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Publication numberUS3911524 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1975
Filing dateJun 3, 1974
Priority dateJun 3, 1974
Also published asCA1029906A1, DE2524656A1
Publication numberUS 3911524 A, US 3911524A, US-A-3911524, US3911524 A, US3911524A
InventorsCarl Parise
Original AssigneeParise & Sons Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Steam cleaner dump bucket
US 3911524 A
Abstract
For use with a steam cleaner, a dump bucket comprising upper and lower cup-shaped members releasably engageable in facing relationship with an air-tight seal, a hollow riser tube extending upwardly from an aperture in the bottom of the lower cup-shaped member, and an L-shaped connector for attachment to a steam cleaner vacuum wand extending first inwardly from the side of the upper cup-shaped member and then upwardly towards the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member. This configuration causes dirty water forced through the L-shaped connector to be sprayed against the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member, after which it runs down the sides of the upper and lower cup-shaped members without going down the riser tube.
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United States Patent Parise Oct. 14, 1975 STEAM CLEANER DUMP BUCKET [57] ABSTRACT [75] Inventor: Carl Parise, Reno, Nev.

[ Assigneei Parise & Sons Reno, For use with a steam cleaner, a dump bucket compris- [22] Filed: June 3, 1974 ing upper and lower cup-shaped members releasably engageable in facing relationship with an air-tight seal, PP N05 476,029 a hollow riser tube extending upwardly from an aperture in the bottom of the lower cup-shaped member, 52 s Cl 15 353; 15/327 D; 15 327 E; and an L-shaped connector f0! attachment 0 a steam 15/320; 55 B20 cleaner vacuum wand extending first inwardly from 51 Int. cl. A47L 9/10; A47L 9/20 the Side Of the upper pp member and then 58 Field of Search 15/320, 321, 352, 353, upwatdly towards the inner sutface of the P P of the 15/327 D, 327 55/320, 331 344, 4247 upper cup-shaped member. This configuration causes 426 437 438, 439, 467 dirty water forced through the L-shaped connector to be sprayed against the inner surface of the top of the [56] References Cited upper cup-shaped member, after which it runs down UNITED STATES PATENTS the sides of the upper and lower cup-shaped members without going down the riser tube. 3,774,260 11/1973 Emus, Jr. 15/353 Primary ExaminerRichard E. Aegerter Assistant ExaminerLarry Jones Attorney, Agent, or FirmSughrue, Rothwell, Mion, Zinn & Macpeak 13 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures US. Patent Oct. 14, 1975 Sheet 1 Of2 3,911,524

FIG]

US. Patent Oct. 14, 1975 Sheet 2 of2 3,911,524

STEAM CLEANER DUMP BUCKET FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to what are conventionally called steam cleaners, but which are cleaners which in fact generally cause atomized, detergent-containing hot water, rather than steam, to be sprayed on objects, such as rugs and other floor surfaces, to be cleaned. The hot water is then re-collected into a dump bucket by means of a vacuum wand. The present invention is of an improved new dump bucket for use with such a steam cleaner.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The dump bucket according to the present invention comprises upper and lower cup-shaped members releasably engageable in facing relationship with an airtight seal, a hollow riser tube extending upwardly from an aperture in the bottom of the lower cup-shaped member, and an L-shaped connector for attachment to a steam cleaner vacuum wand extending first inwardly from the side of the upper cup-shaped member and then upwardly towards the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member. This configuration causes dirty water forced through the L-shaped connector to be sprayed against the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member after which it runs down the sides of the upper and lower cup-shaped members without going down the riser tube.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a steam cleaner employing a dump bucket built in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional side view of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a sectional top view of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a schematical sectional side view ofa dump bucket according to the present invention during use.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT FIG. 1 shows a steam cleaner employing a dump bucket 12 built in accordance with the present invention. The operation of the steam cleaner 10 is briefly as follows. Water and detergent are placed in the soap tank 14. An immersion heater (not shown) mounted in the bottom of the soap tank 14 may be used to heat the detergent-containing water to an elevated temperature. An internal water pump (not shown) draws the detergent-containing water from an outlet at the bottom of the soap tank 14 and forces it out through a flexible tube (not shown) which may be coupled to the quick disconnect 16. An atomizer nozzle (not shown) at the end of the flexible tube causes the stream of detergentcontaining'water to issue from the flexible tube as a mist, commonly but not strictly accurately referred to as steam. The mist may be directed at an object to be cleaned by the operator of the steam cleaner. Subsequently, the detergent-containing water and the entrained dirt are picked up by the vacuum wand 18. An internal vacuum pump (not shown) communicates with the interior of the dump bucket 12 via a hollow riser tube 20, creating an under pressure in the interior of the dump bucket 12. External air rushing through the vacuum wand 18 draws the detergent-containing water and the entrained dirt through the vacuum wand 18 and into the interior of the dump bucket 12.

