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Publication numberUS3915161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1975
Filing dateJan 18, 1974
Priority dateJan 18, 1974
Publication numberUS 3915161 A, US 3915161A, US-A-3915161, US3915161 A, US3915161A
InventorsShields Ralph J
Original AssigneeShields Ralph J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mobile traction apparatus
US 3915161 A
Abstract
In a mobile traction apparatus, a harness includes a chin receiving strap, an occipital zone receiving strap, and cords interconnecting the straps for cooperation therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of a patient. A frame is supported on the body of the patient and spring-loaded apparatus is mounted on the frame for applying a substantially constant upwardly directed force to the cord of the harness and thereby maintaining the spine of the patient in traction. In one embodiment of the invention a belt is worn around the waist of the patient and the frame includes a lower portion extending upwardly from the belt and an upper portion slidably supported on the lower portion and extending over the head of the patient. The spring-loaded apparatus comprises compression springs mounted between the lower and upper portions of the frame and biasing the upper portion upwardly. In another embodiment of the invention the frame comprises a unitary structure extending upwardly from the belt and over the head of the patient and the spring-loaded apparatus comprises tension springs which secure the cord of the harness to the portion of the frame extending over the head of the patient. In a third embodiment the frame includes a portion supported on the shoulders of the patient and a portion extending over the head of the patient. The springloaded apparatus comprises tension springs depending from the frame on opposite sides of the head of the patient for connection to the cord of the harness, whereby the upper neck of the patient is maintained in traction. A fourth embodiment is substantially identical in operation to the first embodiment but is fabricated from rod sections, thereby substantially reducing the cost of manufacturing the mobile traction apparatus.
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United States Patent [191 Shields Oct. 28, 1975 MOBILE TRACTION APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Ralph J. Shields, 11217 Park Central Place, Dallas, Tex. 75230 [22] Filed: Jan. 18, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 434,831

[52] US. Cl. 128/75; 128/84 C [51] A61H 1/02 [58] Field of Search 128/75, 87, 84, DIG. 24, 128/DIG. 23

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,706,982 4/1955 Hale et al 128/87 B 2,772,675 l2/l956 Simmons 128/87 B 2,813,527 11/1957 Cook 128/87 B 2,828,735 4/1958 Thompson l 28/75 3,336,922 8/1967 Taylor 128/75 3,359,976 12/1967 Laval, Jr. 128/75 3,605,736 9/1971 DAmico et al. 128/75 3,795,243 3/1974 Miller 128/87 BX 3,827,429 8/1974 Heikes 128/75 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 897,783 6/1944 France 128/DIG. 23

1,521,669 3/1967 France 128/75 Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant ExaminerJ. Yasko Attorney, Agent, or FirmRichards, Harris & Medlock [57] ABSTRACT In a mobile traction apparatus, a harness includes a chin receiving strap, an occipital zone receiving strap,

and cords interconnecting the straps for cooperation therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of a patient. A frame is supported on the body of the patient and spring-loaded apparatus is mounted on the frame for applying a substantially constant upwardly directed force to the cord of the harness and thereby maintaining the spine of the patient in traction. In one embodiment of the invention a belt is worn around the waist of the patient and the frame includes a lower portion extending upwardly from the belt and an upper portion slidably supported on the lower portion and extending over the head of the patient. The spring-loaded apparatus comprises compression springs mounted between the lower and upper portions of the frame and biasing the upper portion upwardly. In another embodiment of the invention the frame comprises a unitary structure extending upwardly from the belt and over the head of the patient and the spring-loaded apparatus comprises tension springs which secure the cord of the harness to the portion of the frame extending over the head of the patient. In a third embodiment the frame includes a portion supported on the shoulders of the patient and a portion extending over the head of the patient. The springloaded apparatus comprises tension springs depending from the frame on opposite sides of the head of the patient for connection to the cord of the harness, whereby the upper neck of the patient is maintained in traction. A fourth embodiment is substantially identical in operation to the first embodiment but is fabricated from rod sections, thereby substantially reducing the cost of manufacturing the mobile traction apparatus.

11 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Oct.28, 1975 Sheetl0f3 3,915,161

US. Patent' 00128, 1975 Sheet 2 of3 US. Patent Oct. 28, 1975 Sheet 3 of3 FIG. 5

MOBILE TRACTION APPARATUS BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE, INVENTION This invention relates to a mobile traction apparatus and more particularly to a device for applying traction to the neck of a patient while accommodating complete freedom of movement.

