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Publication numberUS3914572 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1975
Filing dateNov 29, 1973
Priority dateNov 29, 1973
Also published asCA999933A1, USB420016
Publication numberUS 3914572 A, US 3914572A, US-A-3914572, US3914572 A, US3914572A
InventorsFred C Jensen
Original AssigneePark Ohio Industries Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for inductively heating the bearing surfaces of a crankshaft
US 3914572 A
Abstract
An apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a cylindrical bearing surface on a crankshaft, as the crankshaft is rotated about its central axis. The apparatus includes an inductor support element, an inductor generally matching the bearing surface and carried by the element, means for rotating the crankshaft about its central axis so that the bearing surface orbits in a generally circular path concentric with the central axis and first and second members each rotated abouts its own pivot axis which are generally parallel and generally coplanar with the central axis of the rotating crankshaft. The first and second members each include a pivot pin defining support means for the inductor support member and are generally aligned with the bearing surface being heated. The apparatus further includes means driven by crankshaft rotating means for rotating the first and second members in timed relationship with the rotating crankshaft so that the inductor follows along the rotating bearing surface for induction heating of the bearing surface preparatory to quench hardening. Sensors are used for sensing the spacing of the inductor from the bearing surface for slight adjustment in the driving mechanism between the crankshaft and the rotating first and second members when the spacing changes a selected amount.
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United States Patent 1 1 Jensen Oct. 21, 1975 APPARATUS FOR INDUCTIVELY HEATING THE BEARING SURFACES OF A CRANKSHAFT [75] Inventor: Fred C. Jensen, Euclid, Ohio [73] Assignee: Park-Ohio Industries, Inc.,

Cleveland, Ohio [22] Filed: Nov. 29, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 420,016

[44] Published under the Trial Voluntary Protest Program on January 28, 1975 as document no. B 420,016.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,247,353 4/1966 Cory 219/1057 3,300,614 l/1967 Sorensen 219/1043 3,494,604 2/1970 Reinke et al 266/4 E1 Primary ExaminerBruce A. Reynolds Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Meyer, Tilberry & Body [57] ABSTRACT An apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a cylindrical bearing surface on a crankshaft, as the crankshaft is rotated about its central axis. The apparatus includes an inductor support element, an inductor generally matching the bearing surface and carried by the element, means for rotating the crankshaft about its central axis so that the bearing surface orbits in a generally circular path concentric with the central axis and first and second members each rotated abouts its own pivot axis which are generally parallel and generally coplanar with the central axis of the rotating crankshaft. The first and second members each include a pivot pin defining support means for the inductor support member and are generally aligned with the bearing surface being heated. The apparatus further includes means driven by crankshaft rotating means for rotating the first and second members in timed relationship with the rotating crankshaft so that the inductor follows along the rotating bearing surface for induction heating of the bearing surface preparatory to quench hardening. Sensors are used for sensing the spacing of the inductor from the bearing surface for slight adjustment in the driving mechanism between the crankshaft and the rotating first and second members when the spacing changes a selected amount.

11 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures Patent Oct. 21, 1975 Sheetlof6 3,914,572

FIG.

US. Patent Oct. 21, 1975 Sheet 2 of6 3,914,572

Sheet 3 of 6 3,914,572

U.S. Patent Oct. 21, 1975 U.S. Patent Oct. 21, 1975 Sheet4of6 3,914,572

Patent Oct. 21, 1975 Sheet50f6 3,914,572

APPARATUS FOR INDUCTIVELY HEATING THE BEARING SURFACES OF A CRANKSHAFT DISCLOSURE The invention relates to the art of induction heating and more particularly to an improved apparatus for inductively heating the bearing pin of a crankshaft.

The invention is particularly applicable for inductively heating the bearing pins on the throws of a crankshaft preparatory to quench hardening of these pins, and it will be described with particular reference thereto; however, it is appreciated that the invention has broader applications and can be used for inductively heating various cylindrical surfaces as they are rotated about an axis.

