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Publication numberUS3910181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1975
Filing dateJan 4, 1974
Priority dateJan 4, 1974
Publication numberUS 3910181 A, US 3910181A, US-A-3910181, US3910181 A, US3910181A
InventorsAndrews James S, Hierath Leonard L
Original AssigneeFremco Manufacturing Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baling press
US 3910181 A
Abstract
Inturned lips alongside the wire slots provide "self-cleaning" slots which prevent cardboard flaps and the like from extending upwardly between the edge of the platen and the baling chamber at the slot to obscure a wire channel on the underside of the platen. A notch in the platen to accommodate each pair of inturned lips also assists in providing the self-cleaning slots. Thus, the compressed bale may be tied without releasing the pressure of the platen and also before any wall of the baling chamber is opened.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Andrews et a1.

[451 Oct. 7, 1975 1 BALING PRESS [75] Inventors: James S. Andrews, Westminster;

Leonard L. Hierath, Denver, both of Colo.

[73] Assignee: Fremco Manufacturing, Inc.,

Denver, Colo 221 Filed: Jan. 4, 1974 211 Appl. No.: 430,795

[52] 1.1.8. CL, 100/226; 100/3; 100/255; 100/295; 100/256 [51] Int. Cl. B30B 15/06; 13658 13/06 [58] Field of Search 100/226, 53, 255, 295, 100/3 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 737,521 8/1903 Stopple 100/255 1,049,889 1/1913 1,058,611 4/1913 3,463,079 8/1969 3,687,068 8/1972 Loughran 100/226 Primary Examiner-Robert W. Jenkins Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Ho race B. Van Valkenburgh; Frank C. Lowe [57] ABSTRACT lnturned lips alongside the wire slots provide selfcleaning slots which prevent cardboard flaps and the like from extending upwardly between the edge of the platen and the baling chamber at the slot to obscure a wire channel on the underside of the platen. A notch in the platen to accommodate each pair of inturned lips also assists in providing the self-cleaning slots. Thus, the compressed bale may be tied without releasing the pressure bf the platen and also before any wall of the baling chamber is opened. it

A latch having a hook-shaped cam is adapted to latch the pivoted front door in closed position, the cam engaging a cam roller mounted on a front post. Lock pins on a side door interfit with holes in the front door, so that the latch may hold both doors in closed position.

8 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures US. Patent O ct. 7,1975 Sheet 2 of 4 3,910,181

U.S. Patent 00!. 7,1975 Sheet 3 of4 3,910,181

1 mum; harass patent to Anthony Loughran, US. Pat. No. 3,613,567,

issued Oct. 17, 1971. Such baling presses are used with loose waste material; primarily papers, rags and the like which, when loose, are considerably fluffed but when compressed will form a comparatively solid bale, although some loose ends of papers or rags or the like will project from the surfaces and especially from the edges of the bales.

A bale, when released from the press, will ordinarily fluff or expand, and it becomes important to tie the bales to restrain such expansion before they are released. Thus, it is a practice to place tie wires in the press and across the bottom of the bale chamber prior to the bale forming operation. Thereafter, the wires are wrapped about the bale while it is still in the press. To facilitate doing this, slotted openings are provided in the back wall of the press and registered slots are provided in the press platen to facilitate threading the wires about a bale and permit the wrapping operation. The front wall of the press chamber which forms a door is then opened and the upper and lower ends of the wires are brought together and tied into position. The tying operation thus necessarily proceeds after a partial release of pressure on a bale and this is basically undesirable. For example, when the front wall door of the press chamber is opened, the compressed material can fly apart and out of the press chamber, if the material forming the bale was not properly arranged and balanced before it was compressed.

The present invention was conceived and developed with the foregoing and other considerations in view. The present invention, a baling press for compacting loose material, consists essentially of a compressor head supporting a platen, an open top, box-like chamber, and a supporting framework carrying these two components. The compressor head will drive its platen into the chamber to compress material placed therein; however, the framework includes guideways to permit the head to shift rearwardly and out of the way of the chamber to expose the top of the chamber so that it may be filled with material prior to a compressing cycle. The chamber, box-like in form, includes a floor, front and rear walls and side walls which are held in place by the framework. Two adjacent walls, preferably the front wall and a side wall, are hinged to this framework as doors which can be opened for easy removal of a bale formed therein. The chamber is also provided with upright slots in both the front and rear walls and interconnecting slots across the undersurface of the platen to permit the wires to be threaded about a bale and tied into place before any doors are opened to remove the bale. The slots on the front and rear walls are between inwardly extending flanges which provide self-cleaning slots, i.e. the flanges prevent the clogging of the slots and also prevent clogging of the slots on the underside of the platen, as by cardboard or the like, as well as assist in guiding the platen, all as hereinafter described in detail.

