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Publication numberUS3913656 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1975
Filing dateJan 24, 1973
Priority dateJan 24, 1973
Publication numberUS 3913656 A, US 3913656A, US-A-3913656, US3913656 A, US3913656A
InventorsReynolds Guyer
Original AssigneeReynolds Guyer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hinged panels
US 3913656 A
Abstract
Hinged panels are provided to form an advertising display, partition, or decoration. The panels include spaced front and rear panel portions connected along hinged areas to adjoining panels. The hinged areas are so arranged that the panels may fold in either direction through an angle of substantially 360 DEG relative to one another.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 [111 3,913,656

Guyer Oct. 21, 1975 [54] HINGED PANELS 3,516,593 6/1970 Larsen 229/14 0 971 1 [76] Inventor: Reynolds Guyer, 1954 Edgecumbe 1608221 9/1 Hams 60/135 Road, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 v Filed: Jan- 24, 1973 Primary Examiner-Peter M. Caun [21] App]. No.: 326,524

[57] ABSTRACT 2% 5 160/135; 160/ 262 2 3 Hinged panels are provided to form an advertising dis- [58] Fn .ld 232 3 5 l play, partition, or decoration. The panels include 1 3 7 177 spaced from and rear panel portions connected along l I 166 hinged areas to adjoining panels. The hinged areas are so arranged that the panels may fold in either direcll 360 References Cited 2221;153:115: an angle of substanna y relative to UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,442,415 5/1969 Glass 16/150 11 Claims, 33 Drawing Figures Sheet 1 of6 U.S. Patent 0a. 21, 1975 U.S. Patent Oct. 21, 1975 Sheet 3 of6 3,913,656

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00. 21, 1975 Sheet 6 of 6 3,913,656

US Patent i9 Z0 Z1 22 :I F I I :II III HINGED PANELS This invention relates to an improvement in hinged panels, and deals particularly with a particular form of hinge capable of permitting a pair of connected panels to fold through substantially 360 F".

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION For a great number of years, panels have been hingedly connected together either to provide a screen or partition, or to provide a free standing display either for advertising purposes, or for decoration. These screens are usually made of panels including peripheral wooden frames which support a variety of material including fabric, paperboard, plastic or the like. Usually,

where more than two panels are provided to form the screen, they are alternately hinged on one side or the other of the panels so that they can be folded into face contact, or may be folded into zig zag formation to permit them to be free standing. Such panels, incorporating wooden rectangular frames, are not only expensive to produce, but relatively heavy so that they are not particularly easy to handle either during the setting up process or when they are taken to storage. This weight is often advantageous where the screens are used as partitions However, screens of this type are normally too expensive to produce to be used as a means of advertising, particularly when the screens must be produced in considerable volume in order to meet the demand. Furthermore, due to the wooden frame construction, such screens are relatively expensive.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It has been found that panels may be formed which cost a fraction of the previous screens used for this purpose, and which are capable of assuming positions not previously possible with screens of previous types. Furthermore, these screens may be formed of paperboard which is capable of being printed or lithographed to provide extremely intricate design. While the screens are primarilly produced for advertising purposes, they are capable of being used merely for decorative purposes if so desired. The resulting screens may be used for a great number of purposes, and may be made at a cost which is sufficiently low so that they may be disposed of, if desired, after a suitable period of use.

In general, the panels themselves are normally formed of two panels portions, one of which may be considered the rear panel portion, as a means of identification, and the other of which may be considered the front panel portion. The rear panel portions are formed of paperboard, or of corrugated paperboard where greater strength is required. These rear panel portions include a rectangular rear wall including along opposite edges to a series of flanges connected along a series of vertically extending spaced score lines which may be folded to form rectangular sleeves extending vertically along each side edge of the panel. These sleeves include an outer side wall flange designed to extend at right angles to the rear wall, a front flange designed to extend parallel to the rear wall, an inner wall flange designed to extend parallel to the outer side wall flange, and an anchoring flange which is normally secured in face contact with the front surface of the rear wall. These rear panels may be formed on regular gluing equipment by folding the creased structure along the line of fold connecting the outer side wall flange to the front flange, and adhering the anchoring flange to the forward surface of the back wall. Such a structure may be readily erected into rectangular sleeves along each vertical edge of the back wall.

