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Publication numberUS3913586 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1975
Filing dateJan 28, 1974
Priority dateJan 28, 1974
Publication numberUS 3913586 A, US 3913586A, US-A-3913586, US3913586 A, US3913586A
InventorsBaumgarten Carl B
Original AssigneeGomco Surgical Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hemostat
US 3913586 A
Abstract
An inexpensive, easily manufactured surgical hemostat comprising a pair of intersecting arms pivotally mounted on a common axis each arm having a plastic coating over its entire length, whereby the functional elements of the hemostat, i.e., the jaws, finger loops and latching means are formed from the plastic and the core provides the requisite strength and resiliency for the arms of the surgical hemostat.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,913,586

'Baumgarten Oct. 21, 1975 [5 HEMOSTAT 3,779,248 12/1973 Karman 128/346 x Inventor: Carl B Baumgarten Houston Tex- 3,79l,013 2/1974 Rogers 30/254 [73] Assignee: Gomco Surgical Manufacturing FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Corporation, Buffalo, 1,138,263 1/1957 France 30/254 [22] Filed: Jan. 28, 1974 Primary ExaminerChanning L. Pace [21] Appl. No.: 437,064 Attorney, Agent, or Firml(enneth H. Johnson [52] US. Cl. 128/325; 30/254; 30/341 [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl. A61B 17/28 An mexpenswe' easlly manufactured Surglca] hemo' [58] Fi ld f S h 120/254 341 343; 12 /321 stat comprising a pair Of intersecting arms pivotally 128/325, 346 mounted on a common axis each arm having a plastic coating over its entire length, whereby the functional 5 References Cited elements of the hemostat, i.e., the jaws, finger loops UNITED STATES PATENTS and latchlng means are formed from the plastic and the core provides the requisite strength and resiliency 3,222,128 12/13 515 3a 128/321 x for the arms of the Surgical hemostat 2,965,967 12/1960 Wahl 30/254 UX 5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures 'j zzzqlli zzzigl US. Patent Oct. 21, 1975 HEMOSTAT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to method of manufacturing surgical hemostats and the hemostats produced thereby.

Surgical hemostats are very critical instruments which must have strength and reliability. Mainly these requirements have to be achieved by manufacture of the hemostats from polished stainless steel. These are superior instruments usually requiring a great deal of hand finishing, with the consequent high cost, however, because such instruments are used and reused for years, this high initial cost was not considered a detriment. Now a new factor has entered this picture, which has made the use of these expensive devises unattractive. This is the extremely high labor cost now encountered in medical facilities. Hence the added expense of cleaning and sterilizing surgical hemostats is now a significant factor to consider, and even worse in labor short facilities, the availability factor of the cleaned and sterilized materials may be unreliable.

In many procedures, such as male circumcisions, a circumcision clamp suture, clamps and hemostats are maintained together as unit, so that the physician can open one package and have immediately at hand every item needed for the procedure. When prior art hemostats are employed in these packages, not only has there been the cost of labor, but the expensive device is tied up in a storage situation.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an alternative to the prior art hemostats which can be manufactured easily from less expensive material and with less costly labor. It is another object of the present invention to provide hemostats high strength and reliability. It is a further object to provide hemostats that can be combined in an economical preprepared surgical package.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly stated the method of the present invention for making one arm of an intersecting pair of arms comprises forming a metal core having a handle portion, a jaw portion and a box portion intermediate said handle portion and said jaw portion, tempering said metal core, mounting said tempered metal core in an injection mold, injecting a polymeric material into said mold, coating said metal core with polymeric material and forming gripping surfaces on said jaw portion and a finger loop and latching means on said handle portion. The arm so formed is attached at the box with another similarly formed arm to form a pair of intersecting arms by pivot means interconnecting said arms for swinging motion about a common axis.

The surgical hemostat comprises a pair of intersecting arms and pivot means interconnecting said arms for rotating motion about a common axis said arms each comprising a tempered metal core having a handle portion, a jaw portion, and a box portion intermediate said handle and jaw portions, entirely embedded in a plastic shell comprising a finger loop juxtaposed to said handle portion, a gripping surface juxtaposed to said jaw portion, a latching means interior of said handle portion, said gripping surfaces being operably opposed and said latching means being operably engageable when said handle portions are rotated toward each other for holding said handle portions in a fixed position and operably engaging said gripping surfaces.

