be adjusted longitudinally.

An upstanding integral section 218 of the block 184 is shaped and located to fit within the space between the forks 192 and 194 of the traction lever 196 and the bolt 202. The section 218 extends upwardly beyond the forks 192 and 194 when the traction lever is in the posi tion shown in FIG. and has an aperture 220 which is exposed above the forks 192 and 194 when the traction lever 196 is in such position. The aperture 220 may receive the shackle of a padlock when the gate is closed. The base of the section 218 is rounded in cross section to anchor the top longitudinal wire 142 of the gate 128.

A latch bolt 222 extends through the length of the handle 200 and through an opening in the base 198. A latch recess 224 is provided in the adjacent edge of the section 218 to receive the end of the latch bolt 222 when the traction lever 196 is in the position shown in FIG. 15. The edge of the section 218 is suitably sloped above the recess 224 to earn the latch bolt 222 into the recess.

The latch bolt 222 is urged into the latch recess 224 by a compression spring 226 (FIG. 17) acting against a disk 228 that is integral with the bolt 222 and positioned thereon to limit outward movement of the bolt 222 through the base 198. The other end of the compression spring 226 rests against a plate 230 which seats against blocks 232 and 234 secured to the interior of the tubular handle 200, as by spot welding. The plate 230 has a central opening which receives the bolt 222. Opposite the base 198 the bolt 222 passes through a central opening in an end wall 236 of an outer tubular means 238 which telescopes slidably over the end portion of the primary tube of the handle 200.

A pin 240 projects through a perforation in the latch bolt 222 adjacent the inner side of the end wall 236. An elastomeric washer 242, a metal washer 244, and a nut 246 are mounted on the outside of the wall 236. Hence the latch bolt 222 moves with the outer end portion 238 of the traction lever handle 200.

To assemble the plate 230 beyond the blocks 232 and 234 from the terminal entrance to the interior of the tubular handle 200, the plate 230 includes notches 248 and 250 (FIGS. 18 and 19). The notches 248 and 250 are aligned with the blocks 232 and 234 by a special tool which moves the plate 230 against the compression spring 226. When the tool has moved the plate beyond the blocks 232 and 234, the plate 230 is rotated to position the plate in engagement with the blocks 232 and 234 and to center the notches 248 and 250 between the blocks 232 and 234. The plate 230 is provided by pads 252 and 254 which limit rotation of the plate 230 in service. The pads 252 and 254 are secured to the plate 230, as by spot welding.

To release the gate 128 from traction the operator moves the outer tubular portion 238 of the traction lever 196 outwardly to withdraw the latch bolt 222 from the latch recess 224. The spring 226 limits this action when it is fully compressed. The traction lever 196 is then pivoted upwardly and is positioned on top of the gate post as described above in connection with the wire traction gate 30 of FIGS. 1 through 9.

The gate frame is constructed from straight lengths of tubing, with the end standards 138 and perpendicular to the longitudinal member 136 and parallel to each other. After the longitudinal wires 142 are applied their tension causes the distal ends of the standards 138 and 140 to draw toward each other and the longitudinal member 136 to bow downwardly in the middle. However, when traction is applied in sufficient magnitude to restore the standards 138 and 140 to the parallel condition, the longitudinal frame member 136 is relieved of bending moment and returns to its original straight condition. By manipulation of the nut 216 on the eyebolt 212, the amount of traction required to make the longitudinal frame member 136 straight and thereby relieve it of beinding strain can be effected.

In order to achieve precise tension in the longitudinal barbed wires 142 and to mount them on the frame 134 of the swinging gate 128 with minimum labor and highest quality workmanship, it is desirable that the wires 142 be prepared in exact lengths and with end loops before they are assembled on the frame. The block 184 is short and is tapered longitudinally towards the section 218 as shown in FIGS. 11, 12, and 20. By bowing the longitudinal member 136 downwardly in the middle, the upper ends of the end standards 138 and 140 are brought closer together. By hooking one end loop of each wire 142 around the standard 140 first, the other end loop can be slipped over the top of the block 184 of the standard 138 as shown in FIG. 20. The first wire so applied is then slid downwardly along both standards simultaneously until it is preperly positioned. The other wires are then put into their positions on the standards in the same way, except that the top wire is provided with a smaller end loop and is positioned over the section 218 and around its shank as shown in FIG. 15. The longitudinal member 136 is then released from its bowed condition, leaving the wires 142 taut.

