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Publication numberUS3910268 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1975
Filing dateDec 12, 1974
Priority dateDec 12, 1974
Also published asCA1049873A1, DE2542857A1, DE2542857C2
Publication numberUS 3910268 A, US 3910268A, US-A-3910268, US3910268 A, US3910268A
InventorsMiller Shirley A
Original AssigneeJohnson & Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical drape
US 3910268 A
Abstract
A surgical drape for use in orthopedic and related surgery comprising a flexible and unitary sheet having a main portion and two adjacent wing portions whose inner edges, preferably spaced one from the other, define therebetween an elongated slit or gap. One of the wing portions has secured thereto a flap-like sheet which, when the drape is used in a surgical procedure, is foldable to cover at least a portion of the gap and lie in at least partial overlapping relationship with the other of said wing portions. The drape is readily foldable into a compact unit which permits it to be easily and quickly unfolded and applied to a patient prior to surgery.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Miller Oct. 7, 1975 1 SURGICAL DRAPE 3,826,253 7/1974 Larsh et a1 128/132 D [75] Inventor. Shirley A. Miller, Loveland, Oh1o Primary Examiner Lawrence W pp [73] Assignee: Johnson & Johnson, New

Brunswick, NJ. [57] ABSTRACT 22 Filed; 12 1974 A surgical drape for use in orthopedic and related surgery comprising a flexible and unitary sheet having a [21] Appl' 532,283 main portion and two adjacent wing portions whose inner edges, preferably spaced one from the other, de- 52 us. c1 128/132 1) fine therehetween an elongated Slit or r One of the 51] Int. Cl. A61F 13/00 Wing Portions has seeured thereto a psheet 58 Field of Search 12s/132-135, which, when the drape is used in a surgical Procedure, 2 292 is foldable to cover at least a portion of the gap and lie in at least partial overlapping relationship with the 5 References Cited other of said wing portions. The drape is readily fold- UNITED STATES PATENTS able into a compact unit which permits it to be easily and quickly unfolded and applied to a patient prior to 1,724,443 8/1929 Wheeler 128/132 D Surgery 2,593,121 4/1952 DJOI'UP 3,669,106 6/1972 Schrading et a1. 128/132 D 16 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Oct. 7,1975 Sheet 1 of3 3,910,268

5 Q mm US. Patent Oct. 7,1975

Sheet 2 0f 3 rlq- 5 64) 74 f a; I Hi u.. ML

5AM FIT Sheet 3 of 3 3,910,268

U.S. Patent 0 7,1975

SURGICAL DRAPE FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates broadly to surgical cover means. In particular, the invention relates to new and improved surgical drapes of the type which comprise a flexible sheethaving a main portion and wing portions whose inner edges define a slit or gap (hereinafter "gap for convenience) which extends inwardly from an outer edge of the drape. Such drapes are especially useful in orthopedic surgery. neurosurgery, and similar surgical procedures.

In preparing for orthopedic and related surgery it is common practice to cover the patient and operating table with a sterile drape, or drapes, in such a way that only the limb (or portions of the limb) on which surgery is to be performed is presented to the surgeon and his assistants.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART One drape that has been provided for orthopedic and similar surgery comprises a sterile sheet having a main portion and an elongated gap extending outwardly from a central region thereof to an outer edge to provide two spaced wing portions. Such drapes are frequently referred to as split sheet" drapes.

One draping procedure for using these drapes involves raising the patients limb and putting it through the gap in the sheet in such a way that, when the draping is completed, the limb on which the operation is to be performed extends through the gap and lies on the upper surface of the main portion of the drape. The wing portions of the drape are then disposed to overlie parts of the patients body at a region adjacent the operative site.

It is necessary, of course, to insure that a sterile surgical field be provided at the outset of the surgical procedure and that the integrity of the sterile field be maintained until the surgical procedure is completed. In order to establish the sterile field and to prevent the contamination thereof in the event the wing portions of the split sheet should slip or he accidentally moved during surgery, it has been found necessary, prior to place-.

ment of the split sheet, to cover the patient with an auxiliary surgical drape. The auxiliary drape is placed over that portion of the patients body which will underlie the gap in the split sheet when the latter has been positioned.