The front panel portion, in preferred form, normally comprises a wall or panel which is the same size and shape as the main back wall, and which may be secured to the front faces of the tubular sleeve to hold the front and rear walls in spaced relation. In preferred form, two or more of such front panels are hingedly connected together by a pair of hinge panels which are usually the width of the side wall flanges, normally extend from one front wall panel to the next, the cut lines normally being in similarly vertically spaced relationship. The portions of the hinge panels, between the cut lines, and above and below the same, form sections which alternately adhered to the edge of one panel and then the other. With this arrangement, the two panels may be hingedly connected together so that one panel may fold into face contact with either surface of the adjoining panel.

A feature of the present invention resides in the fact that the screens may be completely made of paperboard, or may be made of a stronger material such as corrugated paperboard, depending upon the size of the panels. The upper and lower edges of the screens are normally closed by overlapping panels or flanges hingedly connected to the upper and lower edges of the front and rear panels. When adhered in overlapping relation, the panel thus formed is extremely strong, being reinforced by therectangular sleeves along opposite edges of the panels as well as along the top and bottom edges.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the fact that the top and bottom closure flanges which are secured in overlapping relation may be formed to extend between the rectangular sleeves along opposite vertical edges of the front and rear walls so that the upper and lower ends of the rectangular sleeves are exposed. Alternatively, only the lower ends of the sleeves may be exposed. With this arrangement, the panels may be supported by legs comprising spirally wound tubing of proper size to frictionally engage in the lower ends of the sleeve, and to which an outer spirally wound sleeve is telescoped. The upper ends of the inner sleeves extend into the lower ends of the rectangular sleeves on the panels, while the upper ends of the outer cylindrical sleeves serve as a support by engaging the lower ends of the sleeves.

An added feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a screen of the type described designed to form a display in which two or more panels are supported in superimposed relation. The lowermost panels may be supported by legs in the manner which has been described. Spacers may be provided between the upper edges of the lowermost panels and the lower edges of the uppermost panels. These spacers may also comprise spirally wound paper tubing having an outer larger diameter tubing telescoped thereon to extend intermediate the ends thereof. The lower ends of the spacer members may extend into the upper ends of the rectangular sleeves of the lower panel, and the upper ends of these spacers members may extend into the lower portions of the upper panels so as to provide spaced upper and lower panels each of which may form a display for advertising copy.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a screen which may comprise a pair of hingedly connected panels and which may be used with pairs of similar panels to form displays which are visible from more than one direction. Angularly related panels, mounted on supporting legs, may support additional angularly related panels which are so constructed that the entire assembly is held in assembled form by spacer legs, the disconnected panels of one layer being held assembled by connected panels of a second layer.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision that the screens, particularly when made of larger size, may be free standing and not require any supporting legs or spacing legs. In this event, the overlapping flanges which connect the front and rear panel portions may extend over the upper and lower ends of the rectangular sleeves connecting the panels so as to provide a finished upper and lower surface.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a construction in which the front panel portions of each panel may be separate from the adjoining front panel, this structure being particularly useful where the panels are of substantial size and where the surfaces of the panels must be of proper size to pass through a printing or lithographing press without difficulty. In this arrangement, side by side panels are provided with alternate hinge members each including two flange sections, one of which is designed to extend between the panels, and the other of which is designed to be adhered to the rear surface of the panels. When formed, the two panels are capable of folding throughout an angle of approximately 360so that one panel may lie in face contact with either surface of the other panel.

These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a pair of hingedly connected panels supported upon supporting legs.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the front of the panels illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view through one of the panels, the position of the section being indicated by the line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the two panels folded in face to face relation, and with the legs removed for shipping or storage.

FIG. 5 is a horizontal sectional view through the hinge joint connecting a pair of panels, the panels being swung in one direction from alignment.

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 showing the panels hinged in the opposite direction from alignment.

