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Publication numberUS3913501 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1975
Filing dateNov 29, 1974
Priority dateNov 29, 1974
Publication numberUS 3913501 A, US 3913501A, US-A-3913501, US3913501 A, US3913501A
InventorsDahar Alex J
Original AssigneeAir Preheater
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air supply for incinerator
US 3913501 A
Abstract
A gateless incinerator having an inlet for air required for combustion of organic matter therein that includes a plurality of vertically spaced ports. The ports are positioned at the lower portion of the incinerator in vertically spaced relation to have an air supply port that lies constantly adjacent the underside of the charge of organic matter placed therein. When an accumulation of ash from the burning organic matter covers an inlet port, air flowing therethrough is curtailed whereby conditions that promote oxidation of the carbon in the ash and vaporization of other residual material therein are terminated. Inasmuch as combustion is terminated in the ash it is permitted to cool thereby eliminating the volatilization of inorganic elements in the ash and the production of haze forming gases.
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United States Patent Dahar AIR SUPPLY FOR INCINERATOR Primary Examiner-Kenneth W. Sprague Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Wayne H. Lang [75] Inventor: Alex J. Dahar, Wellsville, NY.

[73] Assignee: The Air Preheater Company, Inc.,

Wellsville, NY. [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: 1974 A gateless incinerator having an inlet for air required [21] APPL 528,530 for combustion of organic matter therein that includes V a plurality of vertically spaced ports. The ports are p0- sitioned at the lower portion of the incinerator in ver- US. Cl. R; A; B; ti ll Spaced l ti t h an i Supply t th t 110/ 75 R lies constantly adjacent the underside of the charge of [51] Int. Cl. F23G 5/00; F23L 3/00 Organic matter placed therein w an accumulation [581 held of Search 110/8 R, 8 8 18 of ash from the burning organic matter covers an inlet 110/18 C, 72 72 75 R port, air flowing therethrough is curtailed whereby conditions that promote oxidation of the carbon in the [56] References C'ted ash and vaporization of other residual material therein UNITED STATES PATENTS are terminated. Inasmuch as combustion is terminated 2,483,946 10/1949 Touton 110/75 in the ash it is Permitted to 0001 thereby eliminating 3,599,609 8/1971 Sams et a1 110/8 the l iz n of in ganic el men in the h and 3,664,277 5/1972 Chatterjee et a1. the production of haze forming gases. 3,678,870 7/1972 Bakker 110/8 6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures 1 {2 I i 24 l A 36 W {8/ FUEL I6 32% I o o n a o o o a c 0 o S'2C 1' L c v o o e o a a v 0 32A U.S. Patent Oct. 21, 1975 Sheet2 0f2 3,913,501

AIR SUPPLY FOR INCINERATOR BACKGROUND oF THE INVENTION 1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION An incinerator for trash and other waste material that includes organic and inorganic matter having an air supply arrangement that controls combustion to preclude the temperature of ash from the burning trash from rising to the point where it volatizes the inorganic constituents thereof and produces haze forming gases.

2. DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART Incinerator devices that reduce waste material to ash are well known and shown generally by the U.S. Pat. of Bakker, No. 3,491,707. Such devices regularly have one feature in common, that being that they are operated at high temperatures to obtain maximum gasification of solids therein. While operating at high temperature, most of the organic matter and some of the inorganic matter in the charge of waste material therein is reduced to gaseous form, with the organic matter being burned in an afterburner and the volatized inorganic material being exhausted to the atmosphere to become the basis of a haze forming gas. Some inorganic material, such as glass, is only melted, and on fusing with 1 other residue in the ash forms a clinker which is removed from the incinerator with difficulty.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention, therefore, relates to an incinerator for trash, garbage, and other waste material having both organic and inorganic values wherein the organic matter thereof is effectively driven off as a combustible gas while the inorganic matter is prohibited from being excessively heated and vaporized. Therefore, the inorganic matter remains relatively cool and is not permitted to be vaporized so it may be exhausted to become the basis of a haze forming atmosphere.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING A better understanding of my invention may be had by reference to the drawing in which:

FIG. 1 shows a sectional elevation of my invention,

FIG. 2 shows a side view of my invention in section 1, and

FIG. 3 shows a sectional elevation of the device having a system of automatic controls.

