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Publication numberUS3911507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1975
Filing dateJul 22, 1974
Priority dateJul 22, 1974
Publication numberUS 3911507 A, US 3911507A, US-A-3911507, US3911507 A, US3911507A
InventorsLennart L Johnson
Original AssigneeLennart L Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toilet cleaning apparatus
US 3911507 A
Abstract
In a flush toilet with a reservoir tank and bowl, a container containing a water-soluble detergent and coloring agent is mounted in line with a water line leading from a riser tube to an overflow tube in the reservoir tank for adding detergent-containing make-up water to the bowl following a flushing operation. The quantity of make-up water per flushing operation, and its detergent concentration provides the resulting bowl water with at least a predetermined concentration of detergent. Large savings in the volume of water used per flushing operation may be realized by proper control, through use of a regulator valve, of the volume of make-up water employed.
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United States Patent Johnson Oct. 14, 1975 TOILET CLEANING APPARATUS Primary E.\'am inerHouston S. Bell, Jr. [76] Inventor: Lennart L Johnson 2749 NE Attorney, Agent, or Firm-H. Dale Palmatier; James Johnson St., Minneapolis, Minn. Haner 55418 22] Filed: July 22, 1974 [57] ABSTRACT Appl. No.: 490,231

In a flush toiletwith a reservoir tank and bowl, a container containing a water-soluble detergent and coloring agent is mounted in line with a water line leading from a riser tube to an overflow tube in the reservoir tank for adding detergent-containing make-up water to the bowl following a flushing operation. The quantity of make-up water per flushing operation, and its detergent concentration provides the resulting bowl water with at least a predetermined concentration of detergent. Large savings in the volume of water used per flushing operation may be realized by proper control, through use of a regulator valve, of the volume of make-up water employed.

11 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures US. Patent Oct. 14, 1975 Sheet 1 of 2 3,911,507

US. Patent Oct. 14, 1975 Sheet 2 of2 3,911,507

TOILET CLEANING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Modern day toilets in common usage include a toilet bowl and an elevated reservoir tank which supplies flushing water to the bowl and which itself is supplied with water from a water line. The reservoir tank ordinarily includes an upright riser tube which is connected at its lower end to a cold water line, a float valve at the top of the riser tube, and an upright hush tube which is connected at its upper end to the riser tube through the float valve and which has its lower end near the bottom of the reservoir tank. A ball float normally operates the float valve so that when water in the tank rises to a given level, the float valve shuts off the flow of water passing through the riser tube to the hush tube. The reservoir tank has a large opening in its floor communicating with the toilet bowl, the opening being plugged with a ball cock which is lifted from its seating position when the toilet is flushed to enable the water in the reservoir to flow into the toilet bowl. The reservoir tank includes an overflow pipe which communicates with the toilet bowl, and a section of tubing leads from the float valve to the overflow pipe, and during refilling of the reservoir tank after a flushing operation, a quantity of water passes through the tubing into the overflow pipe to bring the water in the bowl to the desired level.

In recent years, various devices have been employed to add a detergent and a coloring substance (normally blue) to water in the reservoir tank so that when the toilet is flushed, and the water in the bowl has returned to the desired level, the bowl water is blue in color and contains detergent to avoid the formation of a ring or other stains within the bowl and to cleanse the bowl. To avoid formation of stains and to insure proper cleansing, the detergent in the bowl water must be at or above a given minimum concentration. The bowl water (containing detergent) remaining immediately after flushing is thus diluted by detergent-free water passing through the overflow pipe. The concentration of detergent in the water in the reservoir tank hence must be somewhat greater than that desired in the bowl water. In a toilet having a reservoir tank containing 3 k gallons of water, for example, approximately cups of water pass through the overflow pipe in a single flushing cycle to dilute the detergent-containing water remaining in the bowl immediately after a flushing operation. It will be understood that large quantities of detergent are thus required to maintain the proper concentration of detergent in the reservoir tank water, and it will be further understood that the great majority of the detergent in the reservoir water passes directly to the drain and is thus wasted.

