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Publication numberUS3915455 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1975
Filing dateOct 18, 1974
Priority dateOct 18, 1974
Publication numberUS 3915455 A, US 3915455A, US-A-3915455, US3915455 A, US3915455A
InventorsSavora Maurice W
Original AssigneeSavora Maurice W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Broadhead arrowtip having a single unit solid body receiving removable very sharp quality cutting blades extending from very nearby the tip to the arrow shaft
US 3915455 A
Abstract
Broadhead arrowtips or arrowheads, referred to as broadheads, are used in the bow and arrow hunting of game animals. Each broadhead has a unique single unit solid body, i.e., a solid one piece ferrule having no moving parts. Each broadhead is not permanently attached to an arowshaft, but instead is quickly and simply installed or removed by threaded attachment to an available threaded insert or a threaded sleeve, secured in turn to the leading end of an arrowshaft. Each broadhead has one or more removable very sharp quality cutting blades which are quickly and simply replaced in longitudinal grooves on the single unit solid ferrule by using a unique locking projection on each cutting blade. Each locking projection interfits with a blade locking or blocking device, often a lock ring, in turn surrounding the ferrule in a circumferential groove. Each cutting blade is long, commencing very nearby the tip and continuing until its final locking contact is made with the arrow shaft through its threaded insert on an aluminum or fiberglass shaft or its threaded sleeve on a wood shaft.
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Uited States Patent [1 1 Savora [4 1 Oct. 28, 1975 BROADI-IEAD ARROWTIP HAVING A SINGLE UNIT SOLID BODY RECEIVING REMOVABLE VERY SHARP QUALITY CUTTING BLADES EXTENDING FROM VERY NEARBY THE TIP TO THE ARROW SHAFT [76] Inventor: Maurice W. Savora, 11521 26th Ave., NE. N0. 10, Seattle, Wash. 98125 [22] Filed: Oct. 18, 1974 21 Appl. No.: 515,916

Primary Examiner-Paul E. Shapiro Attorney, Agent, or FirmRoy E. Mattern, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT Broadhead arrowtips or arrowheads, referred to as broadheads, are used in the bow and arrow hunting of game animals. Each broadhead has a unique single unit solid body, i.e., a solid one piece ferrule having no moving parts. Each broadhead is not permanently attached to an arowshaft, but instead is quickly and simply installed or removed by threaded attachment to an available threaded insert or a threaded sleeve, secured in turn to the leading end of an arrowshaft. Each broadhead has one or more removable very sharp quality cutting blades which are quickly and simply replaced in longitudinal grooves on the single unit solid ferrule by using a unique locking projection on each cutting blade. Each locking projection interfits with a blade locking or blocking device, often a lock ring, in turn surrounding the ferrule in a circumferential groove. Each cutting blade is long, commencing very nearby the tip and continuing until its final locking contact is made with the arrow shaft through its threaded insert on an aluminum or fiberglass shaft or its threaded sleeve on a wood shaft.

12 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Oct. 28, 1975 3,915,455

BROADHEAD ARROWTIP HAVING A SINGLE UNIT SOLID BODY RECEIVING REMOVABLE VERY SHARP QUALITY CUTTING BLADES EXTENDING FROM VERY NEARBY THE TIP TO THE ARROW SHAFT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The effectiveness of using arrows having broadhead arrowheads or arrowtips during the bow and arrow hunting of small and large game animals is dependent, over and above the skill of the archer, upon the razor sharpness of the broadhead blades and the overall strength, weight, shape and accuracy of construction and installation of each broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip. The blades must be razor sharp and be positioned to be protected at their tips, and yet be able to start cutting as soon as possible, to cause the almost immediate demise of a game animal struck in a fatal area of its body. Yet if the game animal is not struck in a fatal area, the blades must only produce a superficial clean incision, which will heal quickly without causing any serious after effects. The weight and shape of the broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip and the securement and alignment of its ferrule to the insert or sleeve on the arrowshaft must result in a precisely assembled and well balanced arrow which is stable and accurate in flight. The broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip must be strong to maintain its shape and sharpness when enduring abuse, as it is carried, and as it strikes the bone and muscle of a game animal.