It follows that a primary object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved construction of a baling press having opposing slots in the front and rear walls of the press chamber to permit and facilitate the threading and tying of the wires about the bale while the bale is still confined within the chamber and under pressure.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved baling press having insert flanges at Wire receiving slots in the walls of the press chamber to prevent the wire receiving slots and channels from being interrupted or fouled by cardboard or the like while a bale is being formed by the press, to permit the ready insertion of the wires through channels in the underside of the piston while the platen holds the bale in compressed condition before release by any wall of the chamber.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved construction of a baling press having wire tying slots in the chamber walls which are provided with inwardly extending flanges which are also adapted to guide the platen on its downward movement.

Another object of the invention is to provide a locking and unlocking device which is effective to lock two adjacent doors simultaneously, yet may be easily operated by one hand of an operator.

Other objects are to provide, in a baling press, a low cost, rugged, strong, easily operated, durable unit.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, our present invention comprises certain constructions, combinations and arrangements of parts and elements as hereinafter described, defined in the appended claims and illustrated in preferred embodiment by the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation of the improved baling press;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the baling press, taken from the right side;

FIG. 3 is a transverse section taken from the indicated line 3-3 of FIG. 2 but on an enlarged scale, with the press platen within the baling chamber illustrated as having been lowered below such line;

FIG. 4 is a front elevation of the front wall door, per se, of the baling chamber similar to the showing in FIG. I, but on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the front wall door, per se, but with portions broken away to show parts other wise hidden from view;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary detail view of the lower left corner of the front wall door and of the frame structure whereonto it is hinged;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary detail view of the upper left corner of the front wall door and of the frame structure whereonto it is hinged;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional detail view of a locking pin on the front wall door as taken from the indicated line 8-8 of FIG. 4, but on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional detail view of a locking latch on the front wall door as taken from the indicated line 99 of FIG. 4;, but on an enlarged scale and with portions broken away to conserve space;

FIG. It) is a fragmentary sectional view of the upper portion of the press as taken from the indicated line l010 of FIG. 2, but on an enlarged scale, and with dotted lines indicating a lower position of the platen;

FIG. lll is a fragmentary sectional view of the upper portion of the press as taken from the indicated line 11-1I of FIG. I but on an enlarged scale;

FIG. 12 is an isometric view of the baler with the front wall and side wall doors open, with the press platen retracted and with a bale within the chamber fully tied and ready to be removed from the press;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary sectional detail as taken from the indicated line 13-13 of FIG. 3 but on an enlarged scale and illustrating an edge of the platen compressing paper, with edges of cardboard being extruded into the space between the edge of the platen and the wall of the press;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary plan view as taken from the indicated line I4ll4 of FIG. 13, but on a further enlarged scale and illustrating the manner in which the inset flanges of the wire grooves in the wall of the press chamber prevent cardboard or the like from clogging that groove or the channels on the underside of the platen; and

I is a fragmentary sectional detail as taken from the indicated line 15-15 of FIG. 14.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the bale press is an upright structure consisting of an open top, box-like chamber C and a shiftable carriage or head 1-! which carries a platen P. The head is mounted above the chamber to be directly over the chamber when in a compression position to permit the platen to be lowered therein to form a bale, and to be shifted away from the chamber, with the platen lifted, to permit the chamber to be filled with material which is compressed to form the bale.

A framework F embraces both the chamber and the head, and the framework includes horizontal guide ways wherein the shiftable head is mounted to permit the head to shift rearwardly when it moves away from the chamber. The framework F includes and is carried upon a pair of base sills R and 20L which lie at opposite sides of the apparatus, at the right and left, respectively, to extend rearwardly from the container in spaced parallelism. Front posts 21R and 21L and rear posts 22R and 22L upstand from the respective sills 20R and 20L to hold horizontally disposed, rearwardly extended guideways 23R and 23L in spaced parallelism and directly above the respective sills. The front post 21L is spaced between the sill 20L and guideway 23L and is backset from the front of these members a short distance to provide short overhanging portions forming a hinge connection for the front wall of the chamber, as will be hereinafter described. The front post 21R is mounted against the outward side of the sill 20R and guideway 23R to be offset therefrom, while the front wall and right side wall permit these hinged walls to co operate with each other when they are being opened and closed, as hereinafter described. The guideways 23R and 23L are formed as structural channels facing each other and proportioned to receive and hold the head II. It is to be noted that the guideways 23R and 23L are disposed above the chamber C so that the head and its platen P will also be above the box when they are being shifted rearwardly and out of the way of the chamber.