A device for reducing the quantity of detergent which is employed in each flushing cycle, and for reducing the amount of make-up water added to the bowl water through the overflow pipe, is much to be desired and would result in significant cost savings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to a toilet cleaning apparatus which reduces the amount of detergent required per flush and which also may reduce the amount of water employed per flush. The invention is an improvement on a toilet assembly which includes a bowl and a reservoir tank within which is a riser tube with float valve for supplying water to the tank, a hush tube through which water is supplied to the reservoir through the float valve and an overflow pipe supplying make-up water from the float valve to the bowl. The cleaning apparatus comprises a container including a soluble detergent and coloring agent. A by-pass tube communicates water from the riser tube through the float valve to the container, and a regulator valve regulates the amount of water thus passedto the container during each flushing cycle. A conduit provides a flow passage from the container to the overflow pipe for carrying an equal volume of detergent-containing make-up water to the overflow pipe for discharge into the bowl, the volume and detergent concentration of the make-up water providing the resulting bowl water with at least a predetermined concentration of detergent and coloring; that is, a concentration effective to prevent formation of a ring or stains in the toilet bowl and to insure thorough cleaning. The water in the reservoir tank thus remains free of detergent, and the invention thus avoids adding relatively large quantities of detergent and coloring agent to the reservoir tank water and permits less make-up water to be used per flushing operation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a front view in partial cross section of a toilet assembly including an apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an expanded, broken away view in partial cross section showing details of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a top view, in partial cross section, of the device depicted in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken along line 55 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of the apparatus of FIG. 2 showing the cover partially removed;

FIG. 7 is a front view, partially broken away and in partial cross section, of a modification of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a broken away, cross sectional view taken along line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a top view of the device depicted in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a side view of the device of FIG. 8 with cover partially removed; and

FIG. 11 is a broken away, cross sectional view taken along line 11--l1 of FIG. 8.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION With reference to FIGS. 1 and 7, a toilet assembly is provided with a bowl designated generally as 10 and a reservoir tank designated generally as 12, the reservoir tank being mounted behind and above the bowl in the usual fashion. A drain pipe 10.1 is provided with a U- shaped configuration in a known manner to retain a given quantity of water in the how] after each flushing operation. The reservoir tank 12 has bottom and side walls, a generally central aperture 12.] in the bottom wall through which water in the tank may flow into the bowl, and an overflow pipe 14 which also communicates the interior of the reservoir tank with the bowl. A riser tube 16 is connected at its bottom end to a water line 18 and includes at its upper end a float valve 16.1, the float valve being operated by the rising and falling of a float 16.2 acting on the valve through a series of levers designated generally as 16.3, in a known manner. An upright hush tube 20 with an open lower end near the bottom of the reservoir tank is mounted at its upper end'to a connector 16.4 attached to the riser tube, and communicates through the connector with the riser tube so that the reservoir tank, after a flushing operation, is refilled with water flowing from the water line 18 through the riser tube 16, float valve 16.1 and connector 16.4 and thence downwardly through the hush tube 20. As the reservoir tank is filled with water, the float 16.2 rises, thus gradually closing the float valve and diminishing the amount of water passing through the hush tube 20 until such flow eventually ceases.

With reference to FIGS. l-6, a container 22 includes a quantity of a water-soluble detergent intimately mixed with a water-soluble coloring agent, and desirably in the form of a solid block or cake 22.1. The container is attached to the overflow tube 14 by a clamp 22.2 having spring-loaded arms, as best seen in FIGS. 1 and 3. The clamp 22.2 is generally C-shaped in cross section, with the arms of the clamp clamping with spring pressure against the overflow pipe 14 and holding the top of the container well above the maximum water level in the reservoir tank. The side wall 22.3 of the container adjacent the overflow pipe 14 has a depressed lip 22.4 at its upper end. A conduit, such as the bracket 22.5, provides a flow passage from the container 22 adjacent its top to the overflow pipe 14. The bracket 22.5, having generally an inverted U-shape, is carried on the lip 22.4, the inner arm of the bracket being attached to the container wall 22.3 and the legs of the bracket being spaced so that the outer arm of the bracket extends over and into the upper open end of the overflow pipe 14, as shown in FIG. 2. The upper surface of the bracket is concave upwardly to define a spillway 22.6 over which water from within the container may flow into the overflow pipe. The other walls of the container extend substantially above the lip 22.4, and are provided with outwardly beaded upper edges.