In reference to prior patents, Burton D. Smith in his U.S. Pat. 3,021,138 illustrates and describes a' broadhead arrowhead structure which has an unprotected blade tip. Richard C. Maleski in his U.S. Pat. No. 3,756,600 and Adrian P. Mck'inzie in his U.S. Pat. No. 3,138,383 both use razor blades or razor blade stock to obtain high quality cutting edges. Karbo in-his U.S. Pat. No. 3,741,542 and Mr. John A. Richter i'n his U.S. Pat. No. 2,940,758 both use a multiple part body or ferrule to retain replaceable blades in a broadheadarrowhead. However, none of these prior designs. individually meets all the following objectives:

Objectives in reference to the body or ferrule of the broadhead by making it in one piece:

Strength using a one piece body or ferrule to avoid multiple component parts which upon impact may weaken and be damaged, and using the one piece ferrule to support the cutting blades for their full length until reaching the arrow shaft, thereby transferring their impact forces to the ferrule and arrow shaft thereby and also rendering the ultimate performance in the strength of the broadhead, in total.

Weight a one piece body or ferrule to achieve the .full utilization of its length in receiving and holding removable blades to thereby achieve a better weight and strength distribution between the body or ferruleand the blades; Y

Installation a one piece body or ferrule to achieve the more convenient installation and removal of the blades without using special tools and without requirin special skills; v. 1

Accuracy in Flight a one piece body or ferrule to provide a proper weight relationship between the body or ferrule and the blades to insure accuracy of the arrowin flight; and

Accuracy in Mounting a one piece body or ferrule having its attachment end formed with a load transfer portion and a threaded portion to be accurately fitted and threaded into and aligned with a threaded insert or sleeve previously secured and aligned with the arrow shaft, and placing the ends of the cutting blades so their impact loads will be transferred to the arrow shaft.

Objectives in reference to the razor sharp removable blades to be installed on a one piece body or ferrule:

Sharpness the removable quality blades will be honed to be razor sharp; i.e., they will be precision ground to function as a broadhead blade;

Strength the removable blades will be made of high quality tempered alloy steel of scalpel quality, stronger than razor stock;

Cutting Edges the removable blades will be designed'to obtain the longest possible cutting edge starting just to the rear of the point, and yet not terminate in a barb trailing edge;

Replacement the removable blades will be quickly installed and locked into place on the one piece body or ferrule, and also may be quickly unlocked and removed, handling a minimum of individual parts;

Locking of Blades the locking of the removable blades on the one piece body or ferrule, will initially be a function of the blade design, eventaully leading to a solid locking of the blades so there is no movement of the components to interact with the blades upon impact. If they were to move, they might otherwise weaken the overall assembly of the broadhead arrowtip, threaded insert or threaded sleeve, and shaft, so maximum performance of the arrow, would not be realized.

