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Publication numberUS3909565 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1975
Filing dateApr 29, 1974
Priority dateApr 29, 1974
Also published asDE2519093A1
Publication numberUS 3909565 A, US 3909565A, US-A-3909565, US3909565 A, US3909565A
InventorsClouser Michael T, Shell Bruce W
Original AssigneeMallory & Co Inc P R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic timer switch
US 3909565 A
Abstract
A timer switch includes a clock, an interval timer, and an automatic cooking timer, the cooking timer including a start time dial and knob for setting the time that an oven is to start heating and a stop time dial and knob for setting the desired time that the oven is to stop heating.
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Clouser et a1.

[451 Sept. 30, 1975 AUTOMATIC TIMER SWITCH Inventors: Michael T. Clouser; Bruce W. Shell,

both of Indianapolis, Ind.

Assignee:

Indianapolis, Ind.

Filed: Apr. 29, 1974 Appl. No.: 464,760

US. Cl 200/38 R; 200/38 FA; 200/39 R Int. Cl. H01H 43/00 Field of Search 58/21.13, 21.14, 39.5;

200/35 R, 38 R, 38 F, 38 FA, 38 F8, 39 R,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 58/21.13 X Barton et a1 200/38 FA Boyles P. R. Mallory & Co., Inc,

3,098,131 7/1963 Gallagher et a1. 200/38 FA 3,124,668 3/1964 Zagorski et a1. 200/39 R X 3,358,924 12/1967 Goodhouse et al.. 219/492 X 3,581,026 5/1971 Losert 200/38 R 3,601,973 8/1971 Bassett et a1... 58/21.]4 3,694,591 Bassett et a1, 200/38 FA Primary E.\'aminer.lames R. Scott Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Char1es W. Hoffman; Robert F. Meyer; Donald W. Hanson [5 7] ABSTRACT 5 Claims, 27 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 2 of7 3,909,565

US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 3 of7 3,909,565

U.S. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet4 0f7 3,909,565

mm, QN

m9 5 Nu, Q'Q QM, MN QL US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 5 of7 US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 6 of7 3,909,565

US. Patent Sept. 30,1975 Sheet 7 of 7 3,909,565

AUTOMATIC TIMER SWITCH Generally speaking, the present invention relates to a timer and more specifically to a timer switch having a frame plate, an electric motor carried by the frame plate, a time of day indicating means coupled to the motor, and a mechanically-actuated electrical switching means carried by the frame plate for switching electrical current including a plurality of electrical contacts, an improvement comprising a manuallysettable rotatable start-time means for activating the electrical switch means, a manually-settable, rotatable stop time means for activating the electrical switching means including a stop shaft rotatable in the frame plate, a stop gear carried by the stop shaft having a stop projection extending therefrom, a stop hub carried by the stop shaft having a slot for receiving the stop projection, and a linkage means for mechanically linking the switch means to the stop hub. v

Timer switches are widely used in home appliances such as ranges to time a particular function such as cooking for a preselected time interval, at the end of which an electrical function is performed, for example, the turning off of a heating element. The present invention provides a timer switch that can be set for the time a range oven is to start heating and also for the time it is to stop heating. The operator of this oven can forget about the cooking until it is finished because the present invention automatically cooks according to the preselected start and stop times.

Accordingly, it is a feature of the present invention to provide a compact motor-driven timer switch which indicates time of day and can be preset manually to effect the beginning and the end of the energization of an oven of an electric or gas range. Another feature of the present invention to provide a timer switch that includes a manually-settable, rotatable start time means for activating an electrical switching means. Another feature of the present invention is to provide a timer switch that includes a manually-settable, rotatable stop time means for activating electrical switching means including a stop shaft rotatable in a frame plate, a stop gear carried by the stop shaft having a first engagement means, a stop hub carried by the stop shaft having a second engagement means for engaging the first en gagement means, and linkage means for mechanically linking the switch means to the stop hub. Still another feature of the present invention is to provide a timer switch that can be present manually to operate an audible signal at the end of a present interval. Am ther feature of the present invention is to provide a timer switch to close electrical contacts manually to start an oven independently of the timer control.

These and other features will become more apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view, in front elevation, and at full scale of a motor driven timer in which this invention is embodied.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the motor driven timer shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is partial view, in rear elevation of the motor driven timer shown in FIG. 1. 7

FIG. 4 is a rear view of the motor driven timer, the synchronous motor haying been omitted to show more clearly how the mechanism case is independently secured to the rear side of the mechanism plate and the contact housing also having been omitted to show the rear side of the frame plate on which it is mounted.

FIGS. SA-SB show an exploded view of the motor driven timer.

FIG. 6 is a view, taken generally along line 66 of FIG. 5B looking in the direction of the arrows and shows a part of the mechanism case provided with a shouldered portion for interfitting with the mechanism plate to be secured thereto be a deformable rib.

FIG. 7 is a view taken generally along line 77 of FIG. 5B and looking in the direction of the arrows to show another shouldered .portion of the mechanism case for interfitting with the mechanism plate and to be held thereto by a deformable rib.

FIG. 8 is a horizontal sectional view at an enlarged scale looking in the direction of the arrows and taken generally along line 88 of FIG. 4 and shows the gear train mounted within the mechanism case.

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of the cam that is mounted on the interval shaft.

FIG. 10 is an elevational view of the cam shown in FIG. 9 looking from left to right.

FIG. 11 is a view of the cam shown in FIG. 9 looking from the opposite side.