A removable container cover 22.7 is provided with downwardly and inwardly turned edges 22.8 which snap around the beaded upper edges of the container walls, the cover being spaced above the spillway 22.6 a significant distance.

A regulating valve 24 is attached to the lower surface of the cover, and includes a hollow nipple 24.1 facing the space between the edge of the cover and the spillway 22.6. As shown in FIG. 5, the valve 24 includes an internal flow passage 24.2 extending through the nipple and opening downwardly into the container 22, and the body of the valve is provided with a threaded hole within which is received a threaded valve stem 24.4 protruding through a hole in the cover and having an externally accessable screwdriver slot. The inner end of the valve stem protrudes into the flow passage 24.3, constricting the latter, and the amount of water which can flow through the valve is thus limited and controlled by the depth to which the valve stem 24.4 is threaded into the valve body.

A length of by-pass tubing 26 (which in prior art devices communicated directly with the overflow pipe 14, as shown in phantom lines in FIG. 2) is connected at one end with the connector 16.4 of the riser tube, and at its other end with a section of tubing 26.1 which in turn is fitted over the nipple 24.1 of the regulator valve 24, the section of tubing 26.1 passing inwardly of the container through the space between the cover and the spillway 22.6. The tubes 26 and 26.1, which are normally flexible, rubber tubes, serve to carry make-up water from the riser tube to the container 22, the water passing through the float valve 16.1, connector 16.4, by-pass tube 26, tubing section 26.1 and regulator valve 24. The make-up water entering the container 22 comes into contact with, and dissolves a portion of, the

cake of mixed detergent and coloring agent 22.1, an equal volume of detergent-laden, colored make-up water being displaced and flowing outwardly over the spillway 22.6 and into the overflow pipe 14. The amount of water which flows into and out of the container during each flushing operation is regulatedby the valve 24, as will be explained in greater detail below.

Various structures mounted within the reservoir tank of certain toilet assemblies will not provide enough room for the container 22 to be snapped on to the overflow pipe 14, in the manner shown in FIGS. 16. I have provided the modification depicted in FIGS. 7-11 wherein the container 22 is attached to a side wall 12.2 of the reservoir tank 12, this embodiment employing a return tube 28 connecting the container 22 with the overflow pipe 14. As in the previously described em bodiment, the container 22 is generally rectangular in shape to receivea block or cake 22.1 of mixed detergent and coloring agent. The walls of the container each rise to the same height, and are provided at their upper edges with an outwardly extending head over which snaps the downwardly and inwardly turned edges of thecover 22.7. The regulator valve 24 is mounted on the upper surface of the cover, and is provided with a nipple 24.1 over which the by-pass tube 26 is fitted. As previously described, the regulator valve 24 includes an internal flow passage communicating the nipple with the interior of the container, as shown in phantom lines in FIG. 11, and an adjustable, threaded valve stem 1 A hanger 30 which is generally of inverted U-shape, has one of its legs rivetted to a wall of the container with the other leg spaced sufficient distance from the first leg as to enable the hanger to be positioned over the top of a wall of the reservoir tank, as shown best in FIGS. 7 and 11, the hanger maintaining the upper surface of the container desirably well above the maximum water level reached in the reservoir tank. In the opposed, or inner, wall of the container adjacent its upper end but spaced laterally from the position of the control valve 24 is formed an orifice with a hollow, external nipple 28.1, the return tube '28 being fitted over the latter nipple and passing thence into communication with the overflow pipe 14.

An operation, referring particularly to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-6, the toilet assembly is flushed in the usual manner by operation of an exterior handle, the ,ball cock 12.2 being lifted from its seating engagement against the orifice 12.1, and the water in the tank,

perhaps 3 k gallons, passing downwardly through the orifice to flush into the bowl 10. When the reservoir tank 12 has been substantially emptied, the ball cock is resealed against the orifice 12.1. The ball float 16.2 falls during the flushing operation, acting through the linkage 16.3 to open the float valve 16.1 and cause water to pass upwardly through the riser tube 16, through the connector 16.4 and thence downwardly through the hush tube 20 to refill the reservoirtank to its desired level.