The left side and right side structural rectangles formed by the respective sills 20L and 20R, posts 21L, 21R, 22L and 22R and guideways 23L and 23R are interconnected by various cross members. An array of transverse angle members 24 extends between the front section of the base sills 20R and 20L to support a floor plate 25 which forms the floor of the chamber C. A cross head 26 extends across the front of the framework, at the top, to interconnect the front ends of the guideways 23R and 23L above the chamber C. Also, suitable cross members, not shown, may be located at the rear of the apparatus between the base sills 20R and 20L and the guideways 23R and 23L. Finally, the rear wall 30 of the chamber C lies transversely between these frame members and is affixed to the base sills and guideways by suitable headers constituting the structure of the rear wall of the chamber, as will be described.

The chamber C is formed with a fixed rear wall 30, as mentioned, a gated front wall 31, a fixed left side wall 32, and a gated right side wall 33. It is to be noted that the fixed rear wall 30 and the gated front wall 31 are structurally similar, while the fixed left side wall 32 and gated right side wall 33 are also structurally similar, except for hinging and locking arrangements on the gated walls.

The transverse rear wall 30 is formed as an array of four vertical plates including narrower side plates 34 and wider center plates 35, which lay side by side upon a framework. Each plate is spaced a short distance from its adjacent plate, or plates, to form three elongated vertical slots 36, approximately one-half inch wide. These slots function in conjunction with other slots to permit baling wire to be fitted about a bale formed within the chamber, as will be described. Each edge of the plates at the slots 36 is formed with an inturned flange or lip 37 which projects a short distance inwardly into the container so that a self-cleaning slot is produced, in a manner described later.

The plates 34 and forming this rear wall surface are carried upon a rectangular framework of square sectioned tubular members or the like, which include a top header 38 and a bottom header 39. The top header-38 is positioned to lie directly beneath the structural framework guideways 23R and 23L and is secured to these guideways, as by welding. The bottom header 39 is positioned to lie between and upon the base sills 20R and 20L and is preferably secured thereto, as by welding. The framework also includes a side post 40 between the top and bottom headers 38 and 39 at each side of the structure. Each side post 40 is offset inwardly from the adjacent sills and guideways, rather than being directly underneath the guideways simply to save material. Additional reinforcement members support the plate between the side posts including a horizontal strut 41 between the posts near the top of the wall and in the upper portion of the chamber C, wherein the platen P will move when compressing a bale. Also, vertical stiffeners 42 extend between the strut 41 and the bottom header 39 on each plate near the plate edges at the slots 36.

The front wall gate 31 is wider than the rear wall 30, so that it may hinge onto the sill 20L and guideway 23L. Otherwise, it is similar in structure to the rear wall. The front wall gate 31 is formed as an array of four vertical plates, including side plates 34' and center plates 35' which lay side by side upon a framework in the same spacing arrangement and in direct opposition to the corresponding plates of the rear wall 30. Each plate on the front wall is also spaced a short distance from its adjacent plate, or plates, to form three elongated slots 36' approximately one-half inch wide to receive baling wire. Each edge of the plates at the slot 36' is formed with an inturned flange or lip 37 which projects a short distance inwardly into the container, similar to lips 37 of the rear wall slots. Lips 37 and 37' may terminate a spaced distance above the bottom, as in FIG. 12, for a purpose described later.

The plates 34' and 35 forming this front wall gate 31 are carried upon a rectangular framework of square sectioned tubular members, or the like, which include a top header 38 and a bottom header 39'. These headers connect with side posts which include a left side hinge stile 43 and a right side latch stile 44. Additional reinforcement members support the front wall plates between these stile posts 43 and 44, including a horizontal strut 41' between the posts 34 and 44 near the top of the wall and vertical stiffeners 42 which extend between the strut 41 and the bottom header 39' adjacent to the plate edges at the slots 36.

The gate 31 is proportioned so that the top header 38 lies directly underneath the cross head 26, while the bottom header 39' lies directly over the ends of the base sills R and 20L and the hinge stile 43 and latch stile 44 merge into the headers 38' and 39, at the respective ends of these headers. The hinge connection of the front wall gate 31, at its left side, includes an upper pintle 45 upstanding from the edge of the gate directly over the hinge stile 43 to extend into an orifice 46 at the underside of the cross head 26, as in FIG. 7. The hinge connection also includes a lower pintle 47 depending from the underside of the hinge stile to extend into an orifice 48 in the base sill 20L, as shown in FIG. 6. This lower pintle includes a spacer 49 between the underside of the front wall gate 31 and the base sill 20L to hold the gate above the base sills 20L and 20R at a properly elevated position slightly above the level of the base sills for easy opening and closing movements.