The need for using such auxiliary drapes represents an inconvenience to the operating room staff in that at least two drapes must be handled and put into position. Furthermore. the use of two or more drapes increases the time that must be devoted to the draping procedure and correspondingly delays the start of the surgical procedure.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention there is provided an improved surgical drape for use in orthopedic and similar surgery which eliminates the need for the aforementioned auxiliary drape. The drape of the present invention thus simplifies the draping procedure, saves valuable time. and reduces costs.

The improved drape of the invention comprises a flexible unitary sheet, suitably of a plastic film or a woven or nonwoven fabric, having a main portion and two wing portions. The inner edges of the wing portions define an elongated gap which extends inwardly of the drape from an outer edge thereof. Attached to one of the wing portions, preferably at the inner edge thereof adjacent the gap, is a flap-like sheet of woven, nonwoven, plastic or similar material which is adapted to overlie the aforesaid gap when the drape is in use. The flap-like sheet of material may be extended across the gap, or a part thereof, to lie in overlapping relationship with the other of the two wing portions comprising the sheet. The flap-like sheet is wide enough to cover the width of the gap and at least part of the upper or lower surface of the other wing portion. Preferably, the flap-like sheet, or at least the portion thereof intended to cover the gap, is of sufficient length to extend along a substantial portion of the length of the gap.

The gap in the drape of the present invention may vary in width from substantially zero inches (as would be the case if a slit were formed in the sheet by cutting it with a knife or scissors) up to the diameter of the limb on which surgery is to be performed. The latter dimension depends on the size of the limb on which surgery is to be performed, but normally would be expected to be, for example, from about 3 inches to about 5 inches in the case of an operation on the thigh portion of the leg. A gap measuring from about 2 inches to about 4 inches in width would be suitable for arm surgery. The gap extends from an outer edge of the drape and terminates inwardly of the drape.

In another embodiment of the present invention, each of the wing portions of the drape has a flap-like sheet at its inner edge. Such a drape can be used, will be seen hereinafter, to provide a double layer of draping material which can either overlie parts of the body adjacent the site of surgery or which can be arranged under a limb which is to be subjected to surgery.

As used herein, the term nonwoven fabric" includes a layer of overlapping, intersecting fibers which are bonded by suitable adhesive means, as well as paper made from short length fibers using conventional paper making techniques.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood upon reading the following detailed description and upon reference to the appended drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a first embodiment of a surgical drape in accordance with the present invention, with the drape being folded out flat and with the flap-like sheet of the drape being folded back upon one wing portion to reveal the gap in the drape;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view at an enlarged scale taken along lines 22 of FIG. 1 and showing the manner in which the flap-like sheet is attached to the wing;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the drape of FIG. 1, but showing the flap-like sheet in a position overlying a substantial portion of the length of the gap and covering part of the other wing portion of the drape;

FIGS. 4a, 4b, and 4c are partial top plan views showing alternative arrangements for attaching the flap-like sheet to the wing portion;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a drape similar to that shown in FIG. 1 with the addition ofa reinforcing panel on its upper surface;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a second embodiment of a surgical drape wherein each of the wing portions has a flap-like sheet;

- -IG. 7 is a cross-sectional view at an enlarged scale zen along lines 7-7 of FIG. 6 and showing the manr in which the flaps are attached to the wings; FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the drape of FIG. 6 swing each flap-like sheet folded and overlying the ng portion to which it is attached and showing in bron lines the fold lines for the longitudinal folding of drape; FIG. 9 is a plan view similar to FIG. 6, showing the ape in an intermediate stage of folding wherein the p-like sheets have been folded transversely and the ain portion of the drape has been folded longitudi- "y; FIG. 10 is a diagrammatical cross-sectional view (en along lines 10-10 of FIG. 9; FIG. 11 is a top plan view, at an enlarged scale, of the ape of FIG. 6 after the longitudinal folding thereof been completed; FIG. 12 is a diagrammatical cross-sectional view ken along lines l212 of FIG. 11; and FIGS. 13-18 are perspective views showing the serence of steps in draping a patient for leg surgery with drape of the type shown in FIGS. 6l2.

)ETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION While the invention will be described in connection 1th its preferred embodiments, it will be understood at it is not intended to limit the invention to those em- )diments. On the contrary, it is intended to cover all ternatives, modifications and equivalents as may becluded within the spirit and scope of the invention as :fined by the appended claims.

Referring more particularly to FIGS. 1-3, which IOW one embodiment of the present invention, surgilI drape 10 comprises a flexible sheet 11 made from single piece of a suitable drapable material. Preferay, the material is a drapable nonwoven fabric, such as scrim reinforced tissue or a wet-formed nonwoven )ntaining long fibers. Flexible sheet 11 comprises a ,ain portion 12 at one end thereof, and a pair of iaced wings and 30 at the other end thereof. The :rimeter of the drape comprises opposed side edges 5 and 17 and bottom edge 15.

Wing portions 20 and 30 are integral with, and ex- :nd outwardly from, main portion 12. Wing portion 20 as an inner side edge 24 and an upper edge 26. Correondingly, wing portion 30 has an inner side edge 34 1d an upper edge 36. The upper edges of the wing porons define the upper edge of the drape.

Drape 10 has a gap 45 at least part of which is dened by the adjacent inner edges of the wing portions ad which extends from the upper edge of the drape inardly to a generally central portion thereof. The gap as an open end, i.e., an end which communicates with re outer edge of the drape, and a closed end, i.e., an nd which is located generally centrally of the drape. he closed end of the gap may be of any desired configration.

When, for example, the inner edges of the wing porons are linear, the gap will assume the configuration f an elongated rectangle (the width of which will be etermined by the distance between the adjacent inner dges of the wing portions) and the closed end of the ap will be squared off." Where the adjacent inner dges of the wing portions have curved portions inardly of the drape, the closed end of the gap will asume a curved configuration. Preferably the closed end of the gap has a curved configuration such as that shown in FIG. 1 since, as'will be seen hereinafter, this provides a drape which more readily conforms to the contours of the. body whenthe drape is in use.

Inner side edge 34 of wing portion 30 carries a flap of drapable-material, which, as illustrated in FIG. 3, may be folded across gap and lie in overlapping relationship with wing portion 20. Although FIG. 3 shows flap 40 overlying and covering part of the upper surface of wing 20, it is also contemplated that these two elements may be arranged so that wing 20 overlies sheet 40. This will be described in greater detail in connection with the detailed description hereinafter of the unfolding and use of the drape. The term overlapping relationship is used herein to describe both of the above mentioned arrangements of sheet 40 and wing portion 20.

Flap 40 has a lower edge 41, an upper edge 42, and side edges 43 and 44. The lower and upper edges of flap 40 are substantially equal in length and are sufficiently long so that the flap can be folded across gap 45 and lie in overlapping relationship with at least part of wing 20. Referring especially to FIG. 3, it is seen that the length of the flap along side edges 43, 44 is somewhat less than the length of gap 45. Flap 40 runs inwardly along inner edge 34 from a point inward of the upper edge of wing 30 to a point near the closed end of gap 45.

The particular part of wing 30 to which flap 40 is attached is not critical, provided, of course, that the flap can be folded across the gap'and lie in the aforementioned overlapping relationship with wing 20. Preferabl-y, however, the flap is attached to the wing at or near its inner side edge 34, since a minimum amount of ma terial is thus required and unnecessary bulkin'ess in the folded drape is eliminated. As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 flap 40 is fastened, along a line adjacent its side edge 44, to the upper surface of wing 30 a slight distance from its inner side edge 34. This is convenientlyaccomplished by stitching (indicated by dashed line 39 in FIGS. 1 and 2), but other fastening means, such as an adhesive, may be employed if so desired.