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is side elevation of a surgical hemostat. FIG. 2 is a partial cross sectional view along line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross section of the hemostat along line 3--3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross section of the hemostat along line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a cross section of the hemostat along line 55 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a view of the latch means 8a and 8b as shown in FIG. 2 rotated DETAIL DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The manner of producing the surgical hemostate is very critical to achieving the product having the necessary attributes to qualify for use as such. Hence the process will now be described in more detail. The process used herein is generally described as insert molding and distinguishable from a process where a coating of a plastic is applied over a blank. In a coating process the only configuration is that of the blank, whereas in insert molding the configuration of the molded article is that imparted by the mold. Hence insert molding is a variant of injection molding wherein the polymer is forced into the mold under pressure. Some attempts have been made to produce hermostats by injection molding, however, the products usually do not have the requiste degree of stiffness necessary when the hemostat is clamped, and these devices have had very limited acceptance by the medical profession.

The deficiencies of prior injection molded hemostats are overcome by inserting a particular type of member into the mold and injecting the polymer around the inserted member. The insert is a single piece of material having the general configuration of one side or portion of the hemostat along the long axis. That is, the insert is a substatially straight member which is formed out of tempered steel. For example, 410-412 guage stainless steel wire is stamped in the generalconfiguration of a handle, box and jaw. It may be necessary to stamp only the box in some of the hemostates. A hole may be stamped in the box at this time. The stainless steel wire is then heat tempered at 1,800 2,000F and air cooled.

The insert is then mounted in the mold, being positioned therein by one or two pins. Precautions are taken to prevent extrudate from filing the hole in the box, said hole if present is a convenient point of mounting the insert. The mold contains the configuration for jaws as well as finger loop and latch element. Thus various jaw configurations may be applied to a standard insert blank. The finger loop and latch element are not reinforced and there is no insert portion corresponding thereto. The reinforcement is along the length of the handle, through the box and in the jaw.

The polymer used to mold the hemostate can be any present extrudable polymers, such as, polypropylene, polybutene, polyamides, polyamines, polymethacrylates and polymethylmethacrylates or any of the other polymeric materials which are extrucdable. Included are material such as epoxy polymers which are cross linked after setting. A desirable feature or property for any polymeric material employed is high temperature resistance to deformation. This conveniently allow the instruments to be heat sterilized.

The hemostat produced in the process described above is shown in FIGS. 1-6. In FIG. 1 the assembled hemostate is shown from the side with the metal core or insert 1. in dotted lines. The jaw portion 7 and handle portion are shown to be in substantially the same plane with the box portion 6 being stamped or bent out of line so that the two polymer covered halves or arms of the hemostat will aline and put the handle and jaw portions'of each arm in about the same plane. The two arms are in substantially the same plane to avoid the tendency of the instrument to rotate about its long axis. The tendency to rotate is a result of the unequal pressure that is applied by hand and the torque created thereby.

Referring now to FIG. 2 one arm of the hemostat is shown in cross section along line 22 of FIG. 1. Each arm is composed of metal core 1 which, although it is preferably one piece, consist of three decernable elements the handle portion 5', the box portion 6 and the jawportion 7.

Over the entire core is a cover or shell of a poly- 'meric material, except at the point 4 wherein a pin or other pivot is placed through the two arms joining them at the box. The hole 3 is a mold mount used to hold the core in place in the mold. The shell 10 also is formed into finger loops 2, latching means 8a and 8b and grip-- ping serrations 9 in'the jaw portion 7.

The latching means 8a and 8b are shown in the closed or latched together, hence causing the jaws 7 to grip tightly together. Referring to FIG. 6 the means of operlocking the hemostat in a desired'position. The teeth 12 are released by using the fingers to distort the arms temporarily thereby disengaging the teeth and allowin the hemostat to be opened. 1

upon each other thereby engaging the teeth 12 and FIG. 3 shows a cross section of the hemostat in the jaw portion 7. The two opposedcore jaws 7 are shown to have a broadened surface backing up the molded serrations 9. The enlarged portion of the jaw core 7 can be obtainedby stamping or twisting the blank from which the core is made. In FIGS. 3 and 4 the polymer covering 10 can be seen to be very thin in some areas. This is not particularly detrimental since the covering is not the element providing the strength and need be only of sufficient thickness to provide a complete sterilizable covering on the surface of the hemostat.