Vertical wires 256 and 258 are then applied adjacent the standards 138 and 140, respectively, and are wrapped around the longitudinal wires 142 as shown in FIG. 9 to hold them in properly spaced positions. The lower ends of the vertical wires 256 and 258 are drawn around the longitudinal frame member 136. At the plate 156, the top longitudinal wire 142 may' be held against downward displacement by a separate wire 260 looped about the top wire and the plate 156. The vertical wire 256 may also be employed to secure the lower end of the diagonal guy wire 178 to the longitudinal member 136 and thereby prevent the lower end of the guy wire 178 from slipping upwardly, or a separate wire may be used for this purpose.

One or more stays 262 may be utilized between the end standards 138 and 140 of the gate 128. A preferred stay 262 is shown in FlGS. 1 and 21. At the bottom end the stay 262 is flattened and widened and shaped to fit over the longitudinal member 136 and against its sides. Connection of the stay 262 to the member 136 is completely by looping wire 264 around the bottom of the member 136 and through perforations in the flattened sides of the stay 262.

The bolts 152 and 166 extending through the gate posts 130 and 132 are initially adjusted longitudinally so the gate 128 is centered between the gate posts and so that the top of the bar 150 is centered in the opening 148 provided in the plate 144. Then, with the guy wire 178 slack, the bolt 164 is adjusted longitudinally with the gate 128 open, so the height of the horizontal end of plate 144 corresponds to that of the bolt 152.

At this point the tension of the longitudinal wires 142 of the gate 128 is equal to the stress in the frame 134. This means that the lifting force required of a person to raise the plate 144 over the top of bar 150 is only that force which constitutes the departure from equilibrium. In actual use it has been found that the tension of the wires so effectively counterbalances the weight of the gate at the openable end that the openable end is extremely easy to lift. The slack in the guy wire 178 is next taken up by adjusting the nut 182 to the extent that does not lift the plate 144 from the seat bolt 152.

This provides emergency support to the openable end downward force when the gate is open. However, since the frame 134 yields resiliently, the guy wire 178 is provided toprotect the frame against undue downward strain while the gate 128 is open. After the gate is closed, it can withstand relatively large forces since it is then secured at all four corners.

Although the wire traction gate 30 of FIGS. 1 through 9 and the laterally swinging traction gate 128 of FIGS. 10 through 21 are presented with traction mechanism having different details, principles of either mechanism can be used with either gate. A simpler traction mechansim is more applicable where a gate will not be opened and closed frequently. In both traction mechanisms the traction lever is preferably inclined upward from the pivoted end when latched. This provides a desirable clearance above the top barbed wire for gripping the lever. It also protects the telescoped tube 238 (FIG. 17) from receiving water and then freezing.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that the I use of the present invention results in numerous advantages over the prior art. Being anchored at all four corners when closed, the swinging traction gate of this invention may be considered as stock proof as conventional laterally swinging gates. But is is more economical of material, light in weight and unhampered by wind. It is especially advantageous where unrestricted visibility, unrestricted air circulation or an inconspicuous gate are desired. It also has the special advantage of exerting traction on the two associated gate posts. This substantially reduces the amount of bracing required in the fence sections. The resulting savings in material and labor costs are often equal to or greater than the cost of the gate. Another advantage over conventional laterally swinging gates is the counterbalancing of the openable end of the gate by the tension of the gates longitudinal wires.

Although invented for securing the laterally swining traction gate, the traction mechanism of this invention is also useful for other gates, notably for the disclosed wire traction gate embodiment. With this traction mechanism and cooperating gate structure, gate end coupling and uncoupling, the application of traction, padlocking and adjustability are all uniquely facilitated. At the beginning of and during each traction lever handle movement the lever handles affords optimum convenience from each side of the gate, yet remains out of peoples way.

Although preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated in the accompanying Drawings and described in the foregoing Detail Description, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiments disclosed, but is capable of numerous rearrangements, modifications, and substitutions of parts and elements without departing from the spirit of the invention. 1

What is claimed is:

1. In a traction gate, the combination of:

a frame comprising a pair of upright end standards and a unitary longitudinal frame member integrally connected with and extending between the lower ends of said end standards,

means for hingedly supporting one end of the gate frame for laterally swinging movement between a closed position and an open position,

means for supporting the opposite end of said frame at the bottom against downward and, lateral displacement when the frame is in the closed position,

a wire barrier tensioned between said end standards and tending to apply'bending moment to said longi tudinal frame member,

said wire barrier being positioned entirely above the longitudinal frame member of the frame whereby the longitudinal frame member comprises the lowermost structural element of the swingable portion of the gate; and I means for applying traction at the top of said frame above said bottom support means and thereby rclieving the longitudinal frame member from said bending moment of said wire barrier.

