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Publication numberUS3910462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1975
Filing dateJun 6, 1974
Priority dateJun 6, 1974
Publication numberUS 3910462 A, US 3910462A, US-A-3910462, US3910462 A, US3910462A
InventorsR M Abeles, Monte P Henry
Original AssigneeFlushing Plastics Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for dispensing cleaning solution
US 3910462 A
Abstract
Apparatus for dispensing a cleaning solution, comprising a mixer for mixing cleaning composition and water to form a cleaning solution; conduits between the mixer and sources of supply of water and of cleaning composition, each conduit including a valve therein for controlling the throughput therethrough; a dispenser, such as a nozzle, for dispensing cleaning solution under pressure; and a pump for pumping the water and the cleaning composition to the mixer via the conduits and for pumping the cleaning solution from the mixer to the dispenser. A separate pumping system, including an independent pump, is provided to dispense rinse water.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Abeles et al. Oct. 7, 1975 [54] APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING CLEANING 3,403,821 10/1968 Blood .1 222/63 SOLUTION 3,801,017 4/1974 Jarzynski 239/310 [75] Inventors: R. M. Abeles, Douglaston; Monte P.

Henry, North Valley Stream, both of NY.

[73] Assignee: Flushing Plastics Corporation,

Hicksville, NY.

[22] Filed: June 6, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 477,009

[52] US. Cl. 222/135 [51] Int. Cl. B05B 7/00 [58] Field of Search 222/135, 145, 255, 63,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 900,468 10/1908 Bataille 417/435 3,067,987 12/1962 Ballou et al 222/145 X Primary ExaminerRobert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner-John P. Shannon Apparatus for dispensing a cleaning solution, comprising a mixer for mixing cleaning composition and water to form a cleaning solution; conduits between the mixer and sources of supply of water and of cleaning composition, each conduit including a valve therein for controlling the throughput therethrough; a dispenser, such as a nozzle, for dispensing cleaning solution under pressure; and a pump for pumping the water and the cleaning composition to the mixer via the conduits and for pumping the cleaning solution from the mixer to the dispenser. A separate pumping system, including an independent pump, is provided to dispense rinse water.

ABSTRACT 8 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures HIGH PRESSURE 46 WATER OUT US. Patent Oct. 7,1975

APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING CLEANING SOLUTION The present invention relates to apparatus for brushless cleaning, and in particular to a system for delivering a solution of soap or detergent under pressure.

Prior art systems for delivering a soap solution under pressure generally employ a single pump that has a primary suction inlet connected to a water reservoir and a secondary suction inlet connected between a pump by-pass and a soap reservoir, the mixing then taking place in the pump itself. This system is based on the fact that rinse water is delivered by the same pump employed to deliver the soap solution by shutting down the inlet to the soap reservoir. This suffers from the disadvantages that the soap solution is delivered at extremely low concentration and far too high a pressure.

In addition, maintenance problems arise whichrender the system ineffective for long term reliable use. It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a soap system that is economical and reliable.

It is another object of the invention to'provide separate soap and rinse systems that are capable of being used together to provide an overall washing apparatus capable of economical and reliable operation.

These objects of the invention are accomplished by the provision of apparatus for dispensing a cleaning solution, comprising a mixer for mixing the cleaning composition and water to form a cleaning solution; conduits between the mixer and sources of supply of water and of cleaning composition, each conduit including a valve therein for controlling the throughput therethrough; a dispenser, such as a nozzle, for dispensing cleaning solution under pressure; and a pump for pumping the water and the cleaning composition to the mixer via the conduits and for pumping the cleaning solution from the mixer to the dispenser.

The present invention is illustrated in terms of a preferred embodiment in the accompanying drawings, in which:

F I0. I is a schematic representation of the soap and rinse systems, and

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic representation of the electrical circuits employed.

Water from any suitable source enters line 1 and flows via line 2 to tank 3. The level of water in tank 3 is controlled via a conventional ball float valve (not shown). Water is taken out of tank 3 via valve 4 and line 5 and delivered to valve 6, which is preferably a needle valve. Liquid detergent or soap is stored in tank 7 and is delivered to valve 8, also preferably a needle valve. via line 9. Either or both of tanks 3 and 7 may be permanently connected to the system, or either or both of tanks 3 and 7 may be separate from the system. Valves 6 and 8 are adjusted to give the proper ratio of water to soap. The invention is operable with any detergent or soap. but the preferred cleaning composition is the detergent composition described in US. Pat. application Ser. No. 269,545, filed July 7, 1972, entitled Liquid Cleaning Compositions," in the name of Richard Abeles. one of the coinvcntors of the present appli cation. US. Pat. application Ser. No. 269,545 is incorporated herein by reference thereto. When the detergent composition of US. Pat. application Ser. No. 269,545 is employed, it has been found that good results are obtained when the ratio, by volume, of water to soap is from 3: l to 30:1, preferably 9: 1. While valves 6 and 8 can be freely adjustable, it is preferred to lock them into a particular setting so as to insure the proper ratios and prevent unauthorized tampering.