The manner of attaching the flap to the wing is illustrated in FIG. 2. A marginal portion of flap 40 adjacent its side edge 44 is rolled beneath the remainder of the flap so that part of upper surface 46 of the flap is disposed in a face-to-face relationship with upper surface 32 of wing 30. As mentioned, the flap is conveniently secured to the wing by stitching 39. When the flap is attached to the wing in the manner just described, there will be no folds or bulky portions on the upper surface of the drape when the drape is in use. I

It will be apparent that the flap can be attached to the wing in other ways. For example, a portion of the flap adjacent its upper edge 42 could be secured by stitching 39, or other securing means, to wing 30 near its upper edge 36 (see FIG. 40). Alternatively, the flap could be attached to the wing at, or near, side edge 16 of the drape (FIG. 4b) orat some point intermediate inner edge 34 and the outer edge of the wing (FIG. 40).

The drape of the present invention may be made from the well known linen materials, such as woven cotton cloth, commonly used in hospitals. Preferably, however, flexible sheet 11 (comprising main portion 12 and wing portions 20 and 30) and flap 40 comprise a nonwoven fabric of adequate tensile and tear strength. The nonwoven fabric should be relatively soft and have good draping and folding characteristics. Additionally, of course, the nonwoven fabric must be capable of being subjected to a sterilization treatment without being adversely effected thereby. The use of nonwoven fabrics eliminates the laundering, resterilization, and handling costs associated with linen drapes, since drapes made from nonwoven fabrics are discarded after use. The use of nonwovens in surgical drapes is well known and the selection of a nonwoven fabric having the above mentioned qualities is within the skill of those working in this art. More preferably, the nonwoven fabric used in constructing the drape is, or is treated to be, repellent to liquids such water, body fluids and other liquids commonly encountered during surgery. In this way any liquids which come into contact with the major surfaces of the drape are prevented from striking through the drape and establishing a path for the transmission of bacteria. Methods for rendering nonwoven fabrics repellent to liquids are well known in the art and are not part of the present invention.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is shown a modification of the surgical drape of FIGS. l3. The drape has a reinforcing panel 48 on its upper surface in the regions adjacent gap 45. The reinforcing panel may comprise one or more layers of the aforementioned flexible materials. Preferably, however, the reinforcing panel has an absorbent upper surface 48a and an impervious plastic film (shown as dotted line 49 in FIG. 5) between the absorbent surface and the main sheet of the drape. The upper surface of the reinforcing panel provides absorbency at the operation site to absorb body and other fluids encountered during surgery. The impervious plastic film in the reinforcing panel prevents fluids from striking through the drape to the patient. The reinforcing panel can be affixed to the drape by, for example, a suitable adhesive.

Referring now to FIG. 6, there is shown another embodiment of the present invention. Drape 50 is generally the same as drape of FIGS. 1-3 except that each of its wing portions carries a flap-like sheet. Drape 50 comprises a sheet 51 of drapable material having a main portion 52 and opposed wing portions 60 and 70 extending therefrom. The drape has a gap 85 which extends inwardly from the top edge of the drape and which is defined by inner side edges 64 and 74 of wings 60 and 70, respectively. The drape also has a bottom edge 55, a bottom portion 55' adjacent said bottom edge, and side edges 56 and 57. The drape has an upper surface (the surface exposed to the viewer in FIG. 6) and a lower surface (the surface not seen by the viewer in FIG. 6).

Flap 80 is attached to wing 60 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 7. A marginal portion of flap 80 is folded over inner edge 64 of wing 60 and continued a short distance along lower surface 63 of the wing. The flap may be secured to the lower surface of the wing by, for example, a suitable adhesive 65. Similarly, flap 80' is folded over inner edge 74 and is secured to lower surface 73 of wing 70. If desired, the flaps may be secured to the wings in the same manner as flap 40 is attached to wing 30, that is, in the manner illustrated in FIG. 2.

FOLDING OF THE DRAPE Drapes of the present invention may be folded into a compact unit which facilitates handling during packaging and storage and which permits the drape to be easily and quickly applied to the patient prior to surgery.

As used herein a forward fold" is a fold in which the upper surface is turned toward the upper surface of the drape around a fold line. A reverse fold is a fold in which the upper surface of the drape is turned toward the bottom surface of the drape around a fold line. In the drawings, the letter R indicates a reverse fold and the letter F indicates a forward fold. The numbers preceding the letters F and R refer to the order in which the folding is done.