, Transfer of Cutting Blade Loads the cutting blades are firmly secured for their full length in the solid ferrule until'reaching the arrow shaft, and therefore are positioned'to transfer their impact loads to the ferrule and arrow shaft.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION This broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip, referred to as a broadhead, meets all these objectives set forth in reference to both a one piece body or ferrule and also the one or more radially spaced removable quality blades having razor sharp edges. his now available to be removably secured to arrow shafts which are equipped with internally threaded leading end inserts on aluminum or fiberglass shafts and sleeves on wood shafts. The one piece ferrule or body following the best available machining techniques, now has a short point por tion, a longer gradually tapering enlarging portion, a slightly shorter cylindrical portion, and, then to fit a threaded insert or sleeve on an arrow shaft, it has both a shorter reduced diameter cylindrical portion, and a trailing end portion also of like reduced diameter, which is externally threaded. At spaced radial locations the body or ferrule has longitudinal grooves or slots which extend from adjacent the short point portion, throughout the tapering portion, throughout the larger cylindrical portion, throughout the smaller cylindrical portion, and terminating just forward of the externally threaded portion. These slots or grooves are arranged to receive the longest possible blades, while still protecting their immediate tip edges, yet allowing the cutting to commence as soon as possible. Also located at about the midlength of the one piece body or ferrule is a circumferential groove which controls the axial positioning of a cutting blade locking or blocking device which is often a locking or retaining ring. The razor sharp removable cutting blades are made of high quality tempered alloy steel of scalpel quality. They have an elongated base edge designed to slidably and snugly fit into the longitudinal grooves. The base edge of the blade is interrupted by the presence of an integral locking recess forming a locking projection. During installation, upon the creation of a drop-in and slide forward motion for each cutting blade entering into a longitudinal groove, each locking projection moves under the locking or blocking device, which is often a retaining ring. Then when one or more of the removable cutting blades are initially secured against forward, dropping, and radial movement by the locking or retaining ring, they are thereafter prevented from moving backward, when this broadhead is threaded into the threaded insert or threaded sleeve installed on the arrow shaft. This final locking occurs, as end portions of either an insert or a sleeve abut the trailing edge of each cutting blade completing its snugly locked installation on the ferrule body. Each blade has a long inclined leading cutting edge starting very near the point and terminating at the commencement of a rearwardly abruptly declining integral cutting edge, concluding the contour of the overall blade without forming any barb like blade contour, and presenting a long cutting edge without radially extending the blade very far from the body, thereby helping to insure the maximum depth of penetration into the game animal. As so assembled and threadably installed on the leading end of an insert or sleeve all arranged in alignment with a true arrow shaft, this broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip meets all the highest standards of: razor edge sharpness of blades of high quality steel, strength of all components, minimum well distributed weight, limited overall profile, and excellent flight accuracy of the completed arrow.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS Preferred embodiments are illustrated in the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the boradhead arrowhead or arrowtip, with one blade yet to be installed, when four are to be used, and the broadhead is positioned to be threaded into an internally threaded insert, which in turn is secured to the leading end of a shaft of an overall arrow;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the broadhead and a portion of the internally threaded insert, both with portions cut away and sectioned, to illustrate how the removable cutting blades are held in place;

FIG. 3 is a front view of the broadhead illustrating the radial spacing of four cutting blades, one being shown only in part, and their limited radial projection beyond the body, and, through the use of the illustrative break away of body portions, showing the position of the blade locking or blocking device, such as the locking or retaining ring in removably securing the high quality blades; and

FIGS. 4, 5, 6 and 7 are similar to FIG. 3, illustrating in various front views different embodiments, with cutting blades shown only partially: in FIG. 4, two blades installed opposite one another and no installation of the other two blades, thereby completing the arrow in this way; in FIG. 5, three blades are installed. in equally spaced three longitudinal grooves; in FIG. 6 the ferrule has longitudinal grooves to receive selectively up to six cutting blades; in FIG. 7, the ferrule has only two longitudinal grooves to receive cutting blades.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS A One Piece Body of the Broadhead Arrowhead or Arrowtip The broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip l0, hereinafter referred to as the broadhead 10, using the best machining techniques available today, has a one piece body or ferrule 12, integrally having a short point portion 14, a long gradually tapering enlarging portion 16, a slightly shorter cylindrical portion 18. Then to fit a conventional internal threaded insert 20, or sleeve not shown, on an arrow shaft 22, the ferrule 12 has both a shorter reduced diameter cylindrical load transfer portion 24 and also a reduced diameter portion 26 which is externally threaded to match the internal threads of the insert 20, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Also the one piece body or ferrule 12 has longitudinal grooves 28, radially spaced to receive blades 30. The grooves 28 extend from the short point portion 14 back to the load transfer portion 24 A circumferential groove 32 near the mid length of the body or ferrule 12 receives a blade locking and blocking device 34, which is often a looking or retaining ring 34.

Razor Sharp Single or Multiple Removable Blades Made of High Quality Steel Razor sharp single or multiple removable blades 30 made of high quality steel, such as scalpel quality steel, as used in the preferred embodiment, are shaped as a right angle triangle, as shown in FIG. 2, with their hypotenuse sides 36 formed to fit the longitudinal grooves 28 on the one piece body or ferrule 12, their longest right angle side 38 presenting a long cutting edge 38, and their shortest side 40 presenting a trailing edge, which is not barbed. Near the midpoint of the hypotenuse blade side 36, each blade 30 has a cut out or slotted structure 42, including a projection 44 to be fitted within the blade locking or blocking device 34, which is often a retaining or locking ring 34, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3.