As is well known, an ailment frequently encountered in modern medical practice is that of cervical strain (neck strain) which often occurs as a result of automobile accidents and the like. A related ailment when considered from the treatment standpoint is termed the scapulocostal syndrome, more commonly called a crick in the neck. Still another related ailment is that of tension neck pain.

These and other ailments are often treated by placing the neck of the patient in traction. Heretofore many devices for this purpose have required that the patient be confined to bed. Other systems have been designed which require the patient to be seated adjacent to a door or similar structure which supports a pulley system that is utilized to apply a force to the head of the patient, thereby placing the neck of the patient in traction. Systems have also been designed which are worn entirely by the patient, but prior art systems of this type have been very complicated in design and have therefore been expensive to purchase, and have also been very cumbersome to use. In the latter regard, many prior art systems have been very restrictive of the movements of the patient and have thereby prevented the patient from participating in various activities such as working, recreation, etc.

The present invention relates to a mobile traction apparatus which overcomes the foregoing and other difficulties long since associated with prior art. Thus, by means of the invention there is provided a mobile traction apparatus which is uncomplicated in design and is therefore economical to purchase and use. The very important advantage to the use of the invention relates to the fact that a mobile traction apparatus constructed in accordance therewith permits substantially complete freedom of movement of the patient and thereby permits the patient to perform such routine activities as workday activities, recreational activities which are not otherwise prevented by the ailment, sleeping, and driving an automobile. An equally important advantage to the use of the invention relates to the fact that a mobile traction apparatus incorporating the invention is capable of more effective treatment of ailments such as cervical strain (neck strain), etc. than has been possible with prior art traction devices.

In accordance with the broader aspects of the invention, a mobile traction apparatus includes a harness comprising a strap for receiving the chin of a patient, a strap for receiving the occipital zone of 'the patient, and structure interconnecting the straps for cooperation therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of the patient. A frame includes a portion extending over the head of the patient, and spring-loaded structure is provided for applying a substantially constant upwardly directed force to the harness and thereby maintaining the neck of the patient in traction.

in accordance with one embodiment of the invention a belt is worn at the waist of the patient and is provided with pouches. The frame is supported in the pouches and extends upwardly and over the head of the patient.

The frame includes a tubular lower portion and a tubular upper portion slidably supported on the lower portion. Compression springs are mounted between the upper and lower portions of the frame and bias the upper portion upwardly. The upper portion of the frame is connected to the harness whereby the force of the compressionsprings is applied to the head of the patient to maintain the neck of the patient in traction. The frame is disassembleable into a plurality of relatively small pieces to facilitate both packaging and transportation of the mobile traction harness and subsequent storage of the device by the patient.

. In another embodiment of the invention the frame comprises a unitary structure supported at the waist and extending over the head of the patient. Tension springs depend from the frame and are connected to a the upper neck of the patient in traction.

A fourth embodiment of the invention operates substantially identically to the first embodiment to maintain the neckof a patient in traction. However, the frame is fabricated primarily from rod sections as opposed to tubular sections. By this means the cost of .manufacturing the mobile traction harness is substantially reduced.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A more complete understanding of the invention may be had by reference to the following Detailed Description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying Drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an illustration of a mobile traction harness incorporating a first embodiment of the invention and showing the invention in use; I

"FIG. 2 is a partial exploded view .of the mobiletraction harness of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an illustration of a mobile traction harness incorporating a second embodiment of the, invention;

FIG. 4 is an illustration of a mobile traction harness incorporating a third embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is an illustration of a mobile traction harness incorporating a fourth embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 6 is anillustration of a modification of the mobile traction harness of FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the Drawings, and particularly to FIG. lthereof, there is shown a mobile traction apparatus l0 incorporating a first embodiment of the invention. The mobile traction apparatus 10 includes a belt 12 which is worn around the waist of a patient P in the usual mannenThe belt 12 is conventional in design and may be formed from leather, various synthetic materials, various fabrics, etc. The belt I2 is provided with a buckle' 14 or other conventional means adapted to secure the belt in place around the waist of the patient.

The belt 12 supports a pair of pouches 16 (only one of which is shown). Each pouch 16 preferably includes a loop 18 which slidably receives the belt 12. l'twill' be understood, however, that the pouches 16 may be attached to the belt 12, if desired. Each pouch 16 further includes a frame receiving portion 20 comprising a tubular chamber which is closed at the bottom end and open at the top end.