The presently preferred embodiment of the dump bucket 12 is shown in detail in FIGS. 2 and 3. It comprises an upwardly open, lower cup-shaped member 22 having an aperture 24 in its bottom. The aperture 24 is shown as centrally located, but that is more for esthetic than functional reasons. Extending upwardly from the aperture 24 is the previously mentioned hollow riser tube 20. Releasably engaging the open face of the lower cup-shaped member 22 in an air-tight seal is a downwardly open, upper, cup-shaped member 26. There is an aperture 28 in the side of the upper cupshaped member 26, and an L-shaped hollow connector 30 is mounted in the aperture 28. A first leg 32 of the connector 30 extends inwardly from the aperture 28, and the second leg 34 extends upwardly from the first leg 32, stopping short of but in proximity to the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member 26.

The height of the riser tube 20 is to some extent arbitrary. However, the higher it extends, the more dirty water can be collected in the dump bucket 12 without running the risk of having the collected water run down the riser tube 20 into the vacuum pump. On the other hand, it is generally not desirable to collect water in the dump bucket 12 higher than the lip of the lower cupshaped member 22 for the obvious reason that any water above that level will cascade out in an unrestrained fashion when the upper cup-shaped member 26 is removed from the lower cup-shaped member 22. Also, the riser tube 20 must not extend so close to the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member 26 that it extends into the turbulent flow of dirty water splashed against that surface by the connector 30 or some of that water will run down the inside of the riser tube 20 and get into the vacuum pump. Thus, the preferred embodiment of the subject dump bucket has a riser tube which extends upwardly past the lip of the lower cup-shaped member but stops well short of the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member 26.

In order to permit the operator of the steam cleaner 10 to gauge the level of dirty water in the dump bucket 12 without removing the upper cup-shaped member 26, at least a part of the upper cup-shaped member 26 is preferably made of transparent material. In the presently preferred embodiment, the entire upper cupshaped member 26 is molded in one piece from transparent plastic.

As previously stated, the upper and lower cup-shaped members 22 and 26 must be releasably engageable in air-tight relationship, but the exact manner in which this is accomplished is to some extent arbitrary. In the preferred embodiment, this is accomplished by curling over the upper lip 36 of the lower cup-shaped member 22 to provide a bearing surface and providing a cooperating inwardly extending annular shelf 38 mounted on the inner surface of the side of the upper cup-shaped member 26. A resilient annular seal, or O-ring, 40 is fixed to the bottom surface of the annular shelf 38 to ensure an air-tight seal between the two cup-shaped members. The upper cup-shaped member 26 fits over the upper lip 36 of the lower cup-shaped member 22, and the annular seal 40 receives the upper lip 36 in an air-tight seal.

While the dump bucket 12 may be built with only the parts described up to this point, it has been found convenient in practice to provide it with an additional member for strengthening the upper cup-shaped member 26 and for locating the upper cup-shaped member 26 relative to the lower cup-shaped member 22. That additional member is the flat strut 42, which is preferably fabricated integrally with the annular shelf 38. It extends diametrically across the upper cup-shaped member 26, and an aperture 44 therein receives the upper end of the riser tube 20, locating the upper cup-shaped member 26 relative to the lower cup-shaped member 22. This locating function serves to ensure that the upper lip 36 of the lower cup-shaped member 22 engages the annular seal 40 in the same place every time, ensuring an air-tight seal even after a groove has been worn in the annular seal 40.