The bearing surfaces, such as the pins, of a crankshaft are case hardened by first inductively heating the bearing surfaces of the pins and then quench hardening the surfaces. Many devices have been developed for this purpose. The most common arrangement includes a drive mechanism for rotating the crankshaft about its central axis which causes the various pins to orbit about the central axis of the crankshaft. An inductor is brought into spaced relationship with the pin generally from the top. One or more downwardly extending locator elements are adapted to ride along the pin surface to maintain the proper spacing between the inductor and the surface being heated. The inductor is carried by a counter balanced mechanism, such as parellelogram so that only a slight pressure is exerted on the rotating pin by the locator elements. A quench body is often associated with the inductor so that, after the heating cycle has been completed, the rotating bearing pin can be quench hardened. This type system has been successfully used in hardening the normal crankshaft pins; however, certain problems exist when large crankshafts of the type used in large diesel engines are to be hardened. In that instance, the bearing pins are quite large and the inductor and quench body for heating and quenching the surface of the pins are quite heavy. Consequently, when the inductor rides on pins a substantial amount of weight is exerted on the locator elements and the normal counterbalancing arrangement is not completely acceptable. For this reason, substantial difficulties have been experienced in modifying the basic crankshaft hardening machines for use in hardening the bearing pins of large crankshafts.

The present invention relates to an improved apparatus for heating and then quench hardening the bearing surfaces of a large crankshaft, which improvement overcomes the difficulties encountered when attempting to adapt the normal crankshaft hardening apparatus to this use.

In accordance with the invention, there is provided an apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a bearing on a crankshaft as the crankshaft is rotated about its central axis. The surface of a pin has an axis generally parallel to the central axis of the crankshaft and is offset radially therefrom a given distance along a given radial line with respect to the crankshaft. The apparatus comprises an inductor support element, an inductor generally matching the surface and carried by the element, and means for rotating the crankshaft about its central axis whereby the pin axis orbits in a generally circular path concentric with the central axis and on a radius extending from the central axis the aforementioned given distance. First and LII second members are each rotated about its own pivot axis which are generally parallel to and coplanar with the central axis of the crankshaft. A pin carried by each of the first and second members is pivotally connected to the inductor support member to define support means for this support member. These pins are generally spaced from their respective axes in a direction generally parallel to the radial line of the bearing pin and are generally at the same distance as the given distance. Finally, there are provided means driven by the rotating means for rotating the first and second members in timed relationship with the crankshaft whereby the inductor follows along the bearing surface as the bearing pin orbits around the central axis of the rotating crankshaft. By using this apparatus, there is a positive driving of the inductor in an orbital path matching the orbit of the bearing surface to be heated. No counterbalancing is required and there is no tendency to bounce away from the pin as it is rotating around the central axis of the crankshaft. This positive driving action maintains proper spacing for efficient induction heating of the bearing pin surface during the heating operation.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the apparatus as defined above, includes an adjustable means between the driven means of the inductor element and the crankshaft rotating means so that the relationship between the rotational speed of the crankshaft and the speed of the first and second members driving the inductor support element can be changed to assure proper movement of the inductor with respect to the surface. In accordance with still a further aspect of the invention, sensors are provided at the inductor to sense proper spacing of the inductor during the heating operation so that the adjusting means can be controlled to rectify any improper spacing. By providing this means, slight misalignments between the bearing pin and the mechanism when the crankshaft is located within the apparatus can be compensated for during the heating operation.

The primary object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a bearing on a crankshaft as the crankshaft is being rotated about its central axis, which apparatus provides a positive drive of the inductor in an orbital path matching the orbital path of the rotating bearing pin.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a bearing on a crankshaft as the crankshaft is rotated about its central axis, which apparatus lessens the bouncing action of the inductor with respect to the rotating bearing pin and requires no counterbalancing of the inductor.

Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus as defined above which can be adjusted to various offsets for the bearing pins.

Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus as defined above which is adjustable to compensate for instantaneous changes in the spacing between the inductor and the bearing.