In accordance with this invention, the front wall gate carries, at its right side, a latch 50 which has a hookshaped cam surface 50a and is pivotally mounted upon a pin 51 which, in turn, outstands laterally from the latch stile 44, the pin being located near the center portion of this stile. The latch stile 44 is wider than the adjacent front post 21R of the framework F, so that the pin 51 will lie alongside this front post 21R when the front wall gate 31 is closed, as best shown in FIG. 3. Ac-

cordingly, the hook portion of this latch 50 can swing over a pin mounted, cam roller 52 at the outer side of the front wall post 21R, as illustrated in FIG. 2. The latch also includes a forwardly extending arm having a handle 53 to permit an operator to easily open and close the door and to secure the latch in place with one hand. In addition to the latch stile 44 and in further accordance with this invention, an array of lock pins 54 project from the inner side of the latch stile, as shown in FIG. 8, to engage and hold the right side wall gate 33, as hereinafter further described.

The fixed left side wall 32 is formed as a rectangular plate 55 which is proportioned so that it may be welded to members of the framework F. The upper edge of this plate is welded to the under, inner edge of the guideway 23L, the front, inner edge to the front post 21L, the lower edge to the upper, inner edge of the base sill 20L, and the rear edge is welded to a rear post 56 which extends between the base sill 20L and the guideway channel 23L, as shown in FIG. 3. To complete the structure, the central portion of this plate 55 is reinforced by a ladder-like array of horizontally disposed beams 57, one of which is shown in FIG. 10.

The right side wall gate 33 is similar in structure to the fixed left side wall 32 in that it is formed as a rectangular plate 55 having approximately the same proportions as does the plate 55. However, this plate 55' is mounted upon a rectangular framework of structural members forming the gate, which extend between the guideway 23R and the base sill 20R and between the rear wall 30 and the gated front wall 31. An upper header 58 lites directly beneath the guideway 23R, and an opposing 'header 59 lies directly above the base sill 20R. A hingestile 60 is spaced between the rear ends of the upper andlower headers, while a latch stile 61 is spaced between the forward ends of the upper and lower headers. To complete this framework, a ladderlike array of horizontally disposed beams 57 extend between the hinge stile and latch stile, as illustrated in FIG. 2. i

The rear end of the gate, at the hinge stile 60, lies adjacent to the ends of the top and bottom rear wall headers 38 and 39 and an upper hinge arm 62 and lower hinge arm 63 extend rearwardly from the top and bottom of this hinge stile 60, so that the upper hinge arm 62 lies against the underside of the extended end of the top header 38, and the lower hinge arm 63 lies against the top side of the extended end of the bottom header 39, as best illustrated in FIG. 2. The hinging connections are similar to the hinging connections of the front wall gate heretofore described and illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7. A pintle 45 upstands from the upper hinge arm 62 to fit into a hole 46 in the top header 38, and an opposing pintle 47 depends from the lower hinge arm 63 to fit into a hole 48' in the lower bottom header 39. A spacer 49 is fitted on the lower pintle to hold the gate at a properly elevated position above the level of the base sill 20R.

The forward latch stile 61 of this right side wall gate 33 will swing toa closed position against the inner face of the latch stile44 of the front wall gate 31 when the gates are closed, where an array of sockets 64 in forward latch stile 61' will be engaged by the lock pins 54 outstanding from the front wall gate, as illustrated in FIG. 8. Accordingly, when the chamber is closed, the side wall gate 33 is locked in. position by the engagement with the lock pins 54 in the front wall gate 31 and the front wall gate is held in position by the latch 50. To open the chamber C, the front wall gate 31 is first opened and the side wall gate 33 is then opened, as to the positions illustrated in FIG. 12. To again close the chamber C, the right side wall gate 33 is first closed and then the front wall gate 31 is closed and secured by latch 50.

The carriage or head H which carries the platen P is mounted upon wheels 66, as in FIGS. 10 and 11, and

is essentially a simple framework including side walls 67, front and rear end walls 68 and a cover 69 having a depending rear portion 69. The cover 69 slopes upwardly to a crown portion with a central opening 70 therein. An upstanding hydraulic cylinder 71 is mounted in this opening to extend above the carriage to permit its piston rod 72 to extend downwardly therefrom, the piston rod 72 carrying the platen P.