The preferred method for folding drape 50 from end to end is illustrated in FIGS. 8-12. As seen in FIG. 8, flaps 80 and 80' are fan-folded to form two stacks of folds overlying wings 60 and 70, respectively. Main portion 52 of the drape is folded next. Bottom portion 55 adjacent bottom edge 55 of sheet 51 is forward folded, toward the center of the drape, around fold line 1F. The main portion is then reverse folded around fold line 2R, forward folded around fold line 3F, reverse folded around fold line 4R, and forward folded around fold line 5F.

As best seen in FIG. 8, upper end portion 53 of main portion 52 is defined by fold line 5F, the sides of the drape, and transverse line 54 (shown in dot and dash) along which the wings extend from main portion 52. Thus, as illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10, the above described folding sequence provides a stack A of folds which overlies a substantial part of the upper surface of end portion 53.

The wings (with their flaps already fan-folded as shown in FIG. 8) are folded next. A part of wing adjacent upper edge 76 thereof is forward folded around fold line 6F. Thereafter wing 70 is reverse folded around fold line 7R and forward folded around fold line 8F. It will be observed that the closed endof gap 85 is disposed between fold line 8F and transverse line 54. As seen in FIG. 12, this folding of wing 70 (including its associated flap 80') provides a stack B of folds which overlies stack A of folds. Wing 60, with its flap 80, is then folded in the manner just described for wing 70 to provide a stack C of folds which overlies stack A of folds. FIG. 11 shows drape 50 after it has been folded in accordance with the above described folding procedure. It will be noticed that the closed end of the gap is now exposed to view at the upper portion of the folded unit. This positioning of the closed end of the gap greatly facilitates placement of the drape prior to surgery, as the limb on which surgery is to be performed will extend through this portion of the gap when the patient is completely draped.

Each end of the drape in the elongated, longitudinally folded form shown in FIG. 11 may then be folded, toward the center, to give a final compactly folded drape. Although an ordinary fan fold is suitable for this purpose, it is preferred that a modified fan fold be used. The term fan-folded refers to a folding sequence in which the material being folded has alternate forward and reverse folds. The term modified fan fold refers to a folding sequence which is similar to a fan fold but in which the first two folds thereof are of the same type. An example of a modified fan fold sequence is forward, forward, reverse, forward, reverse, forward.

Thus, the transverse folding of the partially folded drape shown in FIG. I 1 is begun from side edge 56 with aforward fold. The second fold is likewise a forward fold while the third fold is a reverse fold. The forward and reverse fold sequence may subsequently be repeated until the desired degree of compactness is obtained. The transverse folding of the drape from side edge 57 toward the center is accomplished in the same manner.

APPLICATION OF THE DRAPE TO THE PATIENT Referring now to FIGS. 13-18, there is illustrated in stepwise fashion a method of applying the drape of FIG. 8, folded described, to a patient about to undergo surgery on the right knee. FIG. 13 shows drape 50, unfolded from side to side, placed across the upper thigh portions of the patients body with the gap thereof more or less lined up with the patients right leg. An assistant stationed at the patients left side unfolds stack B of folds toward the patients feet to cover the patients left leg. As shown in FIG. 14, this exposes flap 80 in its folded position overlying wing 60. An assistant on the right side of the patient lifts the patients right leg upwardly (See FIG. 15) and unfolds flap 80 across the operating table. While still holding the patients right leg in the upraised position shown in FIG. 15, the assistant on the right side of the patient then unfolds stack C of folds toward the patients right foot. As shown in FIG. 16, wing 70 now overlies flap 80 and flap 80' is exposed in its folded configuration overlying wing 70. While the patients right leg is still upwardly raised, the assistant on the left of the patient unfolds flap 80' across the operating table. As shown in FIG.