2. The gate according to claim 1 further including a diagonal guy wire for supporting the swinging end of the gate from the upper end of the standard at the hinged end of the gate. 7

3. The gate according to claim 1 wherein the traction applying means comprises a toggle mechanism supported for engagement with the upper end of the end standard at the swinging end of the gate and adapted to apply a force to the end standard which is directed oppositely to the tension of the wire barrier.

4. In a traction gate;

a pair of gate posts, one at each end of the closed position of the gate;

a frame comprising a pair of upright gate end standards and a unitary longitudinal frame member integrally connected to the lower ends of said standards,

means for hingedly supporting one end of said gate frame on one of said gate posts for laterally swinging movement between a closed position and an open position,

said hingedly supporting means including top and bottom hinge means,

means for supporting the swingable opposite end of the frame against downward and lateral displacement adjacent the other post when the gate is in its closed position,

said longitudinal frame member of the frame extending continuously between the bottom hinge means and the frame supporting means when the gate is closed,

said supporting means comprising a vertically perforated horizontal lug projecting toward said other post from said frame and an upward projection receivable in said perforation and integral with a seat bolt extending through said other post and having a nut on the other side of that post for longitudinal adjustment,

a wire barrier stretched between said standards and tensioned to exert a lifting force component on the swingable end of the gate frame, and

a traction mechanism for applying tension to the upper end of the gate standard above said seat bolt in a direction toward said other post and at a downward angle to press the gate frame against said seat bolt.

5. The traction gate according to claim 4 wherein the traction mechanism comprises a toggle mechanism mounted on said other post for engaging the gate frame when it is in the closed position and for applying traction to the gate frame in a direction opposite to the force that is applied to the gate frame by the tension of the wire barrier.

6. The traction gate according to claim 5 wherein the toggle mechanism is supported on the gate post for movement between a disengaged position wherein it overlies the upper end of the gate post and a terminal position wherein it overlies the swingable end of the gate frame, and further including cooperating means on the gate frame and the toggle mechanism for retaining the toggle mechanism in the terminal position.

7. In a traction gate, the combination of:

a frame comprising a pair of upright tubular end standards and a unitary longitudinal tubular frame member integrally connected with and extending between the bottoms of said end standards, means for hingedly supporting one end of the gate frame for alterally swinging movement between a a closed position and an open position,

means for receiving the bottom of the opposite end of said frame when the frame is in the closed position and thereby supporting the frame against downward and lateral displacement when the frame is mounted thereon,

a traction mechanism for applying external traction against the top of the supported end of said gate frame and for releasing it from traction; and

a wire barrier tensioned between said standards in opposition to said traction,

said frame maintaining residual tension in said wire barrier when released from said traction, which tension exerts a lifting force upon the swingable end of said gate thereby simplifying the engage-, ment and disengagement of the frame and the frame receiving means.

8. In a traction gate, the combination of:

a frame comprising a pair of upright end standards and a unitary longitudinally frame member integrally connected with and extending between the lower ends of said standards,

said frame, when free from external force, being substantially a rectangle with an open side opposite said longitudinal frame member, making it resiliently flexible in said plane,

a pair of posts for supporting the opposite ends of said frame,

top and bottom hinge means for supporting one end of said frame to one of said posts for laterally swinging movement from a closed position to an open position,

vertically coupling cooperative structure of said gate and said other post for supporting the swingable end of said frame in the closed position at the bottom against downward and lateral displacement,

traction means for connecting the swingable end of the closed gate at the top with said other post in traction and for releasing it from traction, and

a wire barrier extending between said standards and secured thereto as to be tightly tensioned when said gate is in traction and to remain resiliently ten,- sioned by said frame when the gate is released from such traction, thereby exerting lifting moment on the released swingable gate end to facilitate manual lifting of said gate end for coupling and uncoupling at the bottom by said coupling structure.

9. The gate according to claim 8 wherein said longitudinal frame member extends substantially in a line from said lower hinge means to said coupling structure in the closed gate.

disengaged position wherein it overlies the upper end of the gate post and a terminal position wherein it overlies the swingable end of the gate frame, and further including cooperating means on the gate frame and the toggle mechanism for retaining the toggle mechanism in the terminal position.

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US4813182 *May 20, 1987Mar 21, 1989H. S. Jackson & Son (Fencing) Ltd.Gates
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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/381, 292/247
International ClassificationE06B11/02, E06B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationE06B11/021
European ClassificationE06B11/02B