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Publication numberUS391318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 16, 1888
Filing dateApr 13, 1888
Publication numberUS 391318 A, US 391318A, US-A-391318, US391318 A, US391318A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
harkins
US 391318 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

G. H. HARKINS.

WATER GLOSET VALVE.

No. 391,318. Patented Oct. 16, 1888.

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

C. H. HAYRKINS. l

WATER GLosl-:T VALVE.v 110.391,318. Patented Oct. 16, 1888.

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CHARLES I-I. IIARKINS, OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.

WATERCLOSET VALVE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent NO. 391,318, dated October 16, '1888.

(No model.)

To all whom t may concern.:

Be it known that I, CHARLEs II. I-IARKrNs, of the city of St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Vater-Oloset Valves, of which the following is a full,clear,and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming part of this specification, and in which- Figure I is, part in side View and part in vertical section, illustrative of my invention. Fig. II is an enlarged vertical section of the tank and the parts within it. Fig. III is a similar View showing the parts within the tank in elevation and in a different position to that shown in Fig. II. Fig. IV is a detail view showing the main-valvc-operating mechanism and illustrating its operation. Figs. V and VI are detail vertical sections.

My invention relates to certain improvements in valves for water-closets and mechanism for operating them; and my invention consists in features of novelty hereinafter fully described, and pointed out in the claims.

Referring to the drawings, 1 represents a tank; 2, the bowl, and 3 the water-pipe connecting the tank to the bowl.

et represents the pipe through which water enters the tank. This is provided with a valve, 5, (shownin dotted lines, Fig. IL) having a stem, 6, connected to a lever, 7, pivoted at S to an arm, 9, on the pipe, and to the free end of which a float, 10, is connected. The pipe may be provided with a spout, 4l. The valve opens downward, and as the water lowers in the tank the failing of the float opens the valve and allows an inflow of water.

11 represents a leg located inside the tank 1 and communicating with the pipe 3. This leg is divided by a partition, 13, not extending entirely to the top of the leg, leaving a passage, Il.

15 represents a valve hinged at 16 to the leg 1l, near the mouth of the pipe 3, and to this valve is connected the lower end oi'arod,17,the upper end of which is connected at 18 to one end of a lever, 19. As the end ofthe lever 19 is raised the valve 15 is opened, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. II, and water from the tank passes into the leg 11 and through the pipe 3 to the bowl. The lever 19 is preferably operated by means of a lever, 21, pivoted at 22 to ered. As the outer end of the lever2l is lowered,

a projection, 29,011 the arm 27 bears against the inclined face of the arm 28 and forces the end 20 of the lever -19 upward, opening the valve 15. As the outer end of the lever 21 is still further depressed` a projection, 3l', on the arm 27 bears against the lever 19 at82 (see Fig.

IV) and forces the end 20 ofthe lever 19 downward again, closing the valve 15. (See Fig. III.) Thus the valve 15 is closed almost as soon as it is opened, and the water that passes through it at this time gives what is called the forewash,77 it not being sufiicient to produce a siphon in the leg 11. Fig. III shows the valve closed and the levers 19 and 21 in the position they occupy after the outer end ofthe latter has been pulled down. New, when the pressure is removed from the seat, the projection 29 bearing upon the proj eetion 2S, as shown at 40, Fig. III, raises the end'20 of the lever 19 and again opens the valve 15. On

this movement of the parts there is nothing that forces the lever19 back to close the valve 15, but the valve is left to close by gravity, and thus a larger amount of water passes through, and this ilow ofwater creates a siphon in the leg 11,' the water passing up on one side of the partition 13 and down on the other side into the pipe 3, as shown by the arrows in Fig. II. This ilow of water continues until the Siphon is broken, and as one way of breaking the Siphon I have shown a number of holes, 41, in the wall 42 of the leg, all of these holes but one being closed by plugs 43. Vhen the water in the tank is reduced until it cornes to one of these openings which is not plugged,the air entering breaks the siphon and the flow of water ceases. In the drawings I have shown four holes, the upper three being plugged. Any lone of these three, however, may be opened and the plug placed in the lower hole, and thus produce a quicker breaking of the siphon to give a less ilow of water. This flow of water produces the long wash.

It is obvious that instead of having a single IOO leg divided by a partition a bent pipe could be used, one end of which would communicate with the pipe 3 and the other end not quite extending to the bottom of the tank, to leave the space 41.

45 represents a pipe forming a communication between the upper portion of the leg l1 and the trap 46 of the bowl, and 47 represents a pipe leading from the pipe 45 down into the leg 11, and preferably extendinginto the pipe 3. Located in this pipe 45 is a valve, 48, secured to one end of a lever, 49, pivoted at 50 to the leg l1, and to the other end of which is secured a rod, 51. To the rod is secured a float, 52, preferably by means of a set-screw, 53, by which it may be adj usted up or down to open the valve 48 sooner or later. As the water falls in the tank in giving the long wash beneath the float 52 the float falls and opens the valve 48. In doing so it allows air to enter the trap 46 and breaks the siphon in the trap to prevent the Water being carried out of the latter at the close of the long wash. As soon as the water rises in the tank again` the iioat 52 rises and closes the valve 48.