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of the front panel portion of a pair of adjoining panels, showing the general arrangement thereof.

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic view of the rear panel portion for one of the panels illustrated in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a pair of rear panel portions before the front panel portion is attached thereto.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a pair of front panel portions which are flexed .in the opposite direction from the rear panels shown in FIG. 9 to illustrate the construction thereof.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of three panels hingedly connected together to indicate that the number of panels forming the complete screen is not limited.

FIG. 12 is a diagrammatic view of the front panel portions used to form the triple panel screen shown in FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a modified form of construction in which one pair of panels is supported above a second pair of spacer legs.

FIG. 14 is an alternate form of display including three or more pairs of hingedly connected panels.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of another form of display in which six pairs of hingedly connected panels are connected to form a display visible from various sides.

FIG. 16 is an elevational view of one of the support- I ing legs showing the general construction thereof. 7

FIG. 17 is an elevation view of a spacer leg showing:

the general construction thereof;

FIG. 18 is a perspective view of a free standing screen comprising a pair of hingedly connected panels without I FIG. 21 is an enlarged section in perspective showing 1 the hinge joint between the panels, the position ofthe section being indicated by the line 2l-21 of FIG. 19.

FIG. 22 is an enlarged sectional detail throughthe hinge connected between the hingedly connected panels, the position of the section being indicatedby the line 22-22 of FIG. 19.

FIG. 23 is a diagrammatic view of the rear panel por-.

tion of a modified form of panel.

FIG. 24 is a diagrammatic view of the front panel used in connection with the modified form of panel shown in FIG. 23.

FIG. 25 is a front perspective view of a form of panel construction.

FIG. 26 is a rear perspective view of the modified form of construction illustrated in FIG. 25.

FIG. 27 is a horizontal sectional view through the. screen shown in FIGS. 25 and 26, the position of the section being indicated by the line 27-27 of FIG. .25.

FIG. 28 is an enlarged detail of the hinge construction shown in FIG. 27,the panels being bent or hinged in the opposite direction.

FIG. 29 is a sectional view showing the manner in.

which one of the supporting legs is inserted into the panel structure.

FIG. 30 is a diagrammatic view of a pair of side by side front panel portions showing the modified form of construction illustrated in FIGS. 25 through28.

FIG. 31 is a diagrammatic view of the rear panel portion showing the blank from' which this portion is formed. 7

FIG. 32 is a diagrammatic view of the front panel 7 portion used with the rear panel portion shown in FIG. I

FIG. 33 indicates a pair of folded panels and indicating the manner in which the supporting legs may be inserted into the rectangular sleeves connecting the front and rear panel portions.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS One form of hinged panel contruction is best illustrated in FIGS. 1 to of the drawings. In general, the screen includes a pair of panels 10 and 11 which are connected along a hinge joint which is indicated in general by the numeral 12. In order to understand the construction of the panels. FIGS. 7 and 8 show the elements which make up opposite sides of the screen A. FIG. 7 shows a duplex panel which may be considered the front of the screen while FIG. 8 shows a panel portion which maybe considered the rear portion of the screen. Obviously, this terminology is merely for the purpose of explanation, as either side of the screen may be considered the front.

As indicated in FIG. 8, each panel such as 10 or 1 1 includes a back panel 13 which is'hingedly connected along opposite vertical edges along fold lines 14 to side wall flanges 15. The flange 15 are foldably connected along fold lines 16 to front flanges 17 of the rear screen portions. The flanges 17.are connected along fold lines 19 to connecting flanges 20. The connecting flanges 20 are foldably connected along fold lines 21 to anchoring flanges 22. These structures on opposite sides of the panel 13 are designed to form rectangular tubular sleeves when the various flanges are folded into right angular relation.

1 ,37 and 39, and the alternate area between the cut lines In order to form the vertical sleeves which are rectanso that the anchoring flanges 22 overlie the front surface of the back panel 13. The flanges 22 are secured in face contact with the front surface of the panel 13. When squared up, the flanges form a square tube extending along each vertical edge of the back panel 13. These square tubes not only reinforce the panel 13, but also serve as a means of supporting the front panels in spaced relation to the rear panels 13, as will be described.