The carriage is proportioned to fit within the embrace of the flanges of the channel-shaped guideways 23R and 23L, with the wheels 66 being located within these guideway flanges. These wheels, which support the carriage, are carried upon an angle track 73 within each guideway flange, as best illustrated in FIG. 10. Thus, the carriage may freely move forwardly and rearwardly within the guideway, upon the wheels 66, whenever the platen is lifted to its retracted position above the chamber C. However, whenever the carriage is at its forward position over the chamber and the platen is thrust downwardly into the chamber to compress material and form a bale, as by extension of the piston rod 72, the resulting pressure against the platen will raise the carriage. Then, the side edges of the cover 69, which lie within the embrace of the channel-shaped guideways, will engage the underside of the top flanges of the guideway channels, to restrain the carriage against upward movement. Forward movement of the carriage is limited by a pair of laterally spaced stop bolts 74, adjustably attached to and extending rearwardly from the rear wall of cross header 26.

The platen P is formed as a rectangular or square member which fits within the chamber C with anadequate clearance, as on the order of /2 inch, between the edges of the platen and the walls of the chamber. This platen P consists of a flat plate 75 having a peripheral upstanding reinforcing wall 76 adjacent to its edges. An array of upstanding flanges 77 emanate from a centered cylindrical nave 78 and extend to the reinforcing wall 76. The nave 78 is an upstanding cylindrical member having a socket 79 to receive the end of the piston rod 72, connected thereto by a pin 80, as illustrated in FIGS. and 11.

The front and rear edges of the platen are notched, as at 81, to receive the flanged lips 37 and 37 with a comparatively loose, free sliding fit to avoid jamming or binding of the platen. Channels 82 extend across the undersurface of the platen plate 75 at the notches 81, to provide a space for passage of a wire, as from a rear slot 36 to an opposed front slot 36, as best illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 10. To conserve material, the thickness of the plate 75 does not greatly exceed the depth of the channels, and thus the upper surface of the platen is crowned above the channels 82, as at 83. These channels permit a tie wire at the back of the chamber and in a slot 36 to be extended, over a pressed bale, through the registering channel 82 and to the opposing slot 36 at the front of the chamber, for tying a bale, as described later.

The operation of the carriage or head H consists in shifting the carriage back and forth between an operating position over the chamber and a retracted position behind the chamber, as heretofore mentioned, between downward thrusts of the platen. Thus, the platenwill be raised to a retracted position above the chamber when the carriage is to be shifted rearwardly and lowered into the chamber when the carriage is at a forward position over the chamber. The carriage is provided with a handle 85 pivotally mounted upon an ear 86 at the front end wall 68 of the carriage to extend forwardly therefrom to a position capable of being easily reached and pulled and pushed by an operator. The handle 85 carries a detent 87 which reaches into a slot, as shown, in the cross head 26 to lock the carriage in position, whenever it is moved over the chamber C for the lowering of the platen into the chamber. A spring 89, extending between detent 87 and a reinforcing structure 90, holds handle 85 in a locked position and also holds handle 85 in an upper position when the carriage is moved rearwardly. Also, a safety switch 91 may be positioned so that it will be closed when detent 87 is in locked position. Safety switch 91 is connected in the control circuit for the hydraulic fluid supply for moving the platen, so that the platen cannot be lowered unless safety switch 91 is closed. Another safety switch 92, as in FIGS. 1 and 2, is shielded inside cross head 26 and has a trigger 93 depending from the cross head for engagement by the top of wall or door 31. Switch 92 is thus closed when door 31 is in closed position and is also connected in the hydraulic control circuit, so that the platen cannot be lowered unless safety switch 92 is also closed. Safety switches 91 and 92 are also so connected that, if either detent 87 or door 31 is unlocked, the platen will stop.

