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Publication numberUS3912083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1975
Filing dateAug 8, 1973
Priority dateAug 8, 1973
Publication numberUS 3912083 A, US 3912083A, US-A-3912083, US3912083 A, US3912083A
InventorsJay Richard S
Original AssigneeJarke Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular storage frame for flat sheet materials
US 3912083 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 [451 Oct. 14, 1975 MODULAR STORAGE FRAME FOR FLAT SHEET MATERIALS [75] Inventor: Richard S. Jay, Evanston, Ill.

[73] Assignee: Jarke Corporation, Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Aug. 8, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 386,569

[52] US. Cl. 211/50 [51] Int. Cl. A47F 7/00 [58] Field of Search 211/40, 13, 41, 23, 20,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,659,509 2/1928 Ashbrook 21 l/50 1,800,155 4/1931 Romine 108/55 2,518,624 8/1950 Kraft 211/41 UX FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS United Kingdom 21 l/41 1,538,596 7/1968 France 214/105 R Primary Examiner-Robert L. Wolfe Assistant ExaminerDavid H. Corbin Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Dominik, Knechtel, Godula & Demeur [5 7] ABSTRACT A storage frame module is disclosed which is formed by a pair of parallel base members held apart by at least one brace member and including connecting means positioned at either end of each of the pair of base members, a plurality of trapezoidal stanchions fixedly mounted on each of the pair of base members, in normal relation thereto, the stanchions on each of the base members being positioned in opposed relation, one with respect to the other, and a plurality of top rails, being mounted on and interconnecting opposed ones of the trapezoidal stanchions, thereby to support and space the stanchions in spaced relation,

such that the above structure forms a module for storing flat sheet material and a plurality of such modules may be interconnected by means of the connecting means thereby to form an enlarged storage frame for flat sheet materials.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent 0a. 14, 1975 Sheet 1 of2 3,912,83

l {24 l l MODULAR STORAGE FRAME FOR FLAT SHEET MATERIALS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A wide variety of storage frames and modularized storage units are known in the art, each of which is designed for a particular application. For example, US. Pat. No. 3,476,260 discloses a storage rack designed to receive and store cylindrical containers thereon and to facilitate the transporting of the storage racks from one location to another. Another type of material container is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,503,519, wherein the container disclosed therein is designed and constructed to accommodate long flexible material such as metal rods, strips, angles and the like. US. Pat. No. 3,565,018 is directed to a storage rack for bulk material which accommodates the stacking of such materials on the rack in order to facilitate storage and transportation thereof.

Similarly, other types of racks are shown in the art for a variety of materials. One of the important objects in designing and constructing storage racks relates to the ability to provide as many compartments as may be necessary in order to store the desired quantity of materials thereon. In this connection, it has been found desirable to modularize such storage racks or frames in order to permit a plurality of such modules to be interconnected thereby to enlarge or reduce in length the overall rack system provided, depending upon the quantity of materials to be stored and the space allotted for the positioning of the racks or frames.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed to a storage frame in modularized form which permits the storage of flat sheet material thereon. Each of the modules is provided with connecting means to permit the intercon nection of a series of such modules thereby to permit a succession of such modules to be interconnected and expand the amount of storage space available for such flat sheet materials.

In addition, the particular design and construction of the modularized storage frames of the present invention provide an upper clearance between adjoining compartments, thereby permitting the entry of crane clamps or other gripping means as may be necessary for grasping and transporting the flat sheet materials which may be stored in the storage frame of the present invention.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES base members held in fixed and spaced relation by means of at least one brace member and having a plurality of trapezoidal stanchions fixedly secured to each of the base members, the stanchions mounted on one of the base members, being in directly opposed relation with respect to the stanchions mounted on the opposed base member, top rails interconnecting and supporting opposed stanchions mounted on opposed base members and connecting means for permitting the interconnection of one modular storage frame with another modular storage frame, thereby to provide additional storage compartments for flat sheet materials.

A further object of this invention is to provide an modularized storage frame of the type described above, wherein each of the stanchions is formed in a trapezoidal configuration having the smaller dimension of the trapezoidal configuration adjacent the top portion thereof, and the enlarged portion of the trapezoidal configuration at the lower portion of each stanchion such that the stanchion is mounted to the base member at the enlarged portion of the trapezoidal configuration, thereby to provide greater support and stability of the stanchion with respect to the base member.