The mobile traction apparatus further includes a frame 22. The'frame 22 is supported at the waist of the patient P by the belt 12 and the pouches l6 and extends upwardly therefrom and over the head of the patient. The frame includes a lower portion 24 comprising a pair of upwardly extending tubular members 26 positioned on opposite sides of the patient P. An upper portion 28 of the frame 22 is slidably supported on the lower portion 24 and extends over'the head of the patient P. The upper portion 28 is biased upwardly relative to the lower portion 24 by a pair of compression springs 30 positioned between the lower portion 24 and v the upper portion 28.

A pair of fasteners 32 are mounted in the upper portion 28 of the frame 22, and a pair of chains 34 are secured to the fasteners 32. The chains 34 function to connect a harness 36 to the frame 22. The harness 36 is conventional in design and comprises a strap 38 for receiving the chin of the patient P, a strap 40 for receiving the occipital zone of the patient, and a pair of elongate flexible cords 42 which interconnect the straps 38 and 40 and which cooperate therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of the patient.

More specifically, the straps 38 and 40 of the harness 36 comprise a fabric construction having high flexibility and high toughness and having an outer surface which is very soft. By this means the straps combine maximum strength with maximum comfort to the patient. The cords 42 of the harness 36 may be formed from any convenient material having high flexibility and high toughness, such as nylon cord.

v It will thus be understood that the mobile traction apparatus 10 functions to apply a substantially constant upwardly directed force to the head of the patient P, and thereby maintains the spine of the patient in traction. The force is provided by the compression springs 30 which bias the upper portion 28 of the frame 22 up- The construction of the mobile traction apparatus 10' will be better understood by reference to FlG.- 2. The frame 22'is fabricated from metal tubing, such as aluminum tubing, stainless'steel tubing, or the like. The tubular members 26 comprising the lower portion 24 of the frame 22 each comprise a lower portion 44 and an upper portion 46. A rod 48 is mounted in the upper end of the lower portion 44 and is retained by a crimp 50. The rod 48 is received in the lower end ofthe upper portion 46. A relatively long rod 52 is-mounted in the crimp 54. The compression spring 30 is mounted on the rod 52. p

The upper portion 28 of the; frame 22icomprises a. 1' pair of L-shaped portions 56' and 58. A rod 60 is L-shaped portion 56 and 58 are slidably received on the rods 52, whereby the upper portion 28 of the frame 22 is slidably supported on the lower portion 24 thereof.

' FIG. 2 further illustrates a modification of the mobile traction apparatus 10 which may be useful in some instances. The lower portion 44 of each tubular member 26 comprising the lower portion 24 of the frame 22 may be provided with a turnbuckle 64 for use in adjusting the overall height of the frame 22. This is for the purpose of fitting the mobile traction apparatus 10 to a particular patient. However, in actual practice it has been found that most if not all patients can be fitted with a frame 22 having an overall height of about 32 /2 inches.

A feature of the mobile traction apparatus 10 comprises the use of colored collars 66, 68, and at the intersections of the various component parts comprising the frame 22. These'collars are of different colors, for example, the collars 66 may be green, the collars 68 may be yellow, and the collars 70 may be red. This has been found to be advantageous in facilitating assembly of the frame 22 by a patient.v

' Those skilled in the art will appreciate the fact that the force which is applied to the head of a patient in order to maintain the spine of the patient in traction will vary in certain instances. The mobile traction apparatus 10 may be provided with suitable structure for varying the force which is applied by the compression springs 30. However, the mobile traction apparatus 10 is preferably supplied with three sets of compression springs 30, 30, and 30' These springs are designed to exert a force of 6 pounds, 13 pounds, and 20 pounds. when compressed two inches, respectively. By this means the attending physician may match the traction force to the needs of a, particular patient based on the usual criteria.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there is shown a mobile traction apparatus incorporating a second embodiment of the invention. The mobile traction apparatus 80 utilizes a belt and pouches mounted on the belt which may be identical to the belt 12 and the pouches 16 illustrated in FIG. 1. The mobile traction apparatus .80 further includes a frame 82 which is supported at .the waist of the patient by the belt and the pouches mounted thereon and which extends upwardly and over the head of the patient.