Top and bottom flanges 23 and 24 are hingedly connected to the upper and lower edges 25 and 26 of the rear panel 13 along fold lines 25 and 26. The flanges 24 are of a width substantially equal to the width of the flanges 15, 17, 20 and 22. The flanges 23 and 24 are somewhat shorter than the width of the back panel 13 so that the ends of these flanges 23 and 24 do not overlie the upper and lower ends of the square tubes formed by the vertical flanges. The purpose of this is to expose the upper and lower ends of the square sleeves so as to accommodate supporting legs or spacer members, in a manner which will be later described.

There is one back panel unit for each of the panels such as 10 and 11. FIG. 9 of the drawings shows two of these back panels 13 as they appear in readiness for the attachment of the front panel portion which is indicated in general by the numeral 27 and show the areas of attachment in stippled form. As shown in FIG. 7, the front panel section 27 includes a pair of front panels 29 and 30 which are equal in width with the back panels 13. Intermediate the panels 29 and 30 the panels are connected by a hinge area 12 along parallel fold lines 31 and 32. An intermediate parallel fold line 33 divides the hinge area into two vertical flange portions, the distance between the fold lines 31 and 32 and the intermediate fold line 33 being substantially equal to the width of the various flanges such as 15 and so forth of the rear 35, and 36 is also divided into hingedly connected flange sections 37 and 39. The hinge area portions between the cut lines 34 and 35, as well as the section below the lowermost cut line 36 are divided into flange portions 40 and 41. The purpose of this arrangement will be further described in more detail. Top flanges 42 are hingedly connected to the upper edges of the panels 29 and 30 along aligned fold lines 43 while bottom flanges 44 are hingedly connected to the lower edges of the panels 29 and 30 along fold lines 45.

FIG. 10 illustrates, somewhat diagrammatically. the manner in which the hinge sections are folded. However, FIG. 10 is reversed relative to FIG. 9, as the hinge sections and panels 29 and 30 would actually have to be reversed relative to the back panels shown in FIG. 9 in order to fit thereupon. As diagrammatically indicated in FIGS. 9 and 10 the panels 29 and 30 are connected to a pair of similar rear panels 13 along vertical areas of adhesive 46 (shown by stippling) extending along the vertical side edges of the panel 29 and similar adhesive areas 47 which extend along the opposite vertical edges of the panel 30. The adhesive areas are designed to secure the panels 29 and 30 to the forward surfaces of the flanges 17 on the back panels 13. The flange portions 39 are secured to the outer square sleeve flange 15 of one of the back panels 13, while the flanges 40 which are hinged to the panel 30 are adhered to an outer flange surface 15 of the second rear panel 13. The flanges 37 and 39, as well as the flanges 40 and 41 are free of adhesive contact with each other.

To complete the panels, the flanges 23 of the rear panels 13 are adhered in overlapping relation with the flanges 42 of the front section, and the flanges 24 of the rear section are adhered in overlapping relation with the flanges 44 of the front section.

When thus formed, the two panels include spaced front and rear panel portions connected by square hollow tubular members along each vertical edge, the portions of the panels between the, square vertical sleeves and between the top and bottom overlapping flanges comprising a hollow body. The hinge arrangement is such that the two panels can fold through a angle of substantially 360so that either the front or rear panel portions are in face contact. FIG. 4 of the drawings shows the two panels folded so that the front surfaces are in face contact, and back panel portions are outermost. 7

The square sleeves extending vertically along opposite edges of the front and rear panel portions, when open at their lower ends, due to notching the ends of the top and bottom flanges 23, 24, 42 and 44, are de signed toaccommodate supporting legs so that the panels may be supported into spaced relation to the floor or other supporting surface. As indicated in FIG. 16 of the drawings, the legs may comprise spirally wound paper tubes 49 into which are telescoped spirally outside diameter to fit within the square vertical sleeves formed at opposite edges of the back panel 13 as indicated in FIG. 3 of the drawings. The larger diameter cylindrical sleeves 49 are of a diameter too large to fit within the square sleeves of the panels, and the legs which are indicated in general by the numeral 151 may be frictionally engaged in the lower ends of the square panel sleeves to support the panels at a desired elevation.