FIG. 12 is an elevational view of the cam shown in FIG. 11 looking from left to right.

FIG. 13 is an elevational view of the drive dog that is secured to the interval shaft.

FIG. 14 is a horizontal sectional view at an enlarged scale looking in the direction of the arrows and taken generally along line 1414 of FIG. 4 and shows the gearing and related parts for the range timer section.

FIG. 15 is an elevational full scale view of the cover for the contact housing.

FIG. 16 is a vertical elevational view at an enlarged scale taken generally along line 16-l6 of FIG. 2 and shows the range timer section of the timing in manual position.

FIGS. 17 and 18 are views, similar to FIG. 6 in which the range timer section is shown in the off position and in the timed cooking position.

FIG. 19 is an elevational view of the contact operating plate.

FIG. 20 shows the gear train for the range timer section.

FIG. 21 is an elevational view at an enlarged scale of the contact housing and contacts taken along line 21-21 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows, the cover having been omitted.

FIGS. 22, 23 and 24 are sectional views taken generally along lines 2222, 2323 and 2727respectively, of FIG. 21.

FIG. 25 is a perspective view at an enlarged scale of the contact bar.

FIG. 26 is a perspective view at an enlarged scale of the contact slide which carried the contact bar.

In FIGS. 1 and SA-B the reference character 10 designates, generally, a motor driven timer embodying this invention. It includes an elongated metallic dial plate 11 that is arranged to be viewed through a glass 12 that is held in place by a rectangular escutcheon 13. Tabs 14 extend rearwardly from the escutcheon l3 and overlies a flange 15 on the dial plate 11 to hold the assembly together. Time markings 16 are imprinted on the dial plate 11 and with respect to them an hour hand 17, a minute hand 18 and a second hand 19 are arranged to rotate. Concentrically within the time markings 16 interval markings 20 are imprinted on the dial plate 11 and with respect to them an interval hand 21 rotatable with an interval shaft 22 is arranged to rotate.

It will be observed that the interval markings 20 extend from to 4. The markings between 0 and the 15 minute mark are laid out over an angle of 90 while the markings from l minutes to 1 hour are laid out over an angle of 49. The angular spacing between the hour marks I, 2, 3, and 4 is 46. As will appear hereinafter provision is made for rotating the interval hand 21 relatively slowly from the 4 hour marking to the 1 hour marking. During the next 45 minutes the speed of the interval hand 21 is increased slightly and finally during the last minutes it rotates at a relatively high speed. This makes it possible to adjust accurately a setting of the interval hand 21 for a relatively short interval while it is possible to obtain an interval setting of 4 hours within the confines of the interval markings 20.

A knob 23, secured to the end of the interval shaft 22 that projects through the glass 12, permits manual adjustment of the interval hand 21 to the desired interval mark. When the shaft 22 and knob 23 are moved inwardly, as will appear hereinafter, the setting of the hour hand 17 and minute hand 18 to the correct time can be accomplished.

Mounted on the rear side of the dial plate 11 is a metallic adapter plate 25. As shown in FIGS. 8 and 17 tabs 26 extend forwardly from the adapter plate through notches 27 in the dial plate 11 and around openings 28 therein for securing the adapter plate 25 to the dial plate 11. The tabs 26 are turned over to secure the adapter plate 25 in place. Four tabs 26 are employed at each location only two being shown.

Lugs 29, FIG. 3, extend rearwardly from the adapter plate 25 for entering openings 30, FIG. 5A, in a rectangular metallic mechanism plate 31 which is held in spaced relation to the rear side of the adapter plate 25.

A molded plastic mechanism case 32 is mounted on the rear side of the mechanism plate 31. The manner in which it is held in position to facilitate assembly of the motor driven timer 10 is important. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 shouldered portions 33 and 34 are molded integrally with the opposite ends of the plastic mechanism case 32 and they are arranged to interfit with openings 35 and 36, FIGS. 3 and 5A in the mechanism plate 31. After the plastic mechanism case 32 has been positioned on the mechanism plate 31 with the shouldered portions 33 and 34 extending through the openings 35 and 36, ribs 37 and 38 extending between the openings 35 and 36 and slots 39 and 40 in the mechanism plate 31 are deformed inwardly to overlie the shouldered portions 33 and 34. In this manner the plastic mechanism case 32 is securely held in place on the mechanism plate 31. Thus it is held temporarily in position until additional fastening means are employed for further securing the mechanism case 32 to the mechanism plate 31.

After the mechanism plate 32 has been assembled in the manner described, a synchronous motor, indicated generally at 43, is mounted on the rear side of the plastic mechanism case 32. Ears 44 extend laterally from the bottom of the rectangular magnetic field structure 43 of the motor 43 and they are notched to receive screws 45 which extend through the plastic mechanism case 32 and are threaded into the mechanism plate 31. In this manner not only is the motor 43 held in position but also the mechanism case 32 is further secured to the mechanism plate 31. The motor 43 is arranged to be energized from a suitable alternating current source. For this purpose leads 46, FIG. 3, are provided.