SPECIFICATIONS In the drawing of the present invention, the reference numeral 12 defines a housing that encloses a pyrolyzing chamber 14. The chamber 14 has a loading door 16 for loading a charge of waste material therein and an outlet opening 18 through which gases generated in chamber 14 are directed to an afterburner 20.

A duct 22 connected to the opening 18 directs the gas to afterburner 20 and to the stack 24 which in turn directs the exhaust gases to the atmosphere.

A source of air'for combustion is directed from fan 26 via duct 28 to a manifold 30 which supplies the air through vertically spaced apertured ducts 32 to the lower portion of chamber 14. Each duct 32 is similarly sized and provided with a control valve 34 whereby air flow through a particular duct 32 may be terminated when it is determined that it lies beneath the current level of the residual ash that remains after reduction of the waste material in the pyrolyzing chamber. A branch duct 38 having a control valve 37 supplies air as required to the afterburner 20.

In operation a charge of waste material is inserted through the loading door 16 into combustion chamber 14. All valves 34 are normally closed; however, valve 34A is moved to an open position to admit air for pyrolysis from the source 26 through air supply duct 32A at the bottom of chamber 14, while ducts 32B, 32C, and 32D remain closed to the flow of combustion air. Inasmuch as the combustion chamber 14 is free of ash at the beginning of a burn, air from apertured duct 32A combines with the burning waste and thence passes as the gas of pyrolysis to the exhaust opening 18 and the afterburner 20. In afterburner 20 pyrolyzed gas from chamber 14, together with auxiliary fuel from a source of supply 36 and combustion air from supply line 38 controlled by valve 40, provide complete combustion before being exhausted through stack 24 to the atmosphere as completely burned exhaust gas.

As ash from the burning waste material settles to the bottom of chamber 14 and collects around and over elongate duct 32A, valve 34A is closed and valve 348 opened so that combustion air is permitted to be directed through valve 34B and duct 328 to the burning waste material and thence exhausted to the afterburner and the atmosphere.

Combustion air, consequently, is no longer being forced to flow through the ash and other residual matter in the combustion chamber to increase its temperature and oxidize elements thereof.

Control valves 34 may be actuated manually by handwheels 38 in accordance with the depth of ash at the bottom of chamber 14 as seen by an operator when viewed through the open loading door 16. Otherwise, automatic control means 42 may be adapted to open and close the valves 34 in response to various conditions within the combustion chamber 14 brought about by the collection of residual matter at the bottom thereof in the manner shown by FIG. 3. Here, a control means 46 is responsive to thermocouples 48 in the chamber 14. As one of air supply ducts 32 becomes covered with ash, combustion air being forced out therefrom flows through the ash and burns out the residual carbon thereof to produce a blast-furnace ef fect that raises the temperature considerably. As the temperature rises, the controller 46 is programmed to close the appropriate air supply valve 34 so that combustion at all residual carbon in the ash ceases. However, the supply of air to the duct 32 lying above the ash will continue so that pyrolyzation of waste in the space lying above the ash also will continue until it too is covered with ash.

Thus, combustion of residual carbon remaining in the ash is terminated and the ash cools while the air for pyrolyzation of the waste material in chamber 14 is supplied continuously along the bottom of charge where maximum burning effectiveness may be performed.

As the charge of waste material in chamber 14 continues to burn and be reduced to ash, it continuously falls to the bottom of chamber 14 and progressively covers duct 32B. When duct 32B becomes covered with ash, valve 348 is closed and 34C opened, and the pyrolyzation of the waste in chamber 14 is continued. If ash collects at the bottom of chamber 14 in an amount that would cover duct 32C, said duct would be closed off by turning valve 34C and opening valve 34D to continue the supply air for combustion above the level of the residual ash.