The platen P is forcibly lowered into the chamber C, to compress material therein by action of the cylinder 71 extending its piston rod 72. It is contemplated that the cylinder and piston rod will be heavy enough to hold the platen in position against tipping and binding. The platen and piston rod are restrained from rotating about the cylinder axis by a guide rod 95 which upstands from the rearward edge of the platen at the center thereof and fits within a vertical guide tube 96 mounted upon the cover 69 of the carriage, as best shown in FIG. 1 1, during descent from and ascent to its uppermost position from a position corresponding to the dotted position of FIG. 10. During travel of the platen to or from lower positions, twisting thereof is restrained by a guide rod 95 moving upwardly or downwardly between the central, rear flanges or lips 37. Thus, the flanges or lips 37, at the center of the platen, perform a dual function, the second being that of cooperation with the guide rod to prevent twisting of the platen. A box 97 at the top of guide tube 96 encloses a microswitch 98 adapted to be closed by the enlarged upper end 99 of rod 95 when the platen is raised upwardly. Switch 98 is connected in the hydraulic pump circuit, so as to turn off the pump when the platen is returned to its upper position, thereby requiring a button to be pushed by the operator before the platen can be moved again. 7

The hydraulic cylinder 71 may be actuated by any suitable hydraulic system, and such systems and their controls are available as conventional package units, such as including a hydraulic pump driven by an electric motor, a fluid reservoir and suitable control valves, conveniently solenoid actuated. Accordingly, it is convenient to mount such a package unit 101 upon a shelf 102, as behind the back wall of the chamber, as shown in FIG. 2, or at any other desired location. Control buttons 103 may be located at any suitable position, as upon the front frame cross head 26, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 12. The hydraulic lines and the electrical lines for such a package unit are not shown because they are entirely conventional.

The operation of the apparatus may be relatively conventional, such as moving the carriage 65 to a rearward position with the platen elevated, following the front wall 31 and side wall 33 being closed, after a series of tie wires are placed on the bottom of the compression chamber, with each wire extending through a rear slot 36 and the corresponding front slot 36', with just enough additional wire at the front eventually to tie the ends of eachwire and the remainder of each wire at the rear. The length of each wire should provide a sufficient length for eventual passage completely around the formed bale and tying at the front, such as wires 105 tied around a compressed bale 106, with a knot 107 in each wire at the front, as in FIG. 12.

For compression of the paper to form the bale, an amount of paper or the like may be placed in the compression space up to a level which will be cleared by the platen as the carriage is moved forwardly. Then, the carriage is moved forwardly to the position'of FIGS. 1 and 2 and locked in position by the handle 85. Then and preferably only then, can the appropriate button be pushed in order to exert full hydraulic pressure in the cylinder 71 and move the platen downwardly until the platen is stopped by the compression of material, i.e. by the hydraulic pressure reaching a predetermined amount, sensed by a pressure switch which causes automatic reversal of the platen to the elevated position. The lower position of the platen will normally be a fraction of the distance of the original height of the material, such as betwecn one-half and one-fourth the original height. Then the handle 85 may be unlatched and utilized in pushing the carriage rearwardly to clear the upper end of the compression space. Again, material is placed in the compression space up to a level at which it will be cleared by the platen when moved forwardly for another compression action, the platen being auto matically returned on each stroke, except when a special button is pushed to continue the pressure of the platen on the bale. The filling of the space with lesser and lesser amounts of material is repeated until a bale of the appropriate size is produced. It will be noted that the bale 106 shown in FIG. 12 is approximately seveneighths the clearance height of the platen.

After the bale has been formed to the desired height, the pressure of the platen is continued on the bale until tying has been accomplished. For this purpose, the extended ends of the wires, which have been laid on the floor rearwardly of the machine and conveniently in the space beneath the platen when it is in its rear position of FIG. 12, are then taken up in turn, and the ends of the wire thrust through the rear slot 36 above the bale and through the corresponding channel 82 on the underside of the platen and out through the corresponding front slot 36'. Each wire is then pulled on through the platen slot, in turn, until the wire at the rear is disposed between the lips 37. Then, the two ends are brought together at the front and tied. It will be noted that no particular stretching of the wires for tying is necessary, since a slight expansion of the bale, after the wires have been tied and the platen released, is not disadvantageous.

After the bale is tied, the platen is raised and the carriage, then or later, pushed to the rearward position of FIG. 12. At that time, the latch 50 may be unlocked by moving its handle 53 downwardly. Then, the pivoted front wall 31 may be moved outwardly and swung around to one side, as in FIG. 12. This will cause the locking pins 54 to be released from the pivoted side wall 33, which side wall may be swung outwardly, as to the open position of FIG. 12. The bale is then ready for removal from the press.

As will be evident from FIG. 12, the removal of the bale 106 from the press should not be difficult. Although the bale will normally move between the fixed left side wall 32 and the post 21R, the open side wall 33 permits a lever of some type, such as pinch bar or the like, to be inserted behind or underneath the bale or in any position which will assist movement of the bale through the exit opening. Ordinarily, the mere release of pressure by side wall 33 will permit the bale to be removed from the press without difficulty.