After the end of the interval for which the interval hand 21 is set, it is desirable that an audible signal be given. For this purpose a vibrator arm 49 is employed. The vibrator arm 49 is pivoted on a shaft 50 that extends rearwardly from the plastic mechanism case 32. A torsion spring 51 acts to bias the vibrator arm 49 in a counter-clockwise direction, FIG. 3, toward an extension 52 of the magnetic field structure 43' of the motor 42. As shown in FIG. 4 a flange 53 extends from the vibrator arm 49 and carries a cam follower pin 54 that extends into a groove 55, FIG. 9, of a cam that is indicated, generally, at 56. The cam 56 is secured to the inner end of the interval shaft 22 and is arranged to be driven in a manner to be described. As adjusting screw 57., which extends through the vibrator arm 49, is employed for adjusting the tension of spring 51 and thus the frequency of the sound generated by the vibrator arm 59 when it is released. I

A time of day indicating means 300 is generally shown in FIG. 5, 5A, 5B, and 8, wherein a shaft 59 extends forwardly from the motor 43. It is driven through a reduction gear train by the motor 43 at a speed of 1 RPM. The shaft 59 is journaled in a bearing 60 that is secured to the flat bottom portion of the magnetic field structure 43' of the motor 43. The shaft 59 extends through a clearance opening 61 in a rear wall 62 of the plastic mechanism case 32. At its forward end the shaft 59 carries a pinion 63 which has a splined connection 64 with a gear 65 that is journaled in the mechanism plate 31 and between it and the adapter plate 25. The gear 65 meshes with a gear 66 that is secured to a second hand sleeve 67 which extends through the opening 28 in the dial plate 11 and on which the second hand 19 is mounted for rotation therewith.

Also as shown in FIG. 8 the pinion 63 meshes with a gear 68 that is rotatably mounted on a stub shaft 69 that is carried by an embossment formed integrally with the front side of the rear wall 62. Rotatable together with the gear 68 is a pinion 70 which drives a gear 71 that is secured to a pinion 72. The pinion 72 is fast on a shaft 73 one end of which is journaled in the mechanism plate 31 while the other end is journaled in the rear wall 62 of the plastic mechanism case 32. The pinion 72 meshes with a rear 74 that is rotatable with respect to a minute sleeve 75 which is journaled on the interval shaft 22 and to which the minute hand 18 is secured for rotation therewith. In order to permit setting of the time in the manner previously described, a diaphragm time set clutch 76 is secured'to the minute sleeve 75 and frictionally engages the juxtaposed surface of the rear 74. Thus, for time setting purposes, the gear 74 remains stationary while the minute sleeve 75 is rotated for setting the correct time.

A pinion 78, integral with the minute sleeve 75, drives a gear 79 which, together with a pinion 80, is rotatably mounted on the shaft 73. The pinion 80 drives a gear 81 that is secured to an hour sleeve 82 which is journalled on the minute sleeve 75 within the mechanism plate 31. The hour hand 17 is mounted on the hand sleeve 82 for rotation therewith. It will be noted that the second hand sleeve 67 is journaled on the hour sleeve 82 for rotation therewith. It will be noted that the second hand sleeve 67 is journaled on the hour sleeve 82.

Normally the interval shaft 22 is held in its outermost position by a coil compression Spring 83 which reacts between the rear wall 62 of the plastic mechanism case 32 and the rear side of a drive dog 84, FIG. 13, which is secured to the interval shaft 22. The function of the drive dog 84 will be described presently. The inner end 85 of the interval shaft 22 is journaled at 86 in the rear wall 62 of the plastic mechanism case 32. Rearwardly extending teeth 87 are provided on the outer end of the interval shaft 22 for engaging slots 88 in the forward end of the minute sleeve 75. When it is desired to set the time, the knob 23 and the interval shaft 22 are moved inwardly to bring the teeth 87 into engagement with the slots 88. Then, on rotation of the knob- 32, the minute sleeve 75 is rotated and, through the gear train including the pinion 78, gear 79, pinion 80 and gear 81, the hour sleeve 82 also is rotated to rotate the minute hand 18 and hour hand 17 to the correct time indication with respect to the time markings 16. The drive dog 84 is slidably located in a correspondingly shaped slot 89, FIG. 9, in the cam 56 and provides a driving connection between the interval shaft 22 and the cam 56 regardless of whether the interval shaft 22 is in the position shown in FIG. 8 or is in the time setting position just described in which the coil spring 83 is compressed As pointed out above, position is made for rotating the interval hand 21 and the interval shaft 22 at a relatively low speed for a major portion of the presettable time interval and then to increase this speed of rotation during the last or minor portion of the interval in order to make it possible to set accurately the position of the interval hand 21 during this remaining interval. For this purpose a relatively low-speed high-torque clutch, FIG. 8, is employed and it is indicated, generally, at 92. Also there is provided a relatively high-speed low-torque clutch that is indicated, generally, at 93.

The relatively low-speed high-torque clutch 92 comprises a shaft 94 that is journaled at one end in the mechanism plate 31 and at the other end in the rear wall 62 of the plastic mechanism case 32. A hub 95 is secured to the shaft 94 for rotation therewith and it carries a gear 96 that is driven by a gear 97 which is secured to and rotates with the minute sleeve 75. A coil compression spring 98 reacts between the gear 96 and a bushing 99 which is slidable on the shaft 94 and has frictional engagement with one side ofa pinion 100 the other side of which frictionally engages a flange 101 that is integral with the shaft 94. The pinion 100 is arranged to have driving engagement with gear teeth 102 along the periphery of the cam 56.