As indicated in FIG. 17 of the drawings, spacer legs 52 may be used to support one pair of panels above another as will be described. .The spacer legs 52 comprise an elongated tube 53 of material such as spirally wound paperboard onto which a somewhat shorter sleeve 54 of somewhat larger diameter has been telescoped to be supported intermediate the ends of the inner tube 53. The ends of the tube 53 are of proper diameter to fit within the square sleeves of the panel sections, while the larger diameter cylindrical sleeve portions 54 act as a means of spacing panels one above another.

While the screen illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 10 has been shown as having a single pair of panels hingedly connected together, obviously a screen of any desired number of panels may be produced. As indicated in FIGS. 11 and 12, a similar structure having three panels is diagrammatically indicated. The rear panel portions 13 of each of the panels may be made identically to that illustrated in FIG. 8 of the drawings.

As indicated, the blank forming the frontpanel por-- tions may include a front panel portion 29 identical to thatshown in FIG. 7 of the drawings, and an intermedi-,

FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawings show an enlarged horizontal cross section the manner in which the adjoining screens 10 and 11 may fold in either direction. The alternate gluing of the hinge sections first one panel edge and then to the other produces a double action hinge which permits the two panels 10 and 11 to fold from one extreme position to another.

FIGS. 13, 14 and 15 show typical displays which are free standing and supported by legs, the lower pairs of panels supporting upper pairs thereof. As indicated in FIG. 13 of the drawings, the hingedly connected panels 10 and 11 are supported by legs 51 and are folded into substantially right angularly relation to provide a display which is visible from virtually any direction. An upper pair of hingedly connected panels 10 and 11 are supported in superimposed relation to the lower panels by spacer legs 52 sothat the panels 10 and 11 are directly above the lower pair of similar panels.

FIG. 14 shows a different arrangement of panels and indicates two pairs of right angularly extending panels 10 and l 1 arranged in substantially right angularly relation with the panel 11 of one pair adjoining, and in angularly related relation to, the panels of of the other pair. The two pairs of panels 10 and 11 are supported by legs 51. A superimposed upper pair of foldably connected panels 10 and 11 are supported by the lower pairs of panels and act to connect to the same and to hold the two lower pairs fromseparation. As will be.

noted, the spacer legs 52 engage in the upper ends of the square sleeves of the panel 11 of one pair and the panel 10 of the adjoining pair, holding the two pairs of.

panels in close relationship.

FIG. 15 shows another unusal display arrangement where four pair of connected panels 10 and 11' arranged in substantially right angular relation form an arrangement which may be seen from any direction.

The four pairs of panels 10 and 11 are supported by legs such as 51, and two pairs of foldably connected panels are supported by the central portion of the four pairs of panels by spacer legs 52. It will be noted that by placing the hinge connection of the upper most two 1 pairs of panels in vertical alignment with the space be-- tween adjoining pairs of panels of the lowermost series of panels, the lower four pairs of panels are held in supporting surface and in which no legs or spacer legs are provided. This arrangement is particularly adaptable to structures, in which the panel portions forming each panel are made of a material sufficiently rigid so that the square vertical sleeves along opposite sidesof the panel are not required. However, the hinge structure used in connecting the panels is identical to that:

previously described.

As indicated in FIG. 23, the rear panel portions are hingedly connected along parallel fold lines 61 to side flanges 62 designed to form the side walls of the panels. The side flanges 62 are connected along parallel fold lines 63 to anchoring flanges 64 Top and bottom flanges 65 and 66 are foldably connected to the upper and lower edges of the panel 60 along parallel fold lines 67 and 69 respectively.