Still a further object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus as defined above wherein the inductor is positively driven in an oribital path generally matching the orbital path of the rotating pin so that the pin itself need not be used for effecting the movement of the inductor with respect to the rotating, orbiting bearing pin of the crankshaft.

Theseand' other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken together with the accompanying drawings in which:

? FIG. -1' is a side elevational view showing, schematically, the preferred embodiment of the present inventron;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional, enlarged view showing the preferred "embodiment of the present invention;

F IG.3 is across-sectional view taken generally along line 3-3-of'FlG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken generally-along line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken generally along line 66 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged cross-sectional view showing the inductor and quench unit of the preferred embodiment of. the present invention;

1 FIG. 8 is a partial view taken generally along line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 isa partial view taken generally along line 9-9 of FIG. 7; and,

FIG. 10 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating the operation of the sensors used in the preferred embodiment of the present invention.

I Referring now to the drawings wherein the showings are for the purpose of illustrating a preferred embodiment-of the invention only and not for the purpose of generally along limiting same, FIG. 1 shows an apparatus A for inductivelyheating and then quench hardening a crankshaft B rotated about itscentral axis x. The crankshaft includeswaxially spaced main bearings 10 and axially spaced crank pin bearings 12located on the radially extending throws of the crankshaft and having outer cylindrical surfacesl4 concentric with pin axes y, shown in FIG. 3. Apparatus A is primarily used for heating and quench hardening. the bearing pins 12; however, it

v could alsobe used for heating and quench hardening themain bearings which are generally concentric with v"the centralaxis x. In accordance with somewhat normal practice,the crankshaft is supported within apparatus A by a spindle .or chuck at one end and a center 22 at theother end. By driving the chuck or spindle 20, the crankshaft B is rotated about axis x.

.Inaccordance. with, the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the apparatus A includes, as primary elements,a carriage adapted; to move axially along crankshaft B' from one bearing to the next, a drive mechanism 32 for rotatingchuck 20 and driving the apparatus'A, an inductor and quenching support mechanism 34 for heating and quench hardening the individual bearings 10 and 12, an inductor drive mechanism 36 for driving the inductor and quenchsupport mechanism 34 in an orbital pathmatching the orbital path of the associated pin Has it is rotated about the central axis x of crankshaft B'or a circular path matching bearing 10, and a speed modulator 38 for changing the speed relationship between the rotating crankshaft and the inductor and quenching support mechanism 34 to assure that the inductor and quenching support mechanism follows the path of the bearing as the crankshaft rotates. Each of'thes'e main or primary components will be discussed separately with a discussion of their operating characteristics" when heating a bearing pin 12,

which will explain the operation and function of the preferred embodiment of the present invention.

CARRIAGE 30 Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 1-3, carriage 30 includes a lower frame 40 supported by two spaced guides or bars 42, only one of which is shown. Rollers 44 supported upon frame 40 engage rails 42 to allow axial movement of frame 40 with respect to crankshaft B when it is mounted in apparatus A. An abutment 46 extending downwardly from frame 40 engages stop 48 to limit the axial movement of frame 40 toward chuck or spindle 20. A similar stop is provided at the opposite end of apparatus A to limit the opposite movement of carriage 30. A variety of mechanisms could be used for supporting and driving carriage 30; however, in'accordance with the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the bars 42 and rollers 44 provide the support and a carriage drive 60 selectively moves the carriage 30 along the bars. Drive 60 includes a rack 62 extending parallel to bars 42, reversible motor 64 having an output pinion 65 engaging rack 62 and a mounting plate 6 6. Back up rollers 70, 72 coact with pinion 65 to hold the pinion in engagement with the rack for drivingcarriage 30 as motor 64 is rotated in either direction. Motor 64 drives the carriage 30 to the proper position for alignment with the bearing in 12 to be inductively heated and quench hardened.