As the reservoir tank is refilled a small amount of make-up water passes through the by-pass tube 26,tubing section 26.1 and control valve 24 into the container 22 containing the cake 22.1 of detergent and coloring agent. The amount of make-up water which is thus passed through the by-pass tube 26 is dependent upon the length of time that the float valve 16.1 remains open, this valve gradually closing as the reservoir tank fills with water, and also upon the constriction within thevalve 24 caused by the valve stem 24.4. In use, the container 22 remains full of water and the amount of water which is introduced into the container during each flushing operation will be precisely the same as the amount of water containing detergent and coloring agent that flows over the spillway 22.4 and thence downwardly through the overflow pipe 14 into the toilet bowl. With prior art toilet fixtures', as noted above, the tube 26 was introduced directly into the overflow pipe 14, and make-up water in the amount of, for example, cups would be added to the bowl through the overflow pipe in each flushing operation. By use of the regulator valve 24 of the present invention, this amount can be reduced to approximately 4 cups of water for each flushing operation, and I have found that this amount of make-up water is entirely adequate. The embodiment shown in FIGS. 8-11 works in a similar fashion: During each flushing operation, water from the float valve 16.1 passes through the by-pass tube 26 to the valve 24 and thence into the container 22. An equal volume of water carrying dissolved detergent and coloring agent, flows outwardly from the container through return tube 28 and into the overflow pipe 14 for addition to the residual water in the bowl 10.

It will be understood that some minimum concentration of detergent is required in the bowl to avoid ring formation, and that in the present invention the only detergent which reaches the bowl is that which is contained in the make-up water which flows into the bowl from the container 22 during each flushing operation. It will be appreciated that the make-up water must have a reasonably high concentration of detergent so that, upon dilution by the water remaining in the bowl, at least a predetermined minimum effective detergent conectration may be obtained. This may be accomplished, for example, by employing a block or cake 22.1 of detergent-coloring agent which is rapidly soluble in water so that the water passing into the container 22 is rapidly charged with detergent and coloring agent, desirably to the saturation point. Although the detergent cake 22.1 in the drawing takes up the major portion of the volume of the container, it may be desirable in some instances to make the block considerably smaller or the container considerably larger so that a significant volume of water is retained in the container at all times. In the latter instance, a given volume of make-up water is charged into the container during each flushing operation, mixing with a far greater volume of water which is substantially saturated with detergent and coloring agent. A volume of make-up water equal to that charged to the container, and being highly concentrated in detergent and coloring agent, passes from the container into the overflow pipe 14, and the water remaining in the container becomes resaturated with detergent and coloring agent. In another embodiment, the block or cake 22.1 may be of porous material and the container may have openings at opposed ends such that water charged to the container at one end during a flushing operation passes through the porous cake to dissolve detergent and coloring agent therefrom, and thence passes from the other end of the container into the overflow pipe. In the embodiment depicted in the drawing, the cake 22.1 occupies the majority of the volume of the container and is of highly soluble material such that even a very short period of contact between the make-up water passing inwardly of the container permits the water to dissolve sufficient quantities of detergent and coloring agent so that the water in the bowl reaches the minimum effective concentration of detergent. Even with very rapidly soluble detergent cakes, it is desired that the cake occupy less than the entire volume of the container, thus providing some free space within the container in which water may circulate around the cake to aid in the dissolving of the detergent.

The coloring agent, which desirably is a clear blue dye, is incorporated into or mixed with the detergent so that the detergent and coloring agent are released from the cake at approximately the same rate, the depth of color of the water passing from the container yielding a visual indication of the concentration of detergent therein. The presence of a colored bowl water indicates that the system of the invention is operational, whereas the absence of color in the bowl water indicates that the detergent cake 22.1 has likely been used up and another cake must be inserted.

As noted above, by use of the present invention the amount of make-up water added to the bowl water during each flushingoperation may be reduced from, for example, 10 cups of water to 4 cups of water. Although this is a relatively small amount of water when compared to, for example, the 3 A gallons of water employed during each flushing operation, a great saving in water may be obtained. For example, assuming eight flushing operations per day for each resident of a city having a population of 500,000, a saving of 6 cups of water per flushing operation would result in the daily saving of water on the order of 1 12 million gallons, and this saving of water results in an equal reduction in the amount of sewage processed each day. Moreover, the present invention results in the use of far less detergent than is ordinarily used in prior art toilet devices, thus not only reducing the amount of detergent required, but also passing far less quantities of detergent into the sewer lines.