Cutting Blade Locking or Blocking Device, i.e., a Retaining Ring or Locking Ring The one piece body or ferrule 12 has the circumferential groove 32 to receive a blade locking or blocking device 34, which is often a retaining, restraining or locking ring 34. Then each blade 30 has a slotted structure 42 including a projecting portion 44, the latter to be fitted within the retaining ring 34. This retaining, restraining, or locking ring 34 serving as the blade locking or blocking device 34 is made for example, as a ring and also in two turns of resilient metal wire, as shown in FIG. 2.

The Initial and Final Locking of the Cutting Blades to the One Piece Body or Ferrule The blade locking or blocking device 34, often a retaining ring 34, is fitted into the circumferential groove 32 of the one piece body or ferrule 12, having the longitudinal grooves 28. Everywhere this circumferential groove 32 crosses the longitudinal grooves 28, access to a respective clearance volume 46 is opened below the locking, restraining or retaining ring 34, as shown in FIG. 2. Into this clearnace volume 46, i.e., a portion of a longitudinal groove 28, the projecting portion 44 of the slotted edge structure 42 is guided. In doing so,

each high quality blade 30, i.e., each scalpel like blade 30, is first lowered into its restrictive longitudinal groove 28, with its open entry 48 of its slotted structure 42 directed down over the retaining ring 34. After the blade 26 is in the respective longitudinal groove 28, it is moved forward and the projecting portion 44 moves into the clearance volume 46 and within the diameter of the blade locking or blocking device 34, such as the retaining or locking ring 34. The forward 'motion of each installed blade 30 is thereafter restricted, and also its radial or drop out motion is thereafter restricted upon this initial locking, until it is again purposely drawn to the rear of the body or ferrule 12. To complete the final locking of the cutting blades 30, the broadhead is threaded into the internal threaded insert 20, until the rear abutting edge 40 of each blade 30 makes firm blocking and locking contact with leading edge 50 of the insert 20, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. Rearward movement of the blades 30 is thereby prevented until the broadhead 10 is removed from the internally threaded insert 20, which is in turn secured to the arrow shaft 22.

Modifications Indicated by the Embodiments of FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 As indicated in FIGS. 1 through 4, the preferred embodiment of the broadhead 10 has a body or ferrule 12 in which four equally spaced longitudinal grooves 28 are formed to receive the long cutting blades 30. For target practice, and arrow may be shot without installing any blade 30. During hunting only one blade 30 may be installed, or two blades 30 may be installed, as shown in FIG. 4. Preferably, four blades will be installed as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. Yet the general specifications of the design of these broadheads 10 are applicable: to the design of the broadhead 52, shown in FIG. 5, having longitudinal grooves 28 for receiving one to three blades 30; to the design of broadhead 54, shown in FIG. 6, having longitudinal grooves 28 for receiving one to six blades 30; and to the design of broadhead 56, shown in FIG. 7, having longitudinal grooves 28 for receiving one to two blades 30.

As indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the blades 30 in the longitudinal grooves 28, extend the full length of the exposed body or ferrule 12, after its installation on the arrow shaft 22, by using the conventional internally threaded insert 20, or the internally threaded sleeve, not shown, the former used with aluminum and fiberglass shafts and the latter used with wood shafts. The portions of the ferrule 12, not seen after installation, which are the load transfer portion 24 and the externally threaded portion 26, are designed to match these conventional inserts 20, or sleeves. If the conventional attachment ways, reflected by the insert and sleeve designs, were to change, then the ferrule 12, by necessity, would also be changed. However, the objectives would remain to keep the length of the blades 30 almost equal to the full length of the exposed ferrule portions, leaving only a small ferrule pointed end portion 14 to protect the tips of the blades 30.