The frame .82 comprises a unitary structure which may be formed either from solid or tubular metal stock, as desired. The frame 82 is preferably substantially identical in shape to the frame 22 of the mobile traction apparatus '10. A pair of fasteners 84 are mounted in the top of the frame 82, and function to secure a pair of tension springs 86 to the frame 82. The springs 86 are in turn connected to a harness 88 which may beidentical in construction to the harness 36 shown in FIG. 1.

It will thus be understood that the mobile traction apparatus 80 functions substantially identically to the moupper end of the upper portion 46 and is retained bya "9 mounted in the L-shaped portion 58 and is retained by a crimp 62. The rod 60 is received in the corresponding end of the L-shaped portion 56."The lowerendsof the bile traction apparatus 10. A major difference between the'two devices relates to the factthat the frame 82 of the mobile traction apparatus 80 comprises a unitary structure-and is therefore more economical to manufacture. Another important difference between the two devices comprises the fact that rather than utilizing compression springs to apply an upwardly directed 'force to the upper portion of a frame which in turn applies the force to a harness, the mobile traction apparatus 80 utilizes the tension springs 86 to apply an upwardly directed force directly to the harness 88. These differences do not, however, result in any substantial difference between the operation of a mobile traction apparatus 80 and the operation of the mobile traction apparatus 10.

In FIG. 4 there is shown a mobile traction apparatus 90 comprising a third embodiment of the invention. The mobile traction apparatus 90 includes a frame 92 comprising a pair of molded plastic shoulder pads 94 and 96. The shoulder pads 94 and 96 are secured together and are adjustably positionable relative to each other by means of a pair of fasteners 98 mounted in the shoulder pad 96 and a pair of slots 100 formed in the shoulder pad 94 which receive the fasteners 98. A pair of straps 102 are provided for securing the shoulder pads 94 and 96 in place on the shoulders of a patient.

The frame 92 further includes a frame portion 104 mounted on the shoulder pads 94 and 96 by means of fasteners 106 and extending upwardly therefrom and over the head of the patient. A pair of fasteners 108 are mounted in the frame portion 104 and secure a pair of tension springs 110 thereto. The tension springs 110 are in turn connected to a harness 112 which may be identical in construction to the harness 36 illustrated in FIG. 1.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate the fact that the mobile traction apparatus 90 functions substantially identically to the mobile traction apparatus 80 to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of the patient and thereby maintain the spine of a patient in traction. A major difference between the two devices comprises the fact that whereas the frame 82 of the mobile traction apparatus 80 is supported at the waist of the patient, the frame 92 of the mobile traction apparatus 90 is supported on the shoulders of the patient. This results in some difference in the operation of the two devices in that whereas the mobile traction apparatus 80 is adapted to maintain the entire spine and the shoulders of the patient in traction, the mobile traction apparatus 90 maintains only the upper portion of the spine of the patient in traction. However, this difference may actually be advantageous in certain cases.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is shown a mobile traction apparatus 120 incorporating a fourth embodiment of the invention. The mobile traction apparatus 120 is used in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1 in connection with the mobile traction apparatus 10, and operates substantially identically to the mobile traction apparatus to maintain the spine of a patient in traction. The primary difference between the mobile traction apparatus 120 and the mobile traction apparatus 10 relates to the fact that the mobile traction apparatus 120 is fabricated primarily from rod sections, as opposed to tubular sections. By this means the cost of manufacturing the mobile traction apparatus is substantially reduced.

The mobile traction apparatus 120 includes a frame 122 comprising a lower portion 124 and an upper portion 126. The lower portion 124 of the frame 122 includes a pair of rod sections 128 (only one of which is shown) each having dimples 130 formed at the upper end thereof. A tubular section 132 is received on the upper end of each rod section 128 and is positioned by the dimples 130.

The upper portion 126 of the frame 122 includes a pair of rod sections 134 each slidably received in one of the tubular sections 132. A pair of compression springs 136 are mounted between the upper ends of the tubular sections 132 and a pair of washers 138 which are retained by dimples 140 formed on the rod sections 134. The springs 136 therefore function to bias the upper portion 126 of the frame 122 upwardly with respect to the lower portion 124.

The upper portion 126 of the frame 122 further includes a rod section 142 extending between the upper ends of the rod sections 134. The rod section 142 is secured to the rod sections 134 by means of connectors 144 which may comprise springs. Each connector 144 further includes a hook 146. The hooks 146 are employed to secure a harness to the upper portion 126 of the frame 122 of the mobile traction apparatus 120. The harness may be constructed identically to the harness 36 illustrated in FIG. 1 in connection with the mobile traction apparatus 10.