In connection with the foregoing objects, it is still another object of this invention to provide a modularized storage frame of the type described, wherein flat sheet materials stored in adjacent compartments and resting against opposed sides of each of the trapezoidally shaped stanchions are provided with a clearance space adjacent the top portions thereof due to the configuration of the stanchion, thereby to provide access for crane clamps or other gripping means in the event that the flat sheet materials stored therein must be moved by mechanical means rather than manual effort.

Yet a further object of this invention is to provide a modularized storage frame of the type described which may optionally further includea channelled trough mounted on and between opposed base members and positioned between adjacent pairs of stanchions thereby to provide a storage compartment for flat sheet materials which have a length less than the distance between the opposed parallel base members.

In connection with all of the foregoing objects, it is yet a further object to provide a modularized storage frame of the type described, wherein the connecting means consists of a series of two apertures provided at the ends of each of the base members and a splice plate including a series of four apertures such that the base members of one modularized storage frame may be positioned immediately adjacent to the base members of another modularized storage frame and fixedly secured in position by means of a splice plate bolted to each of the adjacent base members thereby to fixedly secure adjacent modules and permit ease of installation in constructing an enlarged storage frame unit for flat sheet materials.

Further features of the invention pertain to the particular arrangement of the elements of the parts, whereby the above-outlined and additional operating features thereof are attained.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following specification, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view illustrating one of the module storage frames of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view showing one of the modularized storage frames of the present invention having flat sheet materials stored therein, and the manner in which mechanical gripping means may be em- FIG. 3 is a perspective, partly exploded view showing the details of construction of, and the relationship between the top rail, stanchion, base member and brace member; and,

FIG. 4 is an end elevational view illustrating the modularized storage frame of the present invention and the manner in which flat sheet materials may be positioned therein.

As is illustrated in the drawings, the modular storage frame 10, of the present invention, is formed by a pair of base members, 12 and 14, respectively, the base members being disposed in parallel orientation. Each of the base members 12 and 14 is formed from a steel U-shaped channel having the legs of the U facing outwardly from the storage frame and the inner surface of the base of the U utilized as the inner face of the storage frame 10. The employment of steel U-shaped channels for the base members 12 and 14 provides strength and stability for the modular storage frame 10, while at the same time avoiding the possibility of damage due to rough treament which may possibly be incurred the result of the use of heavy equipment, such as crane fork-lift trucks and the like, which may be operated in and about the modular storage frame 10.

A series of trapezoidal shaped stanchions 16, are mounted to each of the base members 12 and 14 respectively. As is illustrated in FIG. 3 of the drawings, each stanchion 16 is provided with a series of at least three mounting apertures 18, which mate with base member mounting apertures 20, whereby the stanchion 16 may be mounted to the base member 12, by means of threaded bolts and nuts, 21 and 22 respectively, (FIG. 4). It will be noted that the larger dimension of the trapezoidal configuration of the stanchion 16 is positioned at the lower end thereof, wherein the mounting apertures 18 are located, while the smaller dimension of the trapezoidal configuration is positioned at the top portion thereof, this orientation permitting the greatest amount of stability and strength for the modular storage frame 10, when completely assembled. In addition, the provision of the trapezoidal configuration permits an angularized resting surface for flat sheet material in a manner which will be more fully described hereinafter.

It will further be noted that the stanchions 16, mounted on base member 12, are in directly opposed relation to the stanchions 16, mounted on base member 14, as more clearly shown in FIG. I of the drawings. The securement of the stanchions 16 is completed by means of top rails 24, which consists of inverted U- shaped channels overlapping the top end portions of the stanchions 16. Each top channel 24 is mounted between opposed stanchions 16, mounted on opposed base members 12 and 14 respectively. The mounting of the top rail 24 is accomplished by providing the top end portion of each stanchion 16 with a coupling angle 26, suitable secured thereto by means of a threaded nut and bolt 27 and 28, respectively. The horizontal member 29 of the coupling angle 26 is provided with an aperture 30, which mates with an aperture 31, provided in the top rail 24, such that a threaded bolt and nut 32 and 33 respectively, may be inserted through the apertures 30 and 31 respectively, to hold the top rail 24 in fixed and secure position over the top ends of opposed stanchions 16. The configuration of the top rail 24 is such that the interior channel of the U-shaped channel top rail 24 accommodates the top end portion of each stanchion 16, in a manner more fully illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings. The top rails 24 serve the dual function of providing stability and support for the modular storage frame 10, as well as providing a resting surface for the flat sheet materials stored thereagainst as is illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings.