DRIVE MECHANISM 12 Referring now to the right side of FIGS. 1 and 2 and the phantom lines in FIG. 3, the drive mechanism for apparatus A includes a housing and adrive motor 82 connected through a gearbox 84 to a main drive shaft 86. This shaft rotates timing bar and sprocket 92 secured thereto. A spindle sprocket 94 is connected to sprocket 92 by chain 96 riding over an idler sprocket 98. Operation of motor 82 drives the timing bar 90 and sprocket 94 to rotatea shaft 100 which, in turn, rotates spindle 20 and crankshaft B about the central axis x. During this rotation, the bearing pins 12 orbit around axis x in a path determined by radial spacing of the pin from the axis.

MECHANISM 34 Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 2-4, the inductor and quenching support mechanism 34 includes an inductor support element formed primarily of a plate 112 having an axially extending elongted female dovetail guide 114 supported on the plate and coacting with support bar 116 having a male dovetail structure. For the purposes of loading and unloading, the plate 112 is reciprocated with respect to bar 116. When in the proper position, these two elements are locked by an appropriate means, not shown. Bar 116 is carried and moved by outwardly extending pivot support pins 120, 122 having central axes u, v, respectively. These pins are connected to the output of the inductor drive mechanism 36, in a'rnanner to be de an appropriate design is schematically shown in FIGS.

7, 8 and 9. This inductor'includes schematically illustrated input leads 152, 154 connected across an appropriate alternating current power supply, schematically shown as generator 156. The inductor, in accordance with normal practice, is hollow to allow circulation of an appropriate liquid coolant during the heating operation. To replace the inductor, appropriate contacts are located at joint 158, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. This makes the electrical connection between the inductor and the input leads in accordance with normal inductor design. The quench body 160 is a hollow structure having a cylindrical wall with a plurality of orifices or holes 162 for directing a quenching liquid against the rotating surface 14 after the inductor 150 has inductively heated the surface to a quench hardening temperature. In accordance with the illustrated embodiment of the invention, a manifold 164 is connected to the quench inlet 166 and is pivoted about axis 170 by a spocket 172 fixedly secured to manifold 164 and is driven by sprocket 174 through a chain 176. Rotation of sprocket 174 pivots the manifold 164 to the phantom line position as shown in FIG. 3 for the purpose of loading and unloading a crankshaft into apparatus A. After the crankshaft has been positioned in the apparatus, frame 40 has been positioned properly and support element 110 has been shifted into operating position, sprocket 174 pivots the manifold 164 and quench body 160 into the solid line position shown in FIG. 3.

Incorporated between the inductor block 140 and quench body 160 is a pair of diametrically opposed sensor heads 180, 182 best shown in FIGS. 7-10. These sensors detect the spacing or concentricity of the orbiting pin 12 with respect to the inductor and quench body. If there is an instantaneous decrease detected by either sensor head, a signal is directed to a speed, direction control 184 to create a signal in line 186 to rotate motor 190 in the proper direction at the proper speed determined by the sensed position of the pin 12 with respect to the inductor and quench body. In this man ner, during the heating and quenching operation, motor 190 maintains optimum spacing of the inductor and quench body. This is accomplished by adjusting the orbital movement of inductor support element 110, in a manner. to be described later.

INDUCTOR DRIVE MECHANISM 36 The inductor drive mechanism 36 is best shown in FIGS. 25 as including two pairs of vertically spaced, transversely extending beams 200, 202 supported with respect to each other by vertical pillars 204. Beams 202 are secured, by an appropriate mechanism not shown, onto frame 40 of carriage 30 so that the inductor drive mechanism is movable axially of the crankshaft in accordance with movement of the carriage. In this manner, the drive mechanism can be positioned opposite to a selected one of the orbiting bearing pins 12. A pair of jornals 210, best shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5, form two separate supports for the pins 120, 122 used in driving the inductor support element 110 in the proper orbital path. The structure associated with each of the journals 210 is substantially identical; therefore, only one of these structures will be described in detail and this description will apply to the other journal and its associated structure. Referring to FIG. 5, an outer, rotating hollow shaft 220 is connected at the left'end with a gear 222 and at the right end with an arm 224 so that the arm is rotated in unison with gear 222. In this manner, pin 120, or pin 122, rotates about its axis r. As best shown in FIG. 3, axis r is generally coplanar with and generally parallel to the central axis x of the rotating crankshaft B. The two gears 222 are driven by a single gear 226 for the purpose of rotating arms 224 and pins 120, 122 in unison in a path generally matching the path of pin 12.