Reference has previously been made to the selfcleaning slots 36 and 36. As will be evident, if material is pushed up between the edge of the platen and the inside of the baling chamber at the position of the channels 82, these channels would be plugged and it would then be extremely difficult to insert the corresponding wire through this channel. Cardboard has been found to be particularly obnoxious, insofar as this phenomenon is concerned, particularly the flaps at an end of a cardboard box, as when the box is flattened by the force of the platen. Newspaper and similar types of paper have not produced the same undesirable results as cardboard carton flaps.

It was unexpectedly found that, with the flanges or lips 37 and 37' extending inwardly into the baling chamber, the tendency for flaps of cardboard to clog the channels on the underside of the platen was avoided. In FIG. 13 is illustrated the action of cardboard flaps 108 of compressed. material 109 tending to extend upwardly in the space between the platen plate and a side plate 34' of one of the walls, which can occur at any other wall plate. It will be noted that, if one or more cardboard flaps 1.08 extend upwardly between the edge of the platen and the wall at the position of a slot 82 on the underside of the platen, itwould be difficult, if not impossible, to thrust a wire through the channel, and the bale could not be tied while still in compressed condition. However, it has been found that, with the lips 37 or 37' extending into the baling chamber from the slots, the flaps 108, as in FIG. 14, have a tendency to bridge around the lips 37 or 37 and to remain compressed beneath the platen as a part of the compressed material 109, as in FIG. 15. Even though the spacing between the inner edges of the lips or flanges 37 or 37 and the outer edges of the channels 82 at the notches 81 is sufficient to accommodate a thin flap of cardboard, such flaps have not collected at this position.

It will be understood that variations in the construction shown and described may be used. For instance, the platen P, instead of being cast, may be fabricated by welding from plates and bars to approximate the cast construction shown. For the fabricated platen, the grooves 82 on the underside may be provided between spaced bars welded to the underside of a principal plate.

When the lips 37 and 37 terminate a spaced distance above the bottom of the chamber, as in FIG. 4 and as referred to previously, the baling press may be utilized to bag material, compressed up to below the lower edges of lips 37 and 37 For bagging, preferably utilized are a castered base for the bag and an open frame over the edges of which the upper edges of the bag may be folded. The platen has sufficient clearance to enter the bag and compress the material in the chamber into the bag. When the compressed material is at an appropriate level, such as the top of the bag frame, the bag is folded over onto the material and the platen lowered and held while the tie wires are tied, similar to the baling operation described above. Bagging is particularly desirable for wet, soggy or odoriferous material.

We have now described our invention in considerable detail. However, it is obvious that others skilled in the art can build and devise alternate and equivalent constructions which are nevertheless within the spirit and scope of our invention.

What is claimed is: v l. A baling press for forming bales from loose material, such as cardboard, paper and the like, comprising:

a. a baling chamber formed as an open top, box-like structure having a floor, a rear wall, a front wall opposing the rear wall and left and right side walls opposing each other;

b. a platen and means for moving said platen downwardly and into the chamber to compress material therein whenever the platen is positioned over the chamber;

0. means for supporting said platen and said platen moving means, said supporting means being shiftably mounted above the baling chamber for movement to an offset position to permit material to be placed in the chamber from the open top thereof and for movement to a compressing position directly over the chamber;

d. a vertical slot in a wall of the chamber, a corresponding vertical slot in an opposing wall of the chamber and a channel in the platen in alignment with the opposing vertical slots whenever the platen is lowered into the chamber, whereby'a wire placed upon the floor of the chamber with an end extending from each vertical slot may be wrapped about a bale by placing the ends of the wire in the vertical slots and threading one end through the channel for connection with the opposite end of the wire in the slot at the opposite side of the bale;

and

e. inturned lip means at each slot extending into said chamber from the-wall thereof.

2. In the baling press defined in claim 1, wherein:

a plurality of slots are provided in the rear wall of the chamber, a corresponding pluralityof slots is providedat the opposite front wall of the chamber and channels at the undersurface of the platen are provided in alignment withthe opposing rear wall and front wall slots.

3. In the baling press defined in claim 2, wherein:

an inturned lip isdisposed at each edge of each slot.