The relatively high-speed low-torque clutch 93, FIG. 8, includes the shaft 73 previously described. Also it includes the gear 71 which is secured to the pinion 72 that, in turn, is secured to the shaft 73 and rotates therewith. A washer 105 bears against the pinion 72 at one side. A coil compression spring 106 reacts between it and a washer 107 which overlies an annular flange 108 that extends inwardly from a pinion 109 which is rotatable on shaft 73. A washer 110 on the other side of the flange 108 bears against a flange 111 that is integral with the shaft 73. The teeth of the pinion 109 are arranged to engage the gear teeth 102 on the cam 56.

It will be observed in FIG. that the gear teeth 102 are partially omitted at 112. The purpose of this is to bypass the teeth on the pinion 109 of the high speed clutch 93 during a portion of the revolution of the cam 56. The teeth 102 are omitted entirely as indicated at 113 from another portion of the periphery of the cam 56 in order to provide a section of the cam 56 that is not engaged by the teeth of either the pinion of the low speed clutch 92 or the teeth of the pinion 109 of the high speed clutch 93. It is only during the presettable interval that the cam 56 and the interval shaft 22 are rotated. Otherwise they remain stationary in the off position of the interval hand 21.

In order to facilitate engagement between the teeth of the high speed pinion 109 and the teeth 102 on the cam 56, as shown in FIG. 12, the teeth 102 increase in face width from a minimum width indicated at 114 gradually to the full width. During the interval between the one hour mark and the 15 minute mark, both of the pinions 100 and 109 engage the teeth 102 on the cam 56. However, because the low speed clutch 92, due to the tension of the spring 98, is capable of exerting a higher driving torque than is the high speed clutch 93 with a correspondingly weaker spring 106, the drive is essentially at the relatively low speed until the cam 56 is rotated to disengage the last tooth 115, FIG. 10, from the pinion 100, whereupon the drive is entirely through the high speed clutch 93 for the last 15 minutes of the interval.

During the presettable interval the cam 56 is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction as indicated by arrow 116 in FIG. 9 with the cam follower pin 54 remaining in the groove 55 and holding the vibrator arm 49 in an inoperative position. At the end of the presettable interval, the cam 56 rotates relative to the cam follower pin 54 until it drops into a relatively deep notch 117 as shown by a broken line. This releases the vibrator arm 49 and it is then free to vibrate in the alternating magnetic filed of the synchronous motor 43. At this time the teeth 102 are not engaged by the teeth of the pinion 109 and the cam 56 remains motionless while the vibrator arm 49 continues to vibrate. In order to stop vibration of the arm 49, the knob 23 and the interval shaft 22 are rotated to being the cam follower pin 54, shown by a broken line, into a relatively shallow notch 118. This lifts the vibrator arm 49 to the inoperative position and facilitates stopping the cam 56 in the off position which is indicated by the interval hand 21 registering with this indication on the interval markings 21, FIG. 1.

In those instances where it is desired to operate the interval shaft 22 and the interval hand 21 at the same speed throughout the entire interval, for example through an interval of 60 minutes instead of the 4 hour interval indicated by the interval markings 20, then the relatively low speed high torque clutch 92 is omitted and the 56 is modified to provide the teeth 102 along its periphery, except for a relatively short span in which the teeth are omitted which corresponds to the end of the interval and to the off position. With such a modification the interval markings 20 are appropriately changed, for example to indicate a 60 minute interval over the span of the 4 hour interval markings.

FIGS. 1-4, 5A-B, it will be observed that the dial plate 11 carries start time markings 142 with respect to which a start time hand 143 rotates. The start time hand 143 is mounted on a start time shaft 144 which can be preset manually by a knob 145 that extends forwardly of the glass 12.

The dial plate 11 also has stop time markings 146 thereon, and a stop time hand 149 is arranged to rotate relative to these markings and is mounted on a stop time shaft 150 which can be preset manually by a knob 145 that extends forwardly of glass 12.

In FIG. 14 it will be observed that the start time shaft 144 extends through an opening 28 in the adapter plate 25 and that it comprises a part of a start time means that is indicated, generally, at 154. The start time shaft 144 is endwise slidable through a sleeve 155 and is thereby rotatably mounted intermediate its ends. The sleeve 155 is mounted in an opening 156 that is formed at the base of a deformed section 157 of the mechanism plate 31. Rotatably carried on the sleeve 155 is a gear 158 that is referred to in the claims as a first start gear. The gear 158 has a lug 159 stuck therefrom for entering an opening 160 in a gear 161 which is referred to in the claims as a second start gear. Lug 159 comprises engagement means 251, and opening 160 comprises engagement means 252. The gear 161 is rotatable with an annular operating member 162 which is secured at a knurled section 163 for rotation with the start time shaft 144. The annular operating member 162 has a counterbore 164 for receiving a coil compression spring 165 that reacts between the bottom of the counterbore 164 and a flat section 166 of a friction spring 167 with which an inturned tang 168 on a metallic frame plate 169 cooperates to prevent turning about the start time shaft 144 which extends through the flat section 166. As will appear hereinafter, the start time shaft 144 is arranged to be moved inwardly against the coil compression spring 165 for the purpose of setting the start time by positioning the start time hand 143 at the desired time with respect to the start time markings 142. When the start time shaft 144 is moved inwardly to position the gear 161, as shown by broken lines, it is desirable that provision be made for preventing rotation of the start time shaft 144 and the gear 161. It is for this purpose that the friction spring 167 is employed and it is arranged to have frictional contact engagement with some of the teeth 170 along the periphery of the gear 161. When the gear 161 is shifted to the broken line position, it is located slightly past the distal end of the lug 159 and then it can be rotated out of registry with opening 160. Upon release of the manual force moving the start time shaft 144 inwardly against the biasing action of the coil compression spring 165, the latter causes the face of the gear 161 to engage the distal end of the lug 159 to hold the start time shaft 144 in the depressed position until the gear 158 is rotated to again position the lug 159 in registry with the opening 160 which occurs at the beginning of the cooking cycle. At its inner end the start time shaft 144 is rotatably and slidably mounted in a bearing opening 171 in the metallic frame plate 169.