Soap, via tube 10, and water, via line 1 I, join in com mon line 12 and pass through check valve 13 to line 4. Line 12 and check valve 13 function as a mixture, and a mixture of soap and water is thus delivered via line 14 to soap pump 19. Soappump 19 is operated to deliver the soap solution at low pressure, e.g. in the range of 20 to 50 psig, preferably to 40 psig, at a rate of from about l/ 16 to gallons per minute, preferably about gallon per minute. Soap solution is delivered by pump 19 through lines 20 to filter 21, and to check valve 22. Check valve 22 acts to minimize surging problems which might otherwise arise from operation of the pressure switch 23. Pressure switch 23 operates to open, and thus cut off motor 30, when the pressure reaches a maximum value and to close when the pressure falls back to a minimum value. The connection between switch 13 and motor 30 is diagrammatically shown by the dotted line 31, and is explained in more detail below. We have found that good results are obtained with a cut-in at 30 psig and a cut-out at psig. Finally, the soap solution passes through check valve 24 and leaves via line 25. Line 25 may be connected to any suitable nozzle to deliver the desired spray pattern.

To regulate the spray pattern and to adjust the pressure in line 20, a by-pass 28, including a by-pass valve 29, preferably a needle value, is provided. At higher pressures, there is more fanning at the nozzle, and this is often desirable.

To prime pump 19, a normally closed priming valve 15 is located in lines 17 and 18. Valve 15 is operated by a solenoid 16 in a manner to be described below.

Another pumping system is used to deliver rinse water from tank 3. This is provided by pump 40 which delivers water from tank 3 via strainer 41, and lines 42 and 44 .to surge tank 43. Surge tank 43 is an accumulator that damps pulsations in the high pressure rinse system. Motor 45 operates pump 41 to deliver water at 400 to 500 psig, preferably 500 psig, at 2 to 10 gallons per minute, preferably 3 gallons per minute. Water at high pressure leaves surge tank 43 via lines 46 and passes through check valve 47 before exiting via line 48. Line 48 is also connected to a suitable nozzle (not shown).

An unloader circuit is provided, including a pressure relief valve 61, to guard against buildup of excessive pressure.

FIG. 2 shows the circuitry employed. Motor 45.is connected to a source of AC power and pump 40 is turned ON and OFF via rinse switch 71. Motor 30 is connected to the AC power source through soap switch 72 and one set of 23a of switches in pressure switch 23. The solenoid 16 used to control priming valve 15 is connected to the AC source, and in series with soap switch 72 via priming switch 73 and the other set 23b of switches in pressure switch 23.

In operation, the device of the present invention functions as follows. The rinse valve 47 is closed and the rinse switch 71 is turned ON, so that the rinse system is inactive during the initial soaping operation, the pump 40 then merely being used to pump water through the bypass 60. The two sets of switches 23a and 23b and the pressure switch 23 are left in the normally closed position. The soap valve 24 is opened and the soap switch 72 is turned ON. This activates the motor 30, which starts the pump 19 working to deliver the mixture of soap and water through line 25. When the pressure exceeds the preset maximum of 35 psig,-

the pressure switch 23 opens switch 23a and thus dis connects the motor 30 from the pump '19. The soapsolution continues to be delivered through the outlet line 25, and the pressure in the line 25 will fall until it. reaches the preset minimum value, normally 30 psig,

and then pressure switch 23 cuts in and closes switch in the soap systemfrom excessive water pressure, the

prime switch 73 is in series with the other switch 23b of pressure switch 23. Switches 23a and 2312 are ganged together so that both open when excessive pressure is detected in the lines.

Since the valves 6 and 8 are preset prior to use, the proper ratio of water to soap isautomatically obtained in the soap solution delivered through line 25. The line 25 is connected to a suitable nozzle, such as a No. 4003 nozzle so as to obtain a desired spray pattern.

It is a feature of the present invention that a separate rinse system is provided so as to insure maintenancefree operation of the entire wash and rinse system.