Furthersupport is provided for the modular storage frame 10, by means of one or more brace members 35, which are mounted between the opposed base members 12 and 14 respectively. As is shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, each brace member 35 is provided with a pair of mounting apertures 36, while each brace member 12 and 14 respectively, is provided with an angle member 38. The angle member 38 is mounted to the base member 12, as shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, by means of a pair of threaded bolts and nuts with the horizontal member of the angle member 38 extending inwardly towards the inner portion of the modular storage frame 10. A pair of apertures 39 are provided in the horizontal portion of angle member 38, which mate with the mounting apertures 36 in the brace member 35, thereby to accommodate the bolting thereto of the brace member 35 by means of a pair of threaded bolts and nuts. As shown in the drawings, each of the modular storage frame units, 10, of the present invention includes one brace member 35, although more than one brace member 35 may be provided for each of the modules. It has been found that where steel of sufficient thickness is utilized, stability may be achieved with only one brace member 35, for each module 10. Once again, the brace member 35 is constructed in the form of a U-shaped channel which further lends support stability to the modular storage frame 10.

Each of the modules is further provided with connecting means 40 which consists of a splice plate 42 provided with a series of four apertures 43. The opposed end portions of each of the base members 12 and 14 are provided with a series of two apertures which mate with two of the apertures 43 provided in the splice plate 42. In order to join one modular storage frame 10 with another adjacent storage frame 10, adjacent base members 12 and 14 respectively are joined by means of the splice plate 42, which is bolted through two of the apertures in one base member 12, while the other two bolts are inserted through the other two apertures and into the adjacent base member 12, as is readily apparent from FIG. 3 of the drawings. In this manner, as many or as few modular storage frame units 10 may be interconnected in order to provide the desired amount of storage space necessary for the quantity of flat sheet material to be stored therein.

With regard to the trapezoidal configuration of each of the stanchions 16, it will be apparent from FIG. 2 of the drawings that this configuration accomplishes several functions. In the first place, the angularized side edges of each stanchion 16 form an acute angle 45 with respect to the vertical axis, established by any flat sheet material standing upright across the opposed parallel base members 12 and 14 respectively. This acute angle 45 (FIG. 2) permits the flat sheet material to be rested against the side edge of the stanchion l6 and top rail 24 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings. This resting position is especially advantageous where the particular flat sheet material involved has a tendency to bow or crack, such as enlarged sheets of plasterboard or the like.

tween' opposed sheets of flat material stored against opposed side edges of a single stanchion l6 and top rail 24. As shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, in the event that crane clamps 48 are required in order to grip and transport a flat sheet material, the clearance provided between flat sheets of material stored on each side of a single stanchion 16, permit the entry of the crane clamps 48 therebetween in order to grasp and remove one of the sheets of fiat material. Hence, it will be appreciated that the clearance provided between the top portions of the flat sheet materials stored in the modular storage frame 10, are the results of the acute angle 45 formed by the trapezoidal configuration of each stanchion 16, well as the width of the smaller top end portion of each stanchion 16.

As an additional optional element, a channel shaped trough 50, may be provided, the trough 50 being mounted on the top surfaces of opposed base members 12 and 14 respectively. The trough 50 has a width slightly less than the distance between the lower portions of adjacent stanchion 16, such that the trough 50 may be accommodated therebetween. The relative sizing of the trough 50 with respect to the base members 12 and 14 and adjacent stanchions 16 is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings. The provision of the trough 50 permits the storage of flat sheet material which may have an overall length less than the distance between opposed base members 12 and 14 respectively, such that these flat sheet materials could not rest across the opposed base members 12 and 14. Hence, by providing each module 10, with at least one trough 50, the modular storage frame of the present invention permits the storage of both elongated flat sheet materials and short flat sheet materials. It is apparent that if desired, the base members 12 and 14 may be provided with pre-drilled apertures in order to accommodate the addition of as many troughs 50 as may be desired by the operator or user of the unit in the event that all of the flat sheet materials to be stored have an overall length less than the distance between opposed base members 12 and 14 respectively.