As an additional security against the formation of a siphon on the forewash, I secure an arm, 60, to the lever 21, which comes against the lever 49 and opens the valve 48 as the outer end of the lever 21 is depressed, thus effectually preventing theformation of a siphon on the forewash. When the pressure is removed from the seat, the arm 60 leaves the lever 49 and the valve 48 closes at once.

200 represents stop-lugs to limit the movement of lever 21.

It is obvious that the valve 48 may be utilized to break the siphon in the leg 11 and pipe 3, as Well as in the pipe 45.

In Fig. V another means (in lieu ofthe valve 48 and its parts) is shown for breaking the siphonin the pipe 45. This consists of a branch, 201, communicating with the pipe 45 and having a sliding tube, 202, connectedto it by a stuffing-box, 203. The tube may be slipped up or down, and when the water (as it falls in the tank) reaches its lower end air will enter vand break the siphon.

In Fig. VI is shown another means (in lieu 5o of the plugs 43) for breaking the Siphon in the pipe 3, consisting of a pipe, 204, connected to the leg 11 and having a sliding tube, 205, connected to it by a stuffing-box, 206. The tube extends down into the tank, and by moving it 5.5 up or down the siphon may be broken sooner or later, as described.

I claim as my inventionl. In a water-closet, the combination of the tank, bowl, Water-pipe connecting the tank to 5c the bowl, siphon within the tank communiv--eatng with said pipe, a valve for opening communication between the tank and pipe, a pipe for forming communication between the siphon and trap ofthe bowl, a valve in said trap-pipe,

55 and a float for operating the valve, substan-w tially as and for the purpose set forth.

2. In a water-closet7 the combination ofthe bowl having a trap, the tank, a water-pipe forming communication between the tank and the bowl, a pipe extending from the trap of the bowl into said water-pipe, and a valve situated above the normal water-level of said tank in said trappipe for admitting air to said trap and water-pipe, substantially as and for the purposes set forth.

3. In a water-closet, the combination of a tank, bowl, water-pipe forming a communication between the tank and bowl, and a pipe forming communication between the trap of the bowl and said water-pipe, a valve located in said trap-pipe, and a oat for operating the valve, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

4. In a watcr'closet, the combination, with the tank, of a siphon for draining said tank, valves 15 and 48 for starting and breaking the siphonic fiow, respectively, an arm, 28, adapted to operate valve 15, a lever having an arm adapted to depress and pass said f arm 28 and thereby open valve 15, a float adapted to hold valve 48 closed, and a second arm on said 1ever adapted to sink the iioat when said lever is depressed, substantially as set forth.

5. In a water-closet, the combination, with the seat, a tank and a siphon in said tank, of valves l5 and 48 for starting andv breaking the siphonic flow, respectively, a fleat for holding valve 48 closed, an arm, 28, for operating valve 15, a pivoted lever, two arms on said lever, one adapted to depress and pass the arm 28 and the other to sink said float when the lever is rocked in one direction, whereby valve 48 will be opened and the valve 15 opened and closed, and when rocked in the opposite direction the iioat released and the valve l5 again opened to start the siphonic ilow, said lever being attached to the seat and provided with a weight, substantially as set forth.

6. In a water-closet, the combination of the tank, bowl, and water-pipe forming communication between the tank and bowl, siphon located within'the tank and communicating on one side with the said water-pipe and on the other side with the tank, valve for opening communication between the tank and pipe, mechanism for operating the said valve, an air-valve located on top of said siphon and secured to one end of a pivoted lever, rod on said lever, and a float secured to said rod, substantially asy and for the purpose set forth.

7. In a water-closet, the combination of a tank,bowl,waterpipe forming communication between the tank and bowl, siphon located within the tank, valve for opening communication between the tank and said water-pipe, pipe forming communication between the siphon and the trap of the bowl, pipe 47, extending downward into the siphon, valve 48, and a float for operating the valve 48, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

8. In a water-closet, the combination of the tank,bowl,waterpipe forming communication between the tank and bowl, valve for opening communication between the tank and water- IOC IIO

IIS

pipe, and mechanism for operating the Valve, the tank, a bowl having a. trap, and a siphou consisting, essentially, of two pivoted levers, in said tank having one leg connected with 19 21, to one of which said valve is connected, said bowl, of a pipe connected to said trap and r 5 and the other of which is connected to the extending into said siphon, a. valve in said 5 seat of the bowl, the lever 19 having an arm, trap-pipe above the normal water-level of said 2S, with a face, 30, and the lever 21 having an tank, a pivoted lever connected to said valve, arm, 27, with projection 29, adapted to depress and an adjustable float connected to said leand pass said face, and the projection 31, ver, as set forth. adapted to strike the arln 28 and lever 19 al- CHAS. H. HARKINS. io ternately, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

9. In a Water-closet, the combination, with l ln presence of- Gno. H. KNIGHT, EDWD. S. KNIGHT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5142712 *Nov 26, 1990Sep 1, 1992Fluidmaster, Inc.Vacuum assisted toilet
US5386596 *Sep 20, 1993Feb 7, 1995Fluidmaster, Inc.Water saver toilet
US5426794 *Feb 10, 1994Jun 27, 1995Fluidmaster, Inc.Vacuum assisted toilet with controlled vacuum
US5694652 *Jul 13, 1993Dec 9, 1997Michael John StockToilet flushing system
WO1994002690A1 *Jul 13, 1993Feb 3, 1994Christopher John RichmondFlushing system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE03D5/00