An important feature of the mobile traction apparatus 120 comprises the one piece construction of the rod section 142 at the extreme upper end of the frame 122. It has been found that any twisting of the top portion of the frame of a mobile traction apparatus incorporating the invention is highly undesirable because such twisting imposes an undue strain on the upper neck of the patient. The one piece construction of the rod section 142 completely prevents any such twisting, and

thereby eliminates any possibility of resulting discomfort to the patient.

In FIG. 6 there is shown a modification of the mobile traction apparatus 120. A rod section 148 is shaped identically to the rod section 142 and is conected to the upper ends of the rod sections 134 by means of the connectors 144. However, the hooks 146 are omitted from the connectors 144 when the rod section 148 is used. The rod section 148 is provided with a pair of tabs 150 (only one of which is shown) each having an aperture 152 formed therethrough. The tabs 150 are utilized in conjunction with hooks 154 received in the apertures 152 to secure a harness to the rod section 148 and hence to the upper portion 126 of the frame 122. The harness may be identical to the harness 36 illustrated in FIG. 1 in connection with the mobile traction apparatus 10.

As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, the mobile traction apparatus 120 is used in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1 in connection with the mobile traction apparatus 10. By this means the mobile traction apparatus 120 functions substantially identically to the mobile traction apparatus 10 to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of a patient and thereby maintain the spine of the 'patient intraction. The major difference between the mobile traction apparatus 120 and the mobile traction apparatus 10 relates to the fact that the mobile traction apparatus 120 is fabricated primarily from rod sections as opposed to tubular sections. By this means the cost of manufacturing a mobile traction apparatus is substantially reduced.

From the foregoing it will be understood that the present invention comprises a mobile traction apparatus incorporating numerous advantages over the prior art. A very important advantage resulting from the use of the invention relates to the fact that a patient wearing a mobile traction apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention is permitted to carry on substantially all normal activities without interference. These include routine workday activities, substantially all recreational activities which are not prohibited by the ailment itself, sleeping, and even driving an automobile. In fact, the only activity which is interfered with to even a small degree by the use of the invention is that of eating. An equally important advantage resulting from the use of the invention relates to the fact that the discomforts and pain which so frequently accompany spinal injuries are relieved to a greater extent by means of a mobile traction apparatus incorporating the present invention than is possible with prior art devices. The extent of the superior performance of devices incorporating the invention will be appreciated by the fact that in certain instances patients scheduled for surgery to relieve the pain accompanying their injury have been permitted to bypass such surgery by using a mobile traction apparatus incorporating the present invention.

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been illustrated in the accompanying Drawings and described in the foregoing Detailed Description, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiments disclosed, but is capable of numerous rearrangements, modifications, and substitutions of parts and elements without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is: l. A mobile traction apparatus comprising: belt means encircling the waist of a patient; frame means including a lower portion mounted on and extending upwardly from the belt means and an upper portion slidably supported on the lower portion and exending upwardly therefrom and over 'the head of a patient;

compression spring means mounted between the upper and lower portions of the frame for biasing the upper portion of the frame upwardly;

harness means including a first flexible strap for receiving the chin of a patient, a second flexible strap for receiving'the occipital zone of the patient, and at least two elongate flexible members interconnecting the ends of the flexible straps for cooperation therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of the patient;

means connecting the ends of each flexible member of the harness means at spaced points along the portion of the frame means extending over the head of the patient and thereby applying a constant upwardly directed force to the head of the patient to maintain the spine of the patient in traction; the lower portion of the frame comprising a pair of elongate tubular members extending upwardly from the belt means on opposite sides of the body of the patient and having rod means extending upwardly from their upper ends;

the upper portion of the frame comprising a pair of elongate tubular members slidably received on the rod means extending from the upper ends of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame; and

the tubular members comprising the upper portion of the frame being joined at a point over the head of the patient by a rod extending from one of the tubular members and received in the other tubular member.

2. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 1 further including pouch means received on the belt means for supporting the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame.

3. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 2 further comprising means for selectively varying the upward biasing force which is applied to the upper portion of the frame and thereby varying the traction force which is applied to the head of the patient.

4. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 3 wherein the lengths of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame are selectively adjustable.