Moreover, the blades 30 must be initially locked to permit the installation and removal of two or more blades 30 so they will not drop out as the arrow shaft 22 is rolled around during installation of the blades. Then the final locking upon tightening the threads results in all blades 30 to bear directly against the leading edge 50 of the insert 20, or sleeve thereby in effect,

upon impact of the arrow with the game animal, transferrring the porportional impact loads occurring on the blades 30 directly to the arrow shaft 22. Beyond, the initial locking, no loads, thereafter, are carried by the blade locking or blocking device 34, i.e., generally the locking, retaining or restraining ring 34. 7

Changes are anticipated, if plastic molded parts prove satisfactory. Recesses will be created for the projection 44 on the blade 30 to enter, and then a blade locking or blocking device 34 will not be used as a separate component. Instead the functional structural recess, like the clearance volume 46, will be molded into the ferrule or body 12. Moreover, as metal machining techniques are improved, or as molded plastic techniques are improved, the body or ferrule 12, will be formed, so a constant increasing taper is used throughout its exposed length.

SUMMARY OF SOME OF THE ADVANTAGES This broadhead arrowhead or arrowtip, embodies the best aspects of the sought after five factors of utmost importance: razor sharpness, adequate strength, lower well distributed weight, compact configuration for adequate penetration, and excellent balance and alignment for accuracy in flight. More specifically, this broadhead securely holds multiple blades having no barbs, the leading edges of which are protected by the tip of the one piece body, yet they start cutting quickly upon impact utilizing extended razor sharp cutting edges, which extend substantially the full length of the exposed ferrule. The blades are easily installed and removed without using special tools or employing special skills, so effective sharpening may be readily undertaken or, as

necessary, a replacement blade may be installed. The

blades, being removable, from the one piece body, are made of high quality alloy steel as the basis for forming very sharp and durable cutting edges, which are continuous in length from adjacent the very entry tip back to the arrow shaft. The blade shapes, although alike on any particular broadhead, as a group may be changed in some aspects. Yet all blades are fitted to the one piece body or ferrule, which is essentially solid with no each broadhead and the initial locking of the blades make it very convenient to change blades. The transverse overall cross sectional area of the broadhead is comparatively small. Moreover, the broadhead is always accurately fitted to standard designed arrow shafts equipped with threaded inserts or sleeves, to insure the overall accurate alignment of a well balanced arrow which will follow the intended flight path to the game animal.

I claim:

1. A broadhead used as an arrowtip for an arrow used in hunting game animals, comprising:

a. a ferrule in a single piece, therefore with no moving parts, having at least one longitudinal groove to receive a cutting blade commencing very near the pointed commencement of the ferrule and extending at least throughout the exposed length of the ferrule, a circumferential groove not as deep as the longitudinal groove about the ferrule to receive a locking and blocking means, and a non exposed threaded connection structure of the ferrule beyond the exposed length of the ferrule to transfer loads as it is threaded to an arrow shaft via an ferrule in its single piece configuration has respective contoured portions commencing in a short point exposed portion, then a longer gradually enlarging tapered exposed portion, followed by a slightly shorter cylindrical exposed portion, and concluding with an overall non exposed connection portion, which has a non threaded snugly fitting load transfer portion thereof and also an externally threaded portion thereof, the sizes of which meet the standard receiving sizes of internally threaded inserts or sleeves conventionally previously secured to the leading ends of arrow shafts.

c. a cutting blade, removably secured to the ferrule,

arrow shafts self contained threaded insert or sleeve;

b. a locking and blocking means, surrounding the ferrule and positioned in the circumferential groove creating at each longitudinal groove a restrictive opening below the locking and blocking means; and

c. at least one cutting blade precision ground to function as a broadhead blade formed substantially as a right angle triangle, having a hypotenuse side sized to slidably and snugly fit a longitudinal groove of the ferrule and extending from very near the pointed end of the ferrule to the end of the exposed length of the ferrule, and also having a cutout structure inclusive of a radial entry and a horizontal projection formed at and near this hypotenuse side edge, this cutout structure allowing the cutting blade to radially enter the longitudinal groove without interference with the locking and blocking means; and upon the subsequent forward sliding of the cutting blade, the horizontal projection of the cutout structure enters the restrictive opening formed below by the locking and blocking means at the longitudinal groove, to thereby initially lock the cutting blade against forward and radial motion, the final locking of the cutting blade occuring as the ferrule of the broadhead is threaded upon the arrow shaft using its non exposed threaded connection structure and the arrow shafts selfcontained threaded insert or sleeve, and having the longest right angle side serving as the cutting edge, and the shortest right angle side serving as the non barbed trailing edge of the cutting blade.