17, flap-like sheet 80' now overlies part of wing 60 and there is advantageously provided a double thickness of draping material between the operating table and the leg on which surgery is to be performed. Referring to FIG. 18, the patient's right leg is lowered so that it lies on the upper surface of wing 70 (and possibly also on part of flap 80). The draping procedure is completed by unfolding stack A of folds toward the patients head, so that the main portion of the drape covers the upper torso of the patient.

It will be recognized that, once the draping is completed, the limb on which surgery is to be performed will extend through the closed end of the gap and will be contacted with the drape material. This arrangement advantageously isolates the patient from various fluids, such as blood and the like, which are normally encountered during surgery. Thus the remaining portions of the patients body, that is, those on which no surgery is to be performed, are protected from bacteria originating in the operative area. Similarly, the operative site is protected from contamination by bacteria originating from areas remote from the operative site.

It will be understood by those skilled in the art that drape 10 of FIGS. l-3 may be folded in the manner described herein for drape 50. Drape 10, of course, has two wings, but only one of the two wings has a flap. Drape 10, when folded longitudinally, would look substantially like drape 50 in the folded form illustrated in FIG. 11, each wing being folded into a stack of folds. If the wing having the flap be first unfolded longitudinally, and the flap attached thereto be next extended transversely (while the limb to be operated on is uplifted), then the flap would be under the otherwing after the latter is subsequently unfolded longitudinally. Where the wing without the flap is first unfolded longitudinally and the wing having the flap is next unfolded longitudinally, the flap, after it has been unfolded transversely, would lie over the wing without the flap.

What is claimed is:

l. A surgical drape comprising a sheet of flexible, drapable material, said sheet having a main portion at one end thereof and a pair of spaced wings at the other end thereof, said wings extending outwardly from a central region of said sheet and defining a gap in said sheet; and a flap on at least one of said wings, said flap being transversely extendible from said one wing so as to cover at least a portion of said gap and to lie in contacting relationship with at least part of the other of said pair of wings when the drape is placed on a patient.

2. A surgical drape according to claim 1 wherein said sheet comprises a woven fabric.

3. A surgical drape according to claim 1 wherein said sheet comprises a plastic film.

4. A surgical drape according to claim 1 wherein said sheet comprises a nonwoven fabric.

5. A surgical drape according to claim 4 wherein said nonwoven fabric is fluid repellent.

6. A surgical drape according to claim 1 wherein a reinforcing panel is secured to said sheet adjacent said gap.

7. A surgical drape according to claim 6 wherein the upper surface of said reinforcing panel is absorbent.

8. A surgical drape according to claim 7 wherein there is a fluid impervious element between said sheet and the upper surface of said reinforcing panel.

9. A surgical drape according to claim 8 wherein the upper surface of the reinforcing panel is secured to the fluid impervious element.

10. A surgical drape according to claim 9 wherein said flap is attached to said wing along a line adjacent the inner side edge of said wing.

11. A surgical drape according to claim 1 wherein the other of said pair of spaced wings has a flap attached thereto.

12. A surgical drape according to claim 11 wherein each flap is attached to its respective wing along a line adjacent the inner side edge thereof.

13. A surgical drape according to claim 1 wherein said gap comprises a curvilinear portion.

14. A surgical drape according to claim 1 treated to render it sterile and packaged in said sterile condition.

15. A surgical drape comprising a sheet of flexible, drapable material, said sheet having a main portion at one end thereof and a pair of spaced wings at the other end thereof, said wings extending outwardly from a central region of said sheet and defining a gap in said sheet; and a flap attached to at least one of said wings, said flap being transversely extendible from said one wing so as to cover at least a portion of said gap and to lie in contacting relationship with at least part of the other of said pair of wings, said main portion being folded to form a first stack of folds overlying a portion of said sheet, said flap on said one wing being folded to overlie said one wing, said one wing with its said overlying flap and the other of the two spaced wings each being folded to form stacks of folds overlying said first stack of folds and said portion of said sheet.