The front panels 70 and 72 are hingedly connected by a hinge structure 72 which is similar to that previously described. One side of the hinge structure is connected to the panel 70 along a vertical fold line 73 while the adjoining side of the front panel 71 is connected to the hinge structure along a fold line 74. An intermediate vertical fold line 75 divides the hinge structure into two hinge flanges of equal width. Trans-,

verse cut lines 76, 77 and 79 in vertically spaced par ah lel relation divide the hinged structure into alternate hinge sections, the hinge area between the out line 76.

panels is divided into hingedly connected hinge flanges 82 and 83. Top flanges 84 are hingedly connected to the upper edges of the panels 70 and 71 along aligned fold lines 85, while lower flanges 86 are hingedly connected to the lower edges of the panels 70 and 71 along aligned fold lines 87.

The manner in which the panels are formed is best illustrated in FIGS. 20, 21 and 22 of the drawings. As indicated, the side wall flanges 62 of the rear panels 60 are folded into right angular relation to the rear panel 60, and the anchoring flanges 64 are folded parallel to the panel 60 and adhered to the inner surface of the front panels 70 and71. This forms a hollow tubular structure extending the full width of the panels. The top flanges of the rear panels 60 are secured in overlapping relation to the top flanges 84 of the front panel portions, and the bottom flanges 66 of the rear panel portions are folded into face contact and adhered to the bottom flanges 86 of the front panel portions as shown in FIG. 20.

FIG. 21 is a sectional view through the upper hinge section. As indicated, the hinge flange portion is folded against the side wall flange 62 of the rear panel portion and is adhered thereto. The flange portions 81 connected to the front panel 71 is free of adhesive connection to the flange 80 or to side wall flange of the opposite panel. As is indicated in FIG. 22, which is a section through one of the alternate hinge sections, the flange portion 83 connected to the panel 71 is adhered to the side wall flange 62 of the right hand panel shown in this structure, while the hinge flange 82 is free of adhesive connection. As a result, the two panels may fold in either direction.

The screen structure which is illustrated in 30 through 33 of the drawings is in general similar to the previously described constructions except for the specific screen construction. As indicated in FIG. 31 of the drawings, the rear sections of the panels which are similar to that shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings is virtually similar to that shown in FIG. 7, and accordingly similar numerals have been used to identify the various parts.

However, in the particular type of screen shown in these Figures, the top flanges 85 of the rear panels is shown as extending the full width of the panel 13 and connected thereto by the fold line 86. The rear panels are formed in a manner identical to that described with respect to the structure shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, and comprises a rear panel with rectangular tubular sleeves along opposite vertical edges to which the front panels of the screen are attached.

In front panel portions are indicated by the numerals 87 and 89. As indicated in FIG. 30, two of these panels may be formed simultaneously, but instead of being integrally connected together, they are separated by cut lines. The panel 87 is shown as interlocking, in blank form, with the panel 89. As in the previous construction, the hinge section 90 includes hinge lines 91 of panel 87 which are connected to hinge panels 92 and 93 connected by an intermediate fold line 94. In a similar manner, the panel 89 is connected along hinge lines 95 to panels 96 and 97 which are hingedly connected along intermediate fold lines 99. In other words, the structure is virtually identical to that shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings with the exception of the fact that the hinge sections connected to each of the panels 87 and 89 are separated from the other panel by vertical cut lines extending in alignment with the hinge lines 91 and 93. As a result, the two panels 87 and 89 are separate, the hinge panel being indicated in its separate form in FIG. 32 of the drawings. In view of the fact that FIG. 32 shows the reverse side of panel 89, the hinge panels are correspondingly reversed.

As in the previous arrangement, the vertical marginal edges of the panels 87 and 89 are connected (as shown by the stippled areas) to the rectangular tubular sleeves projecting from the rear of the rear panel 13. However, as indicated in FIGS. 26, 27 28 and 33, the hinge flaps 97 of the panel 89 are adhered to the rear surface of the panel 13. In a similar manner, the hinge flaps 93 of the panel 87 are secured in face contact with the rear panel 13 of the adjoining panel section. Thus the difference between the structure shown in these Figures and in the previous structures lies in the fact that the front panels are individual and are not integrally connected, each hinge section including a flange which extends along a edge of the panels to which it is secured and a second flange which is adhered to the rear surface of the panel 13 of the adjoining panel.