Having described the construction of the preferred embodiment of the present invention in some detail, 1 will now describe the operation of my dump bucket with the aid of the partially schematic FIG. 4, which shows a dump bucket according to the present invention during use. At this time, vacuum is applied to the aperture 24, in effect sucking air through the vacuum wand 18 and down the riser tube 20. The rush of air through the vacuum wand 18 picks up dirty water, which is forced through the L-shaped connector 30 and sprayed against the inner surface of the top of the upper cup-shaped member 26. There, the air and the dirty water separate to a large degree, the air rushing into the riser tube 20 and the water running down the side of the upper cup-shaped member 26, over the annular joint between the upper and lower cup-shaped members, and down the side of the lower cup-shaped member 22 to its bottom, where it collects. The dump bucket 12 is, of course, removable from the steam cleaner l0, and when the desired amount of cleaning is completed or the level of water in the lower cupshaped member 22 approaches its lip, the dump bucket 12 may be removed from the steam cleaner 10, the upper cup-shaped member 26 disengaged from the lower cup-shaped member 22, and the contents of the latter dumped.

CAVEAT While the present invention has been illustrated by a detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes in form and detail can be made therein without departing from the true scope of the invention. For that reason, the invention must be measured by the claims appended hereto and not by the foregoing preferred embodiment.

What is claimed is:

l. A dump bucket for a steam cleaner, said dump bucket comprising:

a. an upwardly open, lower, cup-shaped member having an aperture in the bottom thereof, the upper edge of said upwardly open, lower, cup-shaped member hereinafter being referred to as the lip thereof;

b. a hollow riser tube extending upwardly from the aperture in said lower cup-shaped member;

c. a downwardly open, upper, cup-shaped member adapted to releasably engage said lower cup-shaped member in an air-tight seal, said upper cup-shaped member having an aperture in the side thereof;

d. an L-shaped-hollow connector, a first leg of which extends inwardly from the aperture in said upper cup-shaped member and the second leg of which extends upwardly from the first leg, stopping short of but in proximity to the inner surface of the top of said upper cup-shaped member;

e. means for supporting the first leg of said L-shaped hollow connector adjacent to and in alignment with said aperture; and f. a diametrically extending strut joint opposite sides of the inner surface of the side of said upper cup-shaped member, whereby, if a vacuum is applied to the aperture in said lower cup-shaped member and a steam cleaner vacuum wand is connected to the exterior end of the first leg of said L-shaped hollow connector, dirty water will be forced through said L-shaped hollow connector and sprayed against the inner surface of the top of said upper cup-shaped member, after which it will run down the sides of said upper and lower cup-shaped members without going down said hollow riser tube.

2. A dump bucketas claimed in claim 1 wherein said riser tube extends upwardly past the lip of said lower cup-shaped member.

3. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 1 wherein said upper cup-shaped member is, at least in part, transparent.

4. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 1 wherein said upper cup-shaped member fits over the lip of said lower cup-shaped member.

5. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 4 and further comprising an inwardly extending annular seal mounted on the inner surface of the side of said upper cup-shaped member, said annular seal being shaped to receive the lip of said lower cup-shaped member.

6. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 1 wherein said riser tube extends upwardly to the vicinity of the inner surface of said upper cup-shaped member, said strut has an aperture therein, and said riser tube passes through the aperture in said strut.

7. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 2 wherein said riser tube extend upwardly to the vicinity of the inner surface of said upper cup-shaped member, said strut has an aperture therein, and said riser tube passes through the aperture in said strut.