16. A drape according to claim 15 treated to render it sterile and packaged in said sterile condition.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION P tent N 3,910,268 Dated October 7, 1975 Inventor(s) Shi py in Miller age 1 Of 2 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Columns 3 and 4 should appear as shown on the attached sheet Signed and Sealed this thirteenth Day Of April1976 [SEAL] Arrest:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer (ummissiuncr nflarw'ns and Trademarks PEG. '7 is a cross-sectional view at an enlarged scale taken along lines "i? of HO. 6 and showing the manner in which the flaps are attached to the wings;

8 is a perspective view of the drape of HO. 6 showing each flap-like sheet folded and overlying the wing portion to which it is attached and showing in broken lines the fold lines for the longitudinal folding of the drape; 7

FIG. 9 is a plan view similar to FIG. 6, showing the drape in an intermediate stage of folding wherein the flap-like sheets have been folded transversely and the main portion of the drape has been folded longitudi nally;

FlG. it) is a diagrammatical cross-sectional view taken along lines ill-ill of Z-lG. 9;

FIG. H is a top plan view, at an enlarged scale, of the drape of HG. 6 after the longitudinal folding thereof has been completed;

H6. 12 is a diagrammatical cross-sectional view taken a-ong lines i2-ll2 of HQ. 11', and

FlGS. ll3-llrl are perspective views showing the sequence of steps in draping a patient for leg surgery with a drape of the type shown in FlGS. 6-H.

DETAlLED DESCRlPTiON OF THE INVENTION While the invention will be described in connection with its preferred embodiments, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to those ernbodirnents. On the contrary, it is intended to cover all alternatives, modifications and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Referring more particularly to FlGS. 1-3, which show one embodiment of the present invention, surgical drape it) comprises a flexible sheet 31 made from a single piece of a suitable drapable material. Preferably, the material is a drapable nonwoven fabric, such as a scrim reinforced tissue or a wet-formed nonwoven containing long fibers. Flexible sheet 11 comprises a main portion R2 at one end thereof, and a pair of spaced wings and at the other end thereof. The perimeter of the drape comprises opposed side edges l6 and i7 and bottom edge 15.

Wing portions 20 and 30 are integral with, and extend outwardly from, main portion l2. Wing portion 20 has an inner side edge 24 and an upper edge 26. Correspondingly, wing portion 30 has an inner side edge 34 and an upper edge 36. The upper edges of the wing portions define the upper edge of the drape.

Drape it) has a gap 45 at least part of which is defined by the adjacent inner edges of the wing portions and which extends from the upper edge of the drape inwardly to a generally central portion thereof. The gap has an open end, i.e., an end which communicates with the outer edge of the drape, and a closed end, i.e., an end which is located generally centrally of the drape. The closed end of the gap may be of any desired configuration.

When, for example, the inner edges of the wing portions are linear, the gap will assume the configuration of an elongated rectangle (the width of which will be determined by the distance between the adjacent inner edges of the wing portions) and the closed end of the gap will be squared off." Where the adjacent inner edges of the wing portions have curved portions inwardly of the drape, the closed end of the gap will assume a curved configuration. Preferably the closed end i Page 2 of 2 shown in FIG. 1 since, as will be seen hereinafter, this provides a drape which more readily conforms to the contours of the body when the drape is in use.

lnner side edge 34 of wing portion 30 carries a flap 40 of drapable material, which, as illustrated in H6. 3, may be folded across gap 45 and lie in overlapping relationship with wing portion 20. Although FIG. 3 shows flap 40 overlying and covering part of the upper surface of wing 20, it is also contemplated that these two ele= merits may be arranged so that wing 20 overlies sheet 40. This will be described in greater detail in connection with the detailed description hereinafter of the unfolding and use of the drape. The term overlapping relationship" is used herein to describe both of the above mentioned arrangements of sheet 44 and wing portion 20.

Flap 40 has a lower edge 41, an upper edge 42, and side edges 43 and 44. The lower and upper edges of flap 4x8 are substantially equal in length and are sufficiently long so that the flap can be folded across gap 45 and lie in overlapping relationship with at least part of wing 20. Referring especially to P16. 3, it is seenthat the length of the flap along side edges 43, 44 is somewhat less than the length of gap 45. Flap 40 runs inwardly along inner edge 34 from a point inward of the upper edge of wing 30 to a point near the closed end of gap 45.