As shown more clearly in FIG. B the metallic frame plate 169 includes integral forwardly extending walls 173 and 174 having lugs 175 along their distal edges for entering suitable openings in the metallic mechanism plate 31. The lugs 175 are twisted slightly after passing through the mechanism plate 31 to hold the metallic frame plate 169 securely in position thereon.

Again referring to FIG. 14 it will be noted that the gear 158 is driven from the gear train that is driven by the motor 43. The gear train includes a gear 176 the teeth of which mesh with the teeth on the periphery of the gear 158. Integral with the gear 176 is a gear 177 the teeth of which mesh with the teeth of the gear 81 previously described which rotates ata speed of one revolution in 12 hours. A stub shaft 178 extends from one side of the gear 176 into a bearing opening 179 that is molded in an embossment 180 which forms a part of the molded plastic mechanism case 32. A stub shaft 181 extends from the other side of the gear 177 through a bearing opening 182 in the metallic mechanism plate 31. In this manner, as long as the synchronous motor 43 is energized, the gear 158 is continuously driven. When the lug 159 registers with the opening 160 in the gear 161, the start time shaft 144 is continuously driven so that the start time hand 143 also indicates the time of day as does the hour hand 17.

In FIG. 14 it will be noted that stop time shaft 150 extends through an opening 228 in the metallic adapter plate 25. It forms a part of a stop time means that is indicated, generally, at 185. At its inner end, stop time shaft 150 is journaled in a bearing opening 187 in metallic frame plate 169. A hub 188, which is substantially cylindrical in shape, is pressed onto knurling 189 on stop time shaft 150 to rotate therewith. I-Iub 188 includes an annular groove 190 and a longitudinal slot 192, both being disposed on an outer periphery 141 of hub 188. Slot 192 comprises an engagement means 256.

A yoke 193 includes two spaced apart prongs 194 and 195 which straddle hub 188. Prongs 194 and 195 are carried in annular groove 190 in such a manner so as to move longitudinally with hub 188, at the same time allowing the hub to rotate freely of the prongs. As can be seen best in FIGS. 5B and 14, yoke 193 also includes an apertured projection 196 generally located at a closed end 197 of yoke 193 equidistant from prongs 194 and 195. A link member 198 includes an apertured fork 199 near one end and another apertured fork 200 near the other end. Apertured fork 199 embraces apertured projection 196 on yoke 193 and a pin 201 is inserted therethrough producing a pivotal joint 202. The connection of the remaining apertures ford 200 of link member 198 will be described presently.

Again referring to FIG. 14, stop time shaft 150 is endwise slidable and rotatable through a bushing 203. A stop time gear 204 is shown with its rotational axis substantially coincident with the rotational axis of stop time shaft 150. The bushing 203 is staked in an aperture 205 in mechanism plate 31. A lip 206 of bushing 203 loosely entraps stop time gear 204 against plate 31. Gear 204 is rotatable about an outer periphery 207 of the bushing. Gear 204 has a lug 208 stuck therefrom for entering longitudinal slot 192 in hub 188. Lug 208 comprises engagement means 255.

Driving engagement with gear 204 is had by a gear 213 which is carried by a stub shaft 215. The stub shaft is staked, in a hole 214 in mechanism plate 31 loosely entrapping gear 213 against the plate and allowing the gear to rotate about the shaft. Gear 213 also engages gear 158 for rotation therewith as can be seen in FIG.

When the start time shaft 144 is moved inwardly, accompanied by corresponding movement of the annular operating member 162, switch actuator means 250, comprising a convex end portion 229 of the operating member 162, engages an inclined surface 230, FIG. 22, that is provided by a shoulder member 213 which is formed integrally with a slidable contact operating plate which is indicated, generally, at 232. This movement of the contact operating plate 232 on inward movement of the annular operating member 162 is against the biasing action of a hairpin spring 233, FIG. 19. The hairpin spring 233 has a central convolution located around a lug 234 that extends from and is formed integrally with a control plate 235 which is slidably mounted on the contact operating plate 232. One arm of the hairpin spring 233 comprises a linkage pin 236 which extends through an opening 237 in the shoulder member 231 and also through apertured fork 200 of link member 198, thereby securing contact operating plate 232 to link member 198 and forming a pivotal joint 217. The other arm 238 extends through an opening 239 in a lug 240 which is stuck from and is formed integrally with the control plate 235. In order to reduce frictional engagement between the plates 232 and 235 the latter has dimples 241 formed therein which permit only limited frictional contact engagement therebetween. Limited frictional contact engagement between the contact operating plate 232 and the juxtaposed surface of the metallic from plate 169 is obtained through the provision in the latter of an elongated shoulder 242 and dimples 243 as is best shown in FIG. B. In order to guide the plates 232 and 235 for translatory movement relative to the metallic frame plate 169, the latter has a guide pin 244 extending therefrom through a slot 245 in the correct operating plate 232 and through a slot 246 in the control plate 235. Another guide pin 247, which is staked into plate 235, extends through slot 248 in plate 232 and slot 249 in metallic frame plate 167. Guide pin 247, like guide pin 244, helps guide plates 232 and 235 for translatory movement.