By this arrangement an adequate supply of air is continuously provided at the bottom of the charge of burning waste, but it is never forced through the ash. Thus, the air supply is cut-off and combustion of residual carbon within the ash is eliminated completely while air for pyrolyzation of the waste above the ash is continuously supplied in an amount that permits effective pyrolyzation of the waste material to proceed at a constant rate.

Inasmuch as combustion in the ash ceases, the ash naturally assumes a relatively cool temperature that is considerably below the temperature at which the inorganic constituents thereof are vaporized. Therefore, an incinerator, according to this invention, may be used in locations heretofore denied because of the haze forming potential of the gases being exhausted therefrom.

The invention described herein and illustrated in the accompanying drawings is known to admit to various modifications. Thus, other control means could readily be adapted to modulate the valves controlling the flow of combustion air to the combustion chamber in response to a variable condition in the combustion chamber effected by the collection of residual matter therein. Other modifications could be made by persons skilled in the art, and all such modifications are considered to lie within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An incinerator for the incineration of organic matter in a charge of waste material that contains organic and inorganic values comprising in combination a combustion chamber including a loading opening for the admission of waste material therein and an outlet opening for the exhaust of pyrolyzed gas therefrom, means for the collection of ash at the bottom of the combustion chamber, a source of air for combustion, means supplying combustion air from said source to the combustion chamber including a plurality of vertically spaced passageways at the lower portion of the combustion chamber, and means controlling air flow through each of said passageways whereby the flow of air may be curtailed through the passageways that lie subjacent the level of ashes at the bottom of the combustion chamber to thereby terminate combustion of residual matter in the ash and the volatilization of inorganic matter that produces a haze forming gas.

2. An incinerator for the incineration of waste material as defined in claim 1 wherein the vertically spaced inlet passageways are of equal size to permit a constant rate of air flow therethrough.

3. An incinerator for the incineration of waste material as defined in claim 1 wherein the vertically spaced inlet passageways extend horizontally between ends of the incinerator.

4. An incinerator for the incineration of waste material as defined in claim 1 wherein the vertically spaced inlet passageways are formed with a series of horizontally spaced openings that exhaust into the combustion chamber.

5. An incinerator for the incineration of organic matter in a charge of waste material that contains organic and inorganic values comprising in combination a combustion chamber having a loading opening for the admission of waste material therein and an outlet opening for the exhaust of pyrolyzed gas therefrom, an afterburner adapted to receive exhaust gases from said outlet opening, a source of combustion air, means supplying the combustion air to the combustion chamber and to the afterbumer, said means supplying combustion air to the combustion chamber, comprising duct means having a plurality of vertically spaced openings, and control means for the air flow through each of said openings whereby the flow of air therethrough may be limited to a predetermined opening to closely control the pyrolization of waste material in the combustion chamber.

6. An incinerator for the incineration of waste material as defined in claim 5 wherein said control means is responsive to a condition effected by the collection of residual matter at the bottom of the combustion chamber.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2483946 *Mar 30, 1944Oct 4, 1949Wurton Machine CompanyUndergrate air admission means for lateral feed solid fuel stokers
US3599609 *Sep 5, 1969Aug 17, 1971Sams Agnes MOven for burning waste wood products
US3664277 *Jul 31, 1970May 23, 1972Carborundum CoOn-site incinerator
US3678870 *May 20, 1971Jul 25, 1972Air PreheaterSludge burner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4194488 *Sep 27, 1978Mar 25, 1980William W. WeaverHome heating system
US4285325 *Sep 28, 1979Aug 25, 1981William W. WeaverBalancing air device for a heating unit
US5816796 *Jun 12, 1997Oct 6, 1998The G. C. Broach CompanyFlue gas control
US5820362 *Jun 12, 1997Oct 13, 1998The G. C. Broach CompanyFluid control
US6401632 *May 28, 1998Jun 11, 2002R & K Incinerator, Inc.Animal carcass incinerator
Classifications
U.S. Classification110/190, 110/212
International ClassificationF23L1/00, F23G5/14, F23N3/00, F23G5/44, F23G5/027, F23G5/50, F23N3/06, F23G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23G5/027
European ClassificationF23G5/027