This structure functions in the same identical manner as the structure described, and the two panels may fold relative to one another through an angle of approximately 360 so that the panel 87 may be folded into face contact when the two panels are collapsed.

In accordance with the Patent Statutes, l have described the principles of construction and operation of my improvement in HINGED PANELS and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A foldable panel structure including:

a pair of rigid generally rectangular panels having opposed parallel surfaces and connecting edges of substantially uniform thickness,

a unitary hinge structure including a first face panel portion secured to one of said parallel surfaces of a first of said pair of generally rectangular panels extending to one edge of said one parallel surface,

a first hinge panel foldably connected to said first panel portion along a fold line extending along said one edge of said one parallel surface,

said first hinge panel being substantially coextensive in width to the thickness of said rigid generally rectangular panels,

a second hinge panel foldably connected to said first hinge panel along a line parallel with said first named fold line,

said second hinge panel being substantially coextensive in width to said first hinge panel,

a second face panel portion fringedly connected to said second hinge panel along a fold line parallel to said previously mentioned fold lines,

means securing said second face panel portion to a corresponding parallel surface the second of said generally rectangular panels,

a series of slits extending at right angles to said fold lines and extending across both of said first and second hinge panels in generally right angular relation to said fold lines, dividing said hinge panels into hinge segments,

means securing the portions of said first hinge panels of alternate hinge segments to the edge of one of said pair of generally rectangular panels,

means securing the portions of said second hinge panels of the remaining alternate segments to the edge of the other of said pair of generally rectangular panels, whereby said rectangular panels may fold through substantially l80.

2. The structure of claim 1 and in which said first and second hinge panels are substantially in face contact 5 when said panels are in a common plane.

3. The structure of claim 1 and in which said hinge segments form a continuous connection between the rectangular panels regardless of which way the rectan- 11 gular panels are connected,twhereby there is no space between the adjoining panel edges, regardless of which way they are folded.

4. The structure of claim 1 and in which both panels are formed of paperboard or the like.

5. The structure of claim 1 and in which the hinge lines connecting the panels extend along opposite surfaces of said panels so'that regardless of the manner in which the panels are folded the lines of hinge between the panels is generally straight and aligned.

6. The structure of claim 1 and in which the first and second face panel portions extend the full width of said rectangular panels.

7. A foldable panel construction including each panel which is provided with a first planar panel surface and a rectangular tubular structure along one of two parallel edges hereof,

a second panel surface parallel to the first planar surface and secured to the portion of said rectangular tubular surface which is parallel to said first planar surface,

a pair of hinge panels hi-ngedly connected together and each hingedly connected to an adjoining edge of said second panel surface,

said hinge panels of said pair being between the adjoining edges of said tubular structures in substantial face contact when said panels are in a common plane,

transverse slits extending across said hinge panels dividing said hinge panels into hinge segments,

the portions of said hinge panels forming alternate of said segments being connected in face contact to the portions of said tubular structures forming the adjoining edges of said panels,

the portions of said hinge panels forming the remaining alternate hinge segments being secured in face contact to the portion of the other of saidtubular structures forming the adjoining edge of the other i of said generally rectangular panel, whereby said panels may be folded in either direction from a common plane, a 8. The structure of claim 7 and including a rectangular tubular edge the other one of said parallel edges of said first planar panel and to which said second panel surface is secured.

9. The structure of claim 8 and including top and bot- 7 said rectangular tubular member, and larger diameter legs telescoped onto said first tubular members and engaging the lower ends of said rectangular tubular mem*

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Classifications
U.S. Classification160/135, 160/229.1, 160/351, 16/227
International ClassificationE04B2/74, G09F15/00, A47G5/00, E05D1/02, E05D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G5/00, G09F15/0068, E05D1/02, A47B2220/0072, E04B2/7429, E05D1/00
European ClassificationG09F15/00C, A47G5/00, E05D1/02, E04B2/74C3D3A