The stop time shaft 150 extends through both of the plates 232 and 235. As shown in FIGS. 17, 19 and 22, a slot 250 in the contact operating plate 232 has the inner end of the stop time shaft 150 extending therethrough. Overlying the slot 250 is a slot 251 in the con trol plate 235 through which shaft 150 is also extended therethrough. Slot 250 is capable of engaging an annular groove 218 disposed on stop time shaft 150 near a distal end thereof.

An electrical switching means 253 is best shown in FIGS. 1618 and 21 to 26. As shown in FIGS. 16, 17 and 18 clearance openings 256 are formed in the control plate 235 for receiving therethrough operating arms 257 from plastic contact slides, one of which is indicated at 258 in FIG. 26. The operating arms 257 also extend through openings 259 in the contact operating plate 232 which underlie the clearance openings 256. The ends 260 of the openings 259 engage one slide 257 of each of the arms 257 for controlling the positions of the contact slides 258. The operating arms 257 from the contact slides 258 extend through slots 261 (FIG. 5B) in the base of a plastic contact housing that is indicated, generally, at 262.

FIGS. 21-23 show in more detail the construction of the plastic contact housing 262 and parts associated therewith. Here it will be observed that pairs of stationary contacts 263 and 264 are suitably mounted in the contact housing 262 along one side and additional pairs 265 and 266 of stationary contacts are suitably located on the other side. Bridging contact members 267 and 268 are arranged to interconnect the contacts 263 and 264, respectively, or the contacts 265 and 266, respectively. It will be understood that only a single pair of stationary contacts can be employed in conjunction with a single bridging contact member. However, for purposes of illustration several pairs are shown together with a pair of bridging contact members 267 and 268. One of the bridging contact members 267 is illustrated in FIG. 25. It is arranged to be positioned in a slot 269 in the respective contact slide 258.

As shown in FIG. 24 the bridging contact member 268 is arranged to be biased in one direction by a relatively weak spring 270 which reacts between the bridging contact member 268 and one end of the slot 269. It is arranged to be biased in the opposite direction by a relatively strong spring 271 which reacts between one end of the slot 261 and one side of the contact slide 258. The relatively strong springs 271 bias the operating arms 257 against the ends 260 of the openings 259 in the contact operating plate 232 and urge hub 188 in a direction indicated by arrow 226 in FIG. 14 through the hairpin spring 233 and link 198.

The pairs of stationary contacts 263-264 and 265-266 are held in place by a plastic cover 272, FIGS. 15, 22, 23 and 24. The plastic cover 272 has rectangular shoulders 273 on its underside which, as shown in FIG. 22, are arranged to overlie a shank 274 of each of the stationary contacts to hold the same securely in place. A grounding plate 275 overlies the cover 272 I and it and the cover 272 are held in place on the plastic contact housing 262 by bolt 276.

In order to locate properly the plastic contact housing 262 on the rear side of the metallic frame plate 169, the former is provided with integrally formed dowel pins 279, FIG. 16, which extend through slots 280 formed in the frame plate 169. At the other end of the plastic contact housing 262 there is integrally formed a hollow dowel pin 281 which extends through a corresponding opening 282 in the metallic frame plate 169.

For securing the plastic contact housing 262 to the metallic frame plate 169, the former is provided with an elongated lug 283, FIG. 5B, that is arranged to extend laterally through a slot 284 in an upstruck lug 285 from the metallic frame plate 169. As shown in FIG. 3, the other end of plastic contact housing 262 is an elongated slot 286 molded therein for receiving a lug 287 which is struck from the metallic frame plate 169.

In operation, when the start time-stop time timing is not functioning, hour hand 17, start time hand 143, and stop time hand are in running synchronization and indicate the same time of day on their respective time markings 16, 142 and 146. In this condition, which is illustrated in FIGS. 14, 17 and 21 the bridging contact members 267 and 268 are biased out of engagement, respectively, with the pairs of stationary contacts 265 and 266 by springs 271 and into engagement with pairs of contacts 263 and 264.

The operation of the automatic cooking timing function comprises the following events in the order recited:

l. Start time is manually set.

2. Stop time is manually set.

3. The timer is driven by motor 43 until the start time function begins according to the time set in event 1 above. The beginning of start time is characterized by the contacting of bridging contacting members 267 and 268 with stationary contacts 265 and 266. This action can turn an oven (not shown) on.

4. The timer continues to be driven by motor 43 until the stop time function occurs according to the time set in event 2 above. Stop time is characterized by the disconnection of bridging contacting members 267 and 268 with stationary contacts 265 and 266. This action can turn an oven (not shown) off. These events are explained in more detail in the paragraphs that follow.

The start time is set by indexing start time shaft 144 inwardly by manually depressing knob 145, and rotating it either clockwise or counterclockwise until start time hand 143 points to the desired time on start time markings 142. The inward indexing causes lug 159 on gear 158 to come out of engagement with slot 160 in gear 161, so that the driving connection provided by lug 159 to gear 161 is interrupted. Spring 165 holds gear 161 against the distal end of lug 159. Note that plates 232 and 235 are in no way moved by the indexing an rotation of shaft 144, so that bridging contact members 267 and 268 are still out of engagement with pairs of stationary contacts 265 and 266, respectively. It should be understood that only a single bridging contact 267 and a single pair of stationary contacts 265 can also be employed for controlling the completion of a single circuit.