8. A dump bucket for a steameleaner, said dump bucket comprising:

a. an upwardly open, lower, cup-shaped member having an aperture in the bottom thereof, the upper edge of said upwardly open, lower, cup-shaped member hereinafter being referred to as the lip thereof;

b. a hollow riser tube extending upwardly from the aperture in said lower cup-shaped member;

c. a downwardly open, upper, cup-shaped member adapted to releasably engage said lower cup-shaped member in an air-tight seal, said upper cup-shaped member having an aperture in the side thereof;

d. a connector; I

e. means for mounting said connector in the upper cupshaped member adjacent to and in alignment with said aperture, the combination of said means and said connector constituting a path of fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of said upper cup-shaped member, said connector comprising a generally horizontal portion and a generally vertical portion, the generally vertical portion of said connector having an inner surface portion which is positioned in the path of incoming fluid from the horizontal portion, located within said upper cup-shaped member, and oriented to deflect upwardly fluid coming into said upper cup-shaped member through said connector; and f. a diametrically extending strut joining opposite sides of the inner surface of the top of said upper cupshaped member whereby, if a vacuum is applied to the aperture in said lower cup-shaped member and a steam cleaner vacuum wand is connected to the exterior end of said connector, dirty water will be forced through said connector and sprayed against the inner surface of the top of said upper cup-shaped member, after which it will run down the sides of said upper and lower cup-shaped members without going down said hollow riser tube.

9. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 8 wherein said riser tube extends upwardly past the lip of said lower cup-shaped member.

10. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 8 wherein said upper cup-shaped member is, at least in part, transparent.

11. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 8 wherein said upper cup-shaped member fits over the lip of said lower cup-shaped member.

12. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 11 and further comprising an inwardly extending annular seal mounted on the inner surface of the side of said upper cup-shaped member, said annular seal being shaped to receive the lip of said lower cup-shaped member.

13. A dump bucket as claimed in claim 8 wherein said riser tube extends upwardly to the vicinity of the inner surface of said upper cup-shaped member, said strut has an aperture therein, and said riser tube passes through the aperture in said strut.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3774260 *Jan 31, 1972Nov 27, 1973Carpetech CorpVacuum pick-up system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4088462 *May 27, 1976May 9, 1978Parise & Sons, Inc.Steam cleaner
US4122579 *Dec 21, 1976Oct 31, 1978Parise & Sons, Inc.Steam cleaner dump bucket
US4138761 *Mar 4, 1977Feb 13, 1979Nauta Jelle GConvertible wet/dry vacuum cleaner
US4142270 *Mar 4, 1977Mar 6, 1979Nauta Jelle GWet-dry vacuum cleaner baffle strainer system
US4145198 *Oct 7, 1977Mar 20, 1979Parise & Sons, Inc.Hot water vacuum extraction cleaners
US4167800 *Mar 28, 1977Sep 18, 1979Herbert TriboletUnitary wet and dry vacuum cleaner
US4310945 *Jun 11, 1979Jan 19, 1982Herbert TriboletVacuum extraction recovery system assembly
US5146647 *May 4, 1990Sep 15, 1992Bissell Inc.Cleaning apparatus
US5991971 *Jan 29, 1998Nov 30, 1999Aktiebolaget ElectroluxSuction cleaner
US6167587Jul 8, 1998Jan 2, 2001Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
US6230362Feb 3, 2000May 15, 2001Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
US6286181May 23, 2000Sep 11, 2001Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
US6412141Jan 2, 2001Jul 2, 2002Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
US6438793Jul 10, 2000Aug 27, 2002Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
US6609269May 3, 2002Aug 26, 2003Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine with unitary accessory hose duct
USRE39304 *Jun 27, 2003Sep 26, 2006Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
WO2010102210A1 *Mar 5, 2010Sep 10, 2010Pelletsales.Com, LlcHod system
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/353, 55/320, 15/321, 15/327.7
International ClassificationA47L11/34, A47L7/00, A47L11/29
Cooperative ClassificationA47L7/0042, A47L11/34, A47L7/0009, A47L11/4086
European ClassificationA47L11/40N4, A47L7/00B10, A47L7/00B2, A47L11/34