It will further be apparent from the above description and drawings that the modular storage frame of the present invention permits ease of construction and assembly in that the unit may be shipped in knockeddown configuration to its ultimate destination and then quickly and easily erected in place. Furthermore, by modularizing the storage frame unit of the present invention, the ultimate customer may order as many of such modular units as may be necessary in order to afford the amount of storage space indicated by the quantity of flat sheet material to be stored or warehoused. Hence, it is not necessary to waste warehouse space where the ultimate user knows the specific amount of storage space necessary to store the flat sheet material.

In addition the modular storage frame 10, of the present invention avoids the necessity of constructing permanent storage racks such as commonly observed in lumber yards and other warehouse facilities. In other words, when not in use, the modular storage frame units of the present invention may be .quickly and efficiently unbolted and stored in a minimum amount of space, thereby to recapture valuable warehouse space where necessary.-

It will therefore beapparent that by virtue of the presentinvention, a modular storage frame unit has been provided which permits the unit to be shipped in knocked-down configuration and still be easily assembled at the site of ultimate destination. Furthermore, the modular storage frame unit of the present invention permits the ultimate user to interconnect a plurality of such modules to accommodate the storage space necessary as dictated by the amount of flat sheet materials to be stored. Furthermore, the dimensioning and sizing of the particular element forming the modularizing storage frame unit of the present invention permit the use of heavy machinery or equipment in the event that the particular flat sheet material to be stored can only be handled by equipment such as crane clamps or the like.

While there has been described what at present is considered to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be understood that various modifications may be made therein, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications as may fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A storage frame for fiat sheet material comprising, in combination, a pair of base members, said base members being laterally spaced apart a distance and in parallel disposition,

connecting means comprising at least a pair of apertures disposed through each of said opposed ends of each of said base members and a splice plate provided with a plurality of apertures, thereby to permit the connection of said splice plate to each of said pair of adjacent base members with fastening means,

a plurality of trapezoidal stanchions fixedly mounted on each of said pair of base members and in normal relation thereto, said trapezoidal stanchions fixedly mounted on each of said base members and being positioned in opposed relation with respect to each other,

a channel-shaped trough mounted on and between said base members, said trough being sized to nest within and between opposed pairs of stanchions mounted on said opposed base members,

at least one brace member having one end thereof mounted on one of said base members and an opposed end thereof mounted on the other of said base members, thereby to support and space said base members in fixed relation,

and a plurality of top rails, each of said top rails being mounted on and interconnecting opposed ones of said trapezoidal stanchions mounted on opposed base members, thereby to support and space said stanchions in spaced and fixed relation whereby said pair of base members held in supported and spaced relation by at least one of said brace members and having said trapezoidal stanchions mounted thereon, and held in supported and spaced relation by said top rails, form a module storage frame which may be interconnected with additional such modules through said connecting tions thereof and having the smaller dimensions of said trapezoidal stanchions positioned at the top end of each of said stanchions, whereby an acute angle is formed with respect to the normal vertical axis established by said parallel base members.

4. The modular storage frame unit as set forth in claim 1 above, wherein each of said base members, stanchions, brace members and top rails are formed of U shaped channels thereby to provide stability of strength for the modularized storage frame unit.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1659509 *Feb 3, 1927Feb 14, 1928Ashbrook Murray AEnvelope holder
US1800155 *Mar 2, 1927Apr 7, 1931Robert T RominePortable platform or buck
US2518624 *Oct 11, 1946Aug 15, 1950Louis KraftRack structure for glaziers' vehicles
US2942735 *Apr 10, 1958Jun 28, 1960Higgins William JRectangular storage racks embodying rack units of standard space allocation
US2942827 *Apr 18, 1958Jun 28, 1960Robert A EdsonSkid structure for supporting materials
US3217449 *Dec 6, 1963Nov 16, 1965Levere Chester CScaffold rack
US3263347 *Feb 20, 1964Aug 2, 1966Mccutcheon Lulu AEducational and recreational lessonaids and games with easel
US3493128 *Aug 1, 1968Feb 3, 1970Boussois Souchon Neuvesel SaDevice for the storage,handling and transportation of fragile plates
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8231299 *Jul 14, 2008Jul 31, 2012David KlauerLumber storage and stacking protection device
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/50
International ClassificationB65G1/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65G1/0442
European ClassificationB65G1/04D