After setting the start time, the stop time is set by indexing the stop time shaft 150 inwardly by manually depressing knob 151 and rotating it until the stop time hand 149 points to the desired time on stop time markings 146. This inward indexing causes lug 208 on gear 204 to come out of engagement with longitudinal slot 192, so that the driving connection provided by lug 208 to stop time hub 188 is interrupted. Springs 292, acting through plates 232 and 235, hairpin spring 233, and link member 198, urge hub 188 against the distal end of lug 208. The inward indexing of shaft 150 also causes contact operating plate 232 to be pushed in the direction of arrow 288 by hub 188 acting through link member 198. There is a corresponding shifting in the movement, also indicated by arrow 288, of plate 235 transmitted from plate 232 through hairpin spring 233 to plate 235. However, plates 232 and 235, and, therefore, arms 257, are not pushed far enough to cause engagement of bridging contact members 267 and 268 with stationary contacts 265 and 266. Plate 232 is prevented from complete translating movement by interference of shoulder member 231 with annular operating member 162. This condition is shown in FIG. 18.

After both start and stop times have been set, motor 43 drives from motor output pinion 63 through a train of gears and pinions 68, 70, 71, 80, 81, 177 and 176 to gear 158. Through this train of gears and pinions, hours hand 17, being carried with gear 81 on hours sleeve 82, and gear 158 run in synchronization. It should be recalled that when start time shaft 144 was manually indexed inwardly and rotated, the driving connection between lug 159 and gear 161 was broken. When the gear 158 is rotated in synchronization with the time of day as indicated by hours hand 17 to such position that lug 159 registers with opening 160 in gear 161, gear 161 and the whole start time assembly 154 moves outwardly in the direction of arrow 226 in FIG. 14 under the influence of spring 165. Movement of convex end portion 229 in the direction of arrow 226 allows hairpin spring 233 to advance shoulder member 231, and therefore plate 232, in the direction of arrow 225. And, movement of plate 232in the direction of arrow 225 also moves operating arms 257 (as shown in FIGS. 19, 20 and 21) by the engagement of ends 260 of openings 259 with sides 257 of arms 257. Operating arms 257, in turn, urge bridging contact members 267 and 268 into engagement, respectively, with pairs of stationary contacts 265 and 266. In one example of an application of this timer in conjunction with a cooking oven in the closing of contacts just described turns an oven heating element on. Therefore, the start time indicated by start time hand 143 indicates the time an oven cooking function is started.

Stop time gear 204 is driven by start time gear 158 through gear 213 at the same speed and in synchronization with start time gear 158 and hours hand 17. When gear 204 is rotated to such a position that lug 108 registers with slot 192 in hub 188, the hub moves outwardly under influence of springs 292 in the direction of arrow 226 in FIG. 14. As hub 188 moves outwardly, plates 232 and 235, also under the influence of springs 292, are allowed to be returned in a direction indicated by arrow 222. As plate 232 moves in this direction, the ends 260 of slots 259 move away from arms 257, allowing arms 257 to also move in the direction of arrow 222 under the urging of springs 271. This action, in turn, causes bridging contact members 267 and 268 to separate from stationary contacts 265 and 266. In the previously described example of an application of this time with an oven, the opening of contacts 267 and 268 from 265 and 266 turns the oven off. Therefore, the stop time indicated by stop time hand 149 indicates the time an oven cooking function is stopped.

The operation explained in the preceding paragraphs involves setting the time an oven is to be started and the time it is to be stopped. Another function an operator of the timer may desire to perform is an un-timed cook now function wherein the oven is manually turned on and, after a period of cooking, manually turned off. This is accomplished by this timer by first manually indexing stop time shaft 150 in to turn the oven on and then manually indexing start time shaft 144 in to turn the oven off. It should be recalled now that the automatic timing described in the previous paragraphs was initiated by doing just the opposite, that is, indexing in the start time shaft first, then indexing the stop time shaft. Refer now to FIGS. 14 and 21. By in dexing stop time shaft 150 in the direction of arrow 223, (start time shaft 144 being in its indexed out position) both plates 282 and 235 are pushed in the direction of arrow 225 far enough to completely move bridging contact members 267 and 268 into contact with stationary contacts 265 and 266. Because start time shaft 144 is in its indexedout position, convex end portion 229 of operating member 162 cannot prevent plate 232 from moving its complete journey as it did in the automatic cooking function wherein the start time shaft 144 was manually indexed in prior to the indexing in of stop time shaft 150. An edge 250' of slot 250 catches annular groove 218 in stop time shaft 150 upon indexing in of the stop time shaft and prevents it from indexing out when manual force is removed from the shaft. When it is desired to turn the oven off, start time shaft 144 is manually indexed in (in the direction of arrow 223), whereupon convex end portion 229 of operating memher 162 engages inclined surface 230 of shoulder mem her 231 urging plate 232 back in the direction of arrow 222. This action disengages edge 250' of slot 250 with annular groove 218 and allows stop time shaft 150 to pop out (in the direction of arrow 266) under the influence of springs 292. Movement of plates 232 and 235 in the direction of arrow 222 also causes bridging contact members 267 and 268 to disengage stationary contacts 265 and 266, thereby shutting the oven off.