A variety of structures could be used for adjusting the radial spacing of pins 120, 122 with respect to the axis r or the arm carrying the respective pin. This adjustment is made when the radial spacing of the bearing pin 12 being processed is changed. In other words, the pins 120, 122 are located in generally the same radial direction and the same radial distance from the axes r as the pin being inductively heated. The support bar 116 maintains the parallel relationship between the two rotating arms. As long as the connection with pins 120, 122 is adjusted to be at the same radial distance, the arms are coordinated and act somewhat like a rotating parallelogram wherein one bar extends between the axes r. By adjusting the spacing of the pins 120, 122 with respect to the arms to the same radius as the bearing pin 12 is spaced from axis x, the proper orbiting movement is created by the rotating pins 120, 122 through arms 224. Various arrangements could be used for this adjusting operation; however, in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, each of the arms 224 includes a dovetail slot 230 which receives a dovetailed pin block 232 so that the block can reciprocate in a radial direction with respect to the arm. A slot 234, best shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, provides a lower recess in which there is located a rack as shown in FIG. 4. This rack is secured onto pin block 232 and coacts with a pinion 240 rotatably driven by a shaft 242 extending through hollow shaft 220, as shown in FIG. 5. The slot 234 allows the block 232 to move downwardly into a position where axes u, r are aligned. In this manner, the spacing of pins 120, 122 can be adjusted from this rotating center of arm 224 to an outer position determined by the largest pin to be inductively heated and quench hardened by apparatus A. Shafts 242 terminated in beveled gears 244 which are driven, in unison, by a motor 250 through a drive shaft 252 and spaced beveled gears 254, 256. Rotation of the motor 250 rotates beveled gears 254 and pinions 240. In this manner, the pins 120, 122 are adjusted in unison with respect to the axes r of rotating arms 224. Of course, other arrangements could be provided for making this adjustment. Indeed, pins 120, 122 could be manually adjusted with respect to the arms 224 and located by an appropriate measuring device. To secure the arms in their adjusted position, any appropriate mechanism could be provided. In accordance with the illustrated embodiment of the invention, bolts 260 are threadably received within the pin blocks 232 so that they can be loosened when the blocks are adjusted and tightened when the blocks are to be locked into place. After the adjustment has been done by motor 250, a clutch 262 is disengaged so that the beveled gears 244, 254 and 256 are free wheeling. This prevents a driving action by pinions 240 when the arms 224 are rotated during the normal operation of apparatus A.

To complete the discussion of inductor drive mechanism 36, gear 226 rotates the two spaced gears 222 and is driven by timing bar through speed modulator or by adjusting device 38, to be described later. Assume that there is no adjustment by the modulating device 38, then the gear 226 is driven by timing gear 90 as is spindle sprocket 94. Consequently, pins 120, 122 orbit in a path coinciding with the path of pin 12 so that inductor 150 and quench body 160 remain in the proper spacing during the orbiting of the bearing pin for heating and quenching. 1

SPEED MODULATOR 38 In some instances, the mechanism as so far described does not exactly follow the orbital movement of the bearing pin 12 being heated and quench hardened. Consequently, in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention, there is provided a speed modulator, generally designated as mechanism 38 to compensate for slight deviations in the path followed by pins 120, 122 and the path followed by bearing pin 12. In accordance with the illustrated embodiment, the speed modulator employs a planatary gear box 270 best shown in FIG. 5 and having a spider 272 with a plurality of beveled gears 274. Driven beveled gear 276 is connected to timing bar 90 by a key 276a to form the input to the planatary gear box 270. The output of the gear box is a driven beveled gear 278 journalled in bearing 278a and secured onto gear 226. Spider 272 is journalled between bearing 278a and a similar bearing 272a so that it may be driven by motor 190 through input gears 280, 282. The motor 190 is controlled as discussed in connection with sensors 180, 182 and the schematically illustrated control structure of FIG. 10. In the prefered embodiment, motor 190 is stationary as long as the pins 120, 122 are orbiting in the proper path to prevent actuation of sensors 180, 182 in a manner requesting modulation of the speed between gears 276, 278. When the sensors, together or separately, indicate that there should be a modulation tocorrectthe orbital path followed by inductor 150 and quench body 160, motor 190 is driven at the proper speed and in the proper direction to maintain the desired position of sensors 180, 182 and, thus, the desired position of the orbiting inductor support element 110.