It will be understood that the device of the present invention is adapted to be used with existing toilet assemblies by installing the detergent cake-containing container 22 in a reservoir tank, e.g. by snapping the compartment onto the overflow pipe or hanging the compartment over the edge of the tank wall. A by-pass tube 26, which in prior art devices leads directly to the overflow pipe, may be connected through tubing section 26.1 to the detergent container. Means are then provided for conveying water from the container 22 to the overflow pipe, such means comprising the spillway bracket 22.6 in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6 and the return tube 28 in the embodiment of FIGS. 7-11. The valve stem 24.4 of the regulator valve is adjusted so that approximately 4 cups of by-passwater are added to the remaining bowl water through the overflow pipe during each flushing operation, the deepness of the color of the water in the bowl furnishing an indication of detergent concentration. For example, a very light blue color may signify an unsatisfactorily low concentration of detergent, whereas a deeper color will indicate that the detergent is at or above the effective concentration.

Manifestly, I have provided a cleaning apparatus which significantly reduces the amount of water which is employed in each flushing operation and greatly reduces the amount of detergent which is required. My device operates automatically, and providesvisual indication of when the detergent has been depleted. My device can be installed in various toilet assemblies quickly, easily, and without the use of special tools or other equipment, and in no way detracts from normal operation of the toilet.

While I have described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it should be understood that various changes, adaptations, and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed:

1. In a toilet assembly having a bowl and a reservoir tank containing a riser tube with float valve, a hush tube for receiving water from the riser tube and discharging the same into the reservoir to refill the latter, and an overflow pipefor supplying make-up water from the float valve to the bowl as the reservoir tank is refilled after each flushing operation,

a cleaning apparatus comprising a container mounted within the reservoir tank and containing water-soluble detergent and coloring agent, a bypass tube connecting the riser tube through the float valve with the container to supply make-up water to the container, a manually adjustable regulator valve for regulating the volume of by-pass water supplied to the container during each flushing operation, and a conduit connecting the container adjacent its upper end to the overflow pipe for directing an equal volume of make-up water containing detergent and coloring agent from the container to the bowl, the amount of detergent in the make-up water being sufficient, when added to water remaining in the bowl immediately after a flushing operation, to provide the resulting bowl water with at least a predetermined minimum detergent concentration.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the container includes a removable cover to which the regulator valve is mounted.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the regulator valve is preset with respect to the float valve and the period of time that the latter is open in a flushing operation to deliver approximately four cups of make-up water to the bowl in each flushing operation.

4. In a toilet assembly including a bowl and a reservoir tank within which is a riser tube with a float valve, a hush tube for receiving water from the float valve and discharging the same into the reservoir to refill the latter, and an overflow pipe for supplying make-up water from the float valve to the bowl as the reservoir tank is refilled after each flushing operation,

a cleaning apparatus comprising:

a. a container with a removable cover and mounted within the reservoir tank, the container having a predetermined volume;

b. a water soluble but ordinarily solid detergent including a coloring agent and contained within the container but occupying less than the entire volume thereof, whereby water within the container in contact with the detergent becomes concentrated in detergent;

c. a by-pass tube connecting the riser tube through the float valve with the container to provide makeup water to the container during refilling of the reservoir tank following each flushing operation, the make-up water becoming charged with detergent and coloring agent;

d. a manually adjustable regulator valve for regulating the volume of by-pass water supplied through the by-pass tube to the container during each flushing operation; and

. a conduit connecting the container adjacent its top to the overflow pipe for conveying an equal volume of detergent-containing, colored make-up water from the container to the bowl, the volume of make-up water and its detergent concentration providing the resulting bowl water with a satisfactory water level therein and with at least a predetermined minimum concentration of detergent.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the conduit comprises an inverted U-shaped bracket, the legs of which hook respectively over an upper edge of a wall of the container spaced below the cover and over and into the overflow pipe at its upper, open end, and wherein the top surface of the bracket is concave upwardly to define a spillway over which detergent-containing makeup water flows from the container to the overflow pipe.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the regulator valve is mounted to the lower surface of the cover with the valve stem protruding through a hole in the cover for external manipulation, the by-pass tube passing through the space between the cover and spillway for connection to the regulator valve.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the container includes an exterior mounting clamp having springloaded arms to snap over the overflow pipe and clamp the container thereto.

8. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein the container includes an exterior hanger for hanging the container from the sidewall of the reservoir tank, and wherein the conduit comprises a return tube connecting the container and the overflow pipe.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein the regulator valve is mounted to the upper surface of the cover and includes a nipple over which is fitted the by-pass tube.

10. In a toilet assembly having a bowl and a reservoir tank which includes a riser tube with a float valve, a hush tube for receiving water from the float valve and discharging the same into the reservoir to refill the latter, and an overflow pipe supplying make-up water from the float valve to the bowl as the reservoir tank is refilled after each flushing operation,

a cleaning apparatus comprising:

a. container having a predetermined volume and including a cake of water-soluble detergent including a coloring agent and occupying less than the entire volume of the container, a removable container cover, an exterior mounting clamp attached to the the container and having spring-loaded arms oriented to snap over the overflow pipe to clamp the container thereto, and an inverted U-shaped bracket having downwardly depending legs which hook respectively over the upper edge of a wall of a the container spaced below the cover and into the overflow pipe at its upper, open end, respectively, the bracket having an upwardly concave top surface defining a spillway communicating the container with the overflow pipe;

b. a regulator valve mounted to the removable container cover and having an interior flow passage with an inlet, and an outlet communicating with the container, and including an exteriorly operable valve stem for constricting the flow passage; and

c. a by-pass tube connecting the riser tube through the float valve with the inlet of the regulator valve flow passage to provide a regulated quantity of make-up water to the container during refilling of the reservoir tank, and to cause discharge from the container over the spillway into the overflow pipe of an equal quantity of make-up water charged with detergent and coloring agent, the volume and detergent concentration of the make-up water discharged into the bowl through the overflow pipe being sufficient to provide the resulting bowl water with at least a predetennined minimum concentration of detergent.

11. In a toilet assembly having a bowl and a reservoir tank which includes a riser tube with float valve, a hush tube for receiving water from the float valve and discharging the same into the reservoir to refill the latter, and an overflow pipe supplying make-up water from the float valve to the bowl as the reservoir tank is refilled after each flushing operation,

a cleaning apparatus comprising:

a. a container having a predetermined volume and including a cake of water-souble detergent including a coloring agent and occupying less than the entire volume of the container, a removable cover, an exterior hanger for hanging the container from a side wall of the reservoir tank, and a return tube communicating the container adjacent its top with the overflow pipe;

b. a regulator valve mounted to the removable container cover and having an interior flow passage with an inlet, and an outlet communicating with the container, and including an exteriorly operable stem for constricting the flow passage; and

c. a by-pass tube connecting the riser tube through the float valve with the inlet of the regulator valve flow passage to provide a regulated quantity of make-up water to the container during refilling of the reservoir tank, and to cause discharge from the container through the return tube into the overflow pipe of an equal quantity of make-up water charged with detergent and coloring agent, the volume and detergent concentration of the make-up water discharged into the bowl through the overflow pipe being sufficient to provide the resulting bowl water with at least a predetermined minimum concentration of detergent.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4821346 *Jan 15, 1987Apr 18, 1989Jones Gregory RToilet bowl cleaning composition dispenser
US4937892 *Apr 12, 1989Jul 3, 1990Syrenne Marius HDisinfecting unit for pressure type flush valves and urinals
US5040246 *Apr 27, 1990Aug 20, 1991Rocco ZaninoCleaning fluid dispensing assembly for use in a flush toilet
US5387249 *May 10, 1993Feb 7, 1995Wiecorek; VincentSelf-contained adjustable chemical injection device
US5603126 *Apr 3, 1995Feb 18, 1997Scoggins; Thomas E.Toilet disinfectant dispenser
US5699562 *Dec 3, 1996Dec 23, 1997Lu; Nien-FengDetergent controlling means for use in a toilet
US5815850 *Jan 28, 1997Oct 6, 1998Shon; Adrian Y.Method and apparatus for chemical dispensing into toilet bowl
US5987655 *Aug 13, 1998Nov 23, 1999Smet; Stephen J.Flush tank water conditioner
US6880197Mar 31, 2003Apr 19, 2005Susan KatzDisposable toilet cleaning device with extendable handle
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/224, 4/227.3
International ClassificationE03D9/02
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/037
European ClassificationE03D9/03D4