FIGS. 4 and 5'show cross sectional views of the box and arm portions of the hemostat respectively.

The configuration of the hemostat can be varied from that shown to resemble the conventional configurations employed in the act now.

The'invention' claimed is:

1. A surgical hemostat comprising a pair of intersecting arms and a pivot means interconnecting said arms for rotating motion about a common axis, said arms each comprising a tempered stamped wire metal core having a handle portion, a jaw portion and a box portion intermediate said handle and jaw portions, said arms each being individually permanently embedded in a plastic shell comprising a finger loop juxtaposed to said handle portion, a gripping surface juxtaposed to said jaw portion, and a latching means on said handle portion on the opposite side of saidhandle from said finger loop and in substantiallythe same plane therewith, said gripping surfaces on each jaw being operably opposed and said latching means being operable engagable when said handle portions are rotated toward each other for holding said handle portions in a fixed position, and operably engaging said gripping surfaces.

2. The surgical hemostat according to claim 1 wherein' said metal core comprises a substantially straight stainless steel wire.

3. The surgical hemostat according to claim wherein said box has a hole therein.

4. The surgical hemostat according to claim 3 whe'rein said cores lie in substantially the same plane except for said box portion.

5. The surgical hemostat according to claim 3 wherein said plastic is a themoplastic.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2305156 *Apr 17, 1941Dec 15, 1942Weck & Co EdwardBox lock pivot and method of assembling same
US2626460 *Apr 19, 1948Jan 27, 1953Wahl Clipper CorpScissors
US2965967 *Oct 24, 1958Dec 27, 1960Wahl Clipper CorpScissors
US3779248 *Oct 18, 1971Dec 18, 1973Medical Concepts IncForceps
US3791013 *Nov 3, 1972Feb 12, 1974Wilkinson Sword LtdHand tools
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4121338 *Apr 27, 1977Oct 24, 1978Raychem CorporationNon-shorting wire cutter
US4490326 *Oct 6, 1982Dec 25, 1984Ethicon, Inc.Molding process for polydioxanone polymers
US5242458 *Oct 15, 1991Sep 7, 1993Ethicon, Inc.Suture needle holder for endoscopic use
US5746748 *Dec 27, 1995May 5, 1998Frederic SteinbergCircumcision instrument
US5931843 *Oct 31, 1997Aug 3, 1999Dunaway; William ClaudeSmall bead tipped hemostat for circumcisions and use thereof
US6077280 *Jun 29, 1995Jun 20, 2000Thomas Jefferson UniversitySurgical clamp
US7103947 *Apr 5, 2002Sep 12, 2006Sherwood Services AgMolded insulating hinge for bipolar instruments
US7758609Aug 2, 2004Jul 20, 2010Biolchini Jr Robert FAmbidextrous locking clamp
US7824425Oct 17, 2005Nov 2, 2010Biolchini Jr Robert FAmbidextrous locking clamp system
US8070771Apr 10, 2007Dec 6, 2011Biolchini Jr Robert FAmbidextrous locking clamp system
EP0177252A2 *Sep 24, 1985Apr 9, 1986Michael PoratMedical Forceps and like medical instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/205, 30/254, 30/341
International ClassificationA61B17/28
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/2812
European ClassificationA61B17/28D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 25, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC.
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANE BOSTON FINANCIAL COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:006329/0348
Effective date: 19920831
Aug 26, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: BANCBOSTON FINANCIAL COMPANY (THE LENDER)
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC. A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004444/0863
Effective date: 19850612
Jun 24, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC., 1720 SUBLETTE ST
Owner name: CHEMETRON INVESTMENTS, INC., A CORP OF DE
Effective date: 19850618
Jun 24, 1985AS01Change of name
Owner name: CHEMETRON CORPORATION
Owner name: CHEMETRON INVESTMENTS, INC.
Effective date: 19840221
Jun 24, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC., 1720 SUBLETTE ST
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CHEMETRON INVESTMENTS, INC., A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004417/0915
Effective date: 19850618
Owner name: CHEMETRON INVESTMENTS, INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:CHEMETRON CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004417/0912
Effective date: 19840221
Owner name: ALLIED HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS, INC., A CORP OF DE,MIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CHEMETRON INVESTMENTS, INC., A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004417/0915