The particular part of wing 30 to which flap 40 is attached is not critical, provided, of course, that the flap can be folded across the gap and lie in the aforementioned overlapping relationship with wing 20. Preferably, however, the flap is attached to the wing at or near its inner side edge 34, since a minimum amount of ma terial is thus requiredand unnecessary bulkiness in the folded drape is eliminated. As illustrated in FlGS. 2 and 3 flap 49 is fastened, along a line adjacent its side edge 44, to the upper surface of wing 30 a slight distance from its inner side edge 34. This is conveniently accom plished by stitching (indicated by dashed line 39 in FIGS. 1 and 2), but other fastening means, such as an adhesive, may be employed if so desired.

The manner of attaching the flap to the wing is illus trated in FIG. 2. A marginal portion of flap 40 adjacent its side edge 44 is rolled beneath the remainder of the flap so that part of upper surface 46 of the flap is dis posed in a face-toface relationship with upper surface .32 of wing 30. As mentioned, the flap is conveniently secured to the wing by stitching 39. When the flap is attached to the wing in the manner just described, there will be no folds or bulky portions on the upper surface of the drape when the drape is in use.

It will be apparent that the flap can be attached to the wing in other ways. For example, a portion of the flap adjacent its upper edge 42 could be secured by stitching 39, or other securing means, to wing 30 near its upper edge as (see FIG. 4a). Alternatively, the flap could be attached to the wing at, or near, side edge 16 of the drape (FIG. 41;) or at some point intermediate inner edge 34 and the outer edge of the wing (FIG. 4c).

The drape of the present invention may be made from the well known "linen" materials, such as woven cotton cloth, commonly used in hospitals. Preferably, however, flexible sheet 11 (comprising main portion 12 and wing portions 20 and 30) and flap 40 comprise a nonwoven fabric of adequate tensile and tear strength. The nonwoven fabric should be relatively soft and have

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4089331 *Dec 6, 1976May 16, 1978The Kendall CompanySurgical drape with fenestration liner
US4185625 *Aug 18, 1978Jan 29, 1980Johnson & JohnsonSurgical cover sheet
US4196723 *Oct 6, 1978Apr 8, 1980The Procter & Gamble CompanyDual fenestrated surgical drape with a flap capable of covering and isolating either fenestration
US4334529 *Apr 14, 1981Jun 15, 1982Caroline G. WirthWirth's sterile, disposable surgical drape
US4354486 *Sep 29, 1980Oct 19, 1982The Buckeye Cellulose CorporationOverhead table drape
US4397309 *Feb 20, 1981Aug 9, 1983The Buckeye Cellulose CorporationProtective stack cover flaps for folded drapes
US4479492 *Dec 13, 1982Oct 30, 1984Kimberly-Clark CorporationBilateral split surgical drape
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US5038798 *Aug 23, 1990Aug 13, 1991Baxter International Inc.Opthalmic drape with fluid collection pouch
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US5515868 *Jul 5, 1994May 14, 1996Standard Textile Co., Inc.Surgical drape having at least one openable and reclosable slit formed therein
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US5921242 *May 6, 1997Jul 13, 19993M Innovative Properties CompanyDrape sheets for use in surgical procedures
US6298855Oct 22, 1999Oct 9, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Surgical drape
USRE34512 *Aug 26, 1993Jan 18, 1994Baxter International Inc.Opthalmic drape with fluid collection pouch
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EP0185002A2 *Nov 27, 1985Jun 18, 1986Mölnlycke ABAn arrangement in surgical drapes
EP1009314A1 *Mar 16, 1998Jun 21, 2000Allegiance CorporationSurgical shoulder drape
WO1994024954A1 *Apr 19, 1994Nov 10, 1994Kimberly Clark CoModified lithotomy/pelviscopy surgical drape
WO2007118636A1 *Apr 10, 2007Oct 25, 2007Birgit RiesingerDressing for placing around a line emerging from a human or animal body opening or cavity, said line having been inserted by surgery
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/854, 128/855
International ClassificationA61B19/08, A61B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B19/08, A61B2019/086
European ClassificationA61B19/08