It should be noted that when the timer is operating automatically and the start time shaft pops out allowing plates 232 and 235 to move in the direction of arrow 225, the edge 250 described in the previous paragraph does not engage annular groove 218 in shaft 150. At the time plates 232 and 235 move in the direction or arrow 225, groove 218 is slightly out of alignment with slot 250. It is only when shaft 144 is in its out position as shown in FIG. 14, that shaft 150 may be pushed in far enough to cause slot 250 to grab annular groove 218 and hold shaft 150 in.

What is claimed is:

1. In a timer switch having a frame plate, an electric motor carried by said frame plate, a time-of-day indicating means coupled to said motor, and a mechanically-actuated electrical switching means carried by said frame plate for switching electrical current including a plurality of electrical contacts, the improvement comprising:

a. a manually-settable, rotatable start-time means for activating said electrical switching means;

b. a manually-settable, rotatable stop-time means for activating said electrical switching means including:

i. a stop shaft axially displaceable and rotatable in said frame plate.

ii. a stop gear carried about said stop shaft having a first engagement means,

iii. a stop hub carried by said stop shaft having a second engagement means engaging said first engagement means; and

iv. linkage means mechanically linking said switch means to said stop hub including:

an annular groove disposed in said stop hub;

a yoke member having a first aperture and two side-by-side prongs, said prongs carried in said annular groove of said stop hub;

a link member having second and third apertures,

each disposed near a distal end of said link member;

a first linkage pin located in said first aperture in said yoke member and said second aperture in said link member, thereby forming a pivotal joint; and

a second linkage pin passing through said third aperture in said link member and an aperture in said mechanical-actuated electrical switching means, thereby forming a pivotal joint;

whereby, axial movement of said stop hub is transmitted by said yoke member through said link member to said mechanically actuated electrical switching means thereby actuating said switching means.

2. The improvement to a timer switch as recited in claim 1, wherein said first engagement means comprises a stop projection extending from said stop gear, and said second engagement means comprises a slot receiving said stop projection.

3. The improvement to a timer switch as recited in claim 1, wherein said manually-settable rotatable starttime means comprises:

a. a start shaft rotatable in said frame plate;

b. a first start gear carried by said start time shaft having a third engagement means;

c. a second start gear carried by said start shaft having fourth engagement means engaging said third engagement means; and

d. a switch actuator means fixedly carried by said start shaft for actuating said electrical switching means.

4. The improvement to a timer switch as recited in claim 1, wherein said third engagement means comprises a lug extending from said first start gear and said fourth engagement means comprises an opening disposed in said second gear capable of receiving said lug.

5. The improvement to a timer switch as recited in claim 1 wherein said stop shaft further includes an annular groove and said mechanically actuated electrically switching means includes a slot in a slideable contact operating plate, sides of said slot engaging sides of said annular groove to restrict axial movement of said stop shaft upon alignment of said annular groove with said slot.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OFCORRECTION PATENT N0 3,909,565 Page 1 of 2 DATED 1 April 29, 1974 rnvEN t 1 Michael T. Clouser and Bruce w. Shell It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. l, line 50 delete "present" and substitute therefore ---preset-- Col. l, line 5l delete "present" and substitute therefore ---preset--- 1 2, H 9 d t "b secggnd occurrence and substitute therefore Col. line l7 delete "As" and substitute therefore ---An-- Col Col. 4, line 47 delete "rear" and substitute therefore ---gear- 4, line 54 delete "rear" and substitute therefore --gear--- Col. line 63 delete "hand" and substitute therefore ---hour-- Col line 27 delete 'position" and substitute therefore ---provision--- Col Col. 6, line 8 insert around --off-- 6, line 43 insert around ---off--- Col. line 57 insert around --off--- Col. 8, line 64 delete 2l3" and substitute therefore ---23l--- Col. 9, line 25 delete "correct and substitute therefore ---contact-- Col. l0, line 56 insert around ---set--- Col. l0, line 57 insert around ---set--- Col l0, line 59 insert around --set--- Col l0, line 65 insert '7 around --set PATENT NO.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Q 2 r 2 DATED Spril 29, l974 Page 0 INVENTOR(S) 1 Michael T. Clouser and Bruce W. Shell it is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. ll, line 3 insert around ---set--- Col. ll, line 20 insertaround ---set Col. 11 line 43 insert around --set--- Col. l2, line 9 delete "108" and substitute therefore ---208--- Col. l3, line 8 insert around --out-- Col. l3, line 26 delete and substitute therefore Signed and Sealed. this twenty-fourth Of February 1976 [SEAL] A ttest:

RUTH C. MASON Arresting Officer

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4526332 *Jun 18, 1984Jul 2, 1985The Maytag CompanyControl panel clock lens arrangement
US5193078 *Feb 18, 1992Mar 9, 1993Emerson Electric Co.Uni-directional rotation device for a cam-operated timer
US6713730Sep 14, 2001Mar 30, 2004Zahra M. ZakerinTiming system
EP0030631A1 *Nov 17, 1980Jun 24, 1981ITALORA S.p.A.A control apparatus for an electric appliance requiring a programmed connection and disconnection
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/38.00R, 200/39.00R, 968/613, 200/38.0FA
International ClassificationG04C23/16, G04C23/00, H01H43/04, H01H43/00, F24C7/08
Cooperative ClassificationF24C7/082, G04C23/16
European ClassificationG04C23/16, F24C7/08B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 6, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: EMERSON ELECTRIC CO. A CORP. OF MISSOURI, MISSO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:EMHART INDUSTRIES, INC. A CORP. OF CONNECTICUT;REEL/FRAME:005691/0720
Effective date: 19910125