5. A mobile traction apparatus comprising: belt means encircling the waist of a patient; frame means including a lower portion mounted on and extending upwardly from the belt means and an upper portion slidably supported on the lower portion and extending upwardly therefrom and over the head of the patient; the lower portion of the frame comprising a pair of elongate tubular members extending upwardly from the belt means on the opposite sides of the body of the patient and each having rod means secured in and extending upwardly from its upper end; the upper portion of the frame comprising at least one tubular member having an inverted U-shaped configuration and having the lower ends thereof slidably received on the rod means extending from the upper ends of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame;

compression spring means mounted on and encircling the rod means extending from the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame and engaging the tubular member comprising the upper portion of the frame for biasing the upper portion of the frame upwardly;

harness means including a first flexible strap for receiving the chin of the patient, a second flexible strap for receiving the occipital zone of the patient, and at least two elongate flexible members interconnecting the ends of the flexible strap for cooperation therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of the patient; and

means connecting the ends of each elongate flexible member of the harness means to spaced apart points on the portion of the upper portion of the frame means which extends over the head of the patient and thereby applying a constant upwardly directed force to the head of the patient to maintain the spine of the patient in traction.

6. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 5 wherein the belt means includes pouch means for receiving the lower ends of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame means and thereby supporting the frame means.

7. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 5 wherein each of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame means is further characterized by a lower portion extending generally vertically, a portion extending angularly upwardly and outwardly from the upper end of the lower portion, and an upper portion extending generally vertically from the upper end of the angularly extending portion.

8. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 5 wherein the upper portion of the frame comprises generally vertically disposed portions extending upwardly from the rod means at the upper ends of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame adjacent the sides of the head of the patient and a substantially horizontally disposed portion extending between the upper ends of the vertically disposed portions.

9. The mobile .traction apparatus according to claim further including means for selectively varying the upward biasing force which is applied to the upper portion of the frame and thereby varying the traction force which is applied to the head of the patient.

10. The mobile traction apparatus according to claim 5 wherein the lengths of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame are selectively adjustable.

11. A mobile traction apparatus comprising: belt means encircling the waist of a patient; pouch means on the belt means;

frame means including a lower portion mounted on and extending upwardly from the belt means and an upper portion slidably supported on the lower portion and extending upwardly therefrom and over the head of the patient; the lower portion of the frame means including a pair of tubular members each including a lower portion received in the pouch means of the belt means and extending generally vertically therefrom, a portion extending generally angularly upwardly from the lower portion, and an upper portion extending generally vertically from the upper end of the angularly extending portion; a pair of rods each secured in and extending upwardly from the upper end of one of the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame means;

the upper portion of the frame means comprising at least one tubular member having an inverted U- shaped configuration and including lower ends slidably received on the rods extending from the tubular members comprising the lower portion of the frame;

the tubular member comprising the upper portion of compression spring means mounted on and encircling the rods extending from the tubular members comprising the lower portions of the frame for urging the upper portion of the frame upwardly;

harness means including a first flexible strap for receiving the chin of the patient, a second flexible strap for receiving the occipital zone of the patient, and at least two elongate flexible members interconnecting the ends of the flexible straps for cooperation therewith to apply an upwardly directed force to the head of the patient; and

means connecting the ends of each of the flexible members to the upper portion of the frame means at spaced apart points on the horizontally disposed portion thereof and thereby applying a constant upwardly directed force to the head of the patient to maintain the spine of the patient in traction.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4114611 *May 9, 1977Sep 19, 1978Lyle Judge MTraction device
US4220147 *Dec 5, 1977Sep 2, 1980Allen Ralph SPartially disassemblable traction sling
US4539979 *Apr 27, 1983Sep 10, 1985Bremer Orthopedics, Inc.Temporary cervical traction maintenance
US4632099 *Jan 17, 1985Dec 30, 1986Mollo Leonard JEmergency transport neck immobilizer
US4732144 *Dec 10, 1986Mar 22, 1988Cunanan Oscar SMulti-section emergency transport neck immobilizer
US7124756 *Nov 10, 2005Oct 24, 2006Simon Jacob FrankMedical device for overcoming airway obstruction
US7124757 *Nov 10, 2005Oct 24, 2006Simon Jacob FrankMedical device for overcoming airway obstruction
US8251934 *Dec 10, 2007Aug 28, 2012Bonutti Research, Inc.Orthosis and method for cervical mobilization
WO1988004160A1 *Dec 9, 1987Jun 16, 1988Uniroyal PlasticsEmergency transport neck immobilizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/36, 602/17
International ClassificationA61F5/04, A61F5/055
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/055
European ClassificationA61F5/055