Thus, to rinse after washing, soap valve 24 is closed and rinse valve 47 is opened. In this way, the system immediately switches from a low pressure, low flow rate soap system to a high pressure, highflow rate rinse system. To obtain a suitable spray pattern'for the high, pressure rinse, a 5008 nozzle may be used.-

By the use of separate systems for soap and rinse, it is possible to optimize the systems so that each can provide a pressure which is most suitable for the purpose. In addition, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the rinse system and soap system are physically cleaning composition and said mixing means, each conduit means including a valve means therein for controlling the throughput ,therethrough;

c. means for dispensing said cleaning solution under pressure;

d. first pump means downstream of said mixing means for pumping said water and said cleaning composition to said mixing means -via said conduit means and for pumping said cleaning solution from said mixing means to said dispensing means, said I first pump means having an inlet and an outlet, said pump means inlet being connected in fluid communication with said mixing means and said pump means outlet being in fluid communication with said cleaning solution dispensing means; and

rinse means for dispensing water at a higher pressure than the cleaning solution dispensed from said cleaning solution dispensing means, including second pump means for pumping water from saidsup 'ply of water through said rinse means.

2. Apparatus according toclaim 1, wherein said mixing means includes check valve means.

3. Apparatus. according to claim 1, including by-pass means for passing cleaning solution downstream of said first pump means to the inlet to said pump means, said by-pass means including a valve for controlling the extent of solution to be by-passed, said by-pass means being operable to adjust the pressure of cleaning solution dispensed by said cleaning solution dispensing means.

4. Apparatus according to claim 1, including pressure switch means for disabling said first pump means when the pressure downstream of said first pump means exceeds a predetermined upper value andforreenabling said first pump means'when said pressure falls to a predetermined lower value. I

5. Apparatus according to claim 1, including a check valve upstream of said pressure switch means.

6. Apparatus according to claim 1, including a check valve between said pressure switchmeans and said dis-.

pensing means.

7. Apparatus according to claim 1, includingpumppriming means for conveying water to said first pump,

means.

1 8. Apparatus according to claim, 1, including a reser-, voir means for storing water supplied from said supply of water, said first pump means being operable to pump said water. from said reservoir to said mixing means and said second pump means being operable to pump said water from said reservoir to said rinse means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US900468 *Oct 12, 1907Oct 6, 1908John J BataillePump-primer.
US3067987 *Jun 19, 1959Dec 11, 1962Grace W R & CoTwo-component mixer
US3403821 *Dec 20, 1965Oct 1, 1968Paul B. BloodLiquid proportioning apparatus
US3801017 *Feb 12, 1973Apr 2, 1974L & A Prod IncManifold for high pressure washer in mechanical mode selection
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3997080 *Nov 20, 1975Dec 14, 1976Watsco, Inc.Pressurized liquid mixer and dispenser system
US4787822 *Apr 10, 1986Nov 29, 1988National Instrument Company, Inc.Volume control for multi-nozzle rotary pump filling systems
US5490765 *May 17, 1993Feb 13, 1996Cybor CorporationDual stage pump system with pre-stressed diaphragms and reservoir
US5527161 *Aug 3, 1994Jun 18, 1996Cybor CorporationFiltering and dispensing system
US5611462 *Feb 22, 1995Mar 18, 1997Pure CorporationAircraft cleaning apparatus and mixing valve therefor
US6247903 *Mar 26, 1999Jun 19, 2001Lam Research CorporationPressure fluctuation dampening system
US6406273May 18, 2001Jun 18, 2002Lam Research CorporationPressure fluctuation dampening system
US6685440 *May 7, 2002Feb 3, 2004Lam Research CorporationMethods of pressure fluctuation dampening
US7594801Dec 6, 2002Sep 29, 2009Koganei CorporationChemical liquid apparatus and deaerating method
US7708880 *Dec 6, 2002May 4, 2010Koganel CorporationChemical liquid supply apparatus and a chemical liquid supply method
US20040144736 *Dec 6, 2002Jul 29, 2004Koganei CorporationA Chemical Liquid Supply Apparatus and A Chemical Liquid Supply Method
US20050175472 *Dec 6, 2002Aug 11, 2005Koganei CorporationLiquid medicine supplying device and method for venting air from liquid medicine supplying device
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/135
International ClassificationB05B7/32, B08B3/02, B08B3/08, B05B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/08, B08B3/026, B08B2203/0205, B05B7/00, B08B2203/0217, B05B7/32
European ClassificationB08B3/02H, B05B7/32, B08B3/08, B05B7/00