2. A broadhead, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the 3. A broadhead serving as an arrowtip for arrows used in hunting game animals, comprising:

a. a ferrule which is a solid one piece body having at least one longitudinal groove of a depth approximately one quarter the diameter of the ferrule, commencing near the start of the ferrule and extending at least to the finally exposed portions of the ferrule, to receive a cutting blade, having a circumferential groove formed in the ferrule of sufficient depth to receive a circumferential coiled spring;

b. a circumferential coiled spring serving as a blocking and locking means fitted into the circumferential groove formed in the ferrule and passing through part of the depth of the longitudinal groove which receives a cutting blade to remain there during the installation and removal of a cutting blade; and

of a length commencing very near the commencement of the ferrule and extending to the termination of the finally exposed portions of the ferrule,

when it is fitted into place on an arrow shaft, whereby the cutting blade bears against an arrow shaft, having a cut out structure in the blade to first radially clear the circumferential coiled spring and thereafter upon longitudinal forward movement of the blade to cause some of the cut out structure to pass under the coiled spring to thereafter prevent any radial movement of the cutting blade out of the longitudinal groove as long as the cutting blade is not thereafter allowed to be longitudinally moved back, as it is so restricted when the broadhead is serving as the arrowtip mounted on an arrow shaft.

4. A broadhead serving as an arrowtip for arrows used in hunting game animals, as claimed in claim 3, wherein the ferrule solid one piece body has a non threaded cylindrical portion in which the longitudinal groove terminates and which is of the same inside diameter of a receiving interior of an arrow shaft, which if made of wood may have an insert which is unthreaded first and thereafter threaded, to thereby snugly fit therein and transfer impact loads, and has a threaded cylindrical portion, beyond the non threaded cylindrical portion, to be threadably secured to the interior of an arrow shaft, which if made of wood, may have an insert which is unthreaded first and thereafter threaded, the final securement of the ferrule and its installed cutting blade placing a trailing edge of the cutting blade adjacent an arrow shaft to thereafter transmit impact forces from the blade to the shaft and also to keep the cutting blade in position to remain locked by the coiled spring serving as a blocking and locking means.

5. A broadhead arrowhead for mounting on an arrow shaft, for use in hunting game animals, comprising:

a. a solid ferrule having a forward part culminating in a point, and a cylindrical rearward part which has a sufficiently small diameter to fit within an arrow shaft and which also has a structure for fastening the arrowhead to the arrow shaft, said ferrule having at least one longitudinal groove commencing near the pointed end of the forward part and extending into the rearward part, and also having a circumferential groove about the forward part;

b. a retaining structure extending around the ferrule, positioned within the circumferential groove at least partly below the outer surface of the ferrule; and

c. at least one blade shaped substantially as a right angle triangle, having a hypotenuse side sized to slidably yet snugly fit within one of the longitudinal grooves, a leading right angle side precision ground to function as a cutting edge, and a trailing right angle side, said hypotenuse side having a slot cut into it to receive the retaining structure when the blade is positioned in the longitudinal groove, said slot extending inwardly from the hypotenuse side and rearwardly toward the trailing right angle side and terminating at a point a distance from the trailing end of the hypotenuse side roughly equal to the distance between the circumferential groove and the trailing end of the forward part of the ferrule, whereby the retaining structure, when positioned in said slot, prevents forward and radial movements of the blade relative to the ferrule, and whereby the blade is locked in place against rearward motion relative to the ferrule by the arrow shaft when the arrowhead is fastened to an arrow shaft.

6. An arrowhead, as claimed in claim 5, wherein the forward part of the ferrule commences in a short sharply tapered point portion, is followed by a longer more gradually tapered portion, and ends in a cylindrical portion of a length approximately equal to that of the gradually tapered portion.