4. A baling press for forming bales from loose material, such as cardboard, paper and the like, comprising:

' a. a baling chamber formed as an open top, box-like structure having a floor, a rear wall, a front wall opposing the rear wall and left and right side walls opposing each other;

b. a platen and means for moving said platen downwardly and into the chamber to compress material therein whenever the platen is positioned over the chamber;

c. means for supporting said platen and said platen moving means, said supporting means being shiftably mounted above the baling chamber for movement to an offset position to permit material to be placed in the chamber from the open top thereof and for movement to a compressing position directly over the chamber;

d. a plurality of vertical slots in the rear wall of said chamber and a corresponding plurality of vertical slots in the front wall of said chamber and channels in the underside of said platen in alignment with the front and rear wall slots;

'e. inturned lip means at each slot extending into said chamber from the wall thereof; and

f. a notch in said platen opposite each slot to accommodate the inturned lips.

5. In the baling press defined in claim 4, wherein! said platen and said supporting means are provided with cooperating, upstanding guide members adapted to resist twisting of said platen while above said lip means.

6. In the baling press defined in claim 5, wherein:

said upstanding guide member of said platen is positioned to move downwardly and upwardly between one of said pair of inturned lips.

7. A baling press for forming bales from loose material, such as cardboard, paper and the like, comprising:

a.- a baling chamber formed as a box-like structure having a floor, a rear wall, a front wall opposing the rear wall and left and right side walls opposing each other;

b. a platen and means for moving said platen downwardly and into the chamber to compress material therein whenever the platen is positioned over the chamber;

c. the front wall of the chamber being carried upon a hinge means to constitute a door;

d. latch means at the edge of said front door opposite the hinge means to secure the door in a closed position;

e. the side wall adjacent to the latch means of the front wall door being mounted upon a hinge means at the rearward edge of said side wall to constitute a side door; and

f. cooperating means at the forward edge of said side door and the edge of the front door, whereby the side door is adapted to be held closed by the front door when the front door is closed, said cooperating means including a pin in one door adapted to engage a socket in the other door when the doors are closed.

8. A baling press for forming bales from loose material, such as cardboard, paper and the like, comprising:

a. a baling chamber formed as a box-like structure having a floor, a rear wall, a front wall opposing the rear wall and left and right side walls opposing each other;

b. a platen and means for moving said platen downwardly and into the chamber to compress material therein whenever the platen is positioned over the chamber;

c. the front wall of the chamber being carried upon a hinge means to constitute a door;

d. a post upstanding adjacent the front door and side door; and

e. latch means at the edge of said front door opposite 4 the hinge means to secure the door in a closed position, said latch means including a latch pivotally mounted on said front door and a cooperating member on said post, said latch being provided with a hook-shaped cam portion and said member on said post comprising a pin-mounted, cam engaging roller.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4041856 *Sep 26, 1975Aug 16, 1977Anthony FoxBaling machine with improved platen drive and guide assembly
US4080889 *Jun 16, 1976Mar 28, 1978Mordechay ShiloniDevice for compacting trash and the like
US4584935 *Sep 4, 1984Apr 29, 1986Luggen Leo JStock baler
US4719852 *Jul 24, 1986Jan 19, 1988A.K.G.S.Aircraft trash compactor
US5263412 *Aug 22, 1990Nov 23, 1993Godfrey Aerospatiale Inc.Aircraft trash compactor
US5465660 *Feb 16, 1994Nov 14, 1995Aero-Design TechnologyAircraft trash collection and compacting apparatus
US5746121 *Jul 22, 1996May 5, 1998Zimmer; JohnMethod of compacting trash on a platform
US6925930 *Aug 11, 2003Aug 9, 2005John C. ZimmerCompactor/bailer combination
DE3823416A1 *Jul 11, 1988Feb 2, 1989Hermann SchwellingCasing for baling press
DE4238498A1 *Nov 14, 1992Jun 1, 1994Via Nova Wertstoff EntsorgungHydraulic baling press for waste paper and plastics sheet - has vertical ram with square platen that enters open top of sack suspended in compacting chamber and produces ready wrapped bale
DE4445632A1 *Dec 21, 1994Jun 27, 1996Schwelling HermannAbfallpresse
DE4445632C2 *Dec 21, 1994Sep 30, 1999Hermann SchwellingAbfallpresse
DE10029979C2 *Jun 26, 2000Nov 6, 2003Hermann SchwellingBallenpresse
DE10390331B4 *Feb 6, 2003Apr 10, 2014Hermann SchwellingAnordnung zum Umschnüren von Ballen in einer Ballenpresse
EP2283999A2 *Aug 13, 2010Feb 16, 2011Hermann SchwellingBaling press
Classifications
U.S. Classification100/226, 100/256, 100/255, 100/3, 100/295
International ClassificationB30B9/30, B65B27/12, B65B27/00, B30B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B27/12, B30B9/30, B30B9/3032
European ClassificationB65B27/12, B30B9/30C9, B30B9/30