OPERATION The operation of apparatus A is quite apparent from the description of the individual parts; however, in review, the motor 250 drives shaft 252 through clutch 262 until thepins 120, 122 are positioned in a location corresponding to the radial position of the bearing pin 12 to be hardened. Support bar 116 is released from its locked position with respect to guide. 1 14 so that inductor support element 110 can be moved away from the crankshaft area of the apparatus A. Thereafter, the crankshaft is moved downwardly through the position vacated by support element 110 into a position where center 22 and chuck 20 lock the crankshaft for rotation about axis x. Then, carriage 30 is shifted axially to alignment with pin 12 which is rotated about axis x until it aligns with the inductor support block 140. Then, the inductor support element 110 is moved inwardly until the spacing between inductor 150 and surface 14 has the proper spacing for induction heating. Thereafter, bar 116 is locked with respect to guide 114. During this movement, quench body 160 has been pivoted upwardly by sprocket 174. In the proper position, sprocket 174, by an appropriate driving arrangement, rotates the quench body into the proper position shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The apparatus A is now in condition for operation. Motor 82 drives timing bar 90 and chain 96 drives sprocket 94 to rotate the crankshaft about central axis x. This causes orbiting of pin 12 along a circular path determined by the spacing ofpin 12 from axis x. At the same time, bar drives pins 120, 122 by gear 226 through gears 222 and arms 224. During this rotational movement, generator 156 energizes inductor for inductively heating the outer cylindrical surface 14 of pin 12. After the heating operation has taken place, quenching fluid from inlet 166 is directed through holes 162, best shown in FIG. 7, to quench harden the previously heated outer surface 14.

In accordance with the preferred embodiment, speed modulator 38 controlled by sensors 180, 182 and motor is not used unless the orbiting action of support element 110 created by pins 120, 122 does not cause the inductor and quench body to move in the same path as the orbiting pin 12. When improper spacing exist between the inductor and quench body and the orbiting pin 12, an instantaneous correction is caused by a signal in line 186 from control device 184. This drives the motor 190 the proper direction at the proper speed to allow adjustment between the speed of bevel gear 276 and bevel gear 278 ofplanatary gear box 270. The more the displacement sensed by sensors 180, 182, the faster the speed of motor 190. Also, the direction of displacement determines'whether or not the orbiting action of inductor support element is leading or lagging the orbiting action of pin 12. This determines the direction at which motor 190 is rotating for the corrective action created by the speed modulator 38. This compensation is generally quite small since the apparatus A is adjusted in a manner which attempts to directly correlate the movement of pins 120, l22with the movement of pin 12. It is within the contemplation of the present invention to provide other drive arrangements wherein the sensors 180, 182 can drive in a positive manner the inductor and quench body, in unison, to correspond with the actual orbiting path of the bearing pin 12 being inductively heated and quench hardened by apparatus A.

The present invention can be employed for heating either the concentric main bearings 10 or the offset pin bearings 12 by adjusting the position of block 232 and axes u with respect to axes r. When these axes coincide, the main bearings can be processed. In the past, separate drive arrangements were often required for the main and pin bearings.