7. An arrowhead, as claimed in claim 6, wherein the slot in the blade fllSt extends inwards substantially normal to the hypotenuse side and then extends rearwards substantially parallel to the hypotenuse side.

8. An arrowhead, as claimed in claim 7, wherein the ferrule is of a single piece construction.

ferrule is of a single piece construction.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4006901 *Oct 6, 1975Feb 8, 1977New Archery Products CorporationArrowhead
US4093230 *Nov 2, 1976Jun 6, 1978New Archery Products Corp.Arrowhead
US4141554 *Feb 3, 1977Feb 27, 1979Sherwin Donald DArrow shaft socket
US4146226 *Apr 4, 1977Mar 27, 1979Sorensen David LRazor type arrowhead
US4169597 *Oct 17, 1977Oct 2, 1979Maleski Richard CBroadhead arrow head
US4210330 *Feb 13, 1978Jul 1, 1980Dynamic Sports concepts, Inc.Modular broadhead arrowhead
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US5911640 *Sep 1, 1995Jun 15, 1999Breitwieser; Robert DwaneHunting arrowhead with improved flight characteristics and cutting capabilities
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US6669586Jan 15, 2003Dec 30, 2003Barrie Archery LlcExpanding broadhead
US6695726 *Feb 11, 2003Feb 24, 2004Todd A KuhnArrow blade locking system
US6749801Feb 7, 2003Jun 15, 2004G5 Outdoors, LlcMethod of manufacturing an archery broadhead with sintered components
US6910979Oct 17, 2003Jun 28, 2005Bruce BarrieExpandable broadhead
US7771298Sep 21, 2006Aug 10, 2010Field Logic, Inc.Expandable broadhead with rear deploying blades
US8197367Jul 1, 2010Jun 12, 2012Out Rage, LlcExpandable broadhead with rear deploying blades
US8512179Apr 9, 2012Aug 20, 2013Out Rage, LlcExpandable broadhead with rear deploying blades
US20040127299 *Oct 17, 2003Jul 1, 2004Bruce BarrieExpandable broadhead
US20080045363 *Sep 21, 2006Feb 21, 2008Field Logic, Inc.Expandable broadhead with rear deploying blades
US20090233742 *Mar 17, 2008Sep 17, 2009Sanford Chris GArrowhead
USD730471Dec 18, 2013May 26, 2015Out Rage, LlcBroadhead
USD776782May 22, 2015Jan 17, 2017Feradyne Outdoors, LlcBroadhead arrowhead having both expandable and fixed cutting blades
USRE34397 *Dec 20, 1991Oct 5, 1993Delmonte Nicholas JArrow ringed broadhead
USRE40273 *Mar 14, 2005Apr 29, 2008G5 Outdoors, L.L.C.Method of manufacturing an archery broadhead with sintered components
USRE44144Jun 27, 2007Apr 9, 2013Out Rage, LlcExpandable broadhead
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/584
International ClassificationF42B6/08, F42B6/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B6/08
European ClassificationF42B6/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 6, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: M AND L MACHINE, INC.
Owner name: MATHIESON, LOIS
Owner name: MATHIESON, MARK
Free format text: LICENSE;ASSIGNOR:SAVORA, MAURICE W.;REEL/FRAME:005152/0833
Effective date: 19880711
Oct 6, 1989AS04License
Owner name: M AND L MACHINE, INC.
Effective date: 19880711
Owner name: MATHIESON, LOIS
Owner name: MATHIESON, MARK
Owner name: SAVORA, MAURICE W.
May 22, 1989AS04License
Owner name: M AND L MACHINE, INC.
Owner name: MATHIESON, LOUIS
Owner name: MATHIESON, MARK
Owner name: SAVORA, KATHERINE
Owner name: SAVORA, MAURICE W.
Effective date: 19880711
May 22, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: M AND L MACHINE, INC.
Free format text: LICENSE;ASSIGNORS:SAVORA, MAURICE W.;SAVORA, KATHERINE;REEL/FRAME:005115/0406
Effective date: 19880711
Owner name: MATHIESON, LOUIS
Owner name: MATHIESON, MARK