Having thus defined my invention, I claim:

1. An apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a bearing pin on a crankshaft as said crankshaft is rotated about its central axis, said surface having an axis generally parallel to said central axis and offset radially therefrom a given distance along a given radial line with respect to said crankshaft, said apparatus comprising: an inductor support element; an inductor generally matching said surface and carried by said element; means for rotating said crankshaft about said central axis whereby said pin axis orbits in a generally circular path concentric with said central axis and .on a radius extending from said central axis said given distance; first and second members each rotated about its own pivot axis, said pivot axis being generally parallel to and coplanar withsaid central axis; a pivot pin carried by each of said first and second members and pivotally connected to said inductor support member, said pivot pins defining support means for said inductor support member and being generally spaced from one of said pivot axes in a direction generally parallel to said radial line and generally at said given distance; and, means driven by said rotating means for rotating said first and second members in timed relationship with said crankshaft.

2. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said first and second members each include radially extending guide ways generally parallel to said radial line, block means for carrying each of said pivot pins and means for slidably supporting one of said block means in each of said guide ways.

3. An apparatus as defined in claim 2 including means for moving said block means in unison along said guide ways.

4. An apparatus as defined in claim 3 including means for locking said block means with respect to said guide ways.

5. An apparatus as defined in claim 2 including means for locking said block means with respect to said guide ways.

6. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 including means for moving said pivot pins in unison along lines generally parallel to said radial line.

7. An apparatus as defined in claim 6 including means for locking said pivot pins with respect to said first and second members, respectively.

' 8. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 including adjustable means between said driven means and said crankshaft rotating means for adjusting the relationship between the rotational speed of said crankshaft and rotational speed of said first and second members.

9. An apparatus as defined in claim 1 including releasable means for allowing selective translative movement of said inductor support member with respect to said pivot pins and means for locking said releasable means with respect to said pivot pins.

10. An apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical surface of a bearing pin on a crankshaft as said crankshaft is rotated about its central axis, said surface having an axis generally parallel to said central axis and offset radially therefrom a given distance along a given radial line with respect to said crankshaft, said apparatus comprising: an inductor support element; an inductor generally matching said surface and carried by said element; means for rotating said crankshaft about said central axis whereby said pin axis orbits in a generally circular path concentric with said central axis and on a radius extending from said central axis said given distance; and means for positively driving said inductor support element by said rotating means in a path corresponding to said generally circular path of said pin axis.

11. An apparatus for inductively heating the cylindrical bearing surface on a crankshaft as said crankshaft is rotated about its central axis, said surface having a surface axis generally parallel to said central axis of said crankshaft, said apparatus comprising: an inductor members in timed relationship with said crankshaft.

Patent Citations
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US3494604 *Mar 3, 1967Feb 10, 1970Aeg Elotherm GmbhApparatus for inductively heating parts of cylindrical workpieces
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4363946 *May 29, 1980Dec 14, 1982Hoesch Werke AktiengesellschaftInductor for inductively heating raceways of antifriction bearing rings
US4880281 *Aug 4, 1988Nov 14, 1989Skf Industrial Trading & Development Co. B.V.Wheel bearing
US6013904 *Sep 8, 1998Jan 11, 2000Contour Hardenting, Inc.Induction hardening apparatus for a crankshaft
US6018155 *Oct 29, 1997Jan 25, 2000Contour Hardening, Inc.Induction hardening apparatus for a crankshaft
US6111236 *Sep 17, 1999Aug 29, 2000Contour Hardening, Inc.Induction hardening apparatus for a crankshaft
US6153865 *Nov 1, 1999Nov 28, 2000Contour Hardening, Inc.Induction hardening apparatus for a crankshaft
US6160247 *Jan 24, 2000Dec 12, 2000Contour Hardening, Inc.Induction hardening apparatus for a crankshaft
US6362462Oct 30, 2000Mar 26, 2002Contour Hardening, Inc.Induction hardening coil for a crankshaft
US8716636Oct 4, 2010May 6, 2014John C. BollmanArrangement and method for powering inductors for induction hardening
WO1999022038A2 *Oct 28, 1998May 6, 1999Contour Hardening IncInduction hardening apparatus for a crankshaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/639, 219/676, 266/249, 266/125, 219/652
International ClassificationC21D9/30, H05B6/02
Cooperative ClassificationC21D9/30